APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

LAMBERT

[lam-BEAR, LAM-burt]

ACADIA

Lambert is a common name in France, so it is no wonder that several unrelated families with that name settled in greater Acadia:

According to Acadian genealogist Stephen A. White, Radegonde Lambert was born in France in c1621.  However, in his study of French and Native marriages in North America, Paul R. Bunnell insists:  "Oral Micmac history claims she was a Micmac/Mi'kmaq Indian.  So far [there is] no written proof, but [there is] strong oral history."  What is undisputed is that she married Jean Blanchard, one of the earliest settlers in the colony, at Port-Royal in c1642.  She gave him six children, including two sons who created families of their own.  

~

In September 1678, René Lambert, probably no kin to Radegonde, bound himself for a year's service to a rich widow in the colony.  His service done, he moved on to Jemseg on Rivière St.-Jean, where, in July 1680, he served as godfather to several Indian children.  In that same year, he married at Port-Royal a woman whose name has been lost to history.  They had two sons, both of whom created families of their own:

Older son René, fils, born perhaps on Rivière St.-Jean in c1687, married Marie, daughter of Vincent Longuépée, in c1723 and settled on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island.  In February 1752, a French official counted them on Île Madame, off the southern coast of Île Royale, and noted that the family had been "in the colony" for three years. 

Younger son Jean married in c1720 to a woman whose name, like his mother's, has been lost to history.

~

Philippe Lambert, probably no kin to Radegonde and René, born probably in France in c1682, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Michel Boudrot, in c1712 and settled at Chignecto.  They had five children, including two sons who created families of their own.  Two of their daughters married into the Garceau dit Richard and Doiron families.  

Older son Michel, born probably at Chignecto, married Isabelle, or Élisabeth, daughter of Jacques Girouard, at Beaubassin in November 1743. 

Younger son Pierre, born at Menoudy, Chignecto, in c1726, married Marguerite Arseneau probably at Chignecto in the late 1740s.  Pierre remarried in 1754 or 1755 probably at Chignecto, but the name of his second wife is lost to history.  

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of 1755 scattered these Lambert families to the winds: 

The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  In the early 1750s, Canadian soldiers, assisted by Mi'kmaq warriors led by the fanatical French priest Abbé Jean-Louis Le Loutre, burned Acadian homesteads in the British-controlled area east of Rivière Missaguash, forcing the habitants to move to the French-controlled area west of the river.  Philippe Lambert's widow and probably some of her children and their families were among the refugees.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto settlers, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French regulars, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  

In October 1755, the British deported Philippe Lambert's younger son Pierre, Pierre's second wife, and seven children to South Carolina aboard the ship Edward Cornwallis, which reached Charleston in late November.  In January 1756, Pierre, his wife, and two children appeared on a list of Acadians "incapable of Labor, Sick or Infirm."  Colonial officials counted Pierre at Prince Frederick, South Carolina, in 1756; once again he was a widower.  In c1761, he remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Doiron and widow of Pierre Boucher.  Two years later, in August 1763, colonial officials found Pierre, Marie, son Pierre, fils, and infant son Jean, still living in the colony.   With them were three Doiron orphans, children of Pierre's older sister Anne, who had died at Prince Frederick probably of malaria in October 1756.  Later in 1763 or in 1764, Pierre and his family may have followed other Acadian exiles from South Carolina to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, where the French were building a naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas on the north shore of the island and where they promised a new start for the Acadian exiles who had been languishing in the British colonies.  Evidently Pierre and his family did not care for the place and looked for the first opportunity to leave St.-Domingue. 

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Meanwhile, René Lambert, fils, and his family, living in territory controlled by France, escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, British forces rounded up most of the Acadians on the Maritime islands and deported them to France.  René and his family evidently were lost without a trace aboard one of the two British transports that sank in a mid-Atlantic storm during the second week of December 1758.  

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Descendants of Philippe Lambert of Chignecto were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  Philippe's younger son Pierre, age 39, third wife Marie Doiron, age 28, and two children--son Pierre, fils, age 18, and stepdaughter Marie-Anne Boucher, age 11--probably hooked up with Acadian exiles from Halifax who came through Cap-Français, Haiti, in 1765 on their way to the lower Mississippi Valley.  Pierre and his family reached New Orleans sometime in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before.

Descendants of Pierre LAMBERT (c1726-1790s)

Pierre, younger son of Philippe Lambert and Marie-Madeleine Boudrot, born at Menoudy, Chignecto, in c1726, married Marguerite Arseneau probably at Chignecto in c1750, and remarried in 1754 or 1755 probably at Chignecto to a woman whose name has been lost to history.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported him, his second wife, and seven children to South Carolina, where he was counted with sons Pierre, fils and Jean at Prince Frederick's Parish, Winyaw, in 1756; his second wife and his other children had died by then.  In 1761, he remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Doiron and widow of Pierre Boucher, in South Carolina.  Colonial officials counted him and his family in South Carolina in August 1763.  They probably went to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, later that year or in 1764 and came to Louisiana in 1765 probably with the Acadian refugees from Halifax who came through Cap-Français.  They settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where Pierre and Marie had their marriage blessed in May 1766.  She gave him more children in Louisiana, including a son.  Their daughters married into the Bonvillain and Labis or Labys families.  Four of Pierre's seven sons married, but only three of them created lines that endured.  One of his daughters lived, and died, at New Orleans.  Two of his grandsons moved to the Bayou Lafourche valley in the early 1800s.  The others remained in what became St. James, Ascension, and Livingston parishes.  

