BOOK THREE-2:   Families, Migration, and the Acadian "Begats" - continued

The Families of Greater Acadia:  The Aboiteaux Builders of the Fundy Shore, Outliers, Migrants, and Islanders - continued

Amireau

François Amireau dit Tourangeau, perhaps a 1671 arrival, and his wife Marie Pitre created a large family in the colony.  Marie gave François 11 children, five sons and six daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Mius d'Azy and d'Entremont, Benoit, Léger, Girouard, Comeau, and Aucoin families.  Two of Franços, fils's sons married sisters.  His and Marie's  descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Point-Raz near Cap-Sable and in the French Maritimes.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son François dit Tourangeau, fils married Madeleine, daughter of Julien Lord and Anne-Charlotte Girouard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1714.  Madeleine gave François, fils five children, three sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Hébert and Bourg families.  Two of François, fils's three sons created their own families.   

Oldest son François III married Madeleine, daughter of René Richard and Marguerite Thériot, at Annapolis Royal in February 1741, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Prudent Robichaud, fils and Françoise Bourgeois, at Annapolis Royal in May 1750.   

François, fils's second son Pierre married Marie-Eustache, daughter of Alexandre Hébert and Marie Dupuis, at Annapolis Royal in January 1746.  

François, fils's third and youngest son François le jeune died young. 

François's second son Joseph married Marguerite, another daughter of Julien Lord and Anne-Charlotte Girouard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1718. 

François's third son Pierre married Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of Abraham Brun and Anne Pellerin, at Annapolis Royal in July 1726 and died there by 1752, in his late 40s or early 50s.

François's fourth son Charles married Claire, daughter of Claude Dugas and Marguerite Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in August 1726. 

François's fifth and youngest son Jacques married Jeanne, daughter of Alexandre Lord and Marie-Françoise Barrieau, at Annapolis Royal in August 1726, four days before his older brother Charles married.387

Arseneau

Coastal pilot Pierre Arseneau, as his name came to be spelled, perhaps a 1671 arrival, and his wives Marguerite Dugas and Marie Guérin created a large family in the colony.  In 1676 and 1678, Marguerite gave Pierre two children, both sons, both of whom created families of their own.  Between 1690 and 1702, Marie gave him seven more children, six sons and a daughter--nine children by both wives.  Pierre died probably at Chignecto before 1714, in his early 60s.  His daughter evidently died young, but seven of his sons by both wives created their own families.  Pierre, Marguerite, and Marie's descendants settled not only at Chignecto, but also in the French Maritimes, where they were especially numerous at Malpèque, on the northwest coast of Île St.-Jean.  As a result, not all of Pierre's descendants were "typical" Fundy Acadians.  At least 21 of the pilot's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, most, if not all, of them from Halifax in 1765, but the great majority of his descendants remained in greater Acadia or Canada after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Pierre, fils, by first wife Marguerite Dugas, born at Port-Royal in c1676, married Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of Jean Boudrot and Marguerite Bourgeois, in c1697 probably at Chignecto and moved on to Malpèque, Île St.-Jean, in the late 1720s.  Between 1698 and 1724, Anne gave Pierre, fils 10 children, seven sons and three daughters, at Chignecto.  Their daughters married into the Daigre, Desroches, and Delaunay families, two of them on Île St.-Jean.  Six of Pierre, fils's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Pierre III, born at Chignecto in c1698, married Marguerite, daughter of Alexis Cormier and Marie LeBlanc, at Beaubassin in August 1722, and moved on to Malpèque in 1731.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1744, Marguerite gave Pierre III 10 children, five sons and five daughters, including a set of twins, at Chignecto and Malpèque.  Marguerite died at Malpèque in c1745.  Pierre III did not remarry.  He and his children escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Four of his daughters married into the Vécot, Pitre, Arsenault, and Langlois families on Île St.-Jean and at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Three of Pierre III's five sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Malpèque in c1728, married Jeanne-Marie Héon on Île St.-Jean in c1755.  According to Bona Arsenault, Jeanne gave Pierre, fils a daughter on the island in c1756. 

Pierre III's third son Claude, born at Malpèque in c1731, married Marie Comeau probably on the island in c1758.  They escaped the British that year and took refuge in Canada, where they remained.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1759 and 1772, Marie gave Claude six children, three sons and three daughters, probably in Canada.  They were living on Île d'Orléans, below Québec, in 1766 and moved on to St.-Pierre-de-Sorel, on the upper St. Lawrence between Trois-Rivières and Montréal.  Claude remarried to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of René Doucet and Marie Brossard and widow of Daniel Gareau, at nearby St.-Ours, on the lower Richelieu, in February 1774.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Jeanne gave Claude no more children.  Claude died at Sorel in February 1801, age 70.  His second daughter Pélagie married into the Garceau family at St.-Ours.  Two of his sons created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre, born in exile in c1761, married Charlotte, daughter of Gabriel Lefebvre and Marie-Charlotte Vel, at St.-Ours in February 1786, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Jacob and Marie-Josèphe Gervais, at St.-Ours in January 1800. 

Claude's second son Louis, born probably on Île d'Orléans, in c1766, married Monique, daughter of Louis Thibault and Marie-Catherine Desautels, at St.-Ours in August 1788. 

Pierre III's fifth and youngest son Louis, born at Malpèque in c1739, married Marie-Madeleine Boudrot in c1759 probably at Restigouche.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Madeleine gave Louis a son there in c1760. 

Pierre, fils's second son Charles le jeune, born at Chignecto in c1702, married Cécile, daughter of Antoine Breau and Marguerite Babin, in c1722 probably at Chignecto, and moved on to Malpèque in 1728.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1742, Cécile gave Charles le jeune eight children, six sons and two daughters, including a set of twins, at Chignecto and Malpèque.  His older daughter married into the Boudrot family at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, in the early 1740s.  Three of Charles le jeune's six sons created their own families.  Two of them, twins Jean and Pierre, married sisters on the same day probably at Malpèque.  The twins, along with their parents and siblings, escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Members of Charles le jeune's family evidently were captured at Restigouche in 1760, ended up as prisoners in Nova Scotia, and settled on Île Miquelon in c1765 after the war with Britain ended. 

Son Jean, a twin, born at Malpèque in c1729, married Madeleine, daughter of Claude Boudrot and Judith Belliveau of Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in November 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1751 and 1764, Madeleine gave Jean five children, four sons and a daughter.  Madeleine died at Fort Cumberland, formerly French Fort Beauséjour, in 1764 on the eve of the family's moving to Île Miquelon.  At the urging of French authorities, they likely went to France in 1767 to relieve crowding on the island. 

Pierre, Jean's twin, born at Malpèque in c1729, married Marie-Judith, another daughter of Claude Boudrot and Judith Belliveau, in November 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1755 and 1764, Marie-Judith gave Pierre four children, three sons and a daughter.  Pierre and his family may have gone to France in November 1765 to escape crowded conditions on Île Miquelon, and he and Marie-Judith may have died at Nantes in 1766. 

Charles le jeune's third son Charles, fils, born at Malpèque in c1731, also escaped the British in 1758 but moved on to Canada.  Charles, fils married first cousin Anne-Marie, daughter of Pierre Arsenault III, his uncle, and Marguerite Cormier, in c1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1767, Anne-Marie gave Charles, fils two children, a daughter and a son.  They settled at St.-Jean on Île d'Orléans, below Québec.  Charles, fils remarried to Nathalie, daughter of Paul LeBlanc and Marie Richard, at Bécancour, on the upper St. Lawrence, across from Trois-Rivières, in February 1775.  Soon after their marriage, they moved upriver to Sorel, at the mouth of Rivière Richelieu, and then to St.-Ours, farther up the Richelieu.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1776 and 1787, Nathalie gave Charles, fils four more children, a son and three daughters, at Sorel and St.-Ours.  Two of Charles, fils and Nathalie's daughters married into the Chapdelaine and Arpin families at St.-Ours and Sorel.  One of his sons created his own family. 

Younger son Charles III, by second wife Nathalie LeBlanc, born at St.-Ours in c1786, married Marie-Louise Leroux dit Lenseigne probably at St.-Ours in c1810. 

Pierre, fils's third son Jean, born at Chignecto in c1707, married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Jeanne Gautrot, in c1725 probably at Chignecto and settled at Pointe-Beauséjour on the Missaguash.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1731 and 1754, at Chignecto, Marie-Jeanne gave Jean eight children, four sons and four daughters.  Jean died probably at Pointe-Beauséjour on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  Three of his daughters married into the Bergeron, Bernard, and LeBlanc families, were captured by the British and held at Halifax.  In 1764-65, they emigrated to Louisiana with their oldest brother Pierre le jeune.  Evidently none of Jean's other sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre le jeune, born at Pointe-Beauséjour in c1731, married Anne, daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise and Marguerite Dugas of Rivière St.-Jean, in c1757 while in exile.  They were captured by the British probably at Restigouche in 1760 and held as prisoners at Halifax for the next several years.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Pierre le jeune four children, two sons and two daughters, in exile and at Halifax between 1759 and 1764.  Pierre le jeune took his family to Louisiana with the Broussard party in 1764-65; only his youngest daughter went with them.  They settled with the Broussards at Attakapas west of the Atchafalaya Basin, moved to Cabahannocer on the Mississippi to escape an epidemic, and then returned to Attakapas.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Pierre le jeune five more children, two sons and three daughers, in Louisiana between 1767 and 1775.  Louisiana records reveal that she gave him five more sons in the colony between 1768 and 1787.  His daughters married into the Breaux, Carmouche, and Guilbeau families at Attakapas.  All five of his sons married into the Breaux, Cormier, Nezat, Carmouche, and Mouton families on the western prairies and created vigorous family lines.

Pierre, fils's fourth son François dit Petit François, born at Chignecto in c1710, married Anne dite Annette, daughter of Claude Bourgeois and Anne Blanchard, in c1739 probably at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1740 and 1760, Annette gave Charles eight children, a son and seven daughters.  They escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  They did not escape the British at Restigouche in 1760, however, and were held as prisoners of war at Halifax in the early 1760s.  By 1767, they had moved to Île Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Also counted on the island that year were daughters Marguerite, Henriette, Anastasie, Adélaïde, and Appoline, and nephew Fidèle, son of Petit François's older brother Jean.  Bona Arsenault speculates that Petit François and his family moved on to Spanish Louisiana, but Louisiana records do not support this.  Petit François's daughter Anne married into the Guoguen or Gueguen family on Île Miquelon but settled at Cocagne on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in present-day eastern New Brunswick.  His son created his own family.

Only son Pierre le jeune, born at Chignecto in c1742, married cousin Marie, daughter of Jean Cyr and Anne Bourgeois of Chignecto, on Miquelon in September 1767.  One wonders where they went from there. 

Pierre, fils's fifth son Joseph, born at Chignecto in c1716, followed his older brother Charles le jeune to Malpèque, Île St.-Jean, in c1729.  Joseph married Marguerite, daughter of François Boudrot and Jeanne Landry, probably at Malpèque in July 1739.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1742 and 1751, Marguerite gave him five children, four sons and a daughter, at Malpèque.  

Pierre, fils's sixth son Abraham, born at Chignecto in March 1719, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Jacques Nuirat and Marie-Jeanne Bourgeois, at Beaubassin in May 1741 but settled at Malpèque, where he had gone with brother Joseph in 1729.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1743 and 1750, Marguerite gave Abraham five children, three sons and two daughters, including a set of twins, at Malpèque.  Abraham and his family escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Daughter Marguerite married into the Hébert family during exile and had the marriage blessed on Île Miquelon in July 1763, so the family may have fallen into the hands of the British in 1760 and held as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia.  They did not remain on the island.  Marguerite and her family moved on to Cocagne, where members of her family had settled. 

Pierre, fils's seventh and youngest son Antoine, born at Chignecto in c1724, reached adulthood but did not marry.  He followed his brothers to Malpèque.  One wonders what happened to him there. 

Pierre, père's second son Abraham, by first wife Marguerite Dugas, born at Port-Royal in c1678, married Jeanne, daughter of Pierre Gaudet l'aîné and Anne Blanchard, probably at Chignecto in c1701.  Between the early 1700s and 1729, she gave him 18 children, seven sons and 11 daughters.  Abraham remarried to Marie-Thérèse, daughter of Emmanuel Mirande and Marguerite Bourgeois and widow of Pierre Caissie, by 1752, in his late 60s or early 70s.  She gave him no more children.  Abraham died between 1754 and 1755 at either Chignecto or in the French Maritimes.  Ten of his daughters married into the Chiasson, Poirier, Vigneau dit Maurice, Hébert dit Boudiche, Bourel, Dugas, Hébert dit Canadien, and Boudrot dit Miquetau families.  Two of them settled on Île Miquelon, and another at Bonaventure in Gaspésie, present-day Québec Province.  Five of Abraham's seven sons created their own families.   

Abraham's oldest son, name unrecorded, born at Chignecto before 1707, died young. 

Abraham's second son Jean-Baptiste, born at Chignecto before 1707, married in c1730, probably at Chignecto, a woman whose name has been lost to history; Bona Arsenault calls her Anne Cyr.  According to Arsenault, in 1735 and 1748, Anne gave Jean-Baptiste two children, a son and a daughter, at Chignecto.  Their son created his own family and emigrated to Louisiana. 

Only son Pierre, born at Chignecto in c1735, escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Godin dit Lincour and Anastasie Bourg of Rivière St.-Jean, in c1760 perhaps at Restigouche.  They were captured by the British soon after their marriage and held in a prison compound at Halifax, Nova Scotia, until the end of the war.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre a son, Eusèbe, at Halifax in c1762.  In 1764, they chose to follow their cousins to Louisiana.  Another son, Pierre, fils, was born in 1765 aboard ship or at New Orleans.  Pierre settled his family at Cabahannocer, present-day St. James Parish, on the Mississippi above New Orleans and died there by September 1769, when his wife was listed in a census with her second husband, Basile Préjean.  Pierre was in his 30s when he died.  In the 1790s, his older son Eusèbe married into the Bergeron family and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche in the 1790s.  Pierre's younger son Pierre, fils married twice on the river, into the Bebe and Bourgeois families, and joined his cousins on the western prairies about the time brother Eusèbe moved to Lafourche. 

Abraham's third son Pierre, born at Chignecto before 1707, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Hébert and Anne-Marie Boudrot, in c1728 probably at Chignecto and settled at Pointe Beauséjour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1749, at Chignecto, Marguerite gave Pierre six children, three sons and three daughters.  Their oldest daughter Marie married into the Poirier family.  The family evidently escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Pierre's three sons emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765. 

Oldest son Jean, born at Pointe Beauséjour in c1728, married Judith Bergeron probably at Chignecto on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  British officials counted them with four children, all sons, at Halifax in August 1763.  Jean took his family to Louisiana with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party in 1764-65, followed the Broussards to the Bayou Teche valley in the spring of 1765, but retreated to Cabahannocer on the river that autumn to escape an epidemic that devastated the Teche valley community.  He and Judith remained on the river, where they had more children, including a daughter and two more sons.  He died at St.-Jacques, formerly Cabahannocer, in January 1800.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean was age 75 when he died, but he was closer to 72.  Jean's only daughter, born at Cabahannocer, married into the Clouâtre and Tomlette families.  All six of his sons--the oldest born at Chignecto, three born in exile, and the youngest in Louisiana--married into the Babin, Dupuis, Gaudet, Fontenot, Braud, and Bourgeois famililes and settled on what became known as the Acadian Coast. 

Pierre's second son Joseph, born at Pointe Beauséjour in c1740, married Marie, daughter of Barthélémy Bergeron dit d'Ambroise and Marguerite Dugas of Rivière St.-Jean, in the early 1760s while in exile.  British officials counted them at the prison compound at Halifax in August 1763; they had no children.  Like older brother Jean and his family, Joseph and Marie came to Louisiana with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party in 1764-65.  They followed the Broussards to Bayou Teche that spring but retreated to Cabahannocer on the river that autumn to escape an epidemic that struck the Teche valley community.  They remained on the river, where all of their children were born.  They may have lived in New Orleans from 1767-69 (two daughters were baptized at St.-Louis Church in May 1767 and April 1769).  They were back at Cabannnocer by September 1769, when Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river there.  Joseph died by February 1798, when he was listed as deceased in a daughter's marriage record; he would have been in his late 50s that year.  His daughters married into the Bourgeois, LeBlanc, and Mire families.  Two of his three sons married into the Part and Gaudin families and settled on the river. 

Pierre's third and youngest son Pierre, fils, was, according to Bona Arsenault, born at Chignecto in c1749.  He went to Louisiana from Halifax probably with his older brothers in 1765 and settled at Cabahannocer.  He married Marie, daughter of probably Jean-Baptiste Bergeron dit d'Amboise and Marguerite Bernard of Rivière St.-Jean, probably at Cabahannocer in the late 1760s.  He does not appear in the records of the Louisiana colony until January 1777, when Spanish officials counted him on the right, or west, bank of the river at Cabahannocer with his wife, two sons, and two daughters of fellow Acadian Pierre Bourgeois.  Although this and other records give him and his wife at least three sons, none of them seem to have created families of their own, so his line of the family did not endure in the Spanish colony. 

Abraham's fourth son Paul, born at Chignecto in c1709, married Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Jeanne Gautrot, at Beaubassin in July 1732.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1733 and 1761, Madeleine gave Paul nine children, four sons and five daughters.  They escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Their son Félix, age 6, and Jean-Baptiste, age 1, died at Québec in 1757 probably during a smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadians there late that autumn.  They remained in Canada, settling at Lotbinière, between Québec and Trois-Rivière, in 1761, and at St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan, in the interior north of Montréal, in 1771.  Three of Paul's daughters married into the Arsenault, Gaillard, Girouard, and Pichet families in Canada.  Youngest son Gabriel-Léandre, born probably at Lotbinière in c1761, became the first priest ordained in that community.  Paul died at St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan in August 1779, age 70.  

Abraham's fifth son Claude, born at Chignecto in May 1717, evidently died young.  

Abraham's sixth son Abraham, fils, born at Chignecto in March 1720, married Agnès, daughter of Pierre Cyr and Claire Cormier, at Beaubassin in February 1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1754, Agnès gave him three children, two sons and a daughter, at Chignecto.  They, too, escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  They were counted on Île d'Orléans, below Québec, in 1758.  Abraham, fils died there in c1759.   

Abraham, père's seventh and youngest son François dit Brélé, born at Chignecto probably in the 1720s, married Anne, daughter of Jean Cyr and Françoise Melanson and widow of François Cormier, fils, at Beaubassin in February 1746.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne give him a daughter at Chignecto in c1748.  They, too, escaped the British in 1755 and made their way to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  François died at Restigouche in  September 1759.  Anne was counted with her Cormier son on Île Miquelon in 1767 and died on the island in December 1774.

Pierre, père's third son Charles, by second wife Marie Guérin, born at Chignecto in c1690, married Françoise, another daughter of Emmanuel Mirande and Marguerite Bourgeois, in c1712 probably at Chignecto.  Between the early 1710s and 1734, Françoise gave Charles 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  Charles died at Chignecto between 1733 and 1740, in his 40s.  His daughters married into the Girouard, Poirier, Bernard, Derayer, and Vigneau dit Maurice families.  All six of Charles's sons created their own families.  

Oldest son Charles, fils, born at Chignecto before 1714, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Poirier and Madeleine Bourgeois, at Beaubassin in November 1734.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave Charles, fils two sons in 1738 and 1742.  Charles, fils died at Chignecto between April 1741 and January 1742, in his late 20s.  Marguerite and her sons escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Both sons created their own families.

Older son Pierre dit Bénéry, born at Chignecto in c1738, married cousin Théotiste, daughter of Joseph Bourgeois and Marie Cyr, at Restigouche in July 1760 during the exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1781, Théotiste gave him eight children, four sons and four daughters.  The family evidently was captured by the British at Restigouche soon after their marriage and held as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia.  In c1764, after the war with Britain finally ended, they chose to join their fellow Acadians on French-controlled Île Miquelon.  The British captured Miquelon during the American Revolution and deported the island's residents to La Rochelle, France, in 1778.  Pierre died there in c1782.  His children returned to North America and settled on the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  Three of his four sons created their own families.  

Oldest son Antoine, born in exile in c1763, married Louise Boudrot in the Madeleines in c1785.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1786 and 1802, Louise gave Antoine eight children, four sons and four daughters, on the islands.  Antoine died there in September 1808, age 45.  Three of his four sons created their own families.

Oldest son Isaac, born in the Madeleines in c1786, married Marie, daughter of Jean Cormier and Marie Boudrot, on the islands in September 1808.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1812 and 1819, Marie gave Isaac three children, a son and two daughters. 

Antoine's second son Germain, born in the Madeleines in c1787, married Henriette, another daughter of Jean Cormier and Marie Boudrot, on the islands in July 1811.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1813 and 1820, Henriette gave Germain five daughters.

Antoine's third son Marcel, born in the Madeleines in c1789, married Domitilde, daughter of Louis Therriault and Anastasie Cormier, on the islands in October 1813.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1814 and 1820, Domitilde gave Marcel four children, two sons and two daughters. 

Pierre dit Bénéry's third son Pierre, fils, born probably on Île Miquelon in c1766, married Geneviève Boudrot on the islands in c1790.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1792 and 1806, Geneviève gave Pierre, fils 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  At least two of Pierre, fils's six sons created their own families.

Oldest son Constant, born on the islands in c1795, married Geneviève, daughter of Jean Richard and Charlotte Vigneau, on the islands in October 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1816 and 1821, Geneviève gave Constant three children, two sons and a daughter. 

Pierre, fils's third son Jean, born on the islands in c1799, married cousin Geneviève, daughter of Antoine Arsenault and Louise Boudrot, on the islands in August 1818. 

Pierre dit Bénéry's fifth and youngest son Charles le jeune, born probably on Île Miquelon in c1775, married Anastasie, daughter of Joseph Richard and Agnès Poirier, on the islands in August 1801.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1803 and 1806, Anastasie gave Charles le jeune three children, two sons and a daughter.  Charles le jeune died on the islands in January 1807, age 32. 

Charles, fils's younger son Jean-Baptiste, born at Chignecto in c1742, escaped the British in 1755 and followed older brother Pierre dit Bénéry to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Unlike his brother, however, Jean-Baptiste escaped the British in 1760 and made his way to Canada.  He married Françoise, daughter of François Dumas and Françoise Ruel, at St.-Laurent on the Île d'Orléans, below Québec, in September 1764.  

Charles, père's second son Pierre le jeune, born at Chignecto in September 1716, married Françoise, daughter of Louis Poirier and Cécile Mignot, at Beaubassin November 1740.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1750, Françoise gave Pierre le jeune four children, a son and three daughters, at Chignecto.  Pierre le jeune remarried to Jeanne-Marie, daughter of Charles Héon and Anne Clémenceau, in c1753 probably at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1754 and 1768, Jeanne-Marie gave Pierre le jeune five more children, two sons and three daughters.  They escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge among his relatives on Île St.-Jean, still under French control.  When the British rounded up the habitants on the island in 1758, Pierre le jeune and his family escaped again and made their way to Canada.  They were at Champlain, on the upper St. Lawrence below Trois-Rivières, in 1760; at Batiscan, below Champlain, in 1761; and at Bécancour, across from Trois-Rivières, in 1766.  Pierre le jeune died at Bécancour in April 1770, age 54.  Two of his daughters by first wife Françoise married into the Hébert and Landry families at Bécancour.  His two sons by second wife Jeanne-Marie created their own families. 

Second son Firmin, born at Chignecto in c1754, married Marie, daughter of Antoine Desilets and Madeleine LeBlanc, at Bécancour in January 1773. 

Pierre le jeune's third and youngest son Joseph, born in Canada in c1766, married Marie, daughter of Joseph Vigneau and Marie-Anne Bourgeois, at Bécancour in October 1790, and remarried to Ursule, daughter of François Houde and Thérèse Naud, at Bécancour in July 1798. 

Charles, père's third son Vincent, born at Chignecto in January 1719, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Poirier and Jeanne Gaudet, in c1748 probably at Chignecto.  They moved to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, after February 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1773, Marguerite gave Vincent four children, three sons and a daughter.  If they were still on the island in 1758, they eluded the British and made their way to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  After the war with Britain ended, they settled at Carleton, on the northern shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, in Gaspésie, present-day Québec Province.  Vincent's daughter married into the Laviolette family at Carleton.  Two of his three sons created families of their own. 

Second son Michel, born in exile in c1760, married Luce, daughter of Michel Bourg and Anne Hébert of Minas, at Carleton in November 1784.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1786 and 1790, Luce gave Michel five children, four sons and a daughter, at Carleton.  Michel's daughter married into the Dagneau family at Carleton.  Two of his four sons created their own families. 

Third son Louis, born at Carleton in c1788, married Marie-Julie, daughter of Jean Landry and Marthe Dugas, at Carleton in May 1813.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1814 and 1820, Marie-Julie gave Louis four children, a son and three daughters, at Carleton. 

Michel's fourth and youngest son Eusèbe, the second with the name and the twin of a sister, born at Carleton in c1790, married cousin Anastasie, daughter of Paul Babineau dit Deslauriers and Jeanne Arsenault, at Carleton in November 1812.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1813 and 1825, Anastasie gave Eusèbe seven children, two sons and five daughters. 

Vincent's third and youngest son Joseph, born probably at Carleton in c1764, married cousin Élisabeth Poirier at Carleton in November 1788.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1789 and 1795, at Carleton, Élisabeth gave Joseph five children, three sons and two daughters, all of whom evidently died at an early age.  

Charles, père's fourth son Claude, born at Chignecto in April 1723, married Marie, daughter of Pierre-Paul Cyr and Agnès Cormier, at Beaubassin in January 1744.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Claude a son at Chignecto in c1745.  What wonders what became of them. 

Charles, père's fifth son Joseph dit Cointin, born at Chignecto in June 1733, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Gaudet and Madeleine Brun, at Annapolis Royal in October 1753.  They escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Josèphe gave Joseph a daughter in c1758.  Joseph dit Cointin remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Bugeaud and Marie-Josèphe Landry and widow of Joseph Gauthier l'aîné, in c1760 while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1768, Marguerite gave Joseph three more children, two sons and a daughter.  He served as a captain of the Acadian militia at Restigouche in 1759, escaped the British there in 1760, and settled at Bonaventure, on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, east of Carleton.  Joseph dit Cointin died at Bonaventure in c1802, age 69.  His two daughters married into the Lepage and Cavanaugh families at Bonaventure.  His two sons created families of their own. 

Older son Grégoire, born probably at Bonaventure in c1765, married Théotiste, daughter of Joseph Bourg and Catherine Comeau, at Bonaventure in November 1788.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1790 and 1806, Théotiste gave Grégoire 10 children, eight sons and two daughters, at Bonaventure.  One of his daughters married into the Bernard family at Bonaventure.  All eight of his sons married. 

Oldest son Nicolas, born at Bonaventure in c1790, married Marguerite-Léa, daughter of Charlemagne Arbour and Angélique Babin, at Bonaventure in January 1818.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1818 and 1828, Marguerite-Léa gave Nicolas five children, three sons and two daughters, at Bonventure. 

Grégoire's second son Joseph, born at Bonaventure in c1791, married Anastasie, daughter of Jean-Marie Bernard and Lutine Babin, at Bonaventure in February 1819.  The settled at nearby St.-Charles-de-Caplan.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1819 and 1845, Anastasie gave Joseph 11 children, six sons and five daughters. 

Grégoire's third son Aimé, born at Bonaventure in c1795, married Lucille, daughter of Charlemagne Arbour and Claire Poirier, at Bonaventure in January 1822.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1822 and 1844, Lucille gave Aimé 10 children, seven sons and three daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Grégoire's fourth son Philippe, born at Bonaventure in c1798, married Marguerite-Suzanne, daughter of Henri Cayouette and Élisabeth Robichaud, at Bonaventure in January 1825 at Bonaventure.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1825 and 1842, Marguerite gave Philippe 11 children, nine sons and two daughters, at Carleton. 

Grégoire's fifth son Fréderic, born at Bonaventure in c1800, married Angèle, daughter of Jean-Marie-Olivier Bourdages and Angéle Bujold, at Bonaventure in January 1825.  According to Bona Arsenault, they evidently had no children. 

Grégoire's sixth son Eusèbe, born at Bonaventure in c1802, married Sophie, another daughter of Charlemagne Arbour and Claire Poirier, at Bonaventure in September 1729.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1830 and 1850, Sophie gave Eusèbe 11 children, five sons and six daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Grégoire's seventh son Sébastien, born at Bonaventure in c1804, married Geneviève, daughter of Charles Cavanaugh and Louise Loubert, at Bonaventure in January 1830.  According to descendant Bona Arsenault, between 1831 and 1849, Geneviève gave Sébastien nine children, six sons and three daughters.  (Sébastien, through his son George, born at Bonaventure in 1837, was the great-grandfather of Joseph-Bonaventure-Ambroise dit Bona Arsenault, named for his native Bonaventure.) 

Grégoire's eighth and youngest son Grégoire, fils, married Marguerite, daughter of François-Placide Bujold and Appoline Poirier, at Bonaventure in February 1831.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite evidently gave Grégoire, fils no children.  He remarried to Marie-Reine, daughter of Louis Normandeau and Suzanne Berthelot, at Carleton in May 1835.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1836 and 1853, Marie-Reine gave Grégoire 10 children, seven sons and three daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Joseph dit Cointin's younger son Nicolas, born at Bonaventure in c1768, married Geneviève, daughter of Raymond Bourdages and Esther LeBlanc, at Bonaventure in April 1788.  According to Bona Arsenault, Geneviève gave Nicolas a daughter in 1789, the year he died at Bonaventure.  

Charles, père's sixth and youngest son Jean dit Cointin, born at Chignecto in c1734, escaped the British in 1755 and married Élisabeth, another daughter of Joseph Bugeaud and Marie-Josèphe Landry, at Restigouche in November 1759 while in exile.  They, too, escaped the British at Restigouche in 1760 and also settled at Bonaventure.  According to Bona Arsenault, Élisabeth gave Jean two sons at Bonaventure in 1761 and 1764.  The older son created his own family. 

Older son Jean, fils, born in c1761, married Anne-Blanche, daughter of Pierre Robichaud and Anne Michel, at Bonventure in c1782.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1783 and 1803, Anne-Blanche gave Jean, fils 10 children, three sons and seven daughters, at Bonaventure.  Six of their daughters married into the Poirier, Bernard, Dugas, Bourdages, and Arbour families at Bonaventure.  Two of Jean, fils's three sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Jean-Pierre, born at Bonaventure in c1798, married Euphrosine, daughter of Charles Cavanaugh and Louise Loubert, at Bonaventure in January 1822.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1822 and 1841, Euphrosine gave Jean-Pierre 10 children, five sons and five daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Jean, fils's second son Alexandre, born at Bonaventure in c1801, married Marie, daughter of Antoine Bourdages and Charlotte Bourg, at Bonaventure in February 1825.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1826 and 1845, Marie gave Alexandre 11 children, six sons and five daughters, including two sets of twins, at Bonaventure.

Pierre, père's fourth son Jacques, by second wife Marie Guérin, born at Chignecto in 1692, married Marie, daughter of Michel Poirier and Madeleine Bourgeois, at Beaubassin in February 1720.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1741, Marie gave Jacques eight children, seven sons and a daughter, at Chignecto and on Île St.-Jean.  They settled at Malpèque beginning in the late 1730s.  Jacques died at Malpèque by 1752, in his late 50s.  His daughter Marie married into the Desroches family at Malpèque.  Five of his seven sons created families of their own there.  

Oldest son Jacques, fils, born at Chignecto in c1722, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carret, at Malpèque in c1747.  Between 1748 and 1750, Marie-Josèphe gave Jacques, fils three daughters at Malpèque. 

Jacques, père's second son Joseph, born at Chignecto in c1724, married, according to Bona Arsenault, Anne, another daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carret, at Malpèque in c1749.  Anne gave Joseph a daughter at Malpèque in 1750.  According to Stephen A. White, the Joseph Arseneau married to Anne Doucet at Malpèque in August 1752 was a Comeau, not an Arceneau.

Jacques, père's third son Pierre, born at Chignecto in c1725, married Madeleine Landry at Malpèque in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1751 and 1758, Madeleine gave Pierre two daughters at Malpèque.  They escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge in Canada, where they remained.  Younger daughter Suzanne married into the Brunet-La Sablonnière family at Québec in August 1779. 