1

Pierre, fils, by his first wife, born probably at Chignecto in c1747, married Josèphe-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Bruno Célestin dit Bellemère, at St.-Jacques in October 1787.  Josèphe-Marie, also called Marie-Josèphe, had come to Louisiana from France as a teenaged orphan in 1785.  Their son Pierre III was born at St.-Jacques in July 1788, Éloi-Élias in August 1790, and Pascal in April 1792.  Their daughters married into the Guidry, Moron, Petit, and Rivet families.  Pierre, fils died at St.-Jacques in August 1800; the priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was 55 years old when he died, but he was closer to 53.  His widow Josèphe-Marie remarried at St. James to a French Canadian and moved to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Two sons and two daughters by Pierre, fils followed her there.  

1a

Pierre III married Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadian Augustin Benoit and widow of Charles Bergeron, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in December 1815.  They remained on upper Bayou Lafourche.  

1b

Pascal married Marie Césaire, called Césaire, daughter of French Canadian Nicolas Bélanger of Illinois, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1817.  They remained on upper Bayou Lafourche.  

2

Jean, by his first or second wife, died in South Carolina after 1756.

3

A second Jean, by his third wife, born probably in South Carolina in c1762, also died young.  

4

Michel, by his third wife, born at Cabanocé in c1769, married Marie Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Vincent, at St.-Jacques in May 1798.  Their son Michel-Édouard, called Édouard, was born at St.-Jacques in July 1799, Eugène in January 1801, and Jean Joseph in November 1804.  Their daughter married into the Berteau family.  Michel died at St.-Jacques in March 1804; he was only 35 years old.  

4a

Jean Joseph died near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1823.  He was only 18 years old and did not marry.  

4b

Édouard married cousin Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Guidry, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1827; Célestine's mother, also, was a Vincent; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Édouard Lucien, called Lucien, was born near Convent in January 1828, Auguste Théogène in March 1834, Théodule in July 1838, Victorin in November 1840, a son, name unrecorded, died 6 hours after his birth in May 1843, and Édouard Thelesmar was born in September 1846.  Édouard may have died near Convent in April 1869; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Édouard died at "age 55 years," but this Édouard would have been 69. 

Lucien married cousin Hélène Guidry probably at Convent, St. James Parish, in the late 1850s.  They settled near Convent.  

Victorin died near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1867.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Victorin was 30 years old when he died, but he was only 26.  He probably did not marry.  

4c

Eugène married Virginie, daughter of German Creole Joseph Michel, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in May 1830.  Their son Eusèbe was born near Convent in March 1831, Eugène Sosthène, called Sosthène, was baptized at the Convent church, age 6 months, in June 1835, Justilien or Justinien in May 1837 but died at age 16 months in September 1838, Zenon Félicien was born in July 1839, Auguste in August 1841, Charles Adolphe, called Adolphe, in August 1845, and Laurent Jean in August 1850.  Their daughters married into the Donaldson and Guidry families.  

Eusèbe married cousin Marie Eveline, called Eveline, daughter of German Creole Onésime Oubre, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1858; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Eugène Sosthène married Marie Félicie, called Félicie, daughter of fellow Acadian Célestin Bourgeois, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in April 1859.  Their son Félix Valcour, called Valcour, was born near Convent in August 1865 but died at age 3 1/2 in March 1869, and Eugène Victor was born in January 1867.  

Adolphe married first cousin Angelina, daughter of French Creole Étienne Badeaux, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in April 1868; Angelina's mother was Adolphe's maternal aunt, Elmire Michel, so they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

5

Joseph, by his third wife, born at St.-Jacques in c1773, married Théotiste, also called Osite, daughter of French Creole Nicolas Vicknair, probably at St.-Jacques in the early 1790s.  Their son Joseph, fils was born at St.-Jacques in November 1794 but died at age 14 months in January 1796, Pierre-Léon was born in February 1796, Michel-Drosin in May 1801, a second Joseph, fils in February 1802, and Jean Cyprien or Symphorien in December 1808.   His sons and grandsons were among the few Acadians who settled across the Amite River in Livingston Parish.  They, in fact, helped put the "French" in French Settlement there. 

5a

Joseph, fils married Susanne, daughter of French Creole Jean Descareaux, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in July 1826.  Their son Joseph III was born near Convent in March 1827 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1828.  Their son Pierre Degore was born in Ascension Parish in April 1831.  Joseph, fils remarried to Caisere, daughter of French Creole Antoine Haydel, at the French Settlement church, Livingston Parish, in June 1842.  

Pierre, by his first wife, married first cousin Marie Célestine, daughter of Célestin Poché, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in June 1853; Marie's mother, also, was a Descareaux; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

5b

Michel Drosin married Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadian Eusèbe Babin, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1829.  Their son Joseph Timoléon, called Timoléon, was born in Ascension Parish in November 1829 but died at age 2 1/2 in August 1832.  Michel Drosin remarried to Marie Eulalie, called Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Gautreaux, at the Donaldsonville church in May 1831.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born in Ascension Parish in April 1832, Sosthène, also called Drosin, was baptized at the Donaldsonville church, age 7 months, in December 1838, and Alexandre was born in January 1843.  His sons settled along the Amite River in either Ascension or Livingston Parish, among the relatively few Acadians to live there. 

Joseph le jeune, by his second wife, married fellow Acadian Virginie Adeline Guidry probably in Ascension Parish in the early 1850s.  They settled near French Settlement, Livingston Parish.  Their son Pierre was born in May 1853, Joseph, fils in February 1856, Jean le jeune in June 1858, and Louis in December 1860.  

Sosthène, by his second wife, married Marguerite Lutetia, called Lutetia and Tesia, daughter of Norbert Villeneuve, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1855; Eutecia's mother was a Landry.  They settled near French Settlement, Livingston Parish.  Their son Drosin le jeune was born in October 1857, Jean le jeune in Ascension Parish in June 1860, and Félix Beauregard in February 1867. 

Alexandre, by his second wife, likely married French Creole Marie Irma, called Irma, Guitreau probably at French Settlement, Livingston Parish, in the mid-1860s.  Their son Maurice was born near French Settlement in September 1866.  

5c

Jean Symphorien seems to have married Marguerite Merisa or Mirza Gautreaux, Guitreaux, or Guidroz probably in Ascension Parish in the 1830s.  Their son Jean Symphorien, fils was born probably near French Settlement, Livingston Parish, in January 1840, Hippolyte in April 1844, Joseph le jeune in July 1846, François Luc in October 1848, Pierre le jeune in April 1853, and Marc in November 1857.  They also had a son named Paul.  Their daughter married into the Salassi family.  

Paul married cousin Marie Florestine, daughter of French Creole Leufroi Deslattes, at the French Settlement church, Livingston Parish, in May 1866; Marie's mother was a Vicknair, so they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Evariste was born near French Settlement in March 1867, and Lucien in January 1869.  

6

Philippe or Félix, by his third wife, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in May 1774, married Marguerite, daughter of French Creole Pierre Charpentier of New Orleans, at St.-Jacques in February 1801.  Félix died at St.-Jacques the following October; the priest who recorded his burial said that Félix was 25 years old when he died, but he was 27.  His line of the family died with him.  

7

Youngest son Paul, by his third wife, baptized at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in January 1776, may have died young.

Other LAMBERTs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Lamberts on the Mississippi and in the Amite River valley with known Acadian lines of the family there:  

Marie Mélanie Lambert married Jean Petit.  She died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in March 1830.  The priest who recorded her burial did not bother to list her parents' names or give her age at the time of her death.  One wonders if she was a descendant of Pierre Lambert of St.-Jacques or a non-Acadian Lambert.

Henri Lambert married Marguerite _____.  Their son Laurent was baptized at the St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, age unrecorded, in April 1841, and Jean Baptiste was born in August 1850.  One wonders if they were descendants of Pierre Lambert of St.-Jacques or a non-Acadian Lambert.

Margaret Lambert gave birth to son Louis Belley Marcellis near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, in June 1856.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism in May 1857 did not give the father's name.  One wonders if Margaret was a descendant of Pierre Lambert of St.-Jacques or a non-Acadian Lambert.

Albert Lambert married Bekcisse or Dercise Brown.  Their son Joseph was born near French Settlement, Livingston Parish, in February 1857.  

Pierre Lambert married Louisa Murphy and settled near French Settlement, Livingston Parish, by the early 1860s.  

Anatole or Antoine Lambert married Marie Guitreau or Guitraux, perhaps Guidroz, and settled near French Settlement, Livingston Parish, by the early1860s.  

Pierre Lambert married Marie Séverine, called Séverine, Leche and settled near French Settlement, Livingston Parish, by the mid-1860s.  Their son Séverin was born in Ascension Parish in October 1868, and Evariste near French Settlement in February 1870. 

Louisa Lambert gave birth to son Edgard near Convent, St. James Parish, in July 1865.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not name the father.  

Julienne Lambert died near Indian Village, Iberville Parish, in February 1867.  She was 77 years old.  One wonders if she was a descendant of Pierre Lambert of St.-Jacques or if she was a non-Acadian.

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

During the 1810s, two Lambert brothers from St. James Parish followed their widowed mother to Bayou Lafourche and created a second center of family settlement.  One of the brothers settled down bayou in Terrebonne Parish, the other on upper Bayou Lafourche near the boundary of Assumption and Ascension parishes:  

Descendants of Pierre LAMBERT III (1788-1835; Philippe, Pierre)

Pierre III, eldest son of Pierre Lambert, fils and Josèphe-Marie Célestin dit Bellemère, born at St.-Jacques in July 1788, married Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadian Augustin Benoit and widow of Charles Bergeron, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in December 1815, and remarried to Marie, daughter of French Creole Mathurin Daunis or Donis, at the Plattenville church in January 1819; Marie's mother was a Bourg.  They settled in Terrebonne Parish.  Their daughters married into the Daigle and Thibodeaux families.  Pierre III died in Terrebonne Parish in October 1835; he was only 47 years old; his succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse in August 1836.  Both of his sons married and remained in Terrebonne Parish.  