Jacques, père's fourth son Jean, born at Chignecto in c1729, married Madeleine, daughter of François Boudrot and Jeanne Landry, at Port-La-Joye on the island in November 1750 and settled at Malpèque, where a French official counted them with a year-old son in August 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1751 and 1764, Madeleine gave Jean four children, three sons and a daughter.  Like most of the Acadians at Malpèque, Jean and his family escaped the British roundup on the island in 1758 and made their way to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  In the late 1750s or early 1760s, they either surrendered to, or were captured by, the British and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia, In 1764, after the war had ended, they were still being held at Pointe-Beauséjour, Chignecto, but moved on to Île Miquelon the following year.  They were among the Acadians sent to France in 1767 to relieve crowding on the island.  In the mother country, Jean, Madeleine sons Jean, fils and Basile and daughter Marie settled at Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany with other Acadian exiles.  Jean, père drowned in France in September 1768.  His family remained there.  At least one of his sons created his own family in France.

Younger son Basile, born on Île St.-Jean in c1758, followed his family into exile and to Île Miquelon and France, where he worked as a sailor.  He married Anne, daughter of Joseph Bourgeois and Marguerite Hébert of Notre-Dame, Île Miquelon, at St.-Jean church, La Rochelle, in April 1780.  The priest who recorded the marriage noted that the groom's mother, as well as his father, was no longer living.  He did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785. 

Jacques, père's fifth son Alexandre, born at Chignecto in c1733, married Renée dite Renotte Boudrot, widow of Paul Richard, probably at Malpèque in c1755.  

Jacques, père's sixth son Paul, born at Malpèque in c1737, and seventh sons Paul and Guillaume, born at Malpèque in c1737, was counted with his widowed mother at Malpèque in August 1752, age 15, but Bona Arsenault says nothing more about him.  

Jacques, père's seventh and youngest son Guillaume, who would have been age 11 in August 1752, does not appear in the census with his mother and older brother, so he may have died young. 

Pierre, père's fifth son François, by second wife Marie Guérin, born at Chignecto in c1694, married Marguerite, daughter of René Bernard and Madeleine Doucet, at Beaubassin in January 1719.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1723 and 1744, Marguerite gave François six children, a son and five daughters, at Chignecto.  Three of their daughters married into the Gaudet, Doucet, and LeBlanc families.  One wonders what happened to François's son Pierre, born at Chignecto in c1740. 

Pierre, père's sixth son Claude dit Ambroise, by second wife Marie Guérin, born at Chignecto in c1699, married Marguerite dite Magitte, daughter of Martin Richard and Marguerite Bourg, in c1725 probably at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1745, Magitte gave Claude nine children, four sons and five daughters, at Chignecto and on Île St.-Jean.  They settled at Malpèque in c1737.  Claude died there by 1752, in his early 50s.  His family escaped the British in 1758 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  One of his daughters married into the Savoie family at Restigouche during the exile.  At least two of his four sons created their own families.  

Oldest son Claude, fils, born at Malpèque in c1728, was counted with his widowed mother at Malpèque in August 1752, age 24, so he lived to adulthood, but Bona Arsenault says nothing more of him.  

Claude's second son Pierre, born at Chignecto in c1735, married Théodose Girouard on Île St.-Jean in c1755.  According to Bona Arsenault, Théodose gave Pierre a son in c1756.  They escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge in Canada, where they remained.  Their son created his own family. 

Only son Jean-Pierre, born on Île St.-Jean in c1756, married Rosalie, daughter of Joseph Mignot-Labrie and Rosalie Lizotte of Rimouski, at Québec in November 1786.  They settled at Rimouski on the lower St.-Lawrence.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1788 and 1810, Rosalie gave Jean-Pierre 13 children, seven sons and six daughters, at Rimouski.  Jean-Pierre died at Rimouski in August 1810, age 54.  Three of his daughters married into the Pinault and Létourneau families at Rimouski.  At least three of his seven sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Jean-Pierre, fils, born at Rimouski in c1790, married Marguerite Côte at Rimouski in June 1810.

Jean-Pierre's fifth son Jacob, born at Rimouski in 1801, married Gudule Caneul at Rimouski in January 1823, and, at age 59, remarried to Rosalie Saint-Pierre at nearby Bic in November 1860. 

Jean-Pierre's seventh and youngest son Eugène-Dénéris, born at Rimouski in c1810, married Marie Lucas at Rimouski in February 1832. 

Claude's third son Ambroise, born at Malpèque in c1739, was counted with his widowed mother at Malpèque in August 1752, age 14, but Bona Arsenault says nothing more of him.   

Claude's fourth and youngest son Joseph, born at Malpèque in c1741, escaped the British in 1758 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  The British captured him, perhaps at Restigouche in 1760, and held him as a prisoner at Halifax.  He married Marie, daughter of Jacques Haché dit Gallant and Josèphe Boudrot, probably during his imprisonment.  They were still at Halifax in the summer of 1763.  They remained in the region.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1767 and 1772, Marie gave Joseph three children, two sons and a daughter.  Their two sons created families of their own. 

Older son Simon, born in c1767, married cousin Gertrude, daughter of Pierre Melanson and Rose-Anne Haché, at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, Nova Scotia, in February 1788. 

Joseph's younger son Joseph le jeune, born in c1771, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Godin and Marie-Angélique Bergeron, at Caraquet, persent-day northeastern New Brunswick, in June 1792.

Pierre, père's seventh son Augustin, by second wife Marie Guérin, born at Chignecto in c1700 or 1701, survived childhood but did not marry.

Pierre, père's eighth and youngest son Abraham dit Petit Abram, by second wife Marie Guérin, born at Chignecto in c1702, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Savoie and Marie Richard, in c1731 probably at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1732 and 1750, Marie-Josèphe gave Petit Abrah 10 children, five sons and five daughters, at Chignecto and on Île St.-Jean.  They settled at Malpèque in c1741.  They escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  After the war with Britain, they remained in the region.  Three of Petit Abram's daughters married into the Bernard, Poirier, and LeBlanc families and settled at Egmont Bay on the southwest coast of St. John's Island and at Grande-Digue in present-day eastern New Brunswick.  At least two of Petit Abram's sons created families of their own.  

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste dit Chocolat, born at Chignecto in c1736, married Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Haché dit Gallant and Josèphe Boudreau, at Île Miscou, at the entrance to the Baie des Chaleurs, in September 1773.  

Petit Abram's second son Jacques le jeune, born probably at Chignecto in c1740, married in c1765 to a Poirier from Rustico, formerly Racico, on the north shore of St. John's Island, east of his childhood home at Malpèque. 

Petit Abram's third son Joseph, born at Malpèque in c1744, was counted with the family at Malpèque in August 1752, age 8, but disappears from Bona Arsenault's genealogy.  

Petit Abram's fourth and fifth sons Hilarion, born at Malpèque in c1748, and a second Baptiste, born there in c1750, also appear with the family in August 1752, ages 4 and 2, but also disappear from Bona Arsenault's genealogy.388

Barrieau

Nicolas Barrieau, perhaps a 1671 arrival, and his wife Martine Hébert created a good-sized family in the colony.  Between 1684 and 1707, at Port-Royal and Rivière-Kenescout, Minas, Martine gave Nicolas nine children, four sons and five daughters.  Nicolas died at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, date unrecorded.  Four of his daughters married into the Lord dit Lamontagne, Girouard, Bourg, and Doiron families at Minas.  All four of his sons created their own families.  Nicolas and Martine's descendants settled at Minas and in the French Maritimes, where they became especially plentiful by 1752.  Nine of Nicolas's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but only one line of the family was established there.  The majority of his descendants remained in greater Acadia or Canada after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Antoine, born probably at Minas in c1697, married Angélique, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau l'aîné and Anne-Marie Bourg, in c1722 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1742, Angélique gave Antoine a dozen children, six sons and six daughters.  In 1750, the family moved on to Île St.-Jean and settled at Anse-à-Dubuisson in the island's interior.  They either returned to Nova Scotia and escaped the British roundup there in 1755, or they left Île St.-Jean before 1758 and sought refuge in Canada.  Antoine died at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse, on the St. Lawrence below Québec, in January 1758, age 60, while exile, the victim, perhaps, of a smallpox epidemic that struck hundreds of Acadian refugees in the area.  Two of Antoine's daughters married into the Vincent dit Clément and Savary families.  Three of his sons created their own families.

Second son Antoine, fils, born at Minas in c1726, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Jean Doucet and Marie Doiron, at Port-La-Joye  in February 1752.  A French official counted the newlyweds at Anse-à-Dubuisson the following August.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1753 and 1756, Marie-Blanche gave Antoine, fils two daughters.  They followed his father off the island before the fall of Louisbourg and found refuge in Canada.  Antoine, fils died at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse, below Québec, in January 1758, age 32, perhaps of smallpox, only two days before his father died. 

Antoine, père's third son Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, born at Minas in c1730, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and married Marguerite Doiron (Bona Arsenault says Marguerite Doucet) on the island in 1751.  They, too, were counted at Anse-à-Dubuisson in August 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1751 and 1757, Marguerite gave Jean four children, a son and three daughters.  They followed his father off the island before the fall of Louisbourg and took refuge in Canada.  Jean remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Landry and Anne Melanson of Annapolis Royal, at Québec in April 1758 while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1759 and 1782, Marie-Madeleine gave Jean 10 more children, eight sons and two daughters.  The family settled at St.-Joachim on the St. Lawrence below Québec, and at St.-François-de-Beauce, today's Beauceville, on upper Rivière Chaudière in the Canadian interior south of Québec.  Four of Jean's daughters from his two wives married into the Paré, Paquet, Quirion, Bolduc, and Lessard families at St.-Joachim, nearby Château-Richer, and St.-François-de-Beuce.  Four of Jean's sons, all by his second wife, created their own families. 

Fourth son Joseph-Marie, born in Canada in c1763, married Marie-Josèphe Grondin at St.-Joseph-de-Beauce, below St.-François-de-Beauce, in November 1785. 

Jean-Baptiste's seventh son Joachim, born in Canada in c1778, married Monique Marcoux at St.-Joseph-de-Beauce in January 1801, remarried to Marie-Josèphe Rodrigue at St.-Françoise-de-Beauce in February 1821, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Thérèse Perrault at St.-Joseph-de-Beauce in October 1749. 

Jean-Baptiste's ninth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born in Canada in c1780, married Marguerite Jacques at St.-Joseph-de-Beauce in October 1801.

Antoine, père's fourth son Simon, born at Minas in c1731, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and then to Canada and married Rosalie Simard at Baie-St.-Paul, on the north shore of the lower St. Lawrence in March 1764.  He remarried to Ursule Forest, widow of Charles Hébert, at La Prairie, across from Montréal, in February 1772. 

Nicolas's second son Nicolas, fils, born probably at Minas in c1703, married in c1724 probably at Minas a woman whose name has been lost to history, and remarried to Ursule, daughter of François Gautrot and Marie Vincent, in c1735 perhaps at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1748, Ursule gave Nicolas, fils six children, four sons and two daughters.  They also moved on to the French Maritimes, where Nicolas, fils worked as a mariner at Port-Toulouse on Île Royale.  He died there in c1754, in his early 50s.  Ursule and his children evidently escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge in Canada.  Ursule died at Québec in late December 1757, victim, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadian refugees there that fall and winter.  One of her and Nicolas, fils's daughters married into the Renaud family on Île St.-Jean.  Three of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, born at Minas in c1738, followed his family to Île Royale and Canada.  He married Françoise, daughter of Étienne Trahan and Françoise Roy, at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse, below Québec, in January 1759 while in exile. 

Nicolas, fils's second son Olivier, born at Minas in c1740, followed his family to Île Royale and Canada and married Marie-Reine Boucher at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny, below Québec, in February 1760 while in exile.  They settled across and farther down the St. Lawrence at Baie-St.-Paul.

Nicolas, fils's third son Pierre, born at Minas in c1742, followed his family to Île Royale and Canada and married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Canadians Charles Chainé and Marie-Josèphe Richer of Gentilly, at Champlain, on the upper St. Lawrence between Québec and Troise-Rivières, in April 1762. 

Nicolas's third son Jacques, born probably at Minas in c1705, married Anne-Marie, daughter of Jean Turpin and Catherine Bourg, at Grand-Pré in July 1726.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1730 and 1751, Anne-Marie gave Jacques 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  The family also moved on to the French Maritimes, settling on Île Madame off the southern coast of Île Royale in July 1751.  They evidently escaped the British in 1758 and took refuge in Canada.  Two of Jacques's daughters married into the LeBlanc and Orly families.  At least one of his sons created his own family.

Second son Pierre, born at Minas in c1734, followed his family to Île Madame and Canada.  He married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Lagrave and Marie-Josèphe Richer, probably in Canada in c1761.  They settled at Québec.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre a daughter in c1762. 

Nicolas's fourth and youngest son Pierre, born probably at Minas in c1707, married Véronique, daughter of Pierre Girouard and Marie Doiron, in c1730 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1730 and 1752, Véronique gave Pierre 11 children, three sons and eight daughters.  They moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and settled at Rivière-des-Blancs in the island's interior.  This family did not escape the British.  Pierre died aboard the vessel Picotte in 1758 during the deportation of the island Acadians to France.  Four of his daughters married into the Daigre, Landry, Dugas , Boudrot, Broussard, and Aucoin families on Île St.-Jean and in France and emigrated to Louisiana.  Two of his sons created their own families.

Second son Jean-Bapitiste, born at Minas in c1733, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and France and married Marie, daughter of Jean Daigre and Anne-Marie Breau, at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo, in June 1764.  Between 1765 and 1773, Marie gave Jean-Baptiste 10 children, seven sons and three daughters, in France, most of whom died in childhood.  After living in Poitou and at Nantes, the family--including only four of their children--emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Jean-Baptiste died on upper Bayou Lafourche by January 1788, when wife Marie was listed in a census there without a husband.  His was the only line of the Barrieau family established in Louisiana, where the family's name morphed into Barrilleaux.  Two of his three surviving sons married into the Mazerolle and Gautreaux families and settled on the Lafourche. 

Pierre's third and youngest son Olivier, born at Minas in c1737, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and France.  He served as a privateer soon after reaching the mother country, was captured by the British, and held as a prisoner of war in England until 1763.  After his release, he joined in his family in France and married Anastasie, daughter of Jean Boudrot and Agathe Thibodeau, at Pleudihen in February 1764.  She gave him a daughter in April 1765.  Olivier remarried to Élisabeth, daughter of Pierre Landry and Anne Térriot, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in May 1768.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1769 and 1792, Élisabeth gave Olivier 10 more children, six sons and four daughters, in France and greater Acadia.  They lived at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, until 1774, when they returned to North America with other Acadian exiles and settled at Bonaventure and Carleton, on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs in Gaspésie, present-day Québec Province.  Olivier's daughters by both wives married into the Sainton, LeBlanc, and Comeau families.  Four of his sons, all from his second wife, created their own families. 

Oldest son Charles-Olivier, born at St.-Servan, France, in c1769, married Magloria, daughter of Simon Henry and Marguerite-Josèphe Brault, at Bonaventure in February 1793.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1794 and 1799, Magloria gave Charles-Olivier five children, three sons and two daughters.  After 1800, Charles-Olivier took his family down the coast to St.-Louis-de-Kent, present-day eastern New Brunswick. 

Olivier's second son Jean-Baptiste le jeune, born at St.-Servan in c1771, married Madeleine-Suzanne, another daughter of Simon Henry and Marguerite-Josèphe Brault, at Carleton in November 1793.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1794 and 1813, Madeleine-Suzanne gave Jean-Baptiste le jeune 15 children, seven sons and eight daughters.  He remarried to Collette, daughter of Benjamin LeBlanc and Marie Dugas, at Carleton in April 1823.  According to Bona Arsenault, she evidently gave him no more children.  Five of Jean-Baptiste le jeune's daughters married into the LeBlanc and Lavache families, four of them to sons of Benjamin LeBlanc, at Carleton.  At least four of his sons created their own families.

Third son Pierre-Dosithée, born at Carleton in c1796, married Angélique, daughter of Jean LeBlanc and Charlotte Bujold, at Carleton in January 1833.  They remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1833 and 1850, Angélique gave Pierre seven children, five sons and two daughters.

Jean-Baptiste le jeune's fourth son Charles-Nicolas, born at Carleton in c1805, married Antoinette, daughter of Désiré LeBlanc and Victoire Comeau, at Carleton in September 1840.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1841 and 1846, Antoinette gave Charles five children, three sons and two daughters.

Jean-Baptiste le jeune's fifth son Moïse, born at Carleton in c1806, married Marguerite, daughter of Charles Boudreau and Élisabeth LeBlanc, at Carleton in November 1833.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1834 and 1841, Marguerite gave Moïse three sons. 

Jean-Baptiste le jeune's seventh and youngest son Pierre, born at Carleton in c1813, married Marguerite, daughter of Sévère Landry and Marie-Gilette Bujold, at Carleton in January 1840.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave Pierre no children.  Pierre remarried to Sophie, daughter of Louis-Régis Estiambre and Sophie Mercier, at Carleton in January 1843.   According to Bona Arsenault, between 1843 and 1849, Sophie gave Pierre four children, two sons and two daughters, at Carleton. 

Olivier's third son Joseph-Moïse, called Moïse, born probably in Gaspésie in c1775, married Marguerite-Josette, yet another daughter of Simon Henry and Marguerite-Josèphe Brault, at Carleton in January 1799.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite-Josette gave Moïse a son in c1799.  They followed his older brother Charles-Olivier to St.-Louis-de-Kent after 1800.

Olivier's sixth and youngest son Pierre, born in Gaspésie in c1788, married Angélique, daughter of Joseph Audet and Scholastique LeBlanc, at Carleton in January 1814.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1814 and 1829, Angélique gave Pierre 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  They remained at Carleton.  Two of their daughters married into the Allard and LeBlanc families at Carleton.  At least one of their sons created his own family.

Oldest son Pierre-François, born at Carleton in c1817, married Caroline, daughter of Eusèbe Arsenault and Anastasie Deslauriers, at Carleton in January 1745.  They remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1846 and 1850, Caroline gave Pierre-François four children, two sons and two daughters.389

Benoit

Martin Benoit dit Labrière, perhaps a 1671 arrival, and his wife Marie Chaussegros created a large family in the colony.  Between 1673 and 1694, Marie gave Martin 10 children, five sons and five daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Forest, Trahan, Leprince, Lejeune, and Thibodeau families.  All five of Labrière's sons created their own families.  He and Marie's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Minas, Pigiguit, Cobeguit, and in the French Maritimes, where, by 1752, they could be found at Anse-au-Matelot and Grande-Ascension on Île St.-Jean, and at Pointe-à-la-Jeunesse, Rivière-des-Habitants, and Baie-des-Espagnols on Île Royale.  At least 36 of Martin's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in the 1760s, French St.-Domingue in the late 1760s or 1770s, and especially from France in 1785, but Acadian Benoits also could be found in substantial numbers in greater Acadia, Canada, and France after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Pierre l'aîné, born at Port-Royal in c1675, married Marie, daughter of Michel Forest and Marie Hébert, in c1695 probably at Port-Royal and moved on to Rivière-de-l'Ascension, Minas.  Between 1696 and the early 1700s, Marie gave Pierre l'aîné five children, three sons and two daughters.  One of their daughters married into the Hamet family of Île St.-Jean.  Two of Pierre l'aîné's three sons created their own families.  

Oldest son Martin le jeune married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Claude Lejeune and Anne-Marie Gaudet, at Grand-Pré in November 1725.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, in c1735, Marie-Josèphe gave Martin le jeune a daughter, Marie-Josèphe, who married into the Renaud family at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in February 1757.

Pierre l'aîné's second son Pierre, fils married Anne-Marie, daughter of Jean Gaudet and Jeanne Henry and widow of Claude Lejeune dit Briard, in c1726.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1731 and 1738, Anne-Marie gave Pierre, fils three children, three sons and a daughter.  The family moved to Île St.-Jean in 1749 and two years later to Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, where a French official counted Pierre, fils, Anne-Marie, and daughter Catherine, age 20, in April 1752.  Pierre, fils's three sons created their own families.

Oldest Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, born in c1731, married Anne, daughter of Étienne Trahan and Françoise LeRoy of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, on Île Royale in May 1751.  They were counted next to his family at Baie-des-Espagnols in April 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1752 and 1754, Anne gave Jean two daughters, but none were counted with them at Baie des Espagnols.  They evidently were among the Île Royale Acadians who returned to Pigiguit after 1752.  They were deported to Maryland in 1755 and held at Port Tobacco on the lower Potomac.  Anne gave Jean two more daughters in Maryland, in c1756 and c1760.  He died probably at Port Tobacco in c1760, and Anne remarried to Louis Latier of Île Royale probably at Port Tobacco in c1761.  She, her new husband, three of their young children, and her three Benoit daughters emigrated to Louisiana from Port Tobacco in 1769.  After their adventure in Texas and on the trail to Natchitoches, Anne's Benoit daughters married into the Janis, De La Fosse, Campos, and Broussard families at Natchitoches and Opelousas, so the blood of this family line survived in Bayou State. 

Pierre, fils's second son Pierre-Olivier, called Olivier, born in c1735, evidently remained at Pigiguit when his family moved to Île St.-Jean and was deported to Maryland in 1755.  He married Susanne Boudrot in c1756 probably at Port Tobacco, Maryland.  According Bona Arsenault, between 1756 and 1760, Susanne gave Olivier three children, a son and two daughters.  Olivier remarried to Marie-Geneviève, daughter of Mathieu Brasseau and Anne Célestin dit Bellemère, probably at Port Tobacco in c1765.  She evidently gave him no more children.  Olivier, second wife Marie-Geneviève, and his three children by first wife Susanne emigrated to Louisiana from Port Tobacco in 1769.  After their ordeal in Texas and on the trail to Natchitoches, they lived at San Gabriel on the Mississippi above New Orleans until the 1780s, when they moved to the Opelousas District.  Olivier died at Opelousas in December 1787, age 58.  His two daughters married into the Préjean, Boone, Martin, Favron, and Boudreaux families at Attakapas and Opelousas.  His only son married into the Savoy family and settled on the western prairies. 

Pierre, fils's third and youngest son Pierre III, born in c1738, married Victoire Dugas in c1760 while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and and 1770, Victoire gave Pierre III five children, three sons and two daughters, including a set of twins.  After Le Grand Dérangement, they settled at Arichat on the south shore of Île Madame, off the southern coast of Cape Breton Island. 

Martin's second son Clément, born at Port-Royal in c1677, married Anne, daughter of Antoine Babin and Marie Mercier and widow of Abraham Doiron, in c1705 probably at Minas.  Between 1706 and and 1722, Anne gave Clément seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Clément died by June 1748 probably at Minas. Two of his daughters married into the Labauve and Rivet families.  Two of his three sons created their own families.  

Oldest son Claude le jeune, born in c1706, married Marie, daughter of Étienne Comeau and Marguerite Forest, in c1735.  According to Bona Arsenault, who says Claude was a son of Pierre l'aîné, between 1737 and 1751, Marie gave Claude six children, three sons and three daughters, at Pigiguit.  The family was deported to Massachusetts in 1755 and held at Cambridge and Dedham.  Claude remarried to Anne _____ in c1760 probably in New England.  He died before November 1766 probably in Massachusetts.  His family moved on to Canada and settled at Yamachiche, on the north shore of Lac-St.-Pierre above Trois-Rivières.  One of Claude's daughters married into the Robichaud family in Massachusetts in 1759 and sanctified the marriage at Trois-Rivières in July 1767, soon after their arrival.  One of Claude's three sons created his own family.

Son Joseph, born in c1739, who Bona Arsenault insists was one of Claude's sons, married Jeanne Thibodeau at Boston, Massachusetts, in January 1761 and sanctified the marriage at Trois-Rivières in September 1766, soon after they reached Canada.  According to Arsenault, between 1761 and 1776, Jeanne gave Joseph eight children, five sons and three daughters.  They settled Yamachiche, where their daughters married into the Raymond, LeBlanc, and Héroux families.  Four of Joseph's five sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Firmin, born probably in Massachusetts in c1764, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Roy-Desjardins and Marie-Josèphe Paradis, at Yamachiche in June 1787. 

Joseph's second son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Yamachiche in c1770, married Madeleine, daughter of Louis Potvin and Marguerite Vien, at St.-Michel-d'Yamaska, across Lac-St.-Pierre from Yamachiche, in January 1792. 

Joseph's fourth son Joseph, born probably at Yamachiche in c1774, married Charlotte, daughter of Jean Landry and Rose Martel, at Yamaska in June 1794.

Joseph's fifth and youngest son Alexis, born probably at Yamachiche in c1776, married Catherine, daughter of Étienne Tourel dit Jolicoeur and Thérèse Hébert, at Yamaska in c1796. 

Clément's second son Charles probably died young.  

Clément's third and youngest son Alexis married Hélène, another daughter of Étienne Comeau and Marguerite Forest, in c1749.  They had at least two daughters, Anne and Élisabeth.  They were deported to Massachusetts in 1755, counted at Newton two years later, and were still in the colony in 1763. Daughter Élisabeth, born at Boston, married Jean-Baptiste, son of Antoine Dupuis and Marguerite Boudrot, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans, in February 1775.  Her sister Anne, born probably in Massachusetts in c1759, married Amand, daughter of Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil and Agnès Thibodeau and widower of Hélène Landry, at Attakapas, west of the Atchafalaya Basin, in May 1775.  One wonders when the Benoit sisters arrived in the Spanish colony and from whence they came.  Were their parents among the Acadians held in New England who went not to Canada but to French St.-Domingue after the war with Britain ended?  If so, their daughters may have been among the relatively few Acadian exiles who ventured to Louisiana directly from that colony, in the late 1760s or early 1770s. 

Martin's third son Jean, born at Port-Royal in c1681, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Antoine Breau and Marguerite Babin, in c1704 probably at Port-Royal.  Between the early 1700 and the 1720s, Marie-Anne gave Jean 14 children, five sons and nine daughters.  Jean remarried to Marie, daughter of François Amireau and Marie Pitre and widow of Joseph Mius d'Azy, at Annapolis Royal in May 1731, settled at Cobeguit in the Minas Basin, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  She gave him no more children.  Eight of his daughters married into the Dugas, Marcadet, LeBlanc, Thériot, Hébert, Bourg, and Henry families.  Four of his five sons created their own families, but, thanks to the terrors of Le Grand Dérangement, only one of their lines seems to have survived. 

Oldest son Jean, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1706, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Germain Thériot and Anne Pellerin, in c1728 perhaps at Cobeguit.  Between 1729 and 1748, Marie-Josèphe gave Jean, fils eight children, five sons and three daughters, at Cobeguit.  Jean, fils died there probably in the late 1740s.  In c1750, his widow took their children to Île Royale, where a French official counted her and seven of them at Baie-de-Mordienne in April 1752; evidently youngest son Charles, born in c1748, died before the census.  Daughter Osite-Blanche, at age 20, married into the Petitpas family on Île Royale in March 1756.  In 1758, the British deported Marie-Josèphe and her four surviving sons--Joseph, age 27; Jean-Louis, age 18; Baptiste, age 20; Paul, age 15--to St.-Malo, France, aboard the transport Duke William.  Marie-Josèphe died in the crossing, and youngest son Paul died at St.-Malo in November 1758, four days after their arrival, probably from the rigors of the crossing.  After burying their brother, the three older Benoit sons, a carpenter and two sailors, moved on to Lorient, on the south coast of Brittany, and there, says genealogist Albert J. Robichaux, Jr., "we lose all trace of them."  Records show, however, that Jean-Louis, evidently while pursuing his trade as a sailor, died on the island of Guadaloupe in March 1764; he would have been age 23 at the time.  Oldest sister Anne also ended up on the French island.  She married first to Gabriel Derein perhaps on Guadaloupe.  In April 1768, while she was living at Mont-Carmel on the island, she remarried to Jean Maillard, a merchant from Lorraine, at Basse-Terre.  One wonders when Anne came to the island, and from where.  Younger sister Osite and her husband Nicolas Petitpas may have escaped the British in 1758 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  One wonders what happened to Anne and Osite's sister Isabelle, age 19 in 1752.  Did she die on Île Royale, escape the British, cross to France on another vessel, or marry on Île Royale and cross the North Atlantic with her husband and children?   

Jean, père's second son Claude le jeune married Anne, daughter of Étienne Comeau and Marguerite Forest, in c1737 perhaps at Pigiguit.  They had at least two sons there in c1741 and c1751.  Claude le jeune and Anne seem to have died before Le Grand Dérangement.  

Older son Augustin, born in c1741, evidently moved on to the French Maritimes.  He was deported to St.-Malo, France, in 1758 with his paternal uncles Charles and Pierre aboard the British transport Duke William.  Augustin survived the crossing and married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Thériot and Marguerite Guérin, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in February 1760.  Françoise gave him a son, Nicolas-Jean-Sébastien, at St.-Servan in 1760.  In 1763, Augustin, Françoise, and their son, with other Acadian exiles, sailed aboard the ship L'Aigle to the Falkland Island in the South Atlantic off the coast of South America.  From 1764 to 1767, Françoise gave Augustin three more children there, a son and two daughters.  The settlement failed, and Augustin and his family returned to St.-Malo in April 1768.  They settled again at St.-Servan, where Françoise gave Augustin two more daughters, in 1769 and 1773.  Sometime later in the 1770s, Augustin took his family back to North America and settled on Île St.-Pierre or Île Miquelon, French-controlled islands off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  In 1778, during the American Revolution, the British likely deported them to La Rochelle, France.  One wonders if Augustin remained in France or returned again to greater Acadia.  He did not go to Louisiana, though one of two sons did, from France in the 1780s.

Oldest son Nicolas-Jean-Sébastien, called Sébastien, born at St.-Servan, France, in November 1760, followed his family to the Falkland Islands, back to St.-Servan, to one of the Newfoundland islands, and back to France before he came of age.  He emigrated to Louisiana probably in 1785 and married Jeanne, daughter of Jean De La Forestrie and Marie-Madeleine Bonnière and widow of Joseph Hébert, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans in August 1789.  She likely gave him no children.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where he became a widower by 1795.  After his wife's death, Sébastien crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled on the Calcasieu River at the western edge of the Opelouas District.  He remarried to Hippolythe, called Pauline, daughter of Barthélemy Lebleu and Marie-Josèphe Lamirande, at Calcasieu in August 1800.  She gave him all of his children.  His daughters married into the Courvelle, Lacase, Servant, and Soileau families in the Opelousas District.  His only son Augustin married into the Préjean family in Lafayette Parish in December 1828 and fathered eight sons of his own. 

Claude le jeune's younger son Étienne, born in c1751, was deported to Maryland in 1755 perhaps with relatives.  He emigrated to Louisisana from Maryland in 1768, followed his fellow passengers to San Luìs de Natchez, above Baton Rouge, and resettled at San Gabriel, on the Mississippi below Baton Rouge, when the Spanish allowed the Acadians to abandon Natchez in 1769.  Étienne married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Breau and Claire Trahan of Pigiguit, at St.-Jacques, below San Gabriel, in January 1771.  They moved to the Attakapas District east of the Atchafalaya Basin in the early 1780s and settled at Carencro, at the northern edge of the district.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1772 and 1786, Madeleine gave Étienne eight children, six sons and two daughters.  Étienne died at Carencro in December 1787, age 36.  His widow remarried to twice-widowed Michel Cormier of Chignecto and Opelousas in February 1789 but gave him no more children.  Étienne's daughters married into the Huval and Cormier families.  Louisiana records indicate that he fathered seven sons, four of whom married into the Aucoin, Trahan, Louvière, and Babineaux families in Attakapas, so the family line thrived. 

Jean, père's third son Olivier, born in c1717, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Pierre Part and Jeanne Dugas, in c1742 perhaps at Cobeguit and moved on to the French Maritimes.  In December 1758, during the deportation to France, Olivier and his family were lost aboard one of the British transports that sank in a North Atlantic storm on it way to St.-Malo.  

Jean, père's fourth son Charles, born in c1726, married Marie-Josèphe Thibodeau, or Estiboudon, in c1746 perhaps at Cobeguit, remarried to Marie, daughter of Pierre Girouard and Marie Doiron, perhaps at Cobeguit in c1755, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  They were deported to France in 1758 aboard the British transport Duke William, which made it to St.-Malo.  With them was younger brother Pierre; nephew Augustin, son of Charles's older brother Claude le jeune; and a niece.  Charles, a carpenter as well as a farmer, died at Hôtel-Dieu, St.-Malo, in November 1758, age 32, probably from the rigors of the crossing.  He evidently fathered no children by either of his wives, at least none who survived childhood, so his line of the family died with him. 