1

Older son Pierre Polycarp, by his first wife, born in Assumption Parish in January 1815, married Célanie, daughter of fellow Acadian Béloni Babin of Iberville Parish, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in October 1842.  Their daughter married a Boudreaux stepbrother.  Pierre remarried to Eugènie or Amelise, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Gautreaux and widow of Aurelien Boudreaux, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in July 1849, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in August 1854.  They settled on Bayou Petit Caillou.  Their son Joseph Arthur was born probably on Bayou Petit Caillou in November 1851, and Georges Jean in January 1858.   Pierre died in Terrebonne Parish in December 1870; he was 55 years old.  

2

Younger son Leufroi Donat, by his second wife, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1833, married Zéolide Evelina, daughter of fellow Acadian Firmin Blanchard of Terrebonne Parish, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in August 1858, and, erroneously called Pierre by the recording priest, sanctified the marriage at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in June 1859.  Their son Adam Oleus was born in Terrebonne Parish in October 1864, Joseph Firmin near Montegut in December 1867, and Joseph Pierre Marie in March 1870.  

Descendants of Pascal LAMBERT (1792-?; Philippe, Pierre)

Pascal, third and youngest son of Pierre Lambert, fils and Josèphe-Marie Célestin dit Bellemère, born at St.-Jacques in April 1792, married Marie Césaire, called Césaire, daughter of French Canadian Nicolas Bélanger of Illinois, in a civil ceremony recorded in both Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes in July 1815, and sanctified the marriage at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1817.  They lived near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes before moving to Bayou Boeuf.  Their daughter married into the Mars family.  Only one of Pascal's three sons created a family of his own.  He settled in Assumption Parish.   

1

Oldest son Joseph Drosin, called Drosin, born in Assumption Parish in March 1822, married German Creole Marie Céleste Stout probably in the early 1840s and settled in Assumption Parish.  Their son André Marcellus was born near Paincourtville in February 1853, Lucien near Plattenville in September 1854, and Pierre Hippolyte near Paincourtville in August 1856.  Their daughter married into the Alleman family at Pierre Part, north of Lake Verret. 

2

Joseph Michel, born in Assumption Parish in January 1825, died at age 10 months the following October.  

3

Youngest son Pascal, fils, born in Ascension Parish in March 1835, died at age 17 months in August 1836.  

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Lambert is a common surname in France and Britain and can also be found in Germany and Italy.  Members of the family came to the colony as early as the 1720s, decades before their Acadian namesakes arrived.  Most of these French Lamberts lived at New Orleans, but one family settled on the Lower German Coast and another at Pointe Coupée.  During the late colonial period, non-Acadian Lamberts also settled on the western prairies in the Attakapas and Opelousas districts:

Honoré, son of Barthélémy Lambert and Catherine Solas, married Louise, daughter of Pierre Blois, at Old Biloxi, present-day Mississippi, then a part of Louisiana, in August 1721.  

____ Lambert of Paris died at New Orleans in October 1725.  He was only 23 years old.  

François Lambert married Marie-Catherine _____ perhaps at New Orleans by the late 1720s.  Their son Louis-François was baptized probably at New Orleans, age unrecorded, in February 1729.  

Denis Lambert married Marie-Louise Drouin.  Their son Jean-Pierre was born at New Orleans in November 1750, and Jean-Baptiste was baptized at New Orleans, age unrecorded, in October 1753.  

Charles Lambert dit Dauphiné, a shoemaker from Grenoble, France, died at Pointe-Coupée in September 1760.  

Jeanne-Nicole, daughter of Pierre Lambert and Anne-Marguerite Jeanneray of Besancon, Franche-Comte, France, married Joseph, son of Thiepaul Hiesler Maison of Rochefort, France, at New Orleans in April 1764.  

Jean-Baptiste Lambert married Marie-Catherine Sainte Eustache.  Their son François was born at New Orleans in February 1764.  This couple may have been the same as Jean-Baptiste Lambert and Catherine Lacroix of Mobile.  

Louis Lambert, "surnamed La Fleure," married Catalina Lepine probably at New Orleans by the early1760s.  Their daughter Marianne was born at New Orleans in c1765, married French Creole Louis Simon, and died at St.-Jacques in December 1797, in her early 30s.  

Jean-Baptiste Lambert, "native of Leclusse," married Marie Hosse at New Orleans in 1768.  

Catherine Lambert married Alonso Segobia, widower of Maria Boten and a corporal and later a sergeant in the Louisiana Regiment, at New Orleans in February 1777.  

Marie Lambert gave birth to daughter Eugènie at New Orleans in January 1782.  

Jacob, son of Charles Lambert and Marie-Catherine Boudry of Bordeaux, France, married Louise-Julie, daughter of French Creole Thomas Saulet, at New Orleans in October 1790.   Jacob died at New Orleans in September 1799; he was 45 years old.  

Joseph, son of Pierre Lamberto and Marie Tuomo, married Osite, daughter of German Creole Nicolas Vicknair, at St.-Jean-Baptiste on the Upper German Coast in February 1794.  

Bernard Lambert married Hélène _____ by the late 1790s.  Their son Bernard, fils was born at New Orleans in April 1792. 

Nicolas, son of Antoine Lambert and Barbe Someillier of Bar-le-Duc, Barrois, France, married Susanne-Marguerite, also called Thérèse, daughter of Augustin Leclerc or Leclerq of La Rochelle, France, at New Orleans in April 1798.  Nicolas died at New Orleans in August 1799; he was only 28 years old.  

François, son of Étienne Lambert and Marie-Renée Laval of Bordeaux, France, married Julie, daughter of French Creole Pierre Trepagnier of St.-Charles des Allemands on the Lower German Coast, at New Orleans in July 1803.  