Jean, père's fifth and youngest son Pierre, born in the late 1720s, survived childhood and followed his family to the French Maritimes.  In 1758, in his late 20s or early 30s, he died at sea aboard the British transport Duke William.  He never married. 

Martin's fourth son Pierre le jeune, born at Port-Royal in c1683, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Guillaume LeJuge and Marie Mercier, in c1703 probably at Port-Royal, settled at Minas, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  Between 1704 and 1730, Élisabeth gave Pierre le jeune a dozen children, six sons and six daughters, all of whom married.  He died by November 1751, when wife Élisabeth remarried at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean; she died at Châteauneuf, near St.-Malo, France, in July 1759, age 70.  Pierre le jeune and Élisabeth's daughters married into the Lejeune dit Briard, Doiron, LeBlanc, Guédry dit Labrador dit Labine, and Hébert families.  One of them, Anne, widow of Pierre and Jean-Baptiste Hébert, emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Paul, born in c1704, married Anne, daughter of Alexandre Trahan and Marie Pellerin, in c1725.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1727 and 1747, Anne gave Paul 10 children, three sons and seven daughters, at Pigiguit.  One of his sons, Paul, fils, created a family of his own at Minas.  Paul took his family, including his married son, to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  Paul, père remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Viger and Marie Mius and widow of Martin Corporon, at Port-La-Joye in July 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Paul and his large blended family at Grande-Ascension on the island's south shore.  In December 1758, during the deportation to France, the entire family was lost aboard the British transport Duke William, which sank in a North Atlantic storm on it way to St.-Malo.  

Oldest son Paul, fils, born probably at Minas in c1727, married Madeleine, daughter of René LeBlanc and Jeanne Landry, at Grand-Pré in October 1748.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1749 and 1751, Madeleine gave Paul, fils two children, a son and a daughter.  They followed his father to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and also were counted at Grande-Ascension in August 1752.  They, too, were deported to France in 1758 and were lost aboard the transport Duke William on its voyage to St.-Malo. 

Pierre le jeune's second son Guillaume dit Perrochon, born in c1707, married Marie-Josèphe dite Josette, daughter of Claude Gautrot and Marie Thériot, in c1729 perhaps at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, who says Guillaume was a son of Clément, between 1730 and 1743, Josette gave Guillaume six children, four sons and two daughters, at Pigiguit.  In 1749, they moved on to the French Maritimes.  Arsenault says they settled at Petit-Bras-d'Or on the Atlantic coast of Île Royale, but a French official counted Guillaume and his family at Rivière-aux-Habitants, on the southern coast of the big island, at the end of February 1752.  Guillaume operated a sawmill there and was the community's original settler.  The family evidently escaped the British in 1758 and resettled on Cape Breton Island, formerly Île Royale, after Le Grand Dérangement.  At least two of Guillaume's sons created their own families. 

Third son Boniface, born perhaps at Pigiguit in c1737, was counted with his family on Île Royale in 1752.  He married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Honoré Boucher and Marie-Anne Lalonde, in c1766 and sanctified the marriage at Petit-Bras-d'Or on the Atlantic coast of Cape Breton Island in August 1771. 

Perrochon's fourth son Simon, born perhaps at Pigiguit in c1739, also was counted with his family on Île Royale in 1752.  He married Marie-Gervais, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marguerite Fougère, in c1762 and sanctified the marriage at D'Escousse, Île Madame, off the southern coast of Cape Breton Island, in October 1771. 

Pierre le jeune's third son Abraham, born c1709, married Angélique, daughter of Pierre Vincent and Jeanne Trahan, at Grand-Pré in September 1732.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1747, Angélique gave Abraham six children, a son and five daughters.  They moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  Abraham remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Germain Lejeune and Marie-Anne Trahan and widow of Pierre Serrier, at Port-La-Joye in September 1751.  A French official counted them at Anse-au-Matelot, on the island's south shore, in August 1752.  One of his sons, Jean, married on the island a few years later.  Abraham and his family also perished aboard the British transport Duke William on its voyage to St.-Malo, France, in December 1758. 

Oldest son Jean, born at Minas in c1734, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and was counted with them in 1752.  He married Rufine Doiron on the island in c1756.  They perished with his family in the deportation to France in December 1758. 

Pierre le jeune's fourth son Charles, born in c1713, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Claude Thériot and Marguerite Cormier, at Grand-Pré in October 1735.  Between 1736 and 1751, Marie-Madeleine gave Charles six children, two sons and four daughters.  They, too, moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and settled at Anse-au-Matelot, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  The following year, accompanied by his widowed mother, Élisabeth LeJuge, Charles and his family were deported to St.-Malo, France, in 1758 aboard the transport Tamerlane.  Except for their youngest child, Pierre-Paul, age 7, the family survived the voyage.  Charles died at Châteauneuf near St.-Malo in January 1760, in his late 40s.  Two of his daughters married into the Rassicot, Hébert, and Carret families on Île St.-Jean and in France.  One of his sons created his own family in France.  Three of his children, a son and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Older son Jean-Charles, born perhaps at Pigiguit in c1746, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and France.  He married Anne-Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Haché and Anne Olivier, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in January 1770.  Between 1770 and 1783, Anne-Marie gave Jean-Charles four children, three sons and a daughter, at St.-Servan, in Poitou, and at Nantes.  They emgrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Jean-Charles's family crossed aboard the transport L'Amitié, and he followed aboard La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, a month later.  They settled near English Turn on the Mississippi below New Orleans, where Jean-Charles likely continued his profession as a sailor.  At least one of his sons, François-René, created his own family, marrying at nearby New Orleans into the Cobos family. 

Pierre le jeune's fifth son Claude, born in c1721, married Isabelle, or Élisabeth, another daughter of Claude Thériot and Marguerite Cormier, in c1740 probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1754, Isabelle gave Claude seven childern, three sons and four daughters.  They moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and settled at Anse-au-Matelot, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  Their daughter Pélagie, who would have been age 11 at the time, was counted at nearby Pointe-Prime with relatives.  She married into the Crochet family at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in February 1758, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.  She and her family were deported to France in 1758, survived the crossing to Rochefort, and joined their kinsmen at St.-Malo.  Claude died in France before February 1765.  Two his sons married at St.-Servan.  His younger daughter Marguerite married into the Précieux family in Poitou.  Four of his children, two sons and two daughters, including Pélagie, now a widow with six children, and Marguerite, also a widow but without children, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Pélagie did not remarry there.  Marguerite remarried into the Dugas family soon after she reached the Spanish colony.  One of Claude's married sons created a vigorous family line in the Spanish colony. 

Older son Grégoire, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1744, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and to France, where he married Marie-Rose, daughter of Jean Carret and Rose Trahan, at St.-Servan in February 1770.  They also lived at nearby Megrit.  In 1771 and 1773, Marie-Rose gave Grégoire two sons at St.-Serven, but the older son died at age 1 in December 1772.  The family participated in the settlement scheme in Poitou in 1774, and Marie-Rose gave him a daughter there in 1775.  Later that year, they retreated to Nantes with other disgruntled Acadians.  Between 1777 and 1783, Marie-Rose gave him two more sons and a daughter at Nantes.  In 1785, Grégoire, Marie-Anne, and their five children emigrated to Louisiana aboard the fourth of the Seven Ships.  Marie-Anne was pregnant on the voyage.  Another daughter was born to them at La Balize or New Orleans soon after their arrival; she probably died young.  With six children now, Grégoire and Marie-Anne followed their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where she gave him three more sons between 1788 and 1794.  Grégoire died in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1829, age 85.  His daughters married into the Boudreaux and Tauzin families.  Three of his seven sons married into the Darois, Boudreaux, and Morvant families on Bayou Lafourche.  His oldest surviving sons line was especially vigorous. 

Claude's younger son Daniel, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1748, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and France, where he worked as a box maker.  He married Henriette, daughter of François Legendre and Marguerite Labauve, at St.-Servan in February 1768.  They lived at St.-Servan and also at nearby Megrit.  In 1769 and 1772, Henriette gave Daniel two children, a son and a daughter in the St.-Malo area, but the daughter, Jeanne-Eléonore-Anastasie, died at age 7 months in August 1772.  Daniel also took his family to Poitou, where his son Daniel-Henry died at age 4 1/2 in 1774.  The childless couple retreated to Nantes in 1775, and Henriette gave Daniel a daughter at nearby Chantenay in 1778.  Daniel, Henriette, and their daughter Henriette-Reine emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 aboard the first of the Seven Ships and followed their fellow passengers to Manchac on the Mississppi below Baton Rouge.  Wife Henriette died at Baton Rouge in February 1798, age 46, and Daniel, at age 51, remarried to Madeleine-Ursule, 34-year-old daughter of Alexandre Doiron and Ursule Hébert, at Baton Rouge in c1799.  Madeleine gave him three more sons at Baton Rouge between 1800 and 1804, but none of them survived childhood.  His daughter by first wife Henriette married into the Labauve and Mallet families, and his daughter by second wife Madeleine married an Hébert.  Both daughters moved on to the Attakapas District.  Daniel, who may have followed his daughters to Attakapas in the early 1800s, died in St. Martin Parish at the home of a daughter in December 1825, age 77.  Except for its blood, his family line died with him. 

Pierre le jeune's sixth and youngest son Augustin, born in c1728, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Lejeune and Françoise Guédry, at Port-La-Joye in February 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1750 Marguerite gave Augustin a daughter.  They moved on to Île Royale, where a French official counted them at Baie-des-Espagnols in August 1752.  They were deported to France in 1758-59 aboard the British transport Supply.  Augustin and Marguerite, who was pregnant, survived the crossing, but their three children--Marguerite, age 8, and son Simon and daughter Élisabeth, ages unrecorded--died at sea.  Wife Marguerite and a newborn daughter, Perrine-Jeanne, died soon after reaching St.-Malo, leaving Augustin without a family.  He remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Gautrot and Euphrosine Labauve of Minas, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in July 1763.  Between 1764 and 1772, Marie-Madeleine gave Augustin six more children, three sons and three daughters, at St.-Servan.  A son and two daughters died in childhood between 1768 and 1772.  In 1774 and 1777, in Poitou and at Nantes, Marie-Madeleine gave Augustin two more sons, but the youngest son died at Nantes a week after his birth.  Augustin died in St.-Similien Parish, Nantes, in September 1783, age 55.  Three of his children, a son and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 with relatives.  The two daughters married into the Bergeron, Lambert, and Turreyra families on upper Bayou Lafourche.  The son created his own family in the Spanish colony.

Son François-Jean-Baptiste, also called Jean-François, born at St.-Servan in October 1765, followed his family to Poitou and Nantes and his relatives to Louisiana.  He married Marie-Modeste, daughter of Charles Pinet dit Pinel and Anne-Marie Durel and widow of Jean-Charles Haché, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans in September 1789.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Augeron, Bedford, Bourque, Brosseart, Elsworth, Lamir, and Pierron families.  Jean-François's two sons married into the Thibodeaux family and created vigorous lines in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley. 

Martin's fifth and youngest son Claude, born at Port-Royal in c1686, married Jeanne, daughter of Étienne Hébert and Jeanne Comeau, at Grand-Pré in January 1711 and settled on nearby Rivière-des-Habitants and Rivière-aux-Canards.  Between 1711 and 1734, Jeanne gave Claude a dozen children, six sons and six daughters, at Minas, all of whom married.  Claude died at Minas by November 1743, in his 50s.  His daughters married into the Melanson, Landry, Vincent, LeBlanc, and Hébert dit Manuel families.  

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste dit Bercasse married Isabelle LeBlanc in c1745 probably at Minas.

Claude's second son Claude, fils, born probably at Minas in c1713, married Anne-Hélène, daughter of François Girouard and Anne Bourgeois, at Annapolis Royal in February 1746.   According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1768, Anne gave Claude, fils eight children, seven sons and a daughter.  They were deported to Massachusetts in 1755.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they chose to go to Canada, where they settled at St.-Ours on lower Rivière Richelieu northeast of Montréal.  Claude, fils died at St.-Ours in August 1784, age 74.  His daughter married into the Daigle family at St.-Ours.  Six of his seven sons created their own families.

Oldest son Joseph le jeune, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1749, married Marguerite, daughter of Charles Daigle and Marie-Josèphe Vincent, at St.-Ours in September 1771.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1772 and 1775, Marguerite gave Joseph le jeune three children, a son and two daughters.

Claude, fils's second son Jean-Baptiste, born probably in Massachusetts in c1756, married Anne-Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Roy and Marie-Josèphe Daigle, at St.-Ours in February 1777, and remarried to Marie-Anne Desmarets, widow of Jean-Baptiste Froment, at nearby Sorel in February 1805. 

Claude, fils's third son Pierre, born probably in Massachusetts in c1759, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Mathieu and Madeleine Perrault, at St.-Ours in February 1781.

Claude, fils's fourth son Antoine-Marie, born probably in Massachusetts in c1761, married Véronique, daughter of René Hénault dit Nault and Véronique Mathieu, at St.-Ours in September 1783, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of André Chapdelaine and Louise Payau, at St.-Ours in May 1796. 

Claude, fils's fifth son Michel-Archange, born probably in Massachusetts in c1763, married Françoise, another daughter of René Henault and Véronique Mathieu, at St.-Ours in October 1784. 

Claude, fils's seventh and youngest son François, born probably in Canada in c1768, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Joseph Duguay-Didier and Isabelle Benoit-Laforest, at St.-Ours in February 1794. 

Claude, père's third son Antoine, born probably at Minas in c1719, married Pétronille, daughter of Joseph Bourgeois and Anne LeBlanc, at Annapolis Royal in June 1754, and remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Savoie and Marguerite Blanchard, in c1766.  

Claude, père's fourth son Geoffroi, born probably at Minas in c1720, married Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Babin and Madeleine Bourg, at Grand-Pré in November 1743.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1767, Madeleine gave Geoffroi five children, four sons and a daughter.  They were deported to Massachusetts in 1755, held at Boston, and chose to go to Canada after the war with Britain ended.  They settled at Yamachiche on the north shore of Lac-St.-Pierre below Trois-Rivières.  At least one of Geoffroi's sons created his own family.

Oldest son Joseph le jeune, born probably at Minas in c1748, married Josèphe Gauthier dit Saint-Germain at Chambly on upper Rivière Richelieu, in May 1772. 

Claude, père's fifth son François, born probably at Minas in c1723, married in c1752 a woman whose name has been lost to history.  They were deported to Massachusettes in 1755.  François remarried to Françoise-Marguerite, daughter of Charles Daigre and Françoise Doucet, at Boston in February 1761.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1767, Françoise-Marie gave François three daughters.  After the war with Britain ended, they followed their kinsmen to Québec in 1766 and settled at Yamachiche the following year.  François died by November 1770, when his widow remarried at St.-Ours on the lower Richelieu.  His daughters married into the Gaudet, Mathieu, and Blanchard families at St.-Ours

Claude, père's sixth and youngest son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1732, was deported with his family to Massachusetts in 1755.  He married Anne or Jeanne dite Blanche, daughter of René Thibodeau and Anne Boudrot, at Boston in January 1761.  They also chose to go to Canada after colonial authorities allowed them to leave.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne/Jeanne gave Joseph a son in 1770, about the time they settled at Yamachiche.390

Broussard

François Broussard, perhaps a 1671 arrival, and his wife Catherine Richard created a fairly large and, thanks to two of its members, a significant family in the colony.  Between 1681 and 1705, Catherine gave François 11 children, six sons and five daughters, all born at Beausoleil on haute rivière above Port-Royal.  Four of their daughters married into the Landry, Doucet, Préjean, and Bourg families.  Five of François's sons created families of their own.  His and Catherine's descendants settled not only on the haute rivière at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Chepoudy and Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area Minas and Pigiguit in the Minas Basin, and in the French Maritimes.  At least 49 of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax via French St.-Domingue in 1765, Maryland in the late 1760s, and France in 1785.  After Le Grand Dérangement, a much smaller number of François's descendants also could be found in Canada and France. 

Oldest son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in c1683, married Marguerite, daughter of Abraham Bourg and Marie Brun, at Port-Royal in January 1709, and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, they lived at Pigiguit before moving on to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in the early 1720s.  Between 1709 and 1726, Marguerite gave Pierre nine children, four sons and five daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Boudrot and Préjean families at Port-Toulouse.  Two of Pierre's four sons married at Minas.   

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1711, died young.   

Pierre's second son Joseph le jeune, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1713, may have followed his family to Port-Toulouse before returning to British Nova Scotia.  He married Ursule, daughter of Pierre LeBlanc and Françoise Landry, at Grand-Pré in February 1740 and settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, before returning to the French Maritimes--Île St.-Jean--after 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1746, Ursule gave Joseph le jeune six children, three sons and three daughters.  The British deported Joseph le jeune and two of his teenage sons to Cherbourg, France, in late 1758.  Joseph le jeune died there in January 1759, age 45, soon after reaching the Norman port.  Both of his sons married in France.  They and one of their sisters emigrated to Louisiana aboard three of the Seven Ships in 1785.  Joseph le jeune's daughter married into the Potier and Vincent families in France and Louisiana.  Both of his sons created vigorous lines in the Spanish colony. 

Older son Charles, born at Grand-Pré in April 1743, followed his family to Île St.-Jean after 1752 and his widowed father to Cherbourg, France, in late 1758.  Charles married Bonne-Jacqueline-Françoise Castel, perhaps a fellow Acadian, probably at Cherbourg in c1764.  Between 1764 and 1774, she gave Charles seven children, six sons and a daughter, at Cherbourg and in Poitou, where they were part of a settlement scheme in the early 1770s.  In December 1775, they retreated with other Poitou Acadians to Nantes.  Bonne gave Charles two more sons there in 1776 and 1778, but both of them died young.  Charles, age 41, remarried to Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Barrieau and Véronique Giroir and widow of François Boudrot, at St.-Martin de Chantenay, near Nantes, in June 1784.  Charles, Euphrosine, five of his sons and one of her sons by her previous marriage emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled at Manchac on the river south of Baton Rouge.  Charles died by December 1795, when his wife was counted in an upper Bayou Lafourche census without a husband; he would have been in his late 40s or early 50s that year.  His five sons married into the Templet, Stebens, Miller, Henry, Molaison, Pitre, and Martin dit Barnabé families and settled at Baton Rouge, on upper Bayou Lafourche, and out on the prairies in the Opelousas District.

Younger son Jean, born probably at Minas in c1745, followed his family to Île St.-Jean after 1752 and his widowered father to Cherbourg, France, in late 1758.  Jean married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Honoré Comeau and Marguerite Poirier, at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in July 1773.  They also went to Poitou, where two sons were born at Monthoiron in 1774 and 1775.  They also retreated to Nantes, where French officials counted them in October 1777.  A daughter and another son, twins, were born to them at nearby Chantenay in 1777.  The twin son died young, as did an older son born in Poitou.  Jean, Marguerite, and their remaining son emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled in the Attakapas District near his many kinsmen.  Their son married into the Hébert family and settled in what became Lafayette Parish.

Pierre's third son François le jeune, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1716, died young.  

Pierre's fourth and youngest son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1721, may have followed his family to Port-Toulouse before returning to British Nova Scotia.  He married cousin Madeleine, daughter René LeBlanc the notary and his second wife Marguerite Thébeau, at Grand-Pré in June 1746; they had to secure a dispensation for third and fourth degrees of consanguinity in order to marry.  They settled near his older brother at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  The British evidently deported the family to Maryland in 1755.  One of Charles's sons emigrated to Louisiana from that British colony in 1766. 

Auguste or Augustin, born probably at Minas in c1748, followed his family to Maryland in 1755 and came of age there.  An orphan in his late teens, he followed his kinsmen to Louisiana in 1766 and settled with them at Cabahannocer on the river.  He married Anne, daughter perhaps of fellow Acadians Pierre Landry and Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc and widow of Joseph Melanson, at either Cabahannocer or neary Ascension in c1769 or 1770.  Later in the decade, Augustin joined his kinsmen on upper Bayou Vermilion in the Attakapas District.  Augustin, called by the Opelousas priest who recorded his burial an "inhabitant at Attakapas," died probably on the upper Vermilion in September 1810, "at age about 63 yrs."  He was a widower.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, the following July.  His daughters married into the Dugas, Duhon, Hébert, Meaux, Mire, and Montet families.  His four sons married into the Savoie, LeBlanc, Hébert, and Broussard families and settled on the prairies. 

François's second son François, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1695, died probably on the haute rivière in November 1717, age 22, before he could marry.

François's third son Claude, born probably at Port-Royal in c1697, married Anne, daughter of Vincent Babin and Anne Thériot, at Grand-Pré in 1718 and settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1719 and 1732, Anne gave Claude five children, four sons and a daughter.  Other records give him another son.  While in his late 50s, Claude remarried to Marie, daughter of Claude Dugas and Françoise Bourgeois and widow of Abraham Bourg le jeune, at Annapolis Royal in November 1754 and evidently returned to Ste.-Famille.  Marie gave Claude no more children.  The British deported Claude and his family to Maryland in 1755.  He died there, date unrecorded.  His daughter Marguerite by first wife Anne married into the Melanson family of Minas and emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1766.  Four of Claude's five sons also created their own families, in Acadia and France. None of the three who had been deported to France joined their sister in Louisiana.  The son who had been deported to Maryland died before he could reach the Spanish colony, but thre of his sons, one of them in utero, emigrated to Louisiana with their widowed mother in 1766. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Anne Babin, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1722, followed his parents to Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, and married Osite, daughter of Jean Landry and Madeleine Melanson of Grand-Pré, at Grand-Pré in July 1747.  Jean-Baptiste took his family to the French Maritimes after 1752.  Between 1748 and 1756, Osite gave Jean-Baptiste five children, two sons and three daughters, at Minas and in the French Maritimes.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  Another son was born at sea.  Three of Jean's children, a son and two daughters, died during the crossing.  Jean died in a St.-Malo hospital in February 1759, age 32, a month after reaching the Breton port.  His oldest son also died there a month later.  Jean-Baptiste's widow Osite remarried to a Boudrot at nearby Pleudihen in August 1760 and gave him at least nine children.  Her surviving Broussard daughter married into the Thériot family in France.  Neither this daughter nor Osite's remaining Broussard son chose to join their kinsmen in Louisiana in 1785. 

Oldest son Joseph le jeune, born probably at Ste-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1751, followed his family to the French Maritimes and to France.  He died in a hospital at St.-Malo, France, in March 1759, age 8, from the rigors of the crossing. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Grégoire, born at either St.-Famille, Pigiguit, or in the French Maritimes in c1756, died at sea in late 1758 on the crossing to France.

Jean-Baptiste's third and youngest son Jean-Baptiste-Paul, born aboard ship in December 1758, was baptized at St.-Servan near St.-Malo, France, in January 1759.  He settled with his widowed mother at St.-Servan, where he came of age.  He married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Melanson and François Granger, at Pleudihen near St.-Malo in June 1784.  He and his wife chose to remain in France. 

Son Pierre-Jean, born at La Coquenais near Pleudihen in March 1785, remained with his parents in France.  One wonders if he survived childhood and created a family of his own there. 

Claude's second son Jean, by first wife Anne Babin, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1727, followed his father to Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, Jean married Osite Landry, but other sources say he married Anne, daughter of Abraham dit Chaques Landry and Marie-Isabelle Blanchard of Minas, probably at Ste.-Famille.  According to Arsenault, between 1752 and 1760, Osite, actually Anne, gave Jean three children, two sons and a daughter.  The British deported the family to Maryland in 1755.  The daughter evidently died in Maryland.  Jean died in Maryland in 1766 on the eve of the family's movement to Louisiana.  Anne was pregnant on the voyage and gave birth to a son at New Orleans in November 1766.  She and her three Broussard sons settled at Cabahannocer on the river above the city.  She remarried to a Landry cousin, who also was a widower, probably at Cabahannocer in the late 1760s.  Two of Anne's Broussard sons created their own families on the river, but only one of the lines endured.

Oldest son Firmin dit Simon, born probably at Ste.-Famille in c1752, followed his parents to Maryland in 1755, his widowed mother to Louisiana in 1766, and settled with her at Cabahannocer.  He married cousin Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham dit Petit Abraham Landry and his second wife Marguerite Flan, at nearby Ascension in May 1775.  Firmin, père died at New Orleans in April 1785, age 34.  His daughters married into the Babin and Dugas families.  Three of his four sons married into the Richard, Landry, and Breaux families and settled in Iberville and Ascension parishes, but only two of their lines survived.  A grandson settled near his cousins in West Baton Rouge Parish. 

Jean's second son Jean, fils, born in Maryland in c1760, followed his widowed mother to Louisiana in 1766 and settled with her at Cabahannocer.  One wonders if he created a family of his own. 

Jean, père's third and youngest son Paul le jeune, born posthumously at New Orleans in November 1766, followed his widowed mother to Cabahannocer.  He appears in none of the Cabahannocer censuses of the late 1760s and 1770s with his mother, brothers, and stepfather, so he probably died young.

Claude's third son Pierre-Paul, called Paul, dit Courtiche, from first wife Anne Babin, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1728, followed his father to Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, and married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Landry and Madeleine Melanson of Grand-Pré, probably at Minas in c1749.  According to Bona Arsenault, in c1750 Madeleine gave Courtiche a son.  That year, they moved on to Île St.-Jean, where, in August 1752, a French official counted them on the north side of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  They still had only the one son.  Between 1753 and 1757, Anne gave Courtiche three more children, another son and two daughters.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  Their older son and a daughter died from the rigors of the crossing.  Paul dit Courtiche, wife Anne, and their remaining children settled at Pleudihen near St.-Malo.  Between 1760 and 1768, Anne gave Courtiche four more children, three sons and a daughter.  Neither Courtiche nor any member of his family chose to join their kinsmen in Louisiana in 1785.  His oldest daughter married into the Melanson and Boudrot families in France. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born perhaps at Minas in c1750, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and and was deported with them to France in late 1758.  He died at sea, age 8.

Paul dit Courtiche's second son Pierre, born probably on Rivière-du-Nord-Est, Île St.-Jean, in c1757, followed his family to St.-Malo, France.  He died at La Coquenais, Pleudihen, near St.-Malo, in September 1762, age 5.

Paul dit Courtiche's third son Joseph Osithe, born at Buet, Pleudihen, in March 1760, died at Pleudihen, age 18 months, in August 1761. 

Paul dit Courtiche's fourth son Charles-Jean was born at Bas Champs, Pleudihen, in June 1763.  If he survived childhood, one wonders if he created his own family in France. 

Paul dit Courtiche's fifth and youngest son Jea-Joseph was born at La Coquenais, Pleudihen, in March 1766.  If he survived childhood, one wonders if he created his own family in France. 

Claude's fourth son Firmin, by first wife Anne Babin, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730, followed his father to Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, and his brothers to Île St.-Jean after 1752.  The British deported him to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  He died at Buet near St.-Malo in late April 1759, age 29, probably from the rigors of the crossing and was buried at nearby Pleudihen. 

Claude's fifth and youngest son Charles, by first wife Anne Babin, born at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1732, followed his father to Pigiguit and evidently moved on to the French Maritimes after 1752.  The British deported him to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  He married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Aucoin and Anne Trahan of Rivière-aux-Canards, Minas, at Plouër near St.-Malo in October 1764. Between 1766 and 1769, Anne gave Charles three children, two daughters and a son.  Neither Charles nor any member of his family chose to join their kinsmen in Louisiana in 1785. 

Son Joseph-Charles, born at La Coquenais, Pleudihen, near St.-Malo, France, in November 1767, remained with his parents in France.  One wonders if he survived childhood and created a family of his own there.  

François's fourth son Alexandre dit Beausoleil, was born probably at Port-Royal in c1699.  Bona Arsenault insists that Alexandre was born in c1703, making him younger than brother Joseph, but Stephen A. White's birth year for Alexandre is followed here.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Thibodeau and Agnès Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in February 1724.  Probably later in the decade they moved to Chepoudy and then to upper Rivière Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto.  According to Arsenault, between 1725 and 1748, Marguerite gave Alexandre six children, five sons and a daughter.  Other sources give the couple another son in c1744 and two more daughters, one of them born in c1747.  Alexandre served in the Acadian resistance during King George's War, was a delegate from Chepoudy to the Nova Scotia colonial Council at Halifax in July 1749, and, with brother Joseph, was part of the resistance against the British in the Seven Years' War.  The British deported him to South Carolina in 1755 and held him in close confinement on Sullivan's Island.  With nephew Victor, Joseph's son, and seven other Acadians, the 56-year-old partisan escaped from the workhouse in Charles Town.  They made their way overland to Canada via French Fort Duquesne.  Alexandre and Victor were the only ones in the party who survived the ordeal.  They pushed on the L'Acadie via the Rivière St.-Jean portage, arriving on the lower St.-Jean in June 1756.  They then pushed on to Shediac on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where they reunited with their families.  Alexandre joined his younger brother in the Acadian resistance, which, for the Broussards, ended with their capture at Restigouche in July 1760.  The British transported them to the prisoner-of-war camp on Georges Island, Halifax, where they languished for several years.  Alexandre and his family followed Joseph and 200 other kinsmen to Louisiana in late 1764--the first major group of Acadians to venture to that colony--and followed his brother to lower Bayou Teche in the spring of 1765.  The following September, at age 66, the old freedom fighter died in a mysterious epidemic two weeks after his wife died and was buried along the Teche at dernier camp d'en bas near present-day Loreauville.  His daughters married into Trahan, Landry, Thibodeau, and Berard families during exile and in Louisiana.  One of his three daughters died before she could get to Louisiana:  Marguerite, wife of Jean Trahan, died in exile or in the prison compound at Halifax before July 1763, so her husband and three children came to the Spanish colony without her.  Five of Alexandre's six sons and a grandson from his oldest son accompanied him to Louisiana.  They married into the Brun, Landry, Dugas, Guilbeau, Blanchard, Melançon, Guidry, and Breau families in greater Acadia, at Halifax, and in Louisiana and created vigorous lines on the western prairies.

François's fifth son Joseph dit Beausoleil, born probably at Port-Royal in c1702, married Agnès, another daughter of Michel Thibodeau and Agnès Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in September 1725, Probably later in the decade they followed Joseph's older brother Alexandre to Chepoudy and then to the upper Petitcoudiac, where they settled at Villages-des-Beausoleil near present-day Moncton, New Brunswick.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1745, Agnès gave Joseph five children, all sons.  Other sources give the couple two more sons in c1748 and c1750, and three daughters in c1733, c1739, and c1746, the last a twin of her brother.  Joseph was a leader of the Acadian resistance during several colonial wars from the early 1720s to the late 1750s.  After escaping with dozens other Acadians from Fort Lawrence, Chignecto, in October 1755, Joseph rejoined his family on the Petitcoudiac.  For the next five years, he was a leader in the resistance against British forces in the trois-rivières-Chignecto region and was wounded in the foot during a fight near British Fort Cumberland.  He lost his wife at the refugee camp at Miramichi in the terrible winter of 1756-57.  He did not remarry.  His oldest son also perished in the resistance.  Refusing to surrender with other Acadians at Fort Cumberland in the late fall of 1759, he, brother Alexandre, and their families made their way north to Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  There they joined the remaining French force in the region and other Acadians who refused to surrender.  The British attacked Restigouche in July 1760 and captured Joseph, brother Alexandre, and 300 other Acadians and transported them to prisoner-of-war camps in Nova Scotia.  Joseph was held not only on Georges Island in Halifax harbor, but also at Fort Edward at Pigiguit.  In late 1764, he and Alexandre led 200 of their fellow Acadians, most of them kinsmen, from Halifax to Louisiana via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue.  In early April 1765, at New Orleans, French officials appointed Joseph capitiane commandant of the Acadians who had chosen to settle in the Attakapas District.  In October 1765, at age 63, he, too, died in the epidemic on Bayou Teche and was buried at his seat, "camp Beausoleil," near present-day Loreauville.  His daughters married into the Trahan, Dugas, and Labauve families.  Two of his eight sons, one of whom married into the LeBlanc family, did not survive the rigors of exile.  Six of his sons who had come with him to Louisiana married into the LeBlanc, Savoie, Bourgeois, Landry, Hébert dit Manuel, Trahan, and Benoit families in greater Acadia, at Halifax, and in Louisiana and settled on the western prairies, but not all of the lines endured. 

François's sixth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Port-Royal in March 1705, married Cécile, another daughter of Vincent Babin and Anne Thériot, in c1728 probably at Minas and settled at Annapolis Royal.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1729 and 1744, Cécile gave Jean-Baptiste seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Arsenault also says that in c1748, when he would have been in his early 40s, Jean-Baptiste remarried to Anne, sans doute daughter of Louis Thébeau and Jeanne Levron, no place given.  Arsenault says Anne gave Jean-Baptiste a daughter in c1752.  Evidently Jean-Baptiste and his family escaped the British roundup at Annapolis in 1755, spent a terrible winter in the woods above the valley and along the Fundy shore, crossed to the French-controlled side of the bay in March 1756, and made their way north to the Rivière St.-Jean settlements before joining their kinsmen at Shediac on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Jean-Baptiste fought with older brothers Alexandre and Joseph dit Beausoleil in the Acadian resistance.  When his brothers contemplated surrendering to British forces at Fort Cumberland in late 1759, Jean-Baptiste refused to join them and took his family to Québec.  One account says his wife, two children, and his mother-in-law died on the way to Canada.  Jean-Baptiste died at Mascouche near Montréal in July 1770, age 66--five years after his older brothers had died in faraway Louisiana.  His two daughters by first wife Cécile married into the Richard and Marier families in Canada.  His daughter by second wife Anne married into the Melanson and Maillet families there.  If none of his sons survived the rigors of exile, only the blood of this family line endured.391

Doiron

Jean Doiron, perhaps a 1671 arrival, and his wives Marie-Anne Canol and Marie Trahan created a large family in the colony.  First wife Marie-Anne gave Jean 11 children, eight sons and three daughters, including a set of twins.  Second wife Marie gave him eight more children, four sons and four daughters.  His daughters by both wives married into the Hébert, Testard dit Paris, Boisseau, Vincent, Girouard, Guillot dit L'Angevin, Nogues, and Turcot families.  Eleven of Jean's 12 sons married, but "only" 10 created family lines that endured.  His, Marie-Anne, and Marie's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also in the Minas Basin at Pigiguit and Cobeguit, at Chignecto, and in the French Maritimes, where they were especially numerous on Île St.-Jean.  At least 37 of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax and French St.-Domingue in 1765, Maryland in the late 1760s, and especially from France in 1785.  Even more of Jean's descendants could be found in greater Acadia, Maryland, France, the French Antilles, and Canada after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Abraham, by first wife Marie-Anne Canol, born probably at Port-Royal in c1672, married Anne, daughter of Antoine Babin and Marie Mercier, in c1697 probably at Minas and settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  In 1698, Anne give Abraham a daughter, who married into the Boudrot family.  Abraham died by 1705, in his late 20s or early 30s.  He evidently fathered no sons.  Anne remarried to a Benoit

Jean's second son Charles, by first wife Marie-Anne Canol, born probably at Port-Royal in c1674, married Françoise, daughter of Jean Gaudet and Françoise Comeau, in c1693 probably at Minas, where they settled on Rivière-Kenescout, moved on to Pigiguit and then to Île St.-Jean.  Between 1694 and 1716, Françoise gave Charles seven children, two sons and five daughters.  Bona Arsenault says the couple had three sons.  In August 1752, a French official counted Charles, recorded as age 90 (he was actually 78) and "infirm," and wife Françoise, age 85 (actually 79), on Rivière-des-Blancs in the island's interior.  Charles, along with wife Françoise and other members of his family, died in late 1758, in his early 80s, when the British transport on which they were being deported to St.-Malo, France, sank in a North Atlantic storm.  Four of Charles's daughters married into the Thériot, Doucet, Hébert, and Boudrot families.  Both of his sons created their own families.   

Oldest son Charles, fils, born probably at Minas in c1694, married Anne, daughter of Germain Thériot and Anne Pellerin and sister of one of his brothers-in-law, in c1712 at either Minas or Pigiguit, and moved on Île St.-Jean.  Between 1714 and 1730, Anne gave Charles, fils eight children, six sons and two daughters.  Charles died on Île St.-Jean in March 1751, in his late 50s, a month after wife Anne died.  Their daughters married into the Maréchal and Haché dit Gallant families in the French Maritimes.  Four of Charles, fils's sons created families of their own.  

Oldest son Honoré, born probably at Minas in c1714, married Françoise, daughter of Claude Boudrot and Catherine Meunier, at Grand-Pré in November 1735.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1751, Françoise gave Honoré seven children, four daughters and three sons.  Honoré remarried to Marie-Bonne, daughter of André Savary and Marie-Marthe Doucet, at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in January 1752.  One wonders why they were not counted on the island the following August.  According to Arsenault, between 1753 and 1760, Marie-Bonne gave Honoré five more children, all sons--a dozen children in all.  If Honoré and his family were still on the island in 1758, they escaped the British round up there that led to the deportation of so many of their relatives and sought refuge in Canada.  After the fall of Québec in September 1759, their respite from British control ended.  British officials counted them at St.-Charles-de-Bellchasse across from Québec City in 1760.  Honoré died at nearby St.-François-du-Sud in January 1793, in his late 80s.  Two of his daughters by first wife Françoise married into the Morier and Dion-Dumontier families at Québec.  Five of his eight sons by both wives also married in lower Canada, the older ones to fellow Acadians, the younger ones to Canadians. 

Oldest son Joseph, by first wife Françoise Boudrot, born probably at Minas in c1737, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and Canada, where he married Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Hébert and Marguerite Mius d'Azy, at Québec in October 1764. 

Honoré's second son Alexis, by first wife Françoise Boudrot, born probably at Minas in c1738, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and Canada, where he married fellow Acadian Nathalie Michel in c1761.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1780, Nathalie gave Alexis five children, three daughters and two sons.  One wonders where they settled. 

Honoré's fourth son Amand, by second wife Marie-Bonne Savary, born probably on Île St.-Jean in c1753, followed his family to Canada, where he married Angélique Gagnon at St.-François-de-Montmagny below Québec City in c1775. 

Honore's fifth son Firmin, by second wife Marie-Bonne Savary, born probably on Île St.-Jean in c1754, followed his family to Canada, where, in his early 30s, he married Marie-Josèphe Allaire at St.-François-de-Montmagny in c1787. 

Honore's seventh son Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Marie-Bonne Savary, born either on Île St.-Jean or in Canada in c1757, married Marie-Geneviève Gagné in c1780.  One wonders where they settled. 

Charles, fils's second son Charles III, born probably at Minas in c1716, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Antoine Thibodeau and Marie Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in October 1738 and moved on to the French Maritimes in c1749.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1740 and 1752, Marie-Madeleine gave Charles III seven children, three daughters and four sons, including a set of twins.  In February 1752, a French official counted Charles III, Marie-Madeleine, and their seven children on Île Madame off the southern coast of Île Royale.  Charles III and his family evidently left the island before its dérangement in late 1758 and sought refuge in Canada.  He died at Québec in January 1758, in his early 40s, a victim, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian exiles in the area that fall and winter. 

Charles, fils's third son Joseph, born at Grand-Pré in May 1718, married Françoise Forest in c1739, place unrecorded, but it may have been Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1743 and 1746, Françoise gave Joseph three children, two daughters and a son.  They evidently escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  British officials counted them at St.-Charles-de-Bellchasse across from Québec City in c1760.  Joseph died there in March 1798, age 79.  His daughters married into the Boissil and Couture families at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse.  His son also created his own family.

Only son Joseph, born probably at Pigiguit in c1746, followed his family to Canada.  He married Marie, daughter of Charles Forgues and Marie-Louise Couture, at at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse in January 1767. 

Charles, fils's fourth son Pierre, born probably at Minas in the late 1710s or early 1720s, was living with older brother Honoré at Minas in 1735.  He evidently did not marry.   

Charles, fils's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Minas in c1725, married Élisabeth, daughter of Pierre Boudrot and Madeleine Hébert, in c1746 at either Minas, Pigiguit, or in the French Maritimes.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1747 and 1757, Élisabeth gave Jean-Baptiste five children, two daughters and three sons.  Jean-Baptiste died between January 1757 and January 1759, either on one of the Maritime islands or in the deportation to France. 

Charles, fils's sixth and youngest son Claude, born probably at Minas in c1727, never married.  He died at Richibouctou, New Brunswick, in January 1803, in his late 70s.   

Charles, père's putative second son Pierre, born probably at Minas in c1706, married Marguerite Breau in c1746 perhaps at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1747 and 1748, Marguerite gave Pierre two sons.  Pierre died probably at Ste.-Famille in the late 1740s, in his early 40s, and his widow and children moved on to Île St.-Jean, where they were counted at Port-La-Joye in 1750 and 1751. 

Charles, père's third and youngest son Paul dit Petit Paul, born probably at Minas in c1716, married Marie, daughter of Alexandre Richard and Marie Levron, at Annapolis Royal in June 1738 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1739 and 1760, Marie gave Petit Paul nine children, three sons and six daughters.  In August 1752, a French official counted Petit Paul, Marie, and five of their children at Anse-à-Dubuisson in the island's interior.  They left Île St.-Jean in the mid- or late 1750s and sought refuge in Canada.  They were counted on Île d'Orléans below Québec City in 1757, a year before the British deported their island kinsmen to France.  Petit Paul died at Beaumont below Québec City in November 1804, in his late 80s.  Three of his daughers married into the Jolivet, Marin, and Marinier families at Beaumont.  One of his sons also created his own family.

Third and youngest son Pierre, born in Canada in c1758, married Thérèse, daughter of Paul Terrien, at Beaumont in February 1792. 

Jean's third son Jean, fils, by first wife Marie-Anne Canol, born probably at Port-Royal in c1678, married Anne, daughter of André LeBlanc and Marie Dugas, in c1710, place unrecorded, settled at Minas, moved on to Chignecto, returned to Minas, and died by 1750, when his wife remarried.  Between 1711 and 1729, Anne gave Jean, fils nine children, six sons and three daughters.  His daughters married into the Mazerolle, Poirier, Thibodeau, Boucher, and Lambert families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana.  Four of Jean, fils's six sons created their own families.  

Oldest son Joseph, born at Grand-Pré in March 1711, died eight days after his birth.   

Jean, fils's second son Joseph, the second with the name, born in the 1710s, married Anne, daughter of Philippe Lambert and Marie-Madeleine Boudrot, at Beaubassin in October 1742.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1743 and 1750, Anne gave Joseph five children, all daughters.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported Joseph, Anne, and one of their daughters to South Carolina aboard the sloop Dolphin.  Anne died in the colony, and Joseph remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Alexandre Lord dit Lamontagne and Marie-Françoise Barrieau and widow of Claude Bourg, in c1760.  Colonial officials counted them with two of their own children, a daughter and a son, and two sons from Marie-Josèphe's previous marriage, in August 1763.  Soon afterwards, they followed other Acadians from the seaboard colonies to French St.-Domingue.  Joseph died by c1775, when Marie-Josèphe remarried probably at Môle St.-Nicolas on the north shore of the island.  He would have been in his late 50s or early 60s. 

Jean, fils's third son Jean III, born in the late 1710s, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Poirier and Marie Cormier, at Beaubassin in June 1745.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported Jean III, Madeleine, and six of their children to South Carolina aboard the sloop Dolphin.  Jean III died at St. Helen Parish, South Carolina, in 1756, in his early 30s, soon after he arrived in the southern colony.  One wonders what happened to his family after his death. 

Jean, fils's fourth son Charles, born at Grand-Pré in August 1719, probably died young.  

Jean, fils's fifth son Pierre, born at Grand-Pré in March 1722, married Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Girouard and Anne Petitpas and widow of Jacques Forest, at Beaubassin in January 1746.  Marguerite gave Pierre at least three children.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported the family to South Carolina aboard the sloop Dolphin.  In the late 1750s or early 1760s, Pierre emigrated to French St.-Domingue years before other Acadians went there and died at Port-au-Prince in January 1760, age 37. 

Jean, fils's sixth and youngest son Paul dit Gold, born probably at Minas in the 1720s, married Marie ____ in c1750, place unrecorded, perhaps Chignecto.  She gave him three children.  In the fall of 1755, the British evidently deported them to South Carolina aboard the sloop Dolphin.  In the spring of 1756, Paul dit Gold and his family evidently made their way up the coast with other Acadian exiles, bound for greater Acadia, but they did not complete their voyage.  New York officials detained them.  In late August of that year, colonial officials noted that Paul Divon[sic], his wife, and two children were being held at Westminster Town in Westchester County.  Marie evidently died in New York, and Paul secured permission to go to Pennsylvania, where remarried to Marie, daughter of Joseph Blanchard and Marguerite Vincent, at Phiiladelphia in November 1761.  Colonial officials counted the couple and three children still in the colony in June 1763.  Paul dit Gold remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Paul Bourg and Judith Hébert, at Philadelphia in May 1764.  They moved to Maryland probably soon after their marriage but were not among the Acadians in the Chesapeake colony who emigrated to Spanish Louisiana in the late 1760s.  In 1773, Paul was one of the first Acadians at Baltimore to secure a lot--number 36--on Charles Street in the city's French Town Quarter.  Paul dit Gold's succession record was filed at Baltimore in June 1785, when he would have been in his late 50s or early 60s.  His descendants used the surname Gold, an English iteration of Doiron.

Jean, père's fourth son Pierre l'aîné, by first wife Marie-Anne Canol, born probably at Port-Royal in c1680, married in c1703 at either Minas or Chignecto a woman whose name had been lost to history.  In 1707, she gave Pierre a son, name unrecorded, who died young.  Pierre l'aîné remarried to Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Doucet and Henriette Pelletret and widow of René Bernard, at either Minas or Chignecto in c1709 (Bona Arsenault says c1704, conflating Pierre's first marriage with his second one).  In 1710 and 1712, Madeleine gave Pierre two more sons.  Pierre l'aîné remarried again--his third marriage--to Véronique, daughter of Mathieu Brasseur and Jeanne Célestin dit Bellemère, at Beaubassin in February 1740.  Between 1741 and the early 1750s, Véronique gave Pierre four more children, two more sons and two daughters.  Neither of his daughters seems to have married.  His two sons by second wife Madeleine created families of their own. 

Second son Paul dit Grand Paul, by second wife Madeleine Doucet, born at Chignecto in c1710 , married Marguerite, daughter of François Michel and Marguerite Meunier, in c1734 probably at Chignecto.  Bona Arsenault would have us believe that Paul à Pierre married Marguerite, daughter of Louis Doucet and Marguerite Girouard, in c1726, that Grand Paul was a son of Jean, fils and his imaginary wife Marie Trahan.  Stephen A. White is followed here.  According to Arsenault, between 1735 and 1752, Marguerite gave Grand Paul nine children, six daughters and three sons.  Grand Paul and Marguerite moved on to Île St.-Jean in c1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Grand Paul, wife Marguerite Michel, and their nine children on the north bank of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  The British evidently deported the family to Le Havre, France, in late 1758.  Grand Paul died in exile perhaps at Le Havre before February 1760, in his 40s.  Two of his daughters married into the Thibodeau, Aucoin, and Bourg families on Île St.-Jean and in France.  At least one of his sons created his own family in France and Louisiana. 

Second son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Cobeguit in c1744 or 1745, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in c1750, was counted with them at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752, and followed them to Le Havre, France, in late 1758.  Jean-Baptiste, worked as a sailor, and married Marie-Blanche, called Blanche, daughter of fellow Acadians René Bernard and Marguerite Hébert of Chignecto, at Le Havre in January 1766.  Between 1766 and the early 1770s, Marie-Blanche gave Jean-Baptiste three daughters, one of whom died young.  In 1773, they followed hundreds of other Acadians languishing in the coastal cities to Poitou, where Jean-Baptiste worked as a carpenter and where, in May 1775, Marie-Blanche gave him a son.  They did not remain in Poitou.  In October 1775, they retreated to the port city of Nantes with dozens of other Poitou Acadians.  Marie-Blanche gave Jean-Baptiste four more children, three sons and a daughter, at Nantes.  One of them died in infancy.  In 1785, Jean-Baptiste, Marie-Blanche, and five of their children, three daughters and two sons, emigrated to Louisiana.  They did not follow the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac south of Baton Rouge but settled on the western prairies, where they had more children.  Jean-Baptiste died at his home on Bayou Teche in March 1809, in his early 60s.  His daughters married into the Begnaud, Melançon, Landry, Durio, and Bonin families in St. Martin Parish.  Two of his sons, including the youngest one born in Louisiana, married into the Broussard dit Beausleil and Landry families on the prairies. 

Pierre l'aîné's third son Pierre dit Pitre dit Gould, by second wife Madeleine Doucet, born at Chignecto in the early 1710s, married Anne, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Forest and Marie-Élisabeth Labarre, at Beaubassin in November 1733 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1738 and 1744, Anne gave Pierre dit Pitre three children, two sons and a daughter.  Either during or after Le Grand Dérangement the family sought refuge in Canada.  Pierre dit Pitre died at Napanne, Ontario, Canada, in c1795, in his early 80s.  His two sons created their own families in greater Acadia and France, but only one of the lines endured.

Older son Pierre, fils, born probably at Minas in c1738, followed his family into exile and married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Léger and Marguerite Comeau of Annapolis Royal, in c1761, place unrecorded.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1774, Marguerite gave Pierre, fils six children, four sons and two daughters.  The family was counted on Rivière Petitcoudiac in 1769 and moved on to Baie Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay, on the west coast of Nova Scotia in the early 1770s. 

Pierre dit Pitre's younger son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1746, followed his family into exile and became a sailor, perhaps a privateer.  He was captured by the Royal Navy, imprisoned in England, and repatriated to St.-Malo, France, probably with other Acadian exiles, in October 1763.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Bourg and Ursule Hébert of Minas, at St.-Énogat near St.-Malo in February 1764.  In 1765 and 1766, Marguerite gave Joseph two children, a son and a daughter.  The son died 11 days after his birth.  Joseph evidently continued to work as a sailor.  He died on Île Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland in 1772, in his mid-20s. 

Pierre l'aîné's fourth son Simon, by third wife Véronique Brasseur, born at Chignecto in October 1746, evidently died young. 

Pierre l'aîné's fifth and youngest son, whose name has been lost, from third wife Véronique Brasseur, born probably at Aulac, Chignecto, in 1754 or 1755, also probably died young. 

Jean, père's fifth son Philippe, by first wife Marie-Anne Canol, born probably at Port-Royal in c1682, moved from Pigiguit to the French Maritimes, where he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Claude Guédry and Marguerite Petitpas, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1715.  They settled at Côte des îles à Marlignes by 1732.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1732, Marie-Josèphe gave Philippe five children, three sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Vincent dit Clément and Landry families.  His three sons also created their own families at Chignecto and on Île St.-Jean.

Oldest son Philippe, fils, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1722, married Marie-Ursule, called Ursule, Lejeune in c1741, place unrecorded, but it may have been Chignecto.  They moved to Île St.-Jean in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1755, Ursule gave Philippe, fils eight children, six daughters and two sons.  In August 1752, a French official counted Philippe, fils, Ursule, and five of their children, a son and five daughters, ages 10 years to 15 months, at Anse-au-Matelot on the southeastern coast of Île St.-Jean.  They left before the island's dérangement in 1758 and sought refuge in Canada.  French officials counted them at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse below Québec City in 1758, and British authorities counted them at Québec in 1763.  Three of Philippe, fils's daughters married into the Roy, Houde dit Gervais, and Houle families at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse and nearby Beaumont and at Bécancour near Trois-Rivières on the upper St. Lawrence.  One of his sons also created his own family in upper Canada. 

Younger son Pierre dit Dudevoir, born on Île St.-Jean in c1753, followed his family to Canada.  He married Geneviève, daughter of Claude Phaneuf and Marguerite Tellier, at St.-Antoine-sur-Richelieu northeast of Montréal in February 1778. 

Philippe, père's second son Paul, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1724, married Rose Bourgeois in c1747, place unrecorded, but it probably was Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1763, Rose gave Paul three children, a son and two daughters.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported them to South Carolina aboard the sloop Dolphin.  Colonial officials counted Paul, Rose, and their three children still in the colony in August 1763.  One wonders what happened to them after 1763.  They did not go to Louisiana. 

Philippe's third and youngest son Jean, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1729, followed one of his older brothers to Île St.-Jean in c1751.  Jean married Anne-Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Cellier and Marie-Josèphe Lejeune, on the island in February 1752.  The following August, a French official counted the newlyweds at Anse-au-Matelot near his brother Philippe, fils.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1753 and 1755, Anne-Marguerite gave Jean two sons, Josaphat and Paul-Olivier.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758.  Were they deported to France?  Did they escape the British roundup and seek refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore?  They did not go to Louisiana. 

Jean, père's sixth son Noël, by first wife Marie-Anne Canol, born at Minas in c1684, married Marie, daughter of Robert Henry and Marie-Madeleine Godin, at Boston, Massachusetts, in c1705, during Queen Anne's War.  Evidently he and his bride were among the dozens of prisoners Colonel Benjamin Church of Massachusetts captured in Acadia in July 1704 and held as hostages in the New English city.  Noël and Marie, with their infant son, returned to Port-Royal by September 1706, when their marriage was blessed by the priest there.  They resettled at Cobeguit deep inside the Minas Basin, far away from the Bay of Fundy shore.  Between 1706 and 1720, Marie gave Noël eight children, five sons and three daughters.  In c1750, they moved on to Île St.-Jean.  In February 1752, a French official counted Noël, Marie, and a grandson at Pointe-Prime on the island's southeastern shore.  In late 1758, the British deported Noël, Marie, and dozens of their children and grandchildren on the transport Duke William, which was lost in a mid-Atlantic storm on its way to St.-Malo, France, in December.  The ship's captain averred that an Acadian patriarch aboard the vessel was "a hundred and ten years old," but Noël, who was that patriarch, was "only" 74.  After all efforts had failed to save the vessel, and no other ship had come to its rescue, Noël embraced the captain and insisted that he and his crew take to the boats and save themselves, knowing full well that the ship, with all its passengers, soon would plummet to the bottom of the sea.  Noël's daughters married into the Pitre and Blanchard families; the oldest one perished with her family aboard the Duke William.  The youngest daughter and her husband were deported from Île Royale to Rochefort, France, in late 1758, and she died there within a year of her arrival, so only one of Noël's daughters may have survived deportation.  All five of his sons created their own families.  One son died at Cobeguit before the extended family moved on to Pointe-Prime, and the four other sons and their families also perished aboard the ill-fated transport--a dark testament to the determination of Acadians to remain close to their loved ones. 

Oldest son Louis-Mathieu, born at Boston in February 1706, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Pitre and Françoise Babin and sister of two of his brothers-in-law, in c1726 probably at Cobegut.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1736, Madeleine gave Louis-Mathieu six children, four sons and two daughters.  They followed his family to Pointe-Prime in c1750, and the French official counted Louis-Mathieu (he did not give his surname), Madeleine, an 18-year-old son, and a 12-year-old Doiron niece, in August 1752.  Louis-Mathieu's daughters married into the Leprince and Daigle families and died aboard the Duke William.  His two older sons and his youngest son also married before the island's dérangement.  Louis-Mathieu, Madeleine, their third son, and their married daughters perished with his parents and siblings aboard the Duke William.  Louis-Mathieu would have been in his early 50s in December 1758. 

Oldest son Charles, born probably at Cobeguit in c1728, followed his family to Pointe-Prime, and married Anne-Gertrude, daughter of Paul Benoit and Anne Trahan of Pigiguit, at Pointe-Prime in January 1752.  The following August, a French official counted them at Pointe-Prime near his parents.  They also perished aboard the Duke William. Charles would have been age 30 in December 1758. 

Louis-Mathieu's second son Jean, born probably at Cobeguit in c1730, followed his family to Pointe-Prime and married Victoire, daughter of François Leprince and Catherine Benoit of Pigiguit, perhaps at Cobeguit in c1750.  Victoire gave Jean a daughter that year.  They may not have followed his family to Pointe-Prime; they were not counted on Île St.-Jean in August 1752, so they may have remained at Cobeguit.  If so, they escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Daughter Marie-Madeleine married into the Délage family at Québec in September 1783. 

Louis-Mathieu's third son Baptiste-Olivier, born probably at Cobeguit in c1734, followed his parents to Pointe-Prime, was counted with them there in August 1752, and, at age 24, still unmarried, died with them aboard the Duke William in December 1758. 

Louis-Mathieu's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Cobeguit in c1735, followed his parents to Pointe-Prime and was counted with his paternal grandfather Noèl and grandmother Marie at Pointe-Prime in August 1752.  He likely was the Jean-Baptise Doiron who married Théodose Boudrot on the island in c1757.  When the British deported the island Acadians to St.-Malo in late 1758, Jean-Baptiste and Théodose were placed aboard the transport Supply, which left the Maritimes in late November, on the same day his parents and grandparents departed Pointe-Prime aboard the Duke William.  The Supply survived the North Atlantic storm that sunk the Duke William and its companion the Violet, and arrived at Bideford, England, on December 20.  Some Acadians disembarked and went on to Bristol, but Jean-Baptiste and Théodose, with the majority of their fellow passengers, continued on to St.-Malo, which they finally reached in early March 1759.  They settled at nearby St.-Servan and were still there in 1772, after which they disappear from the historical record.  They did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785. 

Noël's second son Paul, born at Grand-Pré in April 1710, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Benoit le jeune and Élisabeth LeJuge, in c1732 probably at Minas.  Bona Arsenault insists that Paul's first wife was Émilienne, daughter of Philippe Thibodeau and Élisabeth Vincent of Pigiguit, who he married at Grand-Pré in September 1732.  Stephen A. White is followed here.  Paul and Marguerite followed his family to Pointe-Prime in c1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Paul, Marguerite, their son and daughter, ages not given, and two orphans, ages 15 and 12, at Pointe-Prime near his parents.  Paul remarried to Françoise, daughter of Jean Bourg and Françoise Aucoin, on the island in November 1753.  They, too, perished aboard the Duke William with his parents and siblings.  Paul would have been in his late 40s in December 1758. 

Noël's third son Pierre, born probably at Minas in c1711, married Émilienne, daughter of Philippe Thibodeau and Isabelle Vincent, at Grand-Pré in September 1732 and died probably at Minas by 1746, in his early or mid-30s in December 1758.  

Noël's fourth son François, born probably at Minas in c1713, married Madeleine, daughter of François Tillard and Marguerite Leprince, at Grand-Pré in May 1738.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1740 and 1752, Madeleine gave François seven children, five daughters and two sons.  In c1750, they followed his family to Pointe-Prime, where, in August 1752, a French official counted François, Madeleine, and their two sons and four daughters, ages 12 years to 5 months, near his parents.  They, too, perished aboard the Duke William in December 1758.  François would have been in his early 40s in December 1758. 

Noël's fifth and youngest son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1715, married Marguerite, another daughter of François Tillard and Marguerite Leprince, at Grand-Pré in June 1734.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1735 and 1752, Marguerite gave Joseph eight children, four sons and four daughters.  They followed his family to Pointe-Prime in c1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Joseph, Marie, and their four sons and four daughters, ages 17 years to 2 months, at Pointe-Prime near his family.  They also perished aboard the Duke William.  Joseph would have been in his early 40s in December 1758. 

Jean, père's seventh son Jacques, a twin, by first wife Marie-Anne Canol, born probably at Minas in c1689, evidently died young.

Jean, père's eighth son Louis, Jacques's twin, by first wife Marie-Anne Canol, born probably at Minas in c1689, married Marguerite, daughter of Nicolas Barrieau and Martine Hébert and widow of Denis Girouard, at Grand-Pré in November 1712.  Between 1714 and the mid-1720s, Marguerite gave Louis five children, two sons and three daughters.  Louis died at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in November 1727, in his late 30s.  Widow Marguerite followed her sons to Île St.-Jean in c1750.  Two of her and Louis's daughters married into the Boudrot and Daigre families.  Both of her Louis's sons created their own families on Île St.-Jean and in France.   

Older son Alexis, born at L'Assomption in June 1723, married Marguerite, daughter of Alexandre Thibodeau and François Benoit, at L'Assomption in September 1743.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1744 and 1749, Marguerite gave Alexis four sons, but other records say three.  They moved on to Île St.-Jean in c1750, and Marguerite died on the island soon after they got there.  In August 1752, a French official counted Alexis, now a widower, three sons, ages 8, 6, and 3, and his 58-year-old mother at the farthest end of Grande-Anse on the island's southeastern coast.  According to Albert J. Robichaux, Jr., Alexis remarried to Hélène Blanchard probably at Grande-Anse in c1753.  According to Robichaux, in 1754 and 1756 she gave Alexis two more children, a daughter and another son.  Hélène also died on the island.  Alexis remarried again--his third marriage--to Madeleine-Josèphe, daughter of  François Bourg and Marguerite Hébert, probably at Grande-Anse in July 1758, on the eve of the island's dérangement.  Alexis, Madeleine-Josèphe, and two of his sons by first wife Marguerite and a son by Madeleine-Josèphe, survived the crossing to St.-Malo, but the youngest son, age 4 months, died soon after they reached the French port.  Alexis's third son Théodore, age 9, as well as his daughter and son by second wife Hélène, ages 4 and 2, died at sea.  Alexis took his family to nearby St.-Énogat, where, between 1760 and 1764, Madeleine-Josèphe gave him three more children, a son and two daughters.  In November 1765, they were among the few island Acadians who chose to go to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany with other Acadian exiles (older sons Grégoire and Josaphat remained at St.-Énogat, where they created their own families).  They settled near his younger brother Jean at Bortereau, today's Borduro, near Locmaria on the eastern shore of the island.  According to Arsenault, from 1766 to 1773, Madeleine-Josèphe gave Alexis seven more children, five sons and two daughters, on Belle-Île-en-Mer--15 children in all by his three wives.  The family did not remain on the island.  In the early 1770s, Alexis and Madeleine-Josèphe abandoned their concession at Bortereau and returned to St.-Énogat.  According to Arsenault, Alexis, Madeleine-Josèphe, and their youngest children, five sons and two daughters, returned to greater Acadia.  Records show that Alexis's second son Josaphat by first wife Marguerite took his family to England, probably via the Channel Islands in March 1773.  Alexis, Marguerite-Josèphe, and their younger children may have accompanied them.  Alexis's younger children settled on St. John's Island, formerly Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, where his daughters married into the Chiasson and Lebrun families.  His younger sons also created their own families at Rustico on the north shore of the island.  Two of his granddaughters by his oldest son settled in Spanish Louisiana. 

Oldest son Alexis-Grégoire, called Grégoire, by first wife Marguerite Thibodeau, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in April 1744, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, where he was counted with his widowed father and two younger brothers at Grande-Anse in August 1752.  He followed his father and stepmother to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758, went with them to nearby St.-Énogat, but remained there with his younger brother when his father and his new family moved on to Belle-Île-en-Mer in November 1765.  Grégoire married Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Aucoin and Élisabeth Amireau, at St.-Énogat in May 1767.  Between 1768 and 1772, Hélène gave Grégoire three children, two daughters and a son, there.  In 1773, they followed hundreds of other Acadians from the port cities to Poitou, where Hélène gave him another son in 1775.  In November of that year, Grégoire, Hélène, and their four children followed dozens of other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where Hélène gave him two more sons, both of whom died young.  Their oldest son also died there at age 9.  Grégoire worked as a seaman at Nantes and may have died there or at sea before November 1784, when Hélène remarried at Nantes to an Acadian Dantin.  The following year, she, her husband, four of his children from his first marriage, along with her two Doiron daughters, emigrated to Louisiana.  (The second Doiron son would have been age 10 in 1785, so he likely had died young like his brothers.)  Hélène and her family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where her Doiron daughters married into the Baudoin and Hébert families.  The older daughter followed her husband to the western prairies in the 1790s. 

Alexis's second son Joseph dit Josaphat, by first wife Marguerite Thibodeau, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in September 1746, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, where he was counted with his widowed father and two brothers at Grande-Anse in August 1752.  He followed his father and stepmother to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758, went with them to nearby St.-Énogat, but remained there with his older brother when his father and and his new family moved on to Belle-Île-en-Mer in November 1765.  Josaphat married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Duon and Angélique Aucoin of Minas, at Plouër near St.-Malo in August 1766.  Between 1768 and 1770, Marguerite gave Josaphat three sons at St.-Énogat and nearby Pleurtuit.  In March 1773, instead of following his older brother Grégoire to Poitou, Josaphat, perhaps following his father, stepmother, and younger half-siblings, took his wife and children to England probably via the Channel Islands, from which they returned to greater Acadia.  One wonders if they, too, settled on St. John's Island, today's Prince Edward Island. 