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A Lambert, perhaps French Creole, perhaps German Creole, settled on the lower German Coast during the early colonial period: 

Descendants of Jean-Martin LAMBERT (?-?)

Jean-Martin, called Martin, Lambert married Anne-Eve, called Eve, Reine probably at St.-Charles des Allemands on the Lower German Coast in the 1730s.  Their daughter married into the Laurent family.  

1

Oldest son Jean-Michel, fils was born probably at St.-Charles des Allemands in c1739 but died at age 6 in June 1745.

2

Barthélémy, baptized at St.-Charles des Allemands, age unrecorded, in January 1743, married Marguerite, daughter of German Creole George Strocler or Trosclair of the German Coast, at New Orleans in November 1764.  Barthélémy died at New Orleans in December 1794, in his early 50s.  

3

Youngest son Martin died at St.-Charles des Allemands, age unrecorded, in August 1749. 

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A French-Creole or French-Canadian Lambert from Arkansas settled at New Orleans during the late colonial period:

Descendants of Pierre-Joseph LAMBERT (?-?)

Pierre-Joseph Lambert married Louise-Catherine, called Catherine, Landrauny probably at Arkansas Post, Arkansas, by the late 1760s.  Their daughter Marie-Françoise, called Françoise, born at Arkansas Post in May 1766, was baptized at New Orleans in June.  Their daughters married into the Caro, Ceresola, Pardo families, and perhaps into the Pelot family as well.   Geneviève, daughter of perhaps Pierre Joseph Lambert of Arkansas Post and New Orleans and wife of Pierre Pelot, died at her home at L'île des Cypres, present-day Lake Martin, St. Martin Parish, in February 1810; she was only 48 years old.   One wonders, then, if any other members of this family settled west of the Atchafalaya Basin. 

1

Older son Pierre-Joseph, born at Arkansas Post, married Constance, daughter of German Creole Jean-Baptiste Wiltz, at New Orleans in February 1786.  Their son Pierre, fils, "recently-born," died at New Orleans in August 1791.  

2

Younger son Alonso-Joseph was baptized at New Orleans, age unrecorded, in June 1779. 

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An Alibamon, or French Creole who came to New Orleans from eastern French Louisiana, present-day Alabama, when the British took over that part of the colony, settled on the western prairies during the late colonial period:

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste LAMBERT (?-?)

Jean-Baptiste Lambert and his wife Catherine Lacroix came to the lower Mississippi Valley from Mobile with other so-called Alibamons in 1764.  Daughter Marie-Josèphe Lambert, born probably at Mobile in c1753, married Acadian Marin, son of Salvator Mouton of Chignecto, at St.-Jacques in January 1777, and followed him to the Attakapas District, where she died at her home "on Bayou Vermillion[sic] at the place known as Petit Bayou" in September 1811; she was 58 years old. 

François, born either at Mobile in c1759 or at New Orleans in February 1764, followed his older sister Marie-Josèphe to Attakapas and married Marie Eulalie, called Eulalie and also Dorothée, daughter of Acadian Jean-Charles Hébert, at Attakapas in November 1792.  They also settled on Bayou Vermilion.  Their son François, fils was born in c1805.  Their daughter married into the Champagne family.  François, père died in St. Martin Parish in October 1821; the priest who recorded his burial said that François was 62 years old when he died; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in June 1829. 

François, fils died in Lafayette Parish in December 1860.  He was 55 years old.  He may not have married.  If not, this family line, except for its blood, may have died with him.  

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A Lambert from Dalmatia on the Adriatic coast created a vigorous family line in the Opelousas District during the late colonial period: 

Descendants of Antoine LAMBERTI/LAMBERT (?-)

Antoine, son of Paul Lamberti and Thérèse Balady "of Dalmatia" on the Adriatic, married Geneviève, daughter of French Creole Pierre Fontenot of Mobile, at Opelousas in July 1799.  They settled in what became St. Landry Parish.  Their daughters married into the Gradenigo, Joubert, and Pitre families.  Antoine's estate record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in July 1822.  Two of his sons created families of their own in St. Landry Parish.  A few of Antoine's descendants married Acadians, but, typical of non-Acadian families in St. Landry, most did not. 

1

Oldest son Antoine, fils, born at Opelousas in 1799 or 1800, married cousin Eulalie, daughter of Alexandre Baptiste Fontenot, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1826.  They settled at Quartier Plaisance.  Their son Antoine III was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1827, a son, name unrecorded, died at birth in January 1829, and Alexandre, a twin, was born in March 1830.  Their daughters married into the Johnson and Smith families.  Antoine, fils died in St. Landry Parish in August 1831; he was only 31 years old; his succession records were filed at the Opelousas courthouse in October and December 1831 and in February and May 1836.  

1a

Antoine III married Marcelline, daughter of French Creole Don Diegue Lafleur, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1846. 

1b

Alexandre married Célise Forentin, daughter of French Creole Florentin Vidrine, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1850.  Their son Alexandre Bellile was born in St. Landry Parish in July 1861.  Their daughter married into the Foret family.  Alexandre may have remarried to Jeanne Mertille and settled near Eunice by the late 1860s. 

2

Jean-Baptiste, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in September 1800, may have died young.

3

Julien, baptized at Opelousas, age 2 months, in August 1802, also may have died young.  