Alexis's sixth son Jean-Charles, by third wife Madeleine-Josèphe Bourg, born at St.-Énogat, France, in August 1760, followed his family to Belle-Île-en-Mer in 1765 and back to St.-Énogat in the early 1770s.  In March 1773, he and his younger siblings evidently followed his parents and an older half-brother to the Channel Islands and England, from which they returned to greater Acadia.  Jean-Charles married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Poirier and Marguerite Lavigne of Rustico, probably on St. John's Island in c1786. 

Alexis's seventh son Joseph, by third wife Madeleine-Josèphe Bourg, born on Belle-Île-en-Mer in c1766, followed his family to St.-Énogat in the early 1770s and to greater Acadia in 1773.  Joseph married fellow Acadian Angélique Gallant of Rustico probably on St. John's Island in c1790. 

Alexis's eighth son Pierre, by third wife Madeleine-Josèphe Bourg, born on Belle-Île-en-Mer in c1770, followed his family to St.-Énogat in the early 1770s and to greater Acadia in 1773.  Pierre married Juliette, daughter of François Buote and Marie Babineau of Rustico, probably on St. John's Island in c1792. 

Alexis's ninth son François-Xavier dit Mico, by third wife Madeleine-Josèphe Bourg, born on Belle-Île-en-Mer in c1772, followed his family to St.-Énogat in the early 1770s and to greater Acadia in 1773.  Mico married another Angélique Gallant of Rustico probably on St. John's Island, date unrecorded. 

Alexis's tenth and youngest son Élie, by third wife Madeleine-Josèphe Bourg, born on Belle-Île-en-Mer in c1773.  Soon after his birth, he followed his family to St.-Énogat and to greater Acadia.  Élie married Suzanne, daughter of Pierre dit Grand-Pierre Gallant of Rustico, probably on St. John's Island, date unrecorded. 

Louis's younger son Jean, born at L'Assomption in March 1730, followed his family to Grande-Anse and  married Anne, another daughter of Alexandre Thibodeau and François Benoit, on the island in January 1752.  A French official counted the newlyweds living next to his older brother and widowed mother at Grande-Anse in August 1752.  Between 1754 and 1758, Anne gave Jean four children, two sons and two daughters.  The British deported Jean, Anne, and their children to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  Jean and Anne survived the crossing, but all four of their children died at sea.  Jean and Anne settled first at St.-Suliac near St.-Malo and then at nearby St.-Énogat, close to his older brother Alexis.  Between 1760 and 1764, Anne gave Jean four more children, two sons and two daughters.  In November 1765, they were among the few island Acadians who chose to go to Belle-Île-en-Mer with other Acadian exiles.  They settled near older brother Alexis at Bortereau near Locmaria.  Jean sold his concession at Bortereau to Luc Bédex in 1777 and also left the island.  Wife Anne died at Paimbouef, the port of Nantes, in December 1783, age 53, and a daughter married into the Hébert family there in March 1784.  In 1785, Jean, along with married daughter Anne-Dorothée, age 24, and her husband, unmarried daughter Marguerite-Josèphe, age 21, and 18-year-old Paul-Olivier Daigle, emigrated to Louisiana.  Jean's older surviving son Jean-Baptiste, age 25 and still unmarried in 1785, also went to the colony that year on a later vessel.  If youngest son Pierre, who would have been age 23 in 1785, was still alive, he chose to remain in the mother country.  Jean and his family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac south of Baton Rouge.  Jean did not remarry there.  He died at Manchac in July 1786, age 56, less than a year after he reached the Spanish colony.  His daughters married into the Hébert, Daigle, and Trahan families in France and Louisiana.  Son Jean-Baptiste married into the Guidry family and settled at Baton Rouge. 

Jean, père's ninth son Thomas, by second wife Marie Trahan, born probably at Minas in c1699, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Girouard and Marie Comeau, in c1724 probably at Minas and settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1725 and 1747, Anne gave Thomas 11 children, five sons and six daughters.  Other records give them two more daughters, the older one born on the eve of the family's move to Île St.-Jean in c1750, and the other born on the island in the early 1750s.  In August 1752, a French offical counted Thomas, Anne, and 10 of their children, four sons and six daughters, ages 22 to 3, at Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Scie in the island's interior, next to married son Bénoni and his family.  Thomas's second daughter Marie-Françoise had married into the Bourg family on the island in January 1751 and was counted with her husband and infant son at Rivière-aux-Crapauds on the island's south shore by the same official.  In late summer of 1758, the British deported Thomas and his family to St.-Malo, France, aboard the transport Duke William (not to be confused with the later vessel of the same name on which brother Noël's family perished).  Thomas, age 59, and four of his children died at sea.  Soon after their arrival, two of his older daughters and his married son died in a local hospital from the rigors of the crossing.  Widow Anne and their remaining five children settled at nearby St.-Suliac.  Anne died there in December 1761, in her early 50s.  Their younger surviving daughters married into the Naquin family in France.  Their older surviving daughter may not have married.  Their two youngest sons emigrated to Louisiana. 

Oldest son Bénoni, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1725, married Marguerite, daughter of François Boisseau and Marie-Anne Saunier, probably at L'Assomption in c1746.  They followed his family to Île St.-Jean in c1750 and were counted with them at Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Scie in August 1752.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in the late summer of 1758.  His oldest son Simon-Grégoire and youngest daughter Élisabeth died in the crossing.  Bénoni died at St.-Servan, France, in November 1758, age 33, from the rigors of the crossing.  His younger son Olivier died five days later.  Widow Marguerite died at the St.-Malo hospital the following January.  Only second son Pierre, age 8 in 1758, survived the ordeal and likely was raised by relatives.  Pierre did not emigrate to Louisiana with his uncles in 1785, when he would have been in his early 30s.  One wonders if he married and continued his father's line.

Thomas's third son Charles, born probably at L'Assomption in c1738, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, survived the deportation to St.-Malo, and settled at St.-Servan.  He moved to nearby St.-Suliac in 1759 and died there in June 1764, age 26.  He did not marry. 

Thomas's fourth son Alexandre le jeune, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit in c1739, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, survived the deportation to St.-Malo, settled at St.-Suliac, and moved on to nearby Pleslin in 1763, where he worked as a laborer and a carpenter.  He married Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadians François Hébert and Isabelle Bourg of Cobeguit, in January 1763.  From 1763 to 1772, Ursule gave Alexandre le jeune five children, two daughters and three sons, but one of the sons died in infancy.  In 1773, they followed hundreds of other Acadians from the port cities, including younger brother Jacques, to Poitou.  In 1775, Ursule gave Alexandre le jeune another son in Poitou, but they did not remain there.  In March 1776, they followed dozens of other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where brother Jacques had gone the previous December.  Ursule gave Alexandre le jeune two more sons at Chantenay near Nantes, and their son born in Poitou died.  Alexandre le jeune, Ursule, and six of their children, two daughters and four sons, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  They settled at Manchac below Baton Rouge.  They had another son in the colony.  An Alexandre Doiron died at Manchac in October 1793.  The San Gabriel priest who recorded the burial did not give any parents' names, mention a wife, or give the age of the deceased, so one wonders if this was him.  If it was, Alexandre le jeune would have died in his mid-50s.  His daughters married into the Templet and Benoit families in the Spanish colony.  His five sons married into the Hébert, Labauve, and Richard families at Baton Rouge. 

Thomas's fifth and youngest son Jacques dit Jacob, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit in c1742, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, survived the deportation to St.-Malo, and settled at St.-Suliac, where he married Anne-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Breau and Ursule Bourg, in July 1765.  From 1768 to 1771, Anne-Josèphe gave Jacques three children, two sons and a daughter.  They also lived at nearby St.-Servan.   In 1773, they followed hundreds of other Acadians from the port cities, including older brother Alexandre, to Poitou, where, in 1774, Anne-Josèphe gave Jacques another son, but the boy died less than a year later.  In December of 1775, they retreated with dozens of other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to Nantes, where Anne-Josèphe gave Jacques four more children, three sons and a daughter, but they all died young.  In 1785, Jacques, Anne-Josèphe, and their three surviving children, two sons and a daughter, followed brother Alexandre to Louisiana.  Anne-Josèphe was pregnant when they left Paimboeu, the port of Nantes, and another daughter was born to them aboard ship.  Though older brother Alexandre had settled at Manchac on the river, Jacques and Anne-Josèphe chose to follow the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  They had another son in the colony.  Jacques died in Assumption Parish in October 1810, in his late 60s.  His daughters married into the Bergeron and Boudreaux families.  Two of his three sons married into the Dugas and Daigle families on the upper Lafourche, but the younger one moved on to lower Bayou Teche during the antebellum period. 

Jean, père's tenth son Paul, by second wife Marie Trahan, born probably at Minas in the early 1700s, married Marguerite, daughter of Toussaint Doucet and Marie Caissie, in c1725 probably at Minas.  One wonders what happened to them in 1755.  In August 1763, British officials counted Pierre-Paul Douaron, wife Marguerite, and six children--daughters Marie, Madeleine, and Marguerite, and sons Pierre, Jacques, and Charles--at Fort Cumberland, formerly Beauséjour.  If  this was Paul, son of Jean, père, and his family, one wonders wha happened to them after 1763.  They did not go to Louisiana. 

Jean, père's eleventh son Alexandre, by second wife Marie Trahan, born probably at Minas in the early 1700s, married Anne, daughter of Clément Vincent and Madeleine Levron, at Grand-Pré in October 1727 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1738, Anne gave Alexandre seven children, five daughters and two sons.  The British deported most of them to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  In July 1763, colonial officials counted Alexandre, Anne, and six of their children, five daughters and a son, as well as an unnamed child, at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore.  As the counting reveals, one of their children did not go with the family to Maryland.  Alexandre died in the colony, and Anne and three of her Doiron daughters emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1768.  They married into the Amache, St. Pierre, Rodriguez, and LeBlanc families in the Spanish colony.  One wonders what happened to Alexandre and Anne's other three children who had been counted in Maryland. 

Older son André, born probably at Minas in c1730, followed his family to Maryland in 1755 and was counted with them at Oxford in July 1763, when he would have been in his early 30s.  He did not accompany his widowed mother and three sisters to Louisiana in 1768.  Did he join his younger brother in Canada or remain in the Chesapeake colony? 

Alexandre, père's younger son Alexandre, fils, born probably at Minas in c1738, was age 17 when the British deported his family to Maryland.  He evidently sought refuge in Canada, perhaps with relatives.  He married Geneviève dite Ducharme, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Charron and Jeanne Houde of Berthier and widow of Pierre Héneau dit Delorme, at St.-Pierre-de-Sorel, today's Sorel, on the upper St. Lawrence between Trois-Rivières and Montréal. 

Jean, père's twelfth and youngest son Pierre le jeune, by second wife Marie Trahan, born probably at Minas in c1706, married Marguerite Breau in c1746, moved on to the French Maritimes, and died on Île-au-Foin, off Île St.-Jean, in March 1751, in his mid-40s.392

Levron

François Levron dit Nantois, perhaps a 1671 arrival, and his wife Catherine Savoie created a good-sized family in the colony.  Catherine gave Nantois 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  Their daughters married into the Vincent, Benoit, Garceau dit Tranchemontagne, Richard dit Boutin, Picot dit La Rigueur, Maucaïre, Comeau, and Labauve families.  Three of François dit Nantois's four sons created their own families.  His and Catherine's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Minas, in the French Maritimes, and in Canada (before Le Grand Dérangement).  At least six of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and especially from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Jacques married Marie, daughter of Laurent Doucet and Jeanne Babin, at Port-Royal in January 1710, settled on haute rivière, looked at land on Île Royale in August 1714, did not see what he liked there, returned to the Annapolis valley, and died there by February 1746, in his 60s.  Marie gave Jacques 13 children, seven sons and six daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Hébert, Lejeune, Comeau, and Dubois families.  Only three of Jacques and Marie's seven sons created their own families.   

Oldest son Joseph married Anne Comeau in c1739, place unrecorded, and died by 1752, in his 30s.  

Jacques's second son Jacques, fils married Marie Doiron in c1754, place unrecorded.   

Jacques, père's third son Simon dit Nantois married Marguerite, daughter of Louis Renaud dit Provençal and Marie-Madeleine Lapierre, at Grand-Pré in February 1746.   

Jacques, père's fourth son Louis dit Luci reached adulthood and emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax, but he did not marry.   

Jacques, père's fifth, sixth, and seventh sons François, Olivier, and Guillaume-Gaspard, evidently died young. 

François's second son Joseph dit Métayer moved to Canada, where he married Rose dit Denis, daughter of Canadians Denis Veronneau and Catherine Guertin, at Boucherville, near Montréal, in September 1722, and remarried to Catherine, daughter of Canadians Michel-Mathieu Brunet and Marie Blanchard and widow of Honoré Danis, at Fort-Frontenac, today's Kingston, Ontario, in January 1750.  One wonders if he was a soldier or a merchant. 

François's third son Jean-Baptiste married to Françoise, daughter of Louis-Noël Labauve and Marie Rimbault, at Annapolis Royal in January 1716. 

François's fourth and youngest son Pierre died on haute rivière in January 1725, age 29, before he could marry.393

Aucoin

Martin Aucoin, an early 1670s arrival, and his wife Marie Gaudet created a large family in the colony.  Between 1674 and 1707, Marie gave Martin 19 children, 10 sons and nine daughters, including a set of twins.  Five of their daughters married into the Guérin, Gautrot, Thériot, Thibodeau, and Bourg families.  Nine of Martin's sons married, three of them to sisters, but "only" eight of them created lasting family lines.  His third son's line of the family was especially vigorous.  Martin and Marie's descendants settled at Minas, Pigiguit, Cobeguit, Chignecto, Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area, and in the French Maritimes, where they were especially numerous on Île St.-Jean by 1752.  One of Martin's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in the late 1760s, and at least 93 of them chose to go to Louisiana from France in 1785.  However, a substantial number of Aucoins remained in greater Acadia or Canada after Le Grand Dérangement, and some even chose to remain in France when their cousins moved on to Louisiana.  

Oldest son Martin, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1674, married Catherine, daughter of Germain Thériot and Andrée Brun, in c1698 probably at Minas and settled at Rivière-aux-Canard.  Between the late 1690s and the early 1710s, Catherine gave Martin, fils eight children, three sons and five daughters, at Minas.  Their daughters married into the Boudrot, Comeau, Henry, Duon, and Melanson families.  Martin, fils's three sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Martin III, born probably at Port-Royal in the early 1700s, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Claude Boudrot and Anne-Marie Thibodeau, in c1723, settled at Minas, and moved on to Petitcoudiac in the early 1750s.  Martin III died there between 1752 and 1755, in early 50s.  According to genealogist Bon Arsenault, between 1725 and 1742, Élisabeth gave Martin III eight children, two sons and six daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the LeBlanc and Thibodeau families.  Michel III's two sons created their own families. 

Older son Alexis, born in c1725, was deported with his family to South Carolina in 1755.  He married Marie-Josèphe Babin in c1760 while in exile, and remarried to Thècle, daughter of Simon Leureau and Marguerite Loignon, at Ste.-Famille, Île d'Orléans, below Québec, in February 1763.  They settled at St.-Joseph-de-Beauce on Rivière Chaudière south of Québec, soon after their marriage, and moved on to Yamachiche on the north shore of Lac St.-Pierre near Trois-Rivières, in 1767.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1772, Thècle gave Alexis five children, four sons and a daughter.  Alexis died at Yamachiche in December 1792, age 67.  All four of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Alexis, fils, born in Canada in c1763, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Pierre Auger and Madeleine Sylvain, at Rivière-du-Loup, today's Louiseville, on the north shore of Lac St.-Pierre, in January 1786, and remarried to Rosalie Ferron, widow of Joseph Colin, at Yamachiche in April 1814. 

Alexis, père's second son Jean, born in Canada in c1764, Josèphe, daughter of Étienne Grenier and Marguerite Lavigne, at Yamachiche in October 1799. 

Alexis, père's third son Pierre, born in Canada in c1767, married Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Hébert and Marguerite Thibodeau, at Yamachiche in October 1789, and remarried to Marie-Louise, daughter of Alexis Girard and Françoise Lacoste, at Louiseville in November 1803.  Pierre died at Yamachiche in March 1804, in his late 30s. 

Alexis, père's fourth and youngest son Claude, born in Canada in 1769, married Amable, daughter of Joseph Germain and Françoise Guilbault, at Yamachiche in February 1794 and died at Yamachiche in November 1796, in his late 20s, "sans laisser de postérité"--without having fathered any children. 

Martin III's younger son Jean-Baptiste, born in c1726, married Marie-Anne Saulnier probably at Petitcoudiac in c1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1760, Marie-Anne gave Jean-Baptiste three children, two sons and a daughter.  They escaped the British in 1755 and made their way to Canada.  Jean-Baptiste died in exile in c1760, and his widow remarried at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny, below Québec, in October 1762.  

Martin, fils's second son Paul, born at Grand-Pré in April 1712, married Marie-Josèphe-Blanche, daughter of Jacques LeBlanc and Élisabeth Boudrot and older brother Martin III's stepdaughter, at Grand-Pré in November 1737.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1738 and 1748, Marie-Josèphe gave Paul six children, fives sons and a daughter.  At least one of his five sons created his own family.

Oldest son Olivier, born at Minas in c1738, married Anne Dupuis.  One wonders what happened to them.

Martin, fils's third and youngest son Pierre, born probably at Minas in the 1710s, married Madeleine, daughter of Antoine Leprince and Anne Trahan, in c1736 at Minas or L'Assomption, Pigiguit, and died between 1756 and 1762, in his 40s, while in exile. 

Martin's second son Michel, born probably at Port-Royal in c1677, married Jeanne, daughter of Martin Bourg and Marie Potet, in c1699 probably at Minas, settled at Cobeguit by 1703, and in 1750 led his family to Île St.-Jean, where they settled on Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the interior of the island.  Between 1700 and 1717, Jeanne gave Michel seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Dugas and Dupuis families.  All four of Michel's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Antoine le jeune, born probably at Port-Royal in c1700, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of François Amireau and Marie Pitre, in c1730 perhaps at Cobeguit, moved on to Île St.-Jean probably in late summer of 1755, and died at Rivière-des-Blonds on the south shore of the island in December 1756, age 56.  In 1758-59, the British deported Antoine le jeune's widow and younger children--a son and three daughters--as well as a married son and his bride to France.  They settled in the St.-Malo suburbs.  Daughter Hélène married into the Doiron and Dantin families in France and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  The son who married on Île St.-Jean also emigrated to the Spanish colony.

Older son Michel le jeune, born probably at Cobeguit in c1732, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in the summer of 1755.  He married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, Hébert on the island in c1758.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, later that year.  According to Albert J. Rochichaux's study of the Acadians in France, between 1760 and 1782, Élisabeth gave Michel 14 children, eight sons and six daughters, at St.-Énogat, near St.-Malo.  Michel, Élisabeth, and 10 of their children, six sons and four daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian settlement of Bayou des Écores above Baton Rouge before moving on to upper Bayou Lafourche probably in the early 1790s.  Michel le jeune died probably on the Lafourche by December 1795, when wife Élisabeth was listed in a census there without a husband.  He would have been in his early 50s.  Two of his daughters married into the Potier, Pedeau, and Barrilleaux families on the Lafourche.  Five of his six surviving sons married into the Thibodeaux, Aucoin, Bourg, Gautreaux, and Comeaux and families and created vigorous lines on the Lafourche. 

Antoine le jeune's younger son Chrysostôme, born probably at Cobeguit in c1741, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in the summer of 1755 and was deported to France with his widowed mother and siblings in 1758.  Did Chrysostôme marry in the mother country?  If so, when and where?  One thing is certain--he did not emigrate to Louisiana in 1785 with brother Michel and sister Hélène. 

Michel's second son Michel, fils, born probably at Cobeguit in c1704, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Martin Henry and Marie Hébert, in c1729 probably at Cobeguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1730 and 1747, Marie-Josèphe gave Michel, fils six children, all daughters.  They moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1751 and settled at Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Scie in the island's interior.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Michel, père's third son René dit Renauchon, born probably at Cobeguit in c1711, married Madeleine, daughter of François Michel and Marie-Anne Léger, in c1737 perhaps at Cobeguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1738 and 1752, Madeleine gave Renauchon six children, a son and five daughters.  Renauchon was active in the Acadian resistance during the late 1740s, moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750, and settled at Anse-à-Pinnet, on the island's south shore.  Renauchon and his entire family perished in the deportation to France in December 1758. 

Michel, père's fourth and youngest son Paul, born probably at Cobeguit in c1712, married Marie, daughter of François LeBlanc and Marguerite Boudrot, at Grand-Pré in August 1737.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1744 and 1757, Marie gave Paul five children, a son and four daughters.  They followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and settled on Rivière-du-Nord-Est.  One of their daughters, Marie-Josèphe, born on the island in c1757, married into the Breau family.  She emigrated to Louisiana probably from Maryland in the late 1760s, the only member of her family to go to the Spanish colony before 1785.  Paul's son created his own family and emigrated to Louisiana from France. 

Only son Joseph, born probably at Grand-Pré in c1748, was deported to France in 1758, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of François Henry and Marie Dugas, at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in May 1770, and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  At age 49, Joseph remarried to Euphrosine, daughter of Pierre Barrilleaux and Véroinque Giroir and widow of François Boudreaux and Charles Broussard, at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in October 1797.  His daughters, all by his first wife and all born in France, married into the Barbier, Blanchard, Boudreaux, Guillot, and Richard families.  Daughter Élisabeth-Jeanne, born near St.-Suliac in July 1773, died in Assumption Parish in September 1867, age 94, perhaps the last Acadian immigrant in the Bayou State to join her Acadian ancestors.  Joseph's three sons, all by first wife Isabelle, two born in France, the other in Louisiana, married into the Landry, Hébert, and Dupuis families. 

Martin's third son Alexis dit Lexy, a twin, born at Chignecto in March 1684, married Anne-Marie, called Marie, another daughter of Martin Bourg and Marie Potet, in c1707, settled at Cobeguit, and moved on to Île St.-Jean.  Between 1708 and 1737, Anne-Marie gave Alexis 13 children, 12 sons and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Breau family at Cobeguit.  Ten of Alexis's 12 sons created their own families.  Understandably, Alexis's line of the family was especially vigorous. 

Oldest son Pierre le jeune, born at Cobeguit in c1708, married Élisabeth, daughter of Antoine Breau and Marguerite Dugas, at Grand-Pré in November 1732.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1756, Élisabeth gave Pierre le jeune nine children, five sons and four daughters.  In 1750, they moved on to Île St.-Jean, where they settled at Anse-au-Matelot on the island's south shore.  Daughter Marie-Blanche married into the LaVache family at nearby Port-La-Joye in February 1754.  Pierre le jeune died probably on the island in c1757, in his late 40s.  The following year, his widow and children escaped the British and sought refuge in Canada, where Élisabeth remarried in November 1759.  At least one of Pierre le jeune's sons created his own family. 

Son Pierre, fils, born at Minas in c1736, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Brisson and Geneviève Pépin, at St.-Pierre-les-Becquets on the upper St. Lawrence between Québec and Trois-Rivières in April 1762.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1783, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre, fils six children, three sons and three daughters.  

Alexis dit Lexy's second son, name unrecorded, born probably at Cobeguit in the early 1710s, died young. 

Alexis dit Lexy's third son Sylvain, born probably at Cobeguit in c1711, married Catherine, daughter of Joseph Amireau and Marguerite Lord, in c1736 probably at Cobeguit and moved on to Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in c1756.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1755 and 1756, Catherine gave Sylvain two sons. 

Alexis dit Lexy's fourth son Alexis, fils, born at Cobeguit in c1717, married Hélène, daughter of Pierre Blanchard and Françoise Breau, at Cobeguit in c1740.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1742 and 1755, Hélène gave Alexis, fils seven children, four sons and three daughters.  The family moved on to the French Maritimes after 1752.  Alexis, fils died at sea during the deportation to France in 1758, age 41.  At least two his sons married in France, and three of them emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Oldest son Joseph le jeune, born at Cobeguit in c1744, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Claire Dugas, at Ploubalay, near St.-Malo, France, in March 1764.  Between 1765 and 1780, Marie-Josèphe gave Joseph le jeune 10 children, eight sons and two daughters.  Joseph le jeune, now a widower, and four of his remaining sons emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  At age 44, he remarried to cousin Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Aucoin and Marguerite Thériot, probably at Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge in May 1788.  Marie gave him more children there, including two more sons.  Four of Joseph le jeune's sons, by both wives, married into the Henry, Dugas, Darois, Aucoin, and Richard families, and most of them created vigorous lines on Bayou Lafourche. 

Alexis, fils's second son Fabien, born at Cobeguit in c1746, followed his family to the French Maritimes and France.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Charles Dupuis and Marie Trahan of Rivière-aux-Canards, at St.-Similien, Nantes, in May 1776.  They emigrated to Louisiana in 1785, settled on upper Bayou Lafource, and remained a childless couple. 

Alexis, fils's third and youngest son Mathurin-Jean, born at Cobeguit in c1755, followed his family to Île St.-Jean as an infant, was deported with them to France in 1758, and came to Louisiana alone and unmarried in 1785.  In 1788, he was living at Lafourche with older brother Fabien and his wife.  In the 1790s, while in his early 40s, Mathurin-Jean served as an engagé, or hired worker, on the upper Bayou Lafourche farm of fellow Acadian Élie Blanchard, probably a kinsman.  Unlike his older brothers, Mathuirin-Jean did not marry.  

Alexis dit Lexy's fifth son Jean, born at Cobegut in c1719, married Marie, daughter of Martin Blanchard and Isabelle Dupuis, in c1745 probably at Cobeguit and died in greater Acadia before 1758, in his late 30s. 

Alexis dit Lexy's sixth son Joseph l'aîné, born at Cobeguit in c1721, married Anne, another daughter of Pierre Blanchard and Françoise Breau, in c1743 probably at Cobeguit and moved on to the French Maritimes.  Between 1750 and 1756, Anne gave Joseph l'aîné three children, a son and two daughters.  The family was deported to France in 1758.  Anne and all three of their children died at sea.  Joseph l'aîné remarried to Anne, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Claire Dugas and widow of Jean Blanchard, at Ploubalay, near St.-Malo, in October 1759.  Between 1760 and 1785, Anne gave Joseph 11 more children, six sons and five daughters, in the St.-Malo area.  Joseph l'aîné, Anne, and six of their younger children, three daughters and three sons, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores before moving on to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Joseph l'aîné's three daughters married into the Hébert, Bourg, and Gautreaux families in the Spanish colony.  His three surviving sons, all by second wife Anne Hébert, married into the Boudreaux and Delaune families and settled on Bayou Lafourche. 

Alexis dit Lexy's seventh son François, born at Cobeguit in c1725, married Élisabeth, another daughter of Martin Blanchard and Isabelle Dupuis, at Cobeguit in c1748 and moved on to the French Maritimes.  The family was deported to France in 1758, and François remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Claude Girouard and Madeleine Vincent and widow of Jean Pouget, probably at Rochefort in c1770.  

Alexis dit Lexy's eighth son Alexandre, born at Cobeguit in August 1725, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Trahan and Jeanne Daigre, at Minas in c1750 and settled at Rivière-aux-Canards.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Alexandre a daughter there in c1754.  They were deported to Virginia in 1755 and sent on to England in 1756.  Alexandre remarried to Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Duon and Madeleine Vincent of Minas, at Liverpool in October 1759.  Between 1761 and 1778, at Liverpool and in France, Élisabeth gave Alexandre seven more daughters.  The family landed at Pleujean, Morlaix, Brittany, in 1763.  In the fall of 1765, they joined other Acadians from England on Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany.  They remained on the island for a dozen years and then moved on to Nantes in southern Brittany.  Alexandre died at St.-Similien, Nantes, in October 1780, age 55.  His widow and their seven daughters emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Five of Alexandre and Élisabeth's daughters married into the Simon, Faulk, Guidry, Benoit, Trahan, Granger, and Sellers families in the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin. 

Alexis dit Lexy's ninth son Claude, born at Cobeguit in c1728, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Anne-Apolline, daughter of Nicolas Lacroix and Cécile Hébert, at Port-La-Joye in January 1757.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne-Apolline gave Claude a son in 1758, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.  One wonders what happened to them after 1758. 

Alexis dit Lexy's tenth son Hyacinthe, born at Cobeguit in c1732, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and then to France.  He married Marie-Barbe-Antoinette, daughter of French couple Antoine Laidez and Marguerite Pollet, at Calais in November 1763 and settled on Belle-Île-en-Mer near older brother Alexandre.  Unlike Alexandre's widow, in 1785 Hyacinthe evidently chose to remain in France. 

Alexis dit Lexy's eleventh son Amand, born probably at Cobeguit in c1733, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, married Anne-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Hébert and Isabelle Benoit, at Port-La-Joye in January 1756, and died there the following June, age 23.   

Alexis dit Lexy's twelfth and youngest son Chérubin, born at Cobeguit in c1737, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and then to France, where he settled at Dunkerque, one of the few Acadians to go there.  He also settled at Boulogne-sur-Mer and evidently did not marry. 

Martin's fourth son Augustin, Alexis's twin, born at Chignecto in March 1684, evidently died young.

Martin's fifth son Pierre, born in c1689, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Breau and Marie-Josèphe Bourgeois, in c1716 probably at Minas and settled on Rivière-aux-Canards.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Pierre a son in 1717.  Pierre remarried to Catherine, daughter of Jean Comeau le jeune and Catherine Babin, at Grand-Pré in August 1718.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1719 and 1730, Catherine gave Pierre five more children, another son and four daughters.  One of Pierre's daughters married into the Landry family.  Two of his sons created families of their own. 

Older son Pierre, fils, by first wife Marie Breau, born at Minas in c1717, married Anne, daughter of Jean Thibodeau and Marguerite Hébert, at Grand-Pré in October 1745.  One wonders what happened to them after 1755. 

Pierre, père's younger son Charles, by second wife Catherine Comeau, born at Minas in c1723, married Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Trahan and Jeanne Daigre of Pigiguit, at Rivière-aux-Canards in November 1753.  According to Bona Arsenault, Madeleine gave Charles at least one son, Pierre le jeune, born probably at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1755.  The family was deported to Virginia later that year, sent on to England in early 1756, and repatriated to St.-Malo, France, in the spring of 1763.  They settled at Plouër near St.-Malo.  Evidently Pierre le jeune remained their only child.  Charles, Madeleine, Pierre le jeune, and two kinswomen emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores before moving downriver to San Gabriel.  Their only son married into the Hébert and Guidry families and created a vigorous line on the river. 

Martin's sixth son René, born in c1690, married Madeleine, yet another daughter of Martin Bourg and Marie Potet, in c1712 probably at Minas, moved on to Chignecto in the early 1750s, and died there by 1755, in his 60s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1714 and 1735, Madeleine gave René nine children, three sons and six daughters.  Their daughters married into the Landry, LeBlanc, Maillet, Gaudet, Bourgeois, and Comeau families.  Two of René's three sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre le jeune, born probably at Minas before 1714, married Marguerite Dupuis in c1735 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1739 and 1755, Marguerite gave Pierre le jeune a son and three daughters.  In c1740, they followed his family to Chignecto but may have returned to Minas on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  Pierre le jeune and most of his family escaped the British in 1755 and found refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie de Chaleurs, where they were counted in 1759.  Daughter Marie married into the Nuirat family at Restigouche in November 1759.  Daughter Anne became separated from the family, ended up in France, married into the Cheramie family at Nantes, and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Pierre le jeune's son, who also had become separated from the family, also created his own family in France. 

Only son Michel, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1755, somehow became separated from his family as an infant, perhaps in the care of his older sister Anne, and with her was deported to one of the British seaboard colonies.  In the early 1760s, Michel, perhaps with his sister, ventured with other Acadians to French St.-Dominique, today's Haiti, where French authorities employed Acadians to work on a new French naval base on the north shore of the island.  At age 14, Michel, perhaps with his sister, sailed from Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, to St.-Malo, France, which he reached in October 1769.  For the next few years, he lived with the family of his uncle Jean Aucoin at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, and became a woodworker.  Michel married Rosalie or Rose, daughter of Jean De La Forestrie and his first wife Marie-Madeliene Bonnière of Île St.-Jean, at Ste.-Croix Parish, Nantes, France, in July 1779, and emigrated to Louisiana with his wife and two young daughters in 1785.  Michel and Rosalie settled on upper Bayou Lafourche and had more children there.  Michel died in Assumption Parish in June 1833, in his late 70s.  One of his older daughters married into the Dumon family in New Orleans.  Neither of his sons seems to have married, so this line of the family, except for its blood, evidently did not survive in the Bayou State.  

René's second son Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, born probably at Minas in c1714, married Jeanne-Anne, daughter of Jean Thériot and Marie Daigre, in c1746 probably at Minas.  In 1754, they moved on to Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1754 and 1756, Jeanne gave Jean two daughters.  They moved on to Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in 1755, and were deported to Boulogne-sur-mer, France, in 1758.  Another daughter was born to them at Boulogne-sur-Mer in May 1765.  Their older daughters married into the Pitre and Thériot famlies in France, and one of them remarried into the Blanchard family in Louisiana.  Jean, Jeanne, and their youngest daughter Anne-Félicité emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  From New Orleans, they followed the majority of their fellow passengers--including older daughters Élisabeth and Marie-Anastasie and their families--to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Youngest daughter Anne-Félicité married into the Montet family and remained on the upper Lafourche. 

René's third and youngest son Charles, born probably at Minas in c1735, was deported with his family to Virginia in 1755, sent on to Southampton, England, in 1756, and repatriatetd to France in the spring of 1763.  He died at Rochet, near St.-Malo, in December 1763, in his late 20s, before he could marry.

Martin's seventh son Antoine, born at Minas in c1694, married Anne, another daughter of Pierre Breau and Marie-Josèphe Bourgeois, at Grand-Pré in November 1713, settled at Rivière-aux-Canards, moved to Pigiguit in 1748, and moved on to the French Maritimes after 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1717 and 1729, Anne gave Antoine four children, three sons and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Landry family.  Two of Antoine's three sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Jean, born at Grand-Pré in November 1717, likely died young. 

Antoine's second son Olivier, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in the late 1710s or early 1720s, married Claire, daughter of Michel Thibodeau and Agnès Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in November 1748 and settled at Pigiguit.  Olivier remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Paul Daigre and Anne Cormier and widow of Germain Forest, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in October 1762 while in exile. 

Antoine's third and youngest son Antoine, fils, born perhaps at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1729, followed his family to the French Maritimes after 1752, was deported to France in 1758, and married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Hébert and Marguerite Bourg and widow of Élie LeBlanc, at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in January 1760.  Between 1761 and 1770, Françoise gave Antoine, fils four chidren, three sons and a daughter.  Françoise died at St.-Suliac in January 1771.  Antoine, fils did not remarry.  He and two of his sons emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Both sons married, into the Aucoin and Arcement families, but only the younger sons's line endured. 

Martin's eighth son Joseph, born probably at Minas before 1698, married Anne, daughter of Jean-Charles Trahan and Marie Boudrot, in c1720 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1721 and 1741, Anne gave Joseph at least five children, a son and four daughters.  Other sources give the couple another son.  The British deported Joseph and his unmarried children to Virginia in 1755 and sent them on to England in 1756.  The family was repatraited to France in the spring of 1763 and settled in the St.-Malo area.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Maillet, Duon, Broussard, Hébert, and Richard families in England, France, and Louisiana.  Two of them emigrated to the Spanish colony in 1785.  Both of Joseph's and Anne's sons also created their own families and emigrated to Louisiana, where one of the lines survived.  

Older son Joseph, fils, born probably at Minas in c1725, married Françoise Breau probably at Minas in c1747.  According to Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France, Françoise gave Joseph, fils two daughters in 1748 and 1751. The British exiled the family to Virginia in 1755, sent them on to England in 1756, and they were repatriated to France in the spring of 1763.  Joseph, fils remarried to Madeleine, daughter of François Gautrot and Marie Vincent of Minas and widow of Pierre Boudrot, at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo, in February 1764.  She evidently gave him no more children.  One, perhaps both, of Joseph, fils's daughters by first wife Françoise died in France.  He and second wife Madeleine emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and evidently settled in the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  They brought no children to the Spanish colony and had none there. 

Joseph, père's younger son Claude, born probably at Minas in c1728, followed his family to Virginia and England.  He married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Saulnier and Madeleine Comeau of Petitcoudiac, in England in c1757.  They, too, were repatriated to France in 1763.  With them was their 5-year-old son Jean-Baptiste.  Between 1763 and 1779, Marie-Josèphe gave Claude eight more children, five sons and three daughters, in France.  Claude, Marie-Josèphe, and five of their children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Claude, at age 60, remarried to Marie-Geneviève, daughter of Matthew Brasseaux dit La Citardy and Jeanne Célestin dit Bellemère and widow of Pierre-Olivier Benoit, at Opelousas in November 1788.  Claude died at Opelousas in August 1794, age 66.  Two of his daughters by first wife Marie-Josèphe married into the Normand and Bertrand dit Beaulieu families at Opelousas.  Three of his six sons by both wives married into the Forest, Langlois, Sylvestre, and Fontenot families in France and Louisiana and settled on the Opelousas prairies, but not all of the lines survived. 

Martin's ninth son Jean, born probably at Minas in c1698, married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Pitre and Marie Comeau, in c1722 and settled at Minas and Cobeguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1723 and 1730, Marguerite gave Jean five children, two sons and three daughters.  Jean died in c1730 probably at Cobeguit.  His two sons created families of their own.  

Older son Pierre, born in c1728, was deported to Virginia in 1755, sent on to England in 1756, married Félicité LeBlanc in England c1762, and was repatriated to France the following year.  Between 1763 and 1780, Félicité gave Pierre 10 children, five sons and five daughters, in England and France.  In 1773, the family joined other Acadians on the Isle of Jersey, one of the British-owned Channel islands off the western coast of Normandy.  They then returned to North America and settled at Chéticamp on the western shore of Cape Breton Island, and also fished on the Baie des Chaleurs.  Pierre remarried to Marie Doucet in c1782 probably at Chéticamp.  Four of his daughters by first wife Félicité married into the Doucet, Deveau, Gaudet, and LeBlanc families at Chéticamp.  Three of Pierre's sons, all by his first wife, created their own families.  One of them settled in the îles-de-la-Madeleine. 

Oldest son Anselme, by first wife Félicité LeBlanc, born in England in c1763, married Rose Chiasson at Chéticamp in c1785 and remained there. 

Pierre's second son Joseph, by first wife Félicité LeBlanc, born in c1774, married Isabelle LeBlanc in c1794 and remained at Chéticamp. 

Pierre's third and youngest son Pierre, fils, by first wife Félicité LeBlanc, born in c1775, married Luce Babin in c1795 and resettled in the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawerence, northwest of Chéticamp.  According to Bona Arsenault, Luce gave Pierre, fils a son in c1795. 

Only son Pierre III married Esther, daughter of Joseph Chiasson and Henriette Boudrot, at Havre-Aubert in the Madeleines in September 1819, and remarried to Françoise Haché, widow of Jean Blanchard.  (Strangely, Bona Arsenault has Pierre III's father remarrying to this woman as well).  

Jean's younger son Joseph, born in c1730, also was deported to Virginia and England, where he married Marie Hébert in c1762.  They, too, were repatriated to France in 1763, followed Joseph's brother Pierre to the Isle of Jersey in 1773, and settled at Chéticamp.  According to Bona Arsenault, Joseph and Marie were that rare Acadian couple who had no children of their own, but they adopted a young Irishman, Cyriac Roach, also called Roche, who established a family at Chéticamp.  

Martin's tenth and youngest son Charles, born probably at Minas in c1700, married Anne-Marie, called Marie, daughter of Martin Dupuis and Marie Landry, at Grand-Pré in January 1726.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1730 and 1749, Anne-Marie gave Charles at least five children, three sons and two daughters.  The family was deported to Virginia in 1755, sent on to England in 1756, and repatriated to France in May 1763.  Charles died probably in England before the family's repatriation.  Two of his daughters married into the LeBlanc and Aucoin families in England and Louisiana, and both of them emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.  His three sons also created their own families and emigrated to Louisiana.  

Oldest son Olivier, born at Grand-Pré in c1727, married Marguerite Vincent probably at Minas in c1750.  According to Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France, in 1753 and 1755, Marguerite gave Olivier two children, a daughter and a son, at Rivière-aux-Canards.  The British deported them to Virginia in 1755 and sent them on to England in 1756.  After being repatriated to France in May 1763, they settled at St.-Malo.  Olivier remarried to Cécile, daughter of Pierre Richard and Cécile Granger, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in November 1765.  According to Robichaux, between 1766 and 1777, Cécile gave Olivier two more sons and four more daughters at St.-Servan, in Poitou, and at Nantes.  The son died at age 2.  Meanwhile, Olivier's daughter by first wife Marguerite married Acadian shaker and mover Olivier Térriot at Nantes in 1777, and his son by his first wife Marguerite married there in May 1778.  Olivier, Cécile, and their three surviving daughters emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Olivier's daughter by his first wife also emigrated to the Spanish colony with her family aboard the same vessel.  Olivier and Cécile had no more children in Louisiana.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, Blanchard, and Templet families.  Olivier died in Assumption Parish in August 1813, age 86.  Though his son by his first wife died in France--he was the last of Olivier's three sons to die there--his only grandson emigrated to Louisiana and created  his own famliy there. 

Oldest son Firmin, by first wife Marguerite Vincent, born at Rivière-aux-Canards, Minas, in c1755, followed his family to Virginia, England, and France, where he became a sailor.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Alexandre Bourg and Marguerite-Josèphe Hébert, at St.-Jacques, Nantes, in May 1778.  Their son Firmin-Louis was born in St.-Jacques Parish in February 1779.  Firmin died before 1785, and his widow Marguerite, along with her widowed mother, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 on the same vessel which took her father-in-law and his family to the Spanish colony.  Firmin's son Firmin-Louis married into the Arceneaux family in Louisiana and settled on Bayou Lafourche, so Olivier's line of the family endured in the Bayou State.    

Charles's second son Alexandre, born at Grand-Pré in c1740, followed his family to Virginia and England.  He married Rosalie, daughter of Charles Thériot and Françoise Landry, in England in c1761.  They were repatriated to France in May 1763 and settled in the St.-Malo suburbs, where Rosalie gave him at least 11 children, eight daughters and three sons.  Alexandre, Rosalie, and three of their children, two daughters and a son, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  (Two of their older children, a son and a daughter, may have elected to remain in the mother country.)  Alexandre, Rosalie, and their three remaining children followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores on the Mississippi above Baton Rouge.  Alexandre died by January 1788, when his wife remarried at Baton Rouge.  His daughters married into the Raoul and Bourg families on the river, and one of them moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche.  His son Mathurin, who was age 4 when he came to the Spanish colony, evidently did not marry, so only the blood of Alexandre's family line survived in the Bayou State.  

Charles's third and youngest son Charles, fils, born at Grand-Pré in c1747, followed his family to Virginia, England, France, and Louisiana.  At age 39, he married Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, 22-year-old daughter of Pierre Noël and Marie-Madeleine Barbe of Minas and England and widow of Frenchman Guillaume-Jean Roquemont, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans in January 1786 soon after they reached the colony on the same vessel.  Charles, fils died at Ascension, present-day Donaldsonville, in January 1805, in his late 50s.  His daughters married into the Daigle, Hébert, Landry, and LeBlanc families.  None of his three sons married, so this line of the family, except for its blood, did not endure.395

Lord

Julien Lord dit LaMontagne, an early 1670s arrival, and his wife Anne-Charlotte Girouard created a fairly large family in the colony.  Anne-Charlotte gave Julien nine children, five sons and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Doucet and Amireau dit Tourangeau families.  Four of Julien's five sons created their own families.  His and Anne-Charlotte's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Pigiguit, and Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area, and were among the rare Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  If any of Julien's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Alexandre dit LaMontagne married Marie-Françoise, daughter of Nicolas Barrieau and Martine Hébert, in c1701 probably at Port-Royal and died there in October 1740, in his mid-60s.  Marie-Françoise gave Alexandre a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Comeau, Amireau dit Tourangeau, Bonnevie dit Beaumont, Derayer, Martin, Bourg, Doiron, and Vincent families.   

Oldest son Jean married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Comeau and Susanne Bezier, at Annapolis Royal in February 1737 and settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.   

Alexandre's second son Joseph l'aîné married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Antoine Brun and Marie-Françoise Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in January 1742 and died there between January and December 1742, in his late 20s.  

Alexandre's third son Joseph le jeune married Anne, daughter of René Blanchard and Marie Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in September 1716, and remarried to Judith, daughter of François Pitre and Anne Préjean and widow of René Boudrot, at St.-Joachim, below Québec, in November 1760 while in exile.  

Alexandre's fourth son Pierre married Élisabeth, daughter of Étienne Martin and Marie-Jeanne Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in January 1747.   

Alexandre's fifth and youngest son Charles married Marie-Josèphe, another daughter of René Blanchard and Marie Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in January 1755, and remarried to Marie-Ludivine, called Ludivine, daughter of Louis Thibeau and Marie-Jeanne Picot, at Yamachiche, near Trois-Rivière, Canada, in October 1771. 

Julien's second son Jacques married Angélique, daughter of Pierre Comeau l'aîné and Jeanne Bourg, at Port-Royal in November 1708, and remarried to Marie-Charlotte, daughter of Jacques Bonnevie dit Beaumont and François Mius d'Entremont, at Annapolis Royal in August 1721.  First wife Angélique gave Jacques two children, a son and a daughter, neither of whom married.  Second wife Marie-Charlotte gave him eight more children, all sons.  Six of Jacques's nine sons by his second wife married, three of them to sisters.  

Oldest son Jacques, fils, by first wife Angélique Comeau, died at Nicolet, across from Trois-Rivière, Canada, in October 1786, age 77, but never married.  

Jacques, père's second son Charles dit Charlot, by second wife Marie-Charlotte Bonnevie, married Marguerite, daughter of Daniel Garceau and Anne Doucet, at Annapolis Royal in January 1755, on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement

Jacques, père's third son Joseph, by second wife Marie-Charlotte Bonnevie, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre-Jean Garceau and Agnès Doucet, at Annapolis Royal in February 1750.   

Jacques, père's fourth son Pierre-Benjamin, by second wife Marie-Charlotte Bonnevie, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Blanchard and Marie Bourg, somewhere in greater Acadia in May 1763 while in exile.   

Jacques, père's fifth son Jean, by second wife Marie-Charlotte Bonnevie, married Marie-Josèphe, another daughter of Daniel Garceau and Anne Doucet, in New England in c1765.   

Jacques, père's sixth, seventh, and eighth sons Paul, Claude-Poncy, and François, by second wife Marie-Charlotte Bonnevie, evidently died young.   

Jacques, père's ninth and youngest son Honoré, by second wife Marie-Charlotte Bonnevie, married Appoline dite Hippolyte, yet another daughter of Daniel Garceau and Anne Doucet, in New England in c1765, remarried to Susanne, daughter of François Lafaille and Marguerite Forest, at L'Acadie, Canada, in January 1790, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Marguerite, daughter of Louis Babin and Marie-Jeanne Laporte, at L'Acadie in February 1804, age 61. 

Julien's third son Pierre married Jeanne, daughter of Laurent Doucet and Jeanne Babin, at Annapolis Royal in June 1715 and died there in January 1738, a widower in his mid-50s. 

Julien's fourth son Louis evidently died young.

Julien's fifth and youngest son Charles married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jacques Doucet and Marie Pellerin, at Annapolis Royal in February 1726 and settled there.396

Pellerin

Étienne Pellerin, an early 1670s arrival, was not kin to François Pellerin who came to the colony a few years earlier.  Étienne and his wife Jeanne Savoie created a large line of the family that remained in the colony.  From the late 1680s, Étienne owned Hog Island on Rivière-au-Dauphin, now the Annapolis River, near Port-Royal, which he had purchased from Jacques Bourgeois and François Broussard.  In August 1714, soon after the British took over the colony, Étienne was among the Acadians who traveled to Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, aboard the King's vessel La Marie Joseph to look at land with the possibility of removing to the French territory.  Evidently he did not like what he saw on the island and returned to Annapolis Royal, enduring British rule there.  Jeanne gave Étienne 10 children, five sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Calvé dit Laforge, Doucet, Brun, Surette, and Gaudet families.  Four of Étienne's five sons created their own families.  His and Jeanne's descendants remained at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, among the relatively few Acadian families that did not spread out to other communities or retreat to the French Maritimes.  At least three of Étienne's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.   

Oldest son Pierre reached adulthood but did not marry.

Étienne's second son Jean-Baptiste married Marie, daughter of Pierre Martin, fils and Anne Ouestnorouest dit Petitous, at Port-Royal in February 1710 and remained there.  Marie gave Jean-Baptiste six children, three sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Doucet and Raymond families.  Two of Jean-Baptiste's three sons created their own families.   

Oldest son Pierre died an infant.   

Jean-Baptiste's second son Pierre married Anne, daughter of Charles Girouard and Anne Bastarache, at Annapolis Royal in February 1745.   

Jean-Baptiste's third and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, fils married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Abraham Bourg and Marie Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in January 1744.

Étienne's third son Charles dit Toc married Madeleine, daughter of syndic Prudent Robichaud and Henriette Petitpas, at Annapolis Royal in January 1725, in his mid-30s, and settled there. 

Étienne's fourth son Bernard married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Gaudet le jeune and Marie Blanchard, at Annapolis Royal in November 1713 and settled there.  Marguerite gave Bernard 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Brun and Thibodeau families.  Four of Bernard's six sons created their own families.   

Oldest son Pierre married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Belliveau and Marguerite Granger, at Annapolis Royal in March 1745, and remarried to Cécile, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Cécile LeBlanc and widow of Jean-Baptiste Pitre, at Ste.-Croix de Lotbinière, across from Québec, in November 1762 while in exile.   

Bernard's second son Paul married Anne, daughter of Germain Savoie and Geneviève Babineau, at Annapolis Royal in February 1748, and remarried to Marie Girouard after 1752 probably at Annapolis Royal.   

Bernard's third son Joseph died at Annapolis Royal in May 1751, age 29, before he could marry.   

Bernard's fourth son Grégoire married Cécile, daughter of Charles Préjean and Catherine-Josèphe Broussard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752 and emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax with his Broussard kin.   

Bernard's fifth son Charles dit Lasers married Madeleine Thibodeau in c1750 probably at Annapolis Royal, remarried to Isabelle, daughter of Paul Thibodeau and Marguerite Trahan, in c1759 probably at Restigouche, at the head of the Baie des Chalieurs, during exile, and emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax.   

Bernard's sixth and youngest son, name unrecorded, died young.

Étienne's fifth and youngest son Alexandre married Jeanne, another daughter of Pierre Gaudet le jeune and Marie Blanchard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1716 and remained.397

Henry

Robert Henry, a mid-1670s arrival, and his wife Marie-Madeleine Godin created a large family in the colony.  Marie-Madeleine gave Robert 13 children, six sons and seven daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Doiron, Pitre, Druce, Radoux, Pinet, and Guérard families.  All six of Robert's sons created their own families.  His and Marie-Madeleine's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Minas, Cobeguit, and in the French Maritimes, where they were especially numerous by 1752.  At least 48 of Robert's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Martin dit Robert married Marie, daughter of Étienne Hébert and Jeanne Comeau, in c1699 probably at Minas, settled at Cobeguit, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  Marie gave Martin nine children, six sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Carret, Breau, and Aucoin families.  Five of Martin dit Robert's six sons created their own families.   

Oldest son Jean dit Le Neveu married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Germain Thériot and Anne Pellerin, in c1727 perhaps at Cobeguit and moved on to the French Maritimes.   

Martin's second son Pierre married Anne, daughter of Martin Aucoin and Catherine Thériot, in c1730 perhaps at Cobeguit and moved on to the French Maritimes.   

Martin's third son, name unrecorded, died young.   

Martin's fourth son François married Marie, daughter of Joseph Dugas and Anne-Marie Hébert, in c1740 perhaps at Cobeguit and moved on to the French Maritimes.   

Martin's fifth son Martin, fils married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Benoit and Marie-Anne Breau, in c1742 perhaps at Cobeguit and moved on to the French Maritimes.   

Martin, père's sixth and youngest son Paul married Théotiste, daughter of Philippe Thibodeau and Isabelle Vincent, in c1745 perhaps at Cobeguit and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Robert's second son Jean dit le Vieux married Marie, daughter of Jean Hébert and Jeanne Doiron, in c1717, place unrecorded, and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Robert's third son Germain married Cécile, daughter of Michel Deveau and Marie-Madeleine Martin, in c1720, place recorded, and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Robert's fourth daughter Madeleine gave birth to "natural" son Jean-Baptiste two years before she married her first husband, Benjamin Druce.  Jean-Baptiste survived childhood, called himself an Henry, and married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Mius d'Azy and Marie Amireau, in c1733, place unrecorded, and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Robert's fourth son Pierre dit Robert married Marguerite, daughter of Mathieu Brasseur and Jeanne Célestin dit Bellemère, at Grand-Pré in May 1736 and may have remained there.

Robert's fifth son Antoine married Claire Hébert in c1725, place unrecorded, and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Robert's sixth and youngest son Joseph dit le Petit Homme married Christine dite Catherine, daughter of Jean Pitre and Françoise Babin, in c1729, place unrecorded, and moved on to the French Maritimes.409

Gareau

Dominique Gareau, sergeant in the service of King Louis XIV, a mid-1670s arrival, and his wife Marie Gaudet created a small family in the colony whose blood, at least, survived there.  Dominique's family was counted at La Hève in 1693.  His only child, daughter Marie, settled at Minas and married twice, first to ____ LaChapelle in c1693 and then to Jérôme Darois in c1698.  Marie died either in Virginia or England, in her late 70s, while in exile.  If any of Dominique's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.399

Rivet

Étienne Rivet, a mid-1670s arrival, and his wife Marie-Jeanne or Marie-Anne Comeau created a good-sized family in the colony.  She gave him five children, three sons and two daughters.  One of their daughters married into the Boudrot family.  Only one of Étienne's and Marie's sons created his own family.  In c1691, while in his late 30s, Étienne remarried to Catherine ____, widow of Jean Labarre, probably at Minas.  She gave him no more children.  Étienne and Marie-Jeanne's descendants settled at Minas; Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, where they were especially numerous; and in the French Maritimes.  Étienne must have done well in his agricultural enterprises.  In October 1721, 14 or so years after his death, the record of a legal transaction revealed that his estate consisted of two parcels of land, one at Rivière-aux-Canards at Minas, the other at nearby Pigiguit.  At least 11 of Étienne's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in the late 1760s. 

Oldest son René by first wife Marie-Jean Comeau evidently died young.

Étienne's second son Étienne, fils married Anne, daughter of Jacques Leprince and Marguerite Hébert, in c1708 at either Minas or Pigiguit.  Anne gave Étienne, fils eight children, five sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Landry and Forest families.  One of them emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland.  Four of Étienne, fils and Anne's five sons married.   

Étienne, fils's oldest son, name unrecorded, died young.   

Étienne, fils's second son Michel married Anne, daughter of Abraham Landry and Marie Guilbeau, at Pigiguit in c1739, and remarried to Catherine, daughter of Clément Benoit and Anne Babin, at Pigiguit in c1751.   

Étienne, fils's third son Étienne III married Claire, daughter of Pierre Forest and Madeleine Babin, at Pigiguit in 1743, emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland, and remarried to Isabelle, or Élisabeth, daughter of Pierre Landry and Claire Babin, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans in April 1779, in his early 60s.  

Étienne, fils's fourth son Augustin dit Justin married in c1750 a woman whose name has been lost to history and evidently moved on to the French Maritimes after August 1752.  

Étienne, fils's fifth and youngest son Jean moved from Pigiguit to the French Maritimes, where he married Rosalie, daughter of Pierre Bonnière and Madeleine-Josèphe Forest, at Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, in September 1758, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.

Étienne's third and youngest son Antoine died young.400

Triel dit Laperrière

Jacques Triel dit Laperrière, a mid-1670s arrival, and his wife Marie Savoie created a small family in the colony.  Marie gave him five children, three sons and two daughters, who married into the La Chaume dit Loumeray and LeBlanc dit Jasmin families.  Only one of their sons married, but he had no sons of his own.  Jacques and Marie's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and in the French Maritimes.  If any of Jacque's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Pierre dit Triquel dit Patron, born probably at Port-Royal in c1677, married Catherine, daughter of Jean Bourg and Marguerite Martin and widow of Jean Turpin dit La Giroflée, in c1720 probably at Annapolis Royal, moved on to Île Royale after their marriage, and settled on Île Madame.  Their daughter Agnès and husband Pierre Guédry came to the colony in August 1751 and were living with her parents on Île Descoust when a French official counted them there in February 1752. 

Jacques's second son Nicolas, born probably at Port-Royal in c1682, became a fisherman at Annapolis Royal but probably did not marry. 

Jacques's third and youngest son Alexis, born probably at Port-Royal in c1684, died at Port-Royal in February 1708, in his mid-20s, before he could marry.401

Labauve

Noël Labauve, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife Marie Rimbault created a fairly large family in the colony.  Marie gave Noël a dozen children, seven sons and five daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Bastarache, Levron, Hébert dit Baguette, and LeBlanc families.  Daughter Anne-Marie gave birth to a "natural" daughter at Annapolis Royal in June 1713, nine years before she married Louis Hébert dit Baguette at Annapolis.  Five of Noël's seven sons created their own families.  His and Marie's descendants settled at Minas, La Hève, Chignecto, Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area, and Annapolis Royal, as well as in the French Maritimes and Canada before Le Grand Dérangement.  At least eight of Noël's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and France in 1785. 

Oldest son René dit Renochon married Anne, daughter of Martin Lejeune dit Briard and Jeanne Kagigconiac, in c1702 perhaps at Minas and moved on to La Hève on the Atlantic coast before settling at Minas.  Anne gave Renochon six children, one son and five daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Bourey, Tudal, Le Marchand, and Orillon dit Champagne families, two of them on Île St.-Jean.  Renochon's only son Pierre le jeune evidently died young, so only the blood of this family line survived.

Noël's second son Pierre died at Hôtel-Dieu de Québec in May 1714, in his early 30s, and did not marry.

Noël's third son François married Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Blou and Marie Girouard, in c1712 probably at Chignecto and died there by 1752, perhaps in his 60s.  Madeleine gave François six children, three sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Poirier and Héon families.  Only one of François's three sons created a family of his own.   

Oldest son François, fils evidently died young.   

François, père's second son Louis le jeune married Marie, daughter of Jean Landry and Claire LeBlanc, at Beaubassin in October 1740 and moved on to the French Maritimes.   

François, père's third and youngest son Claude died young.

Noël's fourth son Louis married Anne La Vache in c1712, 15 years after she gave birth to "natural" son François La Vache probably at Port-Royal, but they settled at Minas and then Chepoudy.  Anne gave Louis nine children, seven sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Gautrot and Dubois families.  Only three of Louis's seven sons created their own families.   

Oldest son Charles married Marie, daughter of Clément Benoit and Anne Babin, in c1737, place unrecorded, and remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Dubois and Anne Vincent, in c1755, place unrecorded.   

Louis's second son Jean married Agnès, daughter of Marcel Saulnier and Élisabeth Breau, in c1746 probably at Minas.   

Louis's third son Joseph dit Labos married Marie ____ in c1750 probably at Minas, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of François La Vache and Anne-Marie Vincent and widow of Simon Breau, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in April 1766.  

Louis's fourth, fifth, and sixth sons, names unrecorded, died young.  

Louis's seventh and youngest son Paul-Olivier married Marie-Louise, daughter of Canadians Jean Laurent dit Provençal and Marie-Louise Palin, at Québec in July 1765. 

Noël's fifth son Antoine married Catherine, daughter of Pierre Lejeune and Marie Thibodeau, at Grand-Pré in October 1718, moved on to the French Maritimes, and died on Île Royale in April 1733, in his early 40s.

Noël's sixth son Jérôme died young.

Noël's seventh and youngest son Jean married Madeleine, daughter of François Levron and Catherine Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in August 1722.402

Lapierre

François Lapierre dit Laroche, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Rimbault created a good-sized family in the colony.  Jeanne gave François 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the David, Le Marquis dit Clérmont, and Renaud dit Provençal families.  Only three of François's six sons created families of their own.  His and Jeanne's descendants settled not only at Minas, but also at Chignecto and in the French Maritimes.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son François, fils, who became a fisherman, married Marie, daughter of Jacques Blou and Marie Girouard and widow of Sébastien Chiasson, in c1708 perhaps at Minas but resettled at Chignecto.  Marie gave François, fils three children, two sons and a daughter, all of whom married into a single family.  Their daughter married into the Caissie family.   

Older son Michel married Madeleine, daughter of Michel Caissie and Madeleine Gaudet, probably at Chignecto in c1732.   

François, fils's younger son François III married Marie-Josèphe, another daughter of Michel Caissie and Madeleine Gaudet, at Beaubassin in January 1735. 

François's second son Jacques married Marie, daughter of Louis Saulnier and Louise Bastineau dit Peltier, at Grand-Pré in October 1717 and died there in October 1725, age 40.  Marie gave Jacques seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Lalande and Lebert families.  All of Jacques's three sons created their own families   

Oldest son Joseph married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Brun and Cécile Dugas, at Beaubassin in October 1743. 

Jacques's second son Pierre married Angélique, daughter of Philippe Thibodeau and Isabelle Vincent, in c1746, place unrecorded.   

Jacques's third and youngest son Paul married in c1749 a woman whose name had been lost to history, place unrecorded.

François's third and fourth sons Claude and Étienne evidently died young.

François's fifth son Charles married Marie, daughter of Marc Pitre and Jeanne Brun, in c1723, place unrecorded, and died by 1733, age and place unrecorded.

François's sixth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste evidently died young.406

Guédry

Claude Guédry dit Grivois, a late 1670s arrival, and his second wife Marguerite Petitpas created a large family in the colony.  Claude's first wife Kesk8a, a Mi'kmaq, gave him one child, a daughter, who evidently died young.  Second wife Marguerite gave him 11 more children, nine sons and two daughters.  Claude dit Grivois died in British Nova Scotia after January 1723, probably in his 70s.  His daughters married into the Doiron and Lejeune families.  Only four of his nine sons created families of their own, but their lines were vigorous.  His and Marguerite's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Mirliguèche and La Hève on the Atlantic coast; L'Assomption, Pigiguit, and Cobeguit in the Minas Basin; and on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale in the French Maritimes.  At least 44 of Claude's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, from Maryland in the late 1760s, Canada in the 1780s or 1790s, and especially from France in 1785.  Other descendants, in much smaller numbers, could be found in greater Acadia, Canada, and perhaps in Maryland and France after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Claude, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1682, evidently died young. 

Claude, père's second son Jean-Baptiste dit Grivois, born probably at Port-Royal in c1684, married Madeleine, daughter of Philippe Mius d'Azy and Marie ____, a Mi'kmaq, by 1708 probably on the Atlantic coast.  Between 1709 and 1716, Madeleine gave Jean-Baptiste four children, three sons and a daughter, the youngest born at Minas.  Along with his oldest son and three Mi'kmaq, perhaps his kinsmen, Jean-Baptiste was hanged for piracy at Boston, Massachusetts, in November 1726, in his early 40s.  His daughter married into the Lejeune family.  Two of his three sons created families of their own, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana.   

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born soon after his parents' marriage, was hanged with his father at Boston in November 1726, age unrecorded, but he likely was in his late teens.   

Jean-Baptiste, père's second son Claude le jeune, was born perhaps at Pobomcoup in c1714.  Bona Arsenault says Claude le jeune's father was Charles, Jean-Baptiste, père's younger brother, but Stephen A. White, followed here, says Claude le jeune was Jean-Baptiste's son.  Claude le jeune married Anne, daughter of Germain Lejeune dit Briard and Marie-Anne Trahan, probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1746.  According to Arsenault, between 1747 and 1752, Anne gave Claude le jeune three sons.  In c1750, they moved on to Île St.-Jean, where, in August 1752, a French official counted Claude, Anne, and their three sons at Anse-au-Matelot on the island's southeast shore.  Arsenault says Anne gave Claude le jeune two more sons in 1754 and 1758.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  After reaching the Breton port in late January 1759, Claude le jeune took his family to the suburb of Châteauneuf, where Anne, age 36, and the two younger sons, ages 3 years and 10 months, died in February and April from the rigors of the crossing.  Claude le jeune remarried to Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians François Moyse and Marie Brun and widow of Joseph LeBlanc, at nearby St.-Suliac in February 1762.  Between 1763 and 1777, this Anne gave Claude le jeune eight more children, two daughters and six sons--13 children by both wives.  In 1772, 1773, and 1774, Claude le jeune's three oldest son, by first wife Anne, married at St.-Sulaic and Plouër into the Lebert and Comeau families.  Claude, Anne, and six of their unmarried children, five sons and a daughter, emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge.  His three married sons also crossed to Louisiana on another vessel.  One of them settled at Baton Rouge, where his father and his family joined them by 1788.  By the early 1790s, the three married sons had moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, and one of them resettled in the Attakapas District.  Claude le jeune's daughter married into the Aucoin, Robichaux, and Benz families at Baton Rouge.  His younger sons married into the LeBlanc, Aucoin, Dupuis, Landry, and Bergeron families at Baton Rouge, Manchac, and on the upper Lafourche.