4

Youngest son Exupere Zéphirin, called Zéphirin, born at Opelousas in October 1804, married Céleste Noël, daughter of French Creole Jean Baptiste Roy, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1828.  Their son Sosthène was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1832, Louis in August 1835, Zéphirin Paul in April 1839, and Homere in February 1842.  Their daughters married into the Dessarpe, Guidry, Guillory, Launey, McMillan, and St. Amand families.  Zéphirin died in St. Landry Parish in May 1855; he was only 50 years old; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse the following December.  

Sosthène married cousin Alida Pouponne, daughter of Acadian Onésime Pitre, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1853; Alida's mother was Sosthène's cousin Geneviève Lambert.  Sosthène and Alida settled near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish.  Their son Louis was born in c1854 and died at age 13 in October 1867. 

~

During the antebellum period, Lamberts emigrated from France to Louisiana, where they were called Foreign French by native Louisianians.  Most of them remained at New Orleans.  Other Foreign-French, French-Creole, and Anglo-American Lamberts settled on the river and in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley near Acadian Lamberts, and west of the Atchafalaya Basin in St. Mary, St. Martin, Lafayette, and St. Landry parishes, where no Acadian Lamberts settled, at least not before the War Between the States: 

Joseph, son of François Lambert and Barbe Lesteles, married Elizabeth, daughter of Godfroide Fischer.  Their son Gustave Adolphe was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in January 1821.  

Louis Bertrand married Marie Delphine Bertrand by the early 1830s and settled in Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche.  

Marguerite Lambert married French Creole François Leleux.  Her succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in February 1833.  

Josephine Lambert married David Hayes in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in January 1834.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names.  

Eugènie Aure Lambert married John W. Singleton in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1835.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names.  

Sylvestre Félix, called Félix, son of Louis Lambert and Marie Delmas of Bordeaux, France, married Henriette Irma, daughter of Evariste Villavaso, at the bride's father's house in St. James Parish in December 1835.  Their son Arthur Joseph was born in St. James Parish in October 1843.  

Emily Marguerite Lambert married Peter Smith, who died in St. Mary Parish in August 1837.  

In January 1838, a succession record filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, noted that Gustave Adolphus Lambert, age 17, needed a tutor.  The record does not furnish the boy's parents' names.  

Catherine, daughter of Anglo Americans James Lambert and Marguerite Brown and wife of David Redmond, died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in April 1838.  She was 65 years old.  

Emerie, daughter of Jean Lambert and Marie Ihouautrie, married Joseph Mast, widower of Françoise Pique, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1839.  

_____ Lambert dit Lavarriere, native of France and widower of Marianne Lambert, died in Ascension Parish in October 1853; the Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial did not give Lambert's age at the time of his death.   Wife Marianne, native of Salerne, Var, France, had died in September; she was only 36 years old. 

Selina Lambert married Anglo American Simon J. Weldon in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1855.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's the parents' names.  

Jean Jacques Bercier Lambert married Ursule Pisanny.  Their son Eugène Théodore married Marie Louise, daughter of Anglo American Anthony King, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1855.  

David B. Lambert married Almina or Almira, daughter of Anglo Creole Joseph Andrus, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1855, and, called David V. by the recording clerk, remarried to Mary S. Vaugh, perhaps Vaughn, widow of Andrew Smith, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1866.   In neither case did the parish clerk give the groom's parents' names.  David V.'s succession record, naming his first wife, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in October 1868. 

Marguerite Lambert gave birth to son Louis Belley Marcellis near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, in June 1856.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names. 

Simon Lambert married Marie Madeleine Schultz.  Their daughter Mary married John, son of John Dumke, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1860.  

Richard Lambert married Ellen Blewitt.  Their son George Rodney was born near Baton Rouge in September 1860.  

Earnest, son of Anglo Americans John Lambert and Mary Jane Warren, married French Creole Louise Bouchard in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in March 1864.  

Jean Edgar, son of Jacques Philippe Lambert and Marie Euphémie Engeron, married cousin Emma, daughter of French Creole Urbain Engeron, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in March 1867; Emma's mother was a Daigle.  Their child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in Lafourche Parish a day after its birth in July 1870.  

Julien Lambert married Joséphine Green at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in May 1869.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names. 

Julien Lambert married Émilie Hébert.  Their son Julien, fils was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1869. 

Henriette Lambert gave birth to son Homere near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in February 1870.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names. 

Alexandrine Lambert married Ceasar Prewitt in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

John Lambert married Carrie Croswell either at Gonzales, Ascension Parish, or Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in April 1870.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names, and the printed record of the marriage does not make clear where the wedding took place. 

.

During the early antebellum period, a young Parisian Lambert married into a prominent French Creole family in what became St. Martin Parish and created a small family line there:

Descendants of Adrien-Michel-Dumartrait LAMBERT (?-)

Adrien-Michel-Dumartrait, son of François Lambert de Chaunnes and Marie-Jeanne-Eléonore Pepin of Paris, France, married Louise Pouponne, also called Judith Lerise, a native of Opelousas and daughter of French Creole François Grevemberg of Bayou Teche, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1808.  Their daughters married into the Bordelon and Fuselier families.  Adrien Michel remarried to Françoise Céleste, called Céleste, daughter of Anglo American Théophile Collins of Opelousas, at the St. Martinville church in January 1819. 

1

Older son Jean Adolphe, by his first wife, married cousin Euphémie Mathilde, called Mathilde, daughter of French Creole Charles Grevemberg, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1836; the marriage also was recorded in St. Landry Parish.  They settled near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish.  Their son Jean Dumartrait was born near New Iberia in August 1837, and Adrien le jeune in October 1839.

2

Younger son François Marcel Dumartrait, by his second wife, born in St. Martin Parish in August 1828, probably died young.  

~

Lamberts who lived in South Louisiana, especially on the western prairies, during the antebellum and post-war periods were Afro Creoles who may have been owned by Lamberts, or, more likely, were descendants of slaves or free blacks with the given name Lambert:

Guillaume Lambert, a mulatre libre, or free mulatto, "native of New Orleans," died at the home of Gérard Chretien in St. Martin Parish in October 1828.  Guillaume was only 50 years old when he died.  He was buried "in the parish cemetery."  

Édouard Lambert, son of Mary ____ and "affranchi de [freedman of] Mr. Gabriel Fuselier," married Félicité Sindon, "affranchi de Mr. Valéry Ledoux," at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1866. 

Sophie Lambert, affranchi, married John Pitre, affranchi, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Félicia Lambert gave birth to son Séverin near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in October 1867.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names. 

Léon, son of Lambert and Marie Lucille ____, was born "at Md. Wd. Decuir's" near Lakeland, Pointe Coupee Parish, in March 1868. 

Omer, also called Magloire, son of Lambert and Mary ____, married Cécile, daughter of Tom Thom and Marguerite ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1869; the priest who recorded the marriage noted that the groom's parents were deceased. Their son Julien had been born in St. Martin Parish in October 1868. 

Silesie, daughter of Dauphine Lambert, married Harrison, son of Fannie Vanhill or Vanhille, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1870, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May. 

Victoire, daughter of Lambert and Mary ____, and sister of Omer/Magloire, married Alexandre, son of Laurent Laurent and Marguerite ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1870; the priest who recorded the marriage noted that the bride's parents and the groom's mother were deceased.

CONCLUSION

Philippe Lambert settled fairly late in Acadia, but his younger son was among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  Pierre Lambert and his third wife arrived directly from French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, in 1765 and settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river.  She gave him more children there.  Four of his seven sons married, but only three of them created family lines that endured.  During the early antebellum period, two of Pierre's grandsons moved to Bayou Lafourche, but his other grandsons remained in what became St. James, Ascension, and Livingston parishes.  One of the Lafourche valley grandsons moved down bayou to Terrebonne Parish, but the other remained in Assumption Parish.  The larger center of this family's settlement remained on the Mississippi and along the Amite.  The Lamberts along the Amite were among the few Acadians who settled in Livingston Parish.  None of Pierre's descendants moved west of the Atchafalaya Basin during the antebellum period. 

Meanwhile, non-Acadian Lamberts came to the colony as early as the 1720s, decades before their Acadian namesakes arrived from French St.-Domingue.  Most of the French-Creole Lamberts lived at New Orleans, but one family settled on the Lower German Coast and another at Pointe-Coupée.  During the late colonial and early antebellum periods, non-Acadian Lamberts also settled in the predominantly-Acadian communities of St.-Jacques, St.-Gabriel, Assumption, Attakapas, and Opelousas.  During the antebellum period, two non-Acadian families, one created by a Dalmatian from the Adriatic coast, the other by a young Parisian, set down roots in St. Landry and St. Martin parishes.  In the late antebellum period and during the War Between the States, non-Acadian Lamberts, both French and Anglo American, moved to the Baton Rouge area and into the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley, further complicating the family's genealogical picture along the river and the bayous.  Lamberts who lived in South Louisiana, especially on the western prairies, during the antebellum and post-war periods were Afro Creoles who may have been owned by Lamberts, or, more likely, were descendants of slaves or free blacks with the given name Lambert.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Lambar, Lambare, Lamber, L'Ambert, Lamberti, Lamberto, Lampert, Lembert.  It should not be confused with the Lambre family, none of whom were Acadians.  