Jean-Baptiste, père's third and youngest son Joseph, born at Minas in November 1716, married perhaps at Pigiguit in c1738 a woman whose name had been lost to history.  According to Bona Arsenault, who calls her Josette Benoit, between 1739 and 1749, she gave Joseph three children, two daughters and a son, but other records says that Joseph's first wife gave him only two daughers, Perrine in 1739 and Jeanne in 1749.  According to Stephen A. White, Joseph remarried to Marie-Josèphe dite Josette, daughter of Pierre Benoit and Anne-Marie Gaudet, at Pigiguit in c1748 (probably 1749 or 1750).  In c1750, they followed other Acadians from Pigiguit to Île Royale, where Josette gave Joseph a son, Servant, in early 1752.  In April of that year, a French official counted Joseph, Josette, and his three children, two daughters and a 10-day old son, at Baie des Espagnols on the big island.  They evidently returned to Pigiguit soon after the counting.  The British deported them to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  In August 1763, colonial authorities counted Joseph Gaidris, wife Marie Benoist, sons Gabriel and Joseph, and daughter Geneviève at Port Tobacco on the lower Potomac.  They did not follow their kinsmen to Spanish Louisiana in the late 1760s. 

Claude, père's third son Charles, born probably at Port-Royal in c1786, was counted at La Hève in 1708, age 21.  According to Bona Arsenault, the name of Charles's wife has been lost to history.  Arsenault says that in 1714 and 1724, she gave him two sons, Claude and Jacques, but Stephen A. White, followed here, records no marriage for him and says Claude Guèdry, born in 1714, was a son of Charles's older brother Jean-Baptiste. 

Claude, père's fourth son Alexis, born probably at Port-Royal in c1788, was counted at Port-Royal in 1698, age 10, but probably did not survive childhood.

Claude, père's fifth son Augustin, born probably at Port-Royal in c1690, married Jeanne, daughter of Jean Hébert and Jeanne Doiron, probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1722.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1723 and 1741, Jeanne gave Augustin seven children, four daughters and three sons, including a set of twins.  Three of their daughters married into the Breau, Mius d'Azy, Bourneuf, Boutin, and LeBlanc families.  His sons created their own families in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Louisiana. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1728, married Anne-Madeleine Dupuis in c1750.  According to Arsenault, Anne gave Jean a son in 1753.  The British deported the family to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  Arsenault says Anne gave Jean another son in the Chesapeake colony in 1762.  She also gave him three daughters at Pigiguit and in Maryland between 1754 and 1765.  Colonial officials counted Jean Gaidris, wife Anne, sons Firmin and Jean and daughters Magdelaine and Monique at Port Tobacco on the lower Potomac in August 1763.  Jean died in Maryland before December 1767, when Anne and five of their children, two sons and three daughters, followed other Acadian exiles from Port Tobacco to Louisiana.  After they landed at New Orleans the following February, Spanish authorities forced them to settle at distant Fort San Luìs de Natchez.  After the restoration of Spanish control in the colony, authorities allowed the Natchez Acadians to settle where they wanted.  Anne took her children to Ascension on the Acadian Coast.  She did not remarry.  One of her Guédry daughters married into the Breau family at Ascension.  Her Guédry sons also married and settled on the river and out on the western prairies.  

Older son Firmin, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1753, followed his family to Maryland and his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana.  He married Marguerite-Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Landry and Marguerite Boudreaux, at San Gabriel above Ascension in February 1786.  They remained on the river.  Firmin died at Ascension in February 1799, age 46.  His daughter married into the Allain family.  Three of his four sons married into the Dugas, Braud, and Gautreaux families on the river. 

Jean's younger son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born in Maryland in c1762, followed his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana and, after he came of age, joined his cousins on the western prairies.  He married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Breaux and Marguerite Breaux, at Attakapas in June 1785.  Their daughters married into the Ford, Melançon, Semere, and Villier dit Ricard families.  Jean Baptiste, fils, at age 56, remarried to Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians François-Joseph Savoie and his third wife Anne Thibodeaux and widow of Jean Charles Benoit, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1818.  She gave him no more children.  Five of Jean-Baptiste, fils's sons married into the Semere, Melançon, Blanchard, and Beard families on the prairies. 

Augustin's second son Joseph, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit in c1732, followed his older sisters to Île Royale in 1749, where, in early April 1752, a French official counted Joseph with his sister Jeanne, her husband Julien Bourneuf, and their four daughters at Rivière-de-Miré on the island's Atlantic coast.  Joseph returned with his kinsmen to British Nova Scotia soon after the counting, settled with them at Chignecto on the west side of Rivière Missaguash, then, in the fall of 1754, resettled with them at Mirliguèche on the Atlantic coast south of Halifax.  In September 1755, the British rounded up Joseph and his kinsmen, held them on Georges Island, Halifax, and, in December, deported them to North Carolina aboard the sloop Providence.  From Edenton, North Carolina, he followed his kinsmen to Pennsylvania in c1760.  He married fellow Acadian Madeleine ____ at Philadelphia in 1761.  In June 1763, Pennsylvania officials counted them with three children still in the Quaker colony.  They probably moved to Maryland soon after the counting, followed his family to Louisiana in the late 1760s, and settled at Ascension on the river above New Orleans.  A colonial official counted him on the left, or east, bank of the river at Ascension in August 1770 without a wife and children, so he probably was a widower.   At age 41, he remarried to Monique, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Dupuis and Anne Breau of Minas, at Ascension in May 1773.  She may not have given him anymore children.  They were still on the east bank of the river at Ascension in April 1777; the now owned a slave.  Joseph died in St. James Parish in November 1815, in his early 80s.  His line of the family died with him. 

Augustin's third and youngest son Pierre, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1742, followed his older sisters to Île Royale in 1749, where, in early April 1752, a French official counted Pierre at Baie des Espagnols with sister Ursule and her husband Paul Boutin.  Pierre returned with his kinsmen to British Nova Scotia soon after the counting, settled with them at Chignecto on the west side of Rivière Missaguash, then, in the fall of 1754, resettled with them at Mirliguèche on the Atlantic coast south of Halifax.  In September 1755, the British rounded up Joseph and his kinsmen, held them on Georges Island, Halifax, and in December deported them to North Carolina aboard the sloop Providence.  From Edenton, North Carolina, Pierre followed his kinsmen to Pennsylvania in c1760.  In June 1763, Pennsylvania officials, calling him a "boy," counted him with his kinsmen still in the Quaker colony.  He followed his sister and brother-in-law to Maryland soon after the counting and joined other Acadian refugees at Port Tobacco, Maryland.  Pierre married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Dupuis and Anne Breau of Minas and sister of his older brother Joseph's wife, in Maryland in c1764.  She gave him a daughter in c1765.  His sister Ursule and her family emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767 and settled at San Gabriel on the river above New Orleans.  Pierre and Marguerite followed in February 1768 but were compelled by the Spanish governor to settle with the other Port Tobacco arrivals at distant Fort San Luìs de Natchez.  Marguerite did not survive the ordeal.  Pierre remarried to Claire, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Babin and Catherine Landry of Pigiguit, at San Luìs de Natchez in January 1769.  After the restoration of Spanish control in the colony, authorities allowed the Natchez Acadians to settle where they wanted.  Pierre and his family joined his brother Joseph at Ascension.  Pierre, Claire, and their 5-month-old son Louis-David also were counted on the left, or east, bank of the river in August 1770.  Daughter Marie was not counted with them, so she probably had died by then.  Between 1771 and 1780, Claire gave Pierre five more sons.  They did not remain on the river.  In the early 1770s, despite Spanish restrictions, they crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled on Bayou Carencro near Grand Coteau at the southeastern edge of the Opelousas District.  In 1774, Pierre owned 20 head of cattle, five horses and mules, three swine, and no slaves in the district.  Wife Claire died near Grand Coteau in June 1780, age 28, probably from the rigors of childbirth (son Augustin's baptismal record at the Opelousas church, dated 23 July 1780, when he was five weeks old, lists his mother as deceased.)  Pierre remarried again--his third marriage--to Marguerite, called Peggy, daughter of Scotsman William Miller and Irishwoman Anne Kiven, probably at Grand Coteau in c1781.  Between 1784 and 1806, Peggy gave Pierre eight more sons--14 in all by two wives.  Pierre's rise to economic and social prominence was slow but sure.  In 1785, he held three slaves in the Opelousas District.  In 1788, near Grand Coteau, he owned 60 head of cattle, 40 horses, and five slaves on 18 arpents frontage of land.  A few years later, he acquired land at Grande Pointe on upper Bayou Teche in the Attakapas District.  Family tradition says that he was one of the first settlers in the area, but his children's baptismal records and a 1788 census reveal that he may not have moved there from Grand Coteau until the early 1790s, decades after the area was first settled.  (His second wife's succession record, dated 7 January 1781, calls her Mrs. Pierre Guidry "of Baillou Carencro.")  By 1812, he held 40 slaves at Grand Pointe--an amazing number at that time and place (Jean dit Chapeau Mouton, an important land owner in the Attakapas District, for instance, held "only" 28 slaves that year).  By 1812, in fact, Pierre's social prominence was so secure that his daughter Célestine was able to marry St. Martin Parish judge Ranson Eastin, a native of Virginia.  According to one authority, "Before his death ... [Pierre] had amassed a fortune in land, livestock, and slaves, including some 2,000 acres in the Prairie Gros[sic] Chevreuil east of the Teche and several tracts in the Carencro and Grand Coteau areas within the Opelousas District."  He died at his home at Grand Pointe in November 1825, a widower once again.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was age 93 when he died, but he was 83.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse later that month.  Pierre's estate was valued at $200,000 at the time of his death.  He lived long enough to see 12 of his 14 sons, four of his daughters, at least nine grandsons, and over a dozen granddaughters establish families of their own.  He was, in fact, a great-grandfather many times over when he breathed his last at Grande Pointe.  He also witnessed the burial of six of his sons, four of them married, several of his daughters, one of them married, and many grandchildren who died before their time.  His daughters, all by third wife Peggy, married into the Broussard, Devalcourt, Eastin, Picou, Rees, and Thomas families.  Most of the Guidrys of southwest Louisiana are descended from "the patriarch of Grande Pointe" and his many sons, twelve of whom by two of his wives married into the Borda, Semer, Hébert, Duhon, Robichaux, Savoie, Sloan, Bernard, Calais, Potier, Thibodeaux, and Patin families.  They settled not only at Grande Pointe, but also on Bayou Vermilion, at Carencro, and at Grand Coteau.  Some of Pierre's grandsons were among the first Acadians to settle in southeast Texas. 

Claude, père's sixth son Claude, fils, the second with the name, born probably at Port-Royal in c1694, was counted at Port-Royal in 1698 and at La Hève in 1708, age 16, but he did not marry.

Claude, père's seventh son Joseph, born probably at Port-Royal in c1695, also was counted at La Hève in 1708, age 13.  If he survived childhood, he did not marry.

Claude, père's eighth son Pierre dit Grivois dit Labine, born at Port-Royal in c1698, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Brassaud and Gabrielle Forest, in c1722, place unrecorded.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1742, Marguerite gave Pierre 10 children, four daughters and six sons.  Pierre died by 1752, place unrecorded, in his 40s or early 50s.  One of his daughters married into the Mius d'Azy and LeBlanc families, and another may have married into the Breau and Chaperon families, the latter at Rochefort, France.  Five of Pierre's sons also created their own families in Nova Scotia, the French Maritimes, and Louisiana.

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in c1723, married Agnès, daughter of Pierre Triel dit Laperrière and Catherine Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in c1744 and settled at Cobeguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1745 and 1751, Agnès gave Pierre, fils four children, two daughters and two sons.  They may have been among the Cobeguit Acadians who escaped the British roundup in the late summer of 1755 by crossing to Île St.-Jean.  The British deported at least one member of the family to France in 1758-59, and she ended up at Rochefort.  When older daughter Marie married a Camu widower at Rochefort in November 1763, the recording priest noted that both of her parents were deceased.  Neither she nor any member of her immediate family emigated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Pierre, père's second son Charles le jeune, born at Annapolis Royal in February 1726, married Adélaide-Madeleine, called Madeleine, Hébert, widow of Jean Breau, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1745.  In c1751, they moved to Pointe-à-la-Jeunesse, in the interor of Île Royale, where, in March 1752, a French official counted Charles, Madeleine, and their two daughters, the older one from Madeleine's first marriage and the younger one only eight days old.  Between 1752 and 1759, Madeleine gave Charles le jeune three children, two daughters and a son.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758, and they settled in the suburb of Bonnaban.  Madeleine died there in April 1760, in her early 30s.  Charles le jeune resettled at nearby LaGouesnière and remarried to Agnès, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bourg and Françoise Dugas, at nearby St.-Suliac in January 1761.  The settled at St.-Servan.  Between 1762 and 1773, Agnès gave Charles le jeune five more children, all sons--eight children in all by two wives.  In 1773, Charles le jeune took his family to Poitou with other Acadian exiles languishing in the port cities.  In November 1775, after two years of effort, they retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Their youngest son died there in January 1776, age 2.  In the late 1770s, Charles le jeune's oldest son Antoine, by first wife Madeleine, went to North America, perhaps as a privateer, and married an Hébert widow at New Orleans in December 1780.  Claude le jeune's older daughter by first wife Madeleine married into the Boudrot family at St.-Similien, Nantes, in August 1780, and his second son married a Blandin at Nantes before September 1784.  Meanwhile, wife Agnès died at Les Haut-Pavee in St.-Similien Parish, Nantes, in October 1782, age 46.  In 1785, Charles le jeune, his unmarried daughter and his three unmarried sons, along with his married daughter and his married son, emigrated to Louisiana aboard two of the Seven Ships.  Charles le jeune and his family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac south of Baton Rouge.  He did not remarry in the Spanish colony.  He died at New Orleans, perhaps at son Antoine's home there, in September 1767, age 41.  Charles le jeune's older daughter remarried into the Chico family at Ascension below Manchac, and his younger daughter married into the Doiron family at Manchac.  His younger son married into the Breaux, Vachard, Rodriguez, and Babin families families at Manchac, Baton Rouge, and Ascension. 

Pierre, père's third son Anselme, born at Annapolis Royal in c1730, followed his older brothers to the French Maritimes in the 1750s, but he did not go to Île Royale.  According to Bona Arsenault, he married Marie, daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Marie-Madeleine Lalande, on Île St.-Jean in c1756.  They evidently escaped the British roundup there in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By 1760, they had made their way to Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  If the British did not capture them there in the summer of 1760, they either surrrendered to, or were captured by, British forces in the region the early 1760s and likely held in a prisoner-of-war camp in Nova Scotia.  After the war with Britain, they chose to go to the French-controlled island of Miquelon, where French officials counted them in 1767.  One wonders if overcrowding on the island compelled to go to France later that year.  If not, did they go to France in 1778 when, during the American Revolution, the British captured Miquelon and nearby Île St.-Pierre and deported the islanders to La Rochelle?  One suspects that Arsenault confuses Anselme with his cousin, Jean, son of Paul dit Grivois of Annapolis Royal, who also was born in c1729/30, followed his family to the French Maritimes, married a Marie LeBlanc in the mid-1750s, and ended up at Restigouche and on Île Miquelon. 

Pierre, père's fifth son Jean, born at Annapolis Royal in c1735, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Picot and Anne Blin, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1755.  The British deported them to Massachusetts soon after their marriage.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1754 and 1775, Marguerite gave Jean 10 children, four daughters and six sons.  After the war with Britain, they chose to resettle in Canada.  British authorities counted them at Québec in 1766 and at St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan north of Montréal in 1767.  Two of  their daughters married into the Bélec and Martin families at L'Assomption and St.-Jacques.  One of their sons emigrated to Louisiana from Canada in the 1780s or early 1790s, one of the few Louisiana Acadians to take that route. 

Oldest son Joseph, born probably in Massachusetts in c1757, followed his family to Canada.  He married Marie-Geneviève Martineau at Montréal in January 1783, and, at age 60, remarried to Marguerite Poirier, perhaps a fellow Acadian, widow of Charles Racette, at St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan in January 1817.

Jean's second son, also named Joseph, born in Massachusetts in April 1759, followed his family to Canada.  He married Marie, daughter of François Méthot dit Martineau and Marie Tellier, at Repentigny northeast of Montréal in October 1778. 

Jean's third son Jean-Charles dit Labine, born pobably in Massachusetts in c1760, followed his family to Canada and married Marie-Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Doucet and Marie Arsenault, at St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan in March 1782. 

Jean's fourth son Olivier, born at Boston in c1764, followed his family to Canada, but he did not remain there.  After he came of age, he joined his uncle and cousins in Spanish Louisiana probably via the Great Lakes-Upper Mississippi route.  He first appears in Louisiana records in January 1793, when, at age 29, he married Marie-Félicité, called Félicité, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Aucoin and his second wife Élisabeth Duhon and widow of Joseph Faulk, at Attakapas.  Félicité had come to Spanish Louisiana from France in 1785 with her widowed mother and six sisters.  They settled at Grande Prairie on the upper Vermilion, today's downtown Lafayette, where Olivier's neighbors called him "Canada" to distinguish him from a cousin with the same given name.  His daughter married into the Trahan family.  His five sons married into the Broussard, Sonnier, Breaux, Meaux, Calais, Patin, and Landry families on the prairies. 

Pierre, père's sixth and youngest son Augustin le jeune, born at Annapolis Royal in c1740, evidently escaped the British roundup at Annapolis in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  In the late 1750s or early 1760s, he may have surrendered to, or been captured by, British forces in the region and held in a prisoner-of-war camp in Nova Scotia.  After the war with Britain, he remained in Nova Scotia and was at Pigiguit in 1767, when he married Marie-Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Guillaume Jeanson and Marie Aucoin, in a civil ceremony.  The marriage was "rehabilitated" at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, in May 1769.  In 1772, they moved to Météghan on Baie Ste.-Marie.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1767 and 1773, Marie-Françoise gave Augustin le jeune four children, three sons and a daughter.  Augustin le jeune died at Météghan in 1826, in his late 80s. 

Claude, père's ninth and youngest son Paul dit Grivois, born at Port-Royal in January 1701, married Anne-Marie dite Nannette, another daughter of Philippe Mius d'Azy and Marie ____, a Mi'kmaq, in c1720, place unrecorded.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1721 and 1749 Nannette gave Paul eight children, two daughters and six sons.  In August 1750, they followed their kinsmen to Baie des Espagnols, Île Royale, where, in April 1752, a French official counted Paul, Anne, and their six children, five sons and a daughter.  By the fall of 1754, they had returned to British Nova Scotia and resettled at Mirliguèche on the Atlantic coast south of Halifax.  Their daughters married into the Cousin and de Lanoue families at Pobomcoup and on Île Royale.  Two of their sons also created families of their own.

Oldest son Jacques dit Grivois, born at Annapolis Royal in c1724, married Brigitte, daughter of Pierre Lejeune and Jeanne Benoit, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1745.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1746 and 1750, Brigitte gave Jacques three daughters.  In 1751, soon after his parents and siblings moved to Île Royale, Jacques took his family to Île St.-Jean instead.  A French official counted Jacques, Brigitte, and their daughters at Bédec on the southwest coast of the island in August 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Paul's younger son Jean dit Grivois, born at Annapolis Royal in c1729 or 1730, followed his family to Baie des Espagnol, Île Royale in 1750 and was counted with them there in April 1752.  When his family returned to British Nova Scotia and resettled at Mirliguèche, he evidently moved to Île St.-Jean, where his older brother had gone, and married Marie, daughter perhaps of Joseph LeBlanc and Marie-Madeleine Lalande, in c1756.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1757 and 1770, Marie gave Jean six children, four sons and two daughters.  Living perhaps in a remote community on the west coast of the island, they escaped the British roundup there in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore. By 1760, they were at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Jean, called Grivois, and his family of five appear on a list of 1,003 Acadian refugees at Restigouche, dated 24 October 1760.  The Royal Navy had attacked the French stronghold on the Baie des Chaleurs that summer, so they escaped another roundup.  In the early 1760s, however, they either surrendered to, or were captured by, British forces in the region and held as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia until the end of the war.  In August 1763, British officials counted Jean, Marie, and their sons Jean, fils and Alexandre in the prison compound at Fort Cumberland, formerly Beauséjour, at Chignecto.  The war ended, they chose to resettle on the French-controlled island of Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland, where a cousin had gone.  French officials counted them there in 1766.  The following year, however, overcrowding on the island compelled French authorities to send many of the Acadians families to France, Jean and his family among them.  When other island Acadians chose to return to Miquelon, Jean and his family remained in the mother country.  Spanish officials counted them in the Breton port of Nantes in September 1784.  Jean dit Grivois, Marie, and two of their sons emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  They settled on the Acadian Coast above New Orleans before moving to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jean dit Grivois succession record was filed at the Interior Parish courthouse in August 1807.  He would have been in his late 70s that year.  His sons married into the Boudreaux and Bonvillain families and settled on the upper bayou and the Acadian Coast.407

Lambert

René Lambert, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife, whose name has been lost to history, created a small family in the colony.  She gave him two children, both sons, both of whom married.  René and his descendants settled not only on Rivière St.-Jean, but also in the French Maritimes.  If any of René's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Older son René, fils, born in Acadia in c1687, married Marie, daughter of Vincent Longuépée and Madeleine Rimbault, in c1723, place unrecorded, and moved to the French Maritimes.  A French official counted them at the Île Madame fishery south of Île Royale in February 1752. 

René's younger son Jean, born in Acadia in the late 1680s or early 1690s, married in c1720 to a woman whose name also has been lost to history, place unrecorded.418

Haché dit Gallant

Michel Haché dit Gallant, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife Anne Cormier created a large family in the colony.  Between 1691 and 1716, Anne gave him a dozen children, seven sons and five daughters.  In c1720, Michel moved his family to Port-La-Joye, today's Rocky Point, across from present-day Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.  They may have been the first Acadians to settle on the island.  Their daughters married into the Poirier, Rassicot, Prétieux, Jacquemin dit Lorraine, Hango dit Choisy, Duval, and Belliveau families, many on Île St.-Jean.   All of Michel's seven sons created families of their own, and each resulted in vigorous lines of the Haché dit Gallant family.  At least 17 of Michel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but the vast majority of the Hachés, who also called themselves Gallant, remained in greater Acadia after Le Grand Dérangement.  In Louisiana, their named evolved from Haché to Achée

Oldest son Michel dit Gallant, fils, born at Chignecto in c1691, married Madeleine, daughter of Jacques LeBlanc and Catherine Hébert, at Grand-Pré in October 1711.  They settled at Chignecto.  In the late 1720s, however, they joined his family at Port-La-Joye, returned to Chignecto in c1734, and settled at Veskak, west of the Missaguash.  Between 1712 and 1738, Madeleine gave Michel, fils 13 children, four sons and nine daughters, most of them born at Chignecto.  Six of their daughters married into the Savoie, Saulnier, Doucet, Girouard, and Cormier families, all in Canada.  All of Michel, fils and Madeleine's sons created families of their own.  Strangely, Michel dit Gallant, fils died in Ste.-Croix Parish, Bordeaux, France in September 1765, age 74, four years after his wife Madeleine LeBlanc had died at Trois-Rivières, Canada in October 1761.  One wonders how he and Madeleine had become separated and how he ended up in France. 

Oldest son Michel dit Michaud dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1714, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Joseph Gravois and Marie Cyr, in c1737.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1738 and 1748, Marie-Anne Michaud seven children, two sons and five daughters.  Michaud remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of René Blanchard and Marie Savoie, at Annapolis Royal in June 1749.  They settled at Chignecto.  One wonders if she gave him any children.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported Michaud, Marie-Madeleine, and their children to South Carolina, but they did not remain there.  Allowed to return to greater Acadia via sea, they took refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs with many of their Haché kinsmen.  Michaud and his family evidently were among the 300 Acadians captured at Restigouche in the summer of 1760.  The British held them as prisoners of war at Fort Cumerberland, formerly Beauséjour, in the early 1760s.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they settled at Grande-Digue, in today's eastern New Brunswick, where Michaud died in c1768, age 54.  Three of his daughters married into the Bonnevie, Downing, Léger, and Caissie families.  Both of his sons created their own families

Older son Michel III, born in c1738, married Anne, daughter of Charles Melanson and Anne Breau of Annapolis Royal, at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, Nova Scotia, in August 1768.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1767 and 1787, Anne gave Michel III nine children, three sons and six daughters.  They, too, settled at Grande-Digue, where Michel III died in October 1809, age 71.  Five of Michel III's daughters married into the Haché/Gallant, Boudreau, Poirier, Goguen, and Arsenault families at Grande-Digue.  All three of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Isaac, born in c1772, married Scholastique Arsenault at Grande-Digue in c1798.  According to Bona Arsenault, Scholastique gave Isaac eight children, a son and seven daughters, at Grande-Digue between 1799 and 1816. 

Michel III's second Laurent, born in c1773, married Nathalie, daughter of François Bourque and Élisabeth Broussard, at Grande-Digue in c1803.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1804 and 1829, Nathalie gave Laurent 10 children, three sons and seven daughters.  Laurent died at Grande-Digue in July 1847, age 74. 

Michel III's third and youngest son Maurice, born in 1787, married Gertrude, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Després and Madeleine Bourg, at Grande-Digue in July 1809.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1810 and 1832, Gertrude gave Maurice 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  Maurice died at Grande-Digue in June 1861, age 74. 

Michel dit Michaud's younger son Basile, born in c1742, married in c1765 a woman whose name has been lost to history.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1766 and 1770, she gave Basile three sons.  He and his family settled at Mont-Carmel and at Rustico on St. John's Island, formerly Île St.-Jean, where his great-grandfather had settled half a century earlier.  Two of Basile's three sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, born in c1766, married Théotiste, daughter of Pierre Arsenault and ____ Chiasson, in c1790.  After living for a time on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, they resettled at Mont-Carmel, on southwest shore of St. John's Island, which the British renamed Prince Edward Island in 1798.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1792 and 1825, Théotiste gave Joseph eight children, four sons and four daughters. 

Basile's third and youngest son François, born in c1770, married Marie Arsenault.  They settled at Rustico, on the north side of Prince Edward Island, where, according to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave him a son in 1800. 

Michel dit Gallant, fils's second son Jean dit Gallant, born in the late 1710s, married Marguerite, another daughter of Joseph Gravois and Marie Cyr, in c1740.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1760, Marguerite gave Jean five children, a son and four daughters.  Unlike his oldest and youngest brothers, who the British deported to South Carolina in 1755, Jean and his family escaped the British roundup at Chignecto and took refuge at Restigouche.  Jean's youngest daughter was born there in February 1760, and two of his older daughters married into the Bourgeois and Tardif families there in January 1761.  Evidently Jean's only son did not create a family of his own. 

Michel dit Gallant, fils's third son Joseph le jeune, born in c1728, evidently remained on Île St.-Jean and was deported to France, perhaps with his father, in 1758.  Joseph le jeune married Anne, also called Agnès, daughter of Pierre Comeau and Élisabeth Lord, perhaps at Bordeaux, France, in c1766.  Joseph le jeune became a ship's carpenter and settled at Morlaix in Brittany before returning to Bordeaux.  Between 1768 and 1783, Anne gave Joseph le jeune at least six children in France, five sons and a daughter.  Joseph le jeune died at Bordeaux in January 1785, age 57.  His family remained in France. 

Michel dit Gallant, fils's fourth and youngest son Pierre le jeune, born at Chignecto in June 1734, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Hébert and Madeleine Gaudet, in c1755, probably at Chignecto and also ended up in South Carolina.  They, too, returned to greater Acadia by boat and joined their kinsmen at Restigouche.  After the British attacked Restigouche in the summer of 1760, Pierre le jeune and Marguerite moved on to Canada and settled at Pointe-du-Lac, near Trois-Rivières.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1766, Marguerite gave Pierre le jeune three children, two sons and a daughter.  Pierre le jeune died at Louiseville, between Trois-Rivières and Montréal, in March 1766, age 32. 

Michel dit Gallant, père's second son Joseph dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1693, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Gaudet and Cécile Mignot, at Beaubassin in July 1721, and moved on to Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1740, Marie gave Joseph 10 children on the island, eight sons and two daughters.  Joseph died on the island between October 1743 and November 1747, in his late 40s or early 50s.  One of his daughters married into the Deveau family on the island.  Four of Joseph dit Gallant's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1722, died at St.-Pierre-du-Nord on the north shore of island in October 1743, age 21, still a bachelor. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's second son Jean-Charles, called Charles, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1725, married Anne, daughter of Jacques Deveau and Marie Pothier of Chignecto, at Port-La-Joye in November 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him a son, Charles, fils, also called Louis, born on the island in October1754.  After surviving the crossing to France in 1758, Charles, père remarried to Marie, daughter of Charles Hébert and Marie-Claire Daigre, at Cherbourg in January 1761.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1776, Marie gave Charles, père a dozen more children, five sons and seven daughters.  Charles, père died in France before 1784, in his 50s or early 60s.  Two of his sons and a daughter emigrated to Louisiana.  Daughter Bonne by second wife Marie married into the St. Germain family in the Spanish colony.  Only one of his two sons married there, but no lasting line came of it. 

Older son Jean-Baptiste-Charles, called Jean-Charles, born at Cherbourg, France, in December 1762 and followed his family to Nantes.  He married Marie-Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Pinet dit Pinel and Anne-Marie Durel, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in November 1784.  They followed his brother and sister to Louisiana and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  They had a daughter, Martine, born soon after they reached the colony.  Jean-Charles died probably at Lafourche in c1786, age 24, soon after reaching the colony.  He fathered no sons.  Daughter Martine married into the Thibodeaux family and lived to a ripe old age.  She was, in fact, one of the last of the Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join her ancestors. 

Charles's younger son Frédéric, born at Nantes in c1770, followed his brother and sister to Louisiana and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, but he did not remain there.  Frédéric died at St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, on the Mississippi above New Orleans, in March 1839, age 69.  He did not marry, so his father's line of the family, except for its blood, died with him. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's third son Jean-Baptiste le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1728, married Anne Pitre on the island in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him two sons.  He, too, survived the crossing to France in 1758, remarried to Anne Comeau in c1766, and settled at St.-Servans, near St.-Malo.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Jean-Baptiste le jeune three more children, two sons and a daughter, between 1767 and 1772.  Meanwhile, his two sons from his first marriage died at St.-Servan in the late 1760s.  In 1772, Jean-Baptiste le jeune took his family to La Rochelle.  None of them emigrated to Louisiana. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's fourth son Pierre le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1729, married Marguerite Montaury on the island in c1749.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him at least one son.  

Joseph dit Gallant, père's fifth son François le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1730, survived the crossing to France in 1758 and was living at Cherbourg in 1767, still a bachelor.  He may not have married .  

Joseph dit Gallant, père's sixth son René-François, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1732, evidently died young. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's seventh son Jacques le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1736, also survived the crossing to France in 1758.  He married Anne, daughter Paul Boudrot and Marie Doiron, at St.-Énogat, near St.-Malo, in November 1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1782, Anne gave Jacques le jeune 11 children, seven sons and four daughters.  Jacques le jeune died in France in c1782.  Two of his daughters emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Joseph dit Gallant, père's eighth and youngest son Louis, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1740, evidently did not create a family of his own. 