Sources:  Arsenault, Généalogie, 1008, 2520-21; BRDR, vols. 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Bunnell, French & Native North American Marriages, 66; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 234; Milling, Exile Without End, 21, 41, 43, 44;  NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family No. 49; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Reine_d_Espagne.htm>, Family No. 16; White, DGFA-1, 909-11; White, DGFA-1 English, 193.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day parishes that existed during the War Between the States in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Pierre LAMBERT, père 01 1765 StJ born c1726, Menoudy; son of Philippe LAMBERT & Marie-Madeleine BOUDREAUX; married (1)Marguerite ARCENEAUX, late 1740s, probably Chignecto; married, age 28 or 29, (2)_______, c1754 or 1755, either Chignecto or SC; deported from Chignecto to SC aboard ship Edward Cornwallis 13 Oct 1765 with wife & 7 children, arrived Charleston 19 Nov 1765, age 29, called Pierre LAMBEER; at Prince Frederick Parish, Winyaw, SC, 1756, called Peter LAMBERT, Sr., a widower, with sons Peter Jr. & Jean; married, age 35, (3)Marie, daughter of Jean DOIRON & Anne LEBLANC, & widow of Pierre BOUCHER, c1761, SC; on list of Acadians in SC, Aug 1763, called Pierre LEMBERT, no age given, with wife Marie DOIRON no age given, sons Pierre age 16, Jean age 1, orphans Marie DURON age 20, Marie-Josèph[e] DURON age 18, Anne DURON age 16, & stepdaughter Marie-Anne BOUCHE age 9; arrived LA 1765 probably from St.-Domingue, age 39; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Pedro & Pierre, with 1 man in his household; third marriage blessed 5 May 1766, Cabanocé; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Pierre LEMBERT, age 50, with wife Marie age 40, sons Michelle [Michel] age 8, Joseph age 4, Félix age 3, Paul age 1, Pierre age 26, daughters Anne age 10, & Pélagie age 6; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, called Pierre LEMBERT, with 7 unnamed whites, 0 slaves, 15 qts. rice, 4 qts. corn; died probably St.-Jacques before 1 Jul 1794
Pierre LAMBERT, fils 02 1765 StJ born c1747, probably Chignecto; son of Pierre LAMBERT & his first wife Marguerite ARCENEAUX; exiled to SC 1755, age 8; at Prince Frederick Parish, Winyaw, SC, 1756, called Peter LAMBERT Jr., with father & brother; on list of Acadians in SC, Aug 1763, called Pierre LEMBERT, age 16, with father, stepmother, half-brother, stepsister, & 3 orphans; arrived LA 1765, age 18, probably from St.-Domingue; in Cabanocé census, 1766, VERRET's Company, Cabanocé Militia, called Pedro, with 1 man in his household; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Pierre LEMBERT, age 26[sic], with father, stepmother, & half-siblings; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with parents & others; married, age 40, Josèphe-Marie of St.-Servan, France, daughter of Bruno CÉLESTIN dit BELLEMÈRE & Anne BREAUX, 16 Oct 1787, St.-Jacques; died [buried] St.-Jacques 27 Aug 1800, age 55[sic]

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 19, calls him Pierre LAMBERT, & lists him singly; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2520, calls him Pierre LAMBERT, says he was born in 1729 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says he married Marie DOIRON in c1750 but lists no other wives, that he settled at St.-Jacques on the Mississippi, & lists his children as Pierre, born in 1751, Jean in 1762, Philippe in 1774, & Paul in 1775, but gives no birthplaces; White, DGFA-1, 910-11, calls him Pierre LAMBERT, gives his parents' names, says he was born at Menoudie in c1726, that his godmother was Marie, wife of Paul GARCEAU, does not include a brother Philippe in his immediate family, says he married Marguerite ARSENEAU in c1750 but gives no place of marriage nor her parents' names, says he married again to an unidentified woman between 1754-55 but gives no place of marriage, that he married Marie, daughter of Pierre DOIRON & Anne LEBLANC, in c1761 but gives no place of marriage, says he was at Prince Frederick, SC, in 1756 a widower, in SC in 1763, at Cabanocé in 1777, age 51, & says he died before 1 Jul 1794; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 171, & Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 424, the blessing of his third marriage, calls him Pierre LAMBERT, & calls his wife Marguerite DOIRON.  See also Milling, Exile Without End, 41, 43, 44; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 234; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 161; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 114; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 14; De Ville, Acadian Coast, 1779, 19.

Interestingly, Arsenault, Généalogie, 2521, creates a brother for Pierre named Philippe, born in c1735, who married Marguerite DOIRON in c1753.  White, citied above, shows no such sibling.  

Obviously the marriage record at Cabanocé in May 1766 was the blessing of a marriage that, according to Stephen A. White, took place 5 years before.  So why does the Cabanocé census of 1766, taken in Apr, show Pierre LAMBERT alone in his household?  Was his third wife's full name Marie-Madeleine DOIRON?

Why is he not listed in Wall of Names with his son Pierre?

Father Hébert's Acadians in Exile shows no LAMBERTs in Haitian church records, but how else would an Acadian who was in SC in 1763 have gotten to LA by Apr 1766 if not with the refugees from Halifax coming through Cap-Français in 1765?  The only other option for Pierre LAMBERT & his family would have been to book passage on their own from SC to New Orleans.  Other than the 20 Acadians who went to LA from GA via Mobile in 1764 & the hundreds of Acadians who emigrated from MD in 1766-69, which other Acadian refugees booked passage on their own from the British seaboard colonies to New Orleans?  Paul Delaney's careful chronology of Le Grand Dérangement reveals no such passage. 

02.  Wall of Names, 19, calls him Pierre LAMBERT 2, & lists him singly; BRDR, 2:70, 413 (SJA-2, 4), his marriage record, calls him Pedro LAMBER of Acadia, does not gives his or his wife's parents' names but says his wife's parents "were of this Parish," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Baptista BURG & Maria LAMBER; BRDR, 2:413 (SJA-4, 16), his death/burial record, calls him Pedro LAMBERT, "55 years old & Husband of Marie BELLEMÈRE," but does not give his parents' names.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 234; De Ville, St. James Census, 1777, 14; De Ville, Acadian Coast, 1779, 19.

Since the ages given in the censuses of 1763 & 1777 & his burial record disagree, his estimated birth year is based on the earliest primary source--SC, 1763.  Note that White, DGFA-1, 911, says his parents married in c1750.  They probably married earlier.    

Why is he not listed in Wall of Names with his father?  

Why did he wait so long to marry?

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