Michel dit Gallant, père's third son Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1696, married Anne-Marie or Marie-Anne, daughter of Élie Gentil and Cécile Martin, at Beaubassin in February 1719 and followed his family to Port-La-Joye.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1720 and 1743, Marie-Anne gave Jean-Baptiste a dozen children, nine sons and three daughters, on Île St.-Jean.  Jean-Baptiste died on the island by 1752, in his 40s or 50s.  Two of his daughters married into the Olivier, Deveau, and Gautrot families on Île St.-Jean and in France.  Seven of Jean-Baptiste's nine sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born probably at Chignecto in c1720, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Olivier and Françoise Bonnevie of Annapolis Royal, at Port-La-Joye in February 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1766, Anne gave Jean-Baptiste, fils eight children, six sons and two daughters, on Île St.-Jean and at Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, where the family was deported in 1758.  Jean-Baptiste, fils died at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in February 1767, age 47.  Daughter Anne-Marie married into the Benoit family in France and emigrated to Louisiana.  In 1785, Jean-Baptiste's widow also emigrated to Louisiana from France with one of his nieces. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's second son Pierre le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1725, married Marie, daughter of Charles Doiron and Anne Thériot of Pigiguit, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in February 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1758, Marie gave Pierre le jeune four children on the island, three sons and a daughter.  After losing his wife and all four of his children on the crossing to St.-Malo, Pierre le jeune remarried to Anne, daughter of Joseph Dumont and Marie-Madeleine Vécot, at St.-Énogat, near St.-Malo, in July 1759.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1760 and 1765, Anne gave Pierre le jeune four more children at St.-Énogat and nearby St.-Servan.  Pierre le jeune remarried again--his third marriage--to Madeleine, daughter of surgeon Jacques Dingle and Marguerite Landry of Grand-Pré and widow Charles Pellerin, at St.-Servan in September 1766.  According to Bona Arsenault, Madeleine gave Pierre le jeune three more children there between 1768 and 1772.  Pierre le jeune died at Nantes in June 1777, age 52.  Two of his sons and a daughter emigrated to Louisiana from France.  Daughter, Marie-Anne, by second wife Anne Dumont, married into the Charrié, de St. Angel, and Barre families in the Spanish colony.  His older son created a vigorous line there.

Older son Pierre-Alexis, by third wife Madeleine Dingle, born at St.-Servan, France, in March 1768, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana.  He settled on upper Bayou Lafourche and married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Dantin and his French wife Jeanne Gemier, at Assumption in June 1795.  Their daughters married into the Ledet, Marlbrough, Pitre, Roger, and Usé families.  Three of Pierre-Alexis's five sons, all born on the Lafourche, married into the Ayraud or Aymond, Boutary, and Simoneaux familes. 

Pierre le jeune's younger son Joseph-François, also called Joseph dit Canawche, born at St.-Servan in June 1772, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana.  He married Anne-Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste LeBlanc and his second wife Marguerite Célestin dit Bellemère of Grand-Pré and Belle-Île-en-Mer, at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans in January 1803.  He moved to the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin in the early 1800s and remarried to Anastasie, daughter of François Guilbeau and Madeleine Broussard and widow of Donat Breaux, at St. Martinville, St. Martin Parish, in October 1819.  Joseph died in nearby Lafayette Parish in December 1831, age 59.  His daughters, all by first wife Marguerite, married into the Daigle, Hébert, and L'ascange or Lascourieges familes.  His only son Jean-Pierre, also from first wife Marguerite, may not have married. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's third son François le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1726, married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Olivier and Françoise Bonnevie of Annapolis Royal, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in February 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, Françoise gave François le jeune a daughter the following year.  After a French official counted them on upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752, they disappear from the historical record.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's fourth son Michel le jeune, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1731, evidently did not create a family of his own.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's fifth son Antoine, born probably at Port-La-Joye in c1734, married Marie Clémençeau on the eve of island's dérangement.  Antoine and Marie, with his youngest brother and their widowed mother, survived the deportation to St.-Malo in 1758.  Between 1760 and 1769, at St.-Énogat and St.-Servan, Marie gave Antoine six children, two sons and four daughters; all but two of them died in childhood.  She gave him another son at Chantenay, near Nantes, in 1777, but he, too, did not survive childhood.  Antoine died near Nantes in c1782, in his late 40s.  One of his daughters emigrated to Louisiana from France and married into the Heusé family there. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's sixth son, another Michel le jeune, born on Île St.-Jean in c1736, evidently did not create a family of his own. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's seventh son Joseph le jeune, born on Île St.-Jean in c1738, survived the deportation to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, moved on to St.-Malo to join his family, and married Marie, another daughter of Joseph Dumont and Marie-Madeleine Vécot, at nearby St.-Énogat in June 1760.  Between 1761 and 1771, at St.-Servan, she gave him seven children, four sons and three daughters.  She gave him another son at Châtellerault in Poitou in 1774, and another daughter at Chantenay, near Nantes, in 1776.  Joseph le jeune worked as a master ship's carpenter at Nantes and drowned at nearby Paimboeuf, the city's port, in January 1778, age 40.  Four of his daughters emigrated to Louisiana from France, one of them with brother Jean-Baptiste's widow.  Three of his daughters married into the David, Ramirez, and Calandrot families in the Spanish colony.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's eighth son Louis, born at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in June 1741, survived the deportation to Cherbourg, France, in 1758 and also moved on to St.-Malo to be near his family.  After being held as a prisoner of war in England in 1760-63 following his capture on a French privateer, Louis married Anne, daughter of Claude Benoit and Élisabeth Thériot, at St.-Servan in February 1765.  She gave him two children, a son and a daughter, in 1766 and 1767.  Louis remarried to Françoise, daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carret and widow of Alexis Renaud, at St.-Servan in February 1770.  She gave him two more children, a son and a daughter, at St.-Servan in 1771 and 1772.  Françoise gave him another son at Châtellerault in Poitou in 1774, and four more children, three sons and a daughter, at Chantenay near Nantes between 1776 and 1781.  Louis was the only member of his father's family to emigrate to Louisiana.  With him went his second wife, one of his sons, two nephews and a niece.  He settled in the Bayou Lafourche valley and died there after 1798.  His son Pierre-Charles, by second wife Françoise, married into the Bourgeois family and settled on the bayou. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant, père's ninth and youngest son Georges, born at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in December 1743, survived the deportation to St.-Malo with his older brother Antoine and their widowed mother.  Georges married Perrine, daughter of Pierre Basset and Louise Mace, at St.-Servan in January 1768.  Between 1768 and 1771, she gave him three children, a son and two daughters, at St.-Servan, a daughter at Châtellerault in 1774, and a son and a daughter at Chantenay in 1776 and 1781.  Georges worked as a seaman at Chantenay and died there, or at sea, in c1782, in his early 40s.  None of his children emigrated to Louisiana. 

Michel dit Gallant, père's fourth son Charles dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1698, married Geneviève, daughter of Pierre Lavergne and Anne Bernon, at Annapolis Royal in February 1727, joined his family at Port-La-Joye, and then settled on Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the center of the island.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1727 and 1750, Geneviève gave Charles seven children, four sons and three daughters, most of them born on Île St.-Jean.  When the British rounded up the Acadians on the island in 1758, Charles and most of his family were among the habitants there who escaped to present-day eastern New Brunswick.  They also were among the Acadians who returned to St. John's Island, today's Prince Edward Island, after Le Grand Dérangment.  Their daughters married into the Richard, Chiasson, and Melanson families.  Three of Charles's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Jacques-René, born in c1727, married Anne, daughter of Claude Boudrot and Judith Belliveau of Chignecto, in October 1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1759, Anne gave Jacques seven children, including one son and five daughters.  While the rest of his family escaped the British in 1758, Jacques-René and his family were deported to St.-Malo.  Three of his children, including an unnamed newborn, died at sea or from the rigors of the crossing.  Jacques-René survived the crossing but died at Châteauneuf, near St.-Malo, in May 1759, not long after reaching the mother country.  Anne remarried at nearby St.-Énogat four years later.  Two of her Haché daughters emigrated to Louisiana, and one of them married into the Sevin and Babin families in the Spanish colony.   

Charles dit Gallant's second son Charles-Hyacinthe, born on Île St.-Jean in 1733, evidently did not create a family of his own. 

Charles dit Gallant's third son Joseph, born on Île St.-Jean in c1744, escaped the British roundup with his parents and younger siblings in 1758 and took refuge with them at Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Joseph married Marie-Madeleine, daughter Charles Doucet and Anne Arseneau, in c1765 probably at Nepisiguit, today's Bathurst, New Brunswick, where the marriage was blessed in June 1772.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1792, Marie-Madeleine gave Joseph 14 children, six sons and eight daughters, most of them born at Nepisiguit/Bathurst, where Joseph died in November 1822, age 78.  Six of his daughters married into the DeGrâce, Boudreau, Morrison, Pitre, Lavigne, Landry, and Godin families at Bathurst.  Five of his six sons created their own families.

Oldest son Michel, born probably at Nepisiguit in c1766, married Marie, daughter of Ambroise Godin and Madeleine Bergeron, at Bathurst in October 1791.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Michel 10 children between 1792 and 1811.  Michel remarried to Madeleine Cormier, widow of Béloni Thériot, at Bathurst in April 1812.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him another daughter in 1814. 

Joseph's second son Gabriel, born probably at Nepisiguit in c1770, evidently did not create a family of his own. 

Joseph's third son Sylvain, born probably at Nepisiguit in c1772, married Anastasie, daughter of Canadians Jean Lavigne and Isabelle Baudry, at Bathurst in September 1796.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1797 and 1818, Anastasie gave Sylvain a dozen children, all born at Bathurst. 

Joseph's fourth son Joseph, fils, born at Bathurst in c1780, married Hélène Landry probaby at Bathurst in c1802. 

Joseph's fifth son Simon, born at Nepisiguit in c1782, married Vénérande, daughter of Simon Arseneau and Marie Melanson, at Bathurst in September 1706.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1808 and 1825, Vénérande gave Simon eight children, five sons and three daughters, all born at Bathurst. 

Joseph's sixth and youngest son Antoine, born at Nepisigiut in c1784, married Céleste, daughter of Rémi Landry and Charlotte Doiron of Grande-Anse, at Bathurst in April 1812.  According to Bona Arsenault, Céleste gave Antoine seven children between 1813 and 1823.  They settled at Caraquet, near her home at Grande-Anse, New Brunswick.   

Charles dit Gallant's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born on Île St.-Jean in c1750, escaped with his family to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Hélène, daughter of Paul Richard and Renée Boudrot, in c1774 and settled at Île Miscou on the Baie des Chaleurs in c1775.  Jean-Baptiste remarried to Marie, daughter of Joseph Goguen and Anne Arseneau, date unrecorded, probably on Île Miscou.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1775 and 1784, Jean-Baptiste's two wives gave him six children, one son and six daughters.  In 1798, Jean-Baptiste took his family to Rivière-Platte on Prince Edward Island, and moved on to Grand-Ruisseau, today's Egmont Bay, on the island's southwestern coast, in 1812.  Four of Jean-Baptiste's daughters married into the Gallant, Arseneau, Pineau, and Poirier families at Mont-Carmel and Rustico on the island.  His only son created a family of his own. 

Charles le jeune, born probably at Miscou in c1776, married cousin Juliette, daughter of Pierre Gallant and Modeste Arseneau, at Rustico in c1800.  They remained at Rustico, where, according to Bona Arsenault, Juliette gave him eight children, four sons and four daughters, between 1802 and 1823.

Michel dit Gallant, père's fifth son Pierre dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1701, married Cécile, another daughter of Pierre Lavergne and Anne Bernon, in c1726, moved on to Île St.-Jean, and settled at Rivière-du-Nord-Est, in the interior of the island.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1727 and 1743, Cécile gave Pierre dit Gallant nine children, three sons and six daughters, on the island.  Cécile died in 1743; Pierre did not remarry.  Like older brother Charles dit Gallant, Pierre dit Gallant and most of his family also escaped the British in 1758 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where Pierre died before 1760 while in exile.  Four of his and Cécile's daughters married into the Deveau, Lejeune, Chiasson, Ruelle, and Boudrot families at Port-La-Joye, Petit-Bras-d'Or on Cape Breton Island, and at St.-Servan and St.-Énogat, near St.-Malo, France, so not all of the family escaped the British roundup on Île St.-Jean.  All three of Pierre dit Gallant's sons escaped the British and created their own families. 

Oldest son Louis, born on Île St.-Jean in c1727, married Anne, daughter of François Chiasson and Anne Doucet of Chignecto, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in January 1753.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1768, Anne gave Louis eight children, seven sons and a daughter.  Louis and his family escaped the British twice, on Île St.-Jean in 1758 and at Restigouche in 1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, one of their children was born at Restigouche in February 1761.  After the war with Britain finally ended two years later, they settled at Shippagan, present-day northeastern New Brunswick, on the south shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, where Louis died in April 1814, age 87.  His daughter Anastasie married a Doucet cousin from St. John's Island.  All seven of Louis's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Alexandre, born at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in c1753, married cousin Scholastique, daughter of Joseph Gallant, in c1775 probably at Shippagan and settled at Egmont Bay, on the southwest coast of St. John's Island.  According to Bona Arsenault, Scholastique gave Alexandre six children, all sons, between 1776 and 1821. 

Louis's second son Xavier, born at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in c1755, married cousin Madeleine, daughter of Michel Doucet and Louise Belliveau, in c1778 probably at Shippagan and also settled at Egmont Bay.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1780 and 1792, Madeleine gave Xavier seven children, five sons and two daughters. 

Louis's third son Firmin, born in c1758, married Madeleine Poirier probably at Shippagan in c1780 and remarried to Marie Bernard

Louis's fourth son Fabien, born probably at Restigouche in c1760, married Marie, daughter of Jean Doucet and Marguerite Gaudet, probably at Shippagan in c1782.  Fabien followed his older brothers to St. John's Island and settled at Rustico, on the island's north shore.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1784 and 1820, Marie gave Fabien 10 children, five sons and five daughters. 

Louis's fifth son Joseph, born in exile in c1762, married cousin Scholastique, daughter of Joseph Chiasson and Anne Haché, at Île Miscou.  They settled with his family at Shippagan.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1793 and 1797, Scholastique gave Joseph four children, two sons and two daughters. 

Louis's sixth son Jean-Baptiste, born in exile in c1764, married cousin Françoise, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Haché and his first wife Hélène Richard, in c1786.  They also settled at Shippagan.  According to Bona Arsenault, Françoise gave Jean-Baptiste three sons between 1788 and 1792.  Jean-Baptiste remarried to Marie Vautour, who, according to Bona Arsenault, gave him another son in c1828. 

Louis's seventh and youngest son Louis, fils, born in exile in c1766, married cousin Judith, another daughter of Jean-Baptiste Haché and Hélène Richard, in c1786.  They remained at Shippagan, where, according to Bona Arsenault, Judith have him seven children, four sons and three daughters, between 1791 and 1814.  

Pierre dit Gallant's second son Pierre, fils, born on Île St.-Jean in c1728, married Marie, daughter of Jacques Deveau and Marie Pothier, at Port-La-Joye in November 1753.  They also settled on Rivière-du-Nord-Est, where, According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Pierre, fils two daughters in 1756 and 1758.  One wonders what happened to them during the island's dérangement

Pierre dit Gallant, père's third and youngest son Jean-Baptise le jeune, born on Île St.-Jean in c1734, escaped the British in 1758.  He married Anne, daughter of Pierre Doiron and Anne Forest of Chignecto, in c1760 on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1779, Anne gave Jean-Baptiste le jeune eight children, four sons and four daughters.  He took his family down to Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières in 1769, moved on to Amherst, formerly Beaubassin, Nova Scotia, in 1770, to nearby Nappan in c1780, and then to Bédèque, on the south shore of St. John's Island in 1788.  One of Jean-Baptiste le jeune's daughters married into the Roussel family.  At least two of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Jean-François, born in c1766, married Françoise, daughter of Joseph Poirier and Marguerite Lavigne, in c1788.  They also settled at Bédèque on St. John's Island.  According to Bona Arsenault, Françoise gave Jean-François a son in c1790.  Jean-François remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Michel Brun and Marguerite Comeau, in c1800.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave Jean-François three more children, a son and two daughters, between 1802 and 1806.  Jean-François died at Bédèque in May 1821, age 55. 

Jean-Baptiste le jeune's third son Pierre, born in c1775, married Esther Brun in c1788.  According to Bona Arsenault, Esther gave Pierre three children, a son and two daughters, between 1790 and 1802.  Pierre remarried to Marie, daughter of Pierre Caissie and Rosalie Léger, at Richibouctou, eastern New Brunswick, in September 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Pierre two more children, a son and a daughter, in 1818 and 1824.

Michel dit Gallant, père's sixth son François dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1707, married Anne, daughter of François Boudrot and Jeanne Landry of Tracadie, at Port-La-Joye in June 1735 and settled near her family at Tracadie, on the north shore of the island.  By August 1752, however, they had moved to upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est, in the island's interior.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1763, Anne gave François dit Gallant 14 children, 10 sons and four daughters.  One of their daughters, Marie-Rose, married into the Blanchard family.  All 10 of François's sons escaped the British in 1758 and created their own families. 

Oldest son Sylvestre, born on Île St.-Jean in c1736, married Marie, daughter of Ambroise Poirier and Marie Gaudet of Chignecto, in c1759.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1760 and 1798, Marie gave Sylvestre eight children, four sons and four daughters.  They settled at Grande-Digue, eastern New Brunswick, where Sylvestre died in November 1820, age 84.  Two of Sylvestre's daughters married Léger brothers whose mother was a Haché, and a third daughter married into the Arseneau family.  Three of Sylvestre's sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Marin, born in c1760, married cousin Marguerite, daughter of Michel Haché and Anne Melanson of Shédiac, in c1782.  They settled at nearby Grande-Digue.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1784 and 1808, Marguerite gave Marin eight children, five sons and three daughters.  Marin remarried to Rosalie Babin, widow of Dominique Melanson, at Memramcook, New Brunswick, in July 1826, when he was age 66, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Caissie and Anastasie Léger, at Shédiac in August 1732, when he was 72.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marin fathered no children by his second and third wives.  He died at Grande-Digue in February 1743, age 83. 

Sylvestre's second son Thomas, born in c1762, married Hélène, another daughter of Michel Haché and Anne Melanson, in c1795.  They were among the pioneer settlers of Barachois, on the southern Gaspé peninsula near Percé.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1796 and 1814, Hélène gave Thomas six children, four sons and two daughters. 

Syvestre's fourth and youngest son Isidore, born in c1782, married Radegonde, daughter of Pierre Caissie and Rosalie Léger, at Richiboutou, eastern New Brunswick, in November 1803 but settled at nearby Grande-Dugue.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1804 and 1826, Radegone gave Isidore eight children, four sons and four daughters. 

François dit Gallant's second son Louis, born on Île St.-Jean in c1738, married Ursule Doucet in c1760 and, after the war with Britain, settled at Rustico on the north shore of St. John's Island.  

François dit Gallant's third son Jacques-Ange, called Ange, born on Île St.-Jean in c1740, married Marguerite Picard in c1766.  

François dit Gallant's fourth son Jean-François, born on Île St.-Jean in c1742, married Agnès, daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carré in c1765 and also settled at Rustico.  

François dit Gallant's fifth son René, born on Île St.-Jean in c1744, married Marguerite, daughter of Olivier Blanchard and Catherine Amireau of Petitcoudiac, in c1768.  They settled at Le Bocage, Petit-Rivière, near Caraquet, New Brunswick.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1770 and 1790, Marguerite gave René 11 children, six sons and five daughters, all of whom created families of their own.  Their daughters married into the Godin, Thériault, and Thibodeau families at Caraquet.  All six of René's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son François, born in c1770, married Nathalie Thibodeau in c1792 and remained at Caraquet.   According to Bona Arsenault, Nathalie gave François 10 children, six sons and four daughters, between 1795 and 1824. 

René's second son Isaac, born in c1772, married Madeleine Thibodeau in c1800.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1805 and 1823 at Caraquet, Madeleine gave Isaac nine children, three sons and six daughters. 

René's third son Eusèbe, born in c1784, married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Joseph Poirier and Charlotte Léger, at Caraquet in November 1809.  They also remained at Caraquet.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1810 and 1835, Marie-Blanche gave Eusèbe 11 children, six sons and five daughters. 

René's fourth son Jean, born in c1787, married Clothilde, daughter of Pierre Pinet and Barbe Dugas, at Caraquet in June 1813.  According to Bona Arsenault, Clothilde gave Jean a son in 1814.  Jean remarried to Sophie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Léger and Claire-Félicité Robichaud, at Caraquet in September 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, Sophie gave Jean five more children, two sons and three daughters, between 1817 and 1831. 

René's fifth son Isaïe, born in c1788, married Matie, daughter of Cyrille Léger and Vénérande Savoie, at Caraquet in November 1818.  According to Bona Arsenault, Matie gave Isaïe a son in 1819 and a daughter in 1821.  Isaïe remarried to Adèle, daughter of Jean Malais and Anne-Marie Gionnais, at Caraquet in November 1835, when he was 47.  According to Bona Arsenault, Adèle gave Isaïe four more children, a son and three daughters, between 1838 and 1854. 

René's sixth and youngest son Romain, born in c1789, married Félicité Léger at Caraquet in September 1819.  They, too, remained at Caraquet, where, according to Bona Arsenault, Félicité  gave Romain 10 children, six sons and four daughters, between 1822 and 1839.  

François dit Gallant's sixth son Joseph, born on Île St.-Jean in c1748, married Euphrosine, daughter of Jacques Arsenault and Marie-Josèphe Doucet, in c1775.  They settled with his older brothers at Rustico, on the north shore of St. John's Island. 

François dit Gallant's seventh son Charles, born on Île St.-Jean in 1752, married Anne, daughter of Paul Boudrot and Marie-Josèphe Doiron.  They settled at Rustico.  

François dit Gallant's eighth son Pierre, born on Île St.-Jean in c1754, married Modeste, another daughter of Jacques Arsenault and Marie-Josèphe Doucet, in c1778.  They settled at Rustico.  

François dit Gallant's ninth son Simon, born in c1759, married Marie Gaudet in c1780 and settled at Rustico.   

François dit Gallant's tenth and youngest son Basile, born in c1763, married Marguerite Boudrot in c1785 and also settled at Rustico.

Michel dit Gallant, père's seventh and youngest son Jacques dit Gallant, born at Chignecto in c1712, married Marie-Josèphe, called Josèphe, another daughter of François Boudrot and Jeanne Landry, at Port-La-Joye in June 1735, on the same day his brother Francois dit Gallant married Josèphe's sister Anne.  Jacques and Josèphe also settled at Tracadie.  They were still there in August 1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1736 and 1754, Josèphe gave Jacques dit Gallant 11 children, six sons and five daughters, at Tracadie.  Jacques and his family also escaped the British in 1758 and found refuge at Restigouche, where they escaped another British roundup in the summer of 1760.  In 1773, Jacques took his family to Île Miscou on the southern shore of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Four of his daughters married into the Boudrot, Arsenault, Doucet, and Cormier families at Restigouche and Miscou and settled at Miscou and Bathurst in New Brunswick and on the îles de la Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  Three of Jacques's six sons created families of their own. 

Second son Joseph le jeune, born at Tracadie in c1740, married an Arseneau in c1765 and settled at Egmont Bay on the southwest shore of St. John's Island.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1766 and 1780, she gave Joseph le jeune five children, two sons and three daughters. 

Jacques dit Gallant's fifth son Cyprien, born at Tracadie in c1748, married Marie, daughter of Joseph Bernard and Nathalie Arseneau, in c1770 and settled at today's Bloomfield in the far northwest corner of St. John's Island west of Cascumpec.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1772 and 1790, Marie gave Cyprien a dozen children, 10 sons and two daughters.  

Jacques dit Gallant's sixth and youngest son Charles le jeune, born at Tracadie in c1749, married Félicité Gautrot in c1775.  They were at Miscou, near his father, between 1776 and 1779; moved down to Nepisiguit, today's Bathurst, New Brunwick, in 1784; and moved on to Margaree, on the west coast of Cape Breton Island, in 1788.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1776 and 1800, Félicité gave Charles le jeune 11 children, sox sons and five daughters.  Charles le jeune died at Margaree in June 1842, age 93.403

Mirande

Emmanuel dit Tavare Mirande, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife Marguerite Bourgeois created a small family in the colony.  Marguerite gave him nine children, six sons and three daughters.  Emmanuel died by January 1707, when Marguerite remarried--her third marriage--at Port-Royal.  Emmanuel and Marguerite's daughters married into the Caissie, Arseneau, Mignot, and Cordeau dit Des Lauriers families.  Only one of Emmanuel's sons married.  Beginning in the 1710s, Emmanuel's surviving children left Chignecto for Île Royale, where they remained.  If any of Emmanuel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Joseph, born at Chignecto in October 1680, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Gaudet l'aîné and Anne Blanchard, in c1704 probably at Chignecto, and died between 1726 and July 1732, perhaps on Île Royale, in his late 40s or early 50s.  Marie gave him seven children, five sons and two daughters.  In 1713-14, Joseph, described as a fisherman/habitat, spent the winter at Baie-de-Miré on Île Royale with his brother-in-law, Michel Caissie.  In August 1714, Joseph received permission from officials at Louisbourg to settle on the island.  Evidently he liked what he saw there.  His family was counted at Baie-de-l'Indienne, up the coast from Louisbourg, in 1724 and 1725, and down the coast at Petit-Lorembec in 1734.  Joseph's daughter Marie married into the Chauvin family and settled at Lorembec.  Only two of Joseph's sons married.  

Oldest son Pierre, born probably at Chignecto, married Gillette, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Grandin and Anne-Hyacinthe Dupuis, at Port-d'Orléans, Île Royale, in c1737, and died by 1749, probably on the island.  

Joseph's second, third, and fourth sons Jean-Baptiste, Paul, and Charles, born probably at Chignecto, evidently died young.  

Joseph's fifth and youngest son Joseph, fils, born at Baie-de-l'Indienne in c1720, married Marie-Barbe-Élie, daughter of Pierre-César-Alexandre Le Grand and Madeleine Dihars of Newfoudland, at Port-d'Orléans, up the coast, in c1748.  They settled at Lorembec, near Louisbourg, where, in April 1752, a French official counted them on a fishing concession granted to Joseph, père.  With Joseph, fils and Barbe-Élie were 3-year-old son Jean-Baptiste and 8-month-old daughter Josette.  Next to them lived Joseph, fils's sister Marie, her husband, Georges Chauvin, and two of their sons.

Emmanuel's second son François, born at Chignecto in October 1682, survived childhood but probably did not marry.

Emmanuel's third son Jean, born probably at Chignecto in c1689, survived childhood but did probably did not marry.

Emmanuel's fourth son Louis-Joseph, born probably at Chignecto in c1692, survived childhood but did probably did not marry.

Emmanuel's fifth son Michel, born probably at Chignecto in c1695, died at Port-Royal in July 1707.

Emmanuel's sixth and youngest son Alexis, born probably at Chgnecto in c1698, probably died young.404

Mignot

Jean-Aubin Mignot dit Châtillon, a late 1670s arrival, and his wife Anne Dugas created another small family in the colony.  Anne gave him six children, five sons and a daughter, who married into the Gaudet and Poirier families.  Three of Jean-Aubin's five sons married but only a few of them remained at Chignecto.  Decades before Le Grand Dérangement, most of them moved on to Jean-Aubtin's native Canada and settled on the lower St. Lawrence.  If any of Jean-Aubin's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Jean, born probably at Chignecto in c1680, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Emmanuel Mirande dit Tavare and Marguerite Bourgeois, in c1703 probably at Chignecto, moved on to Canada, and died by June 1724 in his early 40s, no place given, but it may have been at Kamouraska on the lower St. Lawrence.  Marie-Madeleine gave him seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Allaire, Paquet dit Lavallée, and Roy families at Kamouraska and Beaumont in Canada.  Three of their sons married.  

Oldest son Pierre, born probably in Canada in c1706, married Agathe, daughter of Canadians Jean-Pierre Roy dit Desjardins and Angélique Autin, at Kamouraska in February 1739.   

Jean's second son Jean-François, born at Rivière-Ouelle on the lower St. Lawrence in October 1708, evidently died young.   

Jean's third son Guillaume, born in Canada in the early 1700s, married Hélène, daughter of Canadians Pierre Michaud and Marie-Madeleine Thibodeau, at Kamouraska in January 1735.   

Jean's fourth and youngest son Antoine, born in Canada in the early 1700s, married Marie-Louise, daughter of Canadians Jean Ouellet and Marie-Geneviève Tardif, at Kamouraska in January 1753.

Jean-Aubin's second son Alexis, born at Chignecto in September 1685, evidently died young.

Jean-Aubin's third son Jacques, born probably at Chignecto in c1689, died at Kamouraska in December 1755, in his his mid-60s, but never married.

Jean-Aubin's fourth son Louis-Joseph dit Aubin, born probably at Chignecto in c1692, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Pierre Michaud and Marie-Madeleine Thibodeau, at Kamouraska in October 1714, and settled in Canada.  Marie-Anne gave Louis-Joseph nine children, three sons and six daughters, including a set of twins.  Five of their daughters married into the Talbot, Marot dit Labonté, Baguenard, Pilote, and Rolandeau dit Laurendeau families in Canada.  Two of their sons married.   

Oldest son Jean-François dit Aubin, his sister Marie-Claire's twin, born at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny below Québec in October 1732, married Marie-Marthe, daughter of Louis Gagné and Marie-Marthe Rouau, at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in February 1765.   

Louis-Joseph's second son Louis-Joseph, fils, born at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in July 1735, may not have married. 

Louis-Joseph, père's third and youngest son Jacques dit Aubin, born at St.-Pierre-du-Sud below Québec in April 1740, married Marie-Marthe, daughter of Charles Rousseau and Marie-Catherine Talbot, at St.-Pierre-du-Sud in October 1763, and remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Gagné and Marie Métivier, at St.-Pierre-du-Sud in November 1782.

Jean-Aubin's fifth and youngest son Pierre dit Châtillon, born probably at Chignecto in c1695, married Jeanne, daughter of François Autin and Marie Boucher, at Kamouraska in November 1714, remarried to Marie-Catherine-Anne, daughter of Joseph Ouellet and Françoise Lizotte, at Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière above Québec in November 1718, and, at age 50, remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Françoise, daughter of Pierre Roy dit Desjardins and Marie-Anne Martin and widow of François Sirois dit Duplessis, at Kamouraska in May 1745.  First wife Jeanne gave Pierre dit Châtillon one child, a daughter, who married into the Chassé family in Canada.  Second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne gave him 10 more children, nine sons and a daughter, who married into the Milville dit Deschênes family in Canada.  Third wife Marie-Françoise gave him no more children.  Seven of his nine sons, all by his second wife, created families of their own.   

Oldest son Jean, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1710s, married Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Bernard and Cécile Gautrot, at Beaubassin in February 1744.  One wonders if they remained there. 

Pierre dit Châtillon's second son Pierre, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born probably at Chignecto in the late 1710s or early 1720s, married Madeleine, daughter of René Bernard and Anne Blou, at Beaubassin in August 1746 and died by 1749, no place given.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's third son Charles, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born probably at Chignecto in the 1720s, married in c1755 probably at Chgnecto to a woman whose name has been lost to history, and remarried to Pélagie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Galerne and Marie-Josèphe Hébert, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in February 1763 during Le Grand Dérangement  

Pierre dit Châtillon's fourth son Étienne, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in July 1727, died there in October 1728, age 1 1/2.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's fifth son Jean-François, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in April 1729, married Marie Bourg in c1753, place unrecorded, perhaps at Kamouraska, remarried to Françoise, daughter of Ignace Lecours and Marie-Anne Hubert, at Québec in September 1758 during Le Grand Dérangement, remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Antoine Gaboury and Françoise Cotin dit Dugal, at Ste.-Foy near Québec in October 1761, and remarried yet again--his fourth marriage--to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Ambroise Roberge and Marie-Louise Goulet, on Île d'Orléans below Québec in July 1779.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's sixth son Alexis, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in February 1731, died in March.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's seventh son Étienne, the second with the name, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in May 1732, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Marie-Anne Cyr, in c1750 probably at Kamouraska, and remarried to Marie-Angélique, daughter of Louis Gazaille and Françoise Beaudreau and widow of Louis Minet dit Montigny, at St.-Denis-sur-Richelieu near Montréal in November 1782.   

Pierre dit Châtillon's eighth son Joseph-Marie, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in May 1734, probably died young.  

Pierre dit Châtillon's ninth and youngest son Michel dit Aubin, by second wife Marie-Catherine-Anne Ouellet, born at Kamouraska in April 1736, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Deneau and Marie-Geneviève Morin, at St.-Thomas-de-Montmagny in November 1763, and remarried to Marie-Rose, daughter of Sébastien Hervé and Rosalie Tremblay, at St.-Roch-des-Aulnaies below Québec in February 1779.405

Labarre

Jean Labarre, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Catherine ____ created a small family in the colony.  Catherine gave him only one child, daughter Marie-Élisabeth, who married Jean-Baptiste, son of Michel Forest and Marie Hébert, probably at Port-Royal in c1698, so the blood of this family survived in the colony.  If any of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.484

Préjean

Jean Préjean dit Le Breton, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Andrée Savoie created a large family in the colony.  In July 1700, Jean and Andrée purchased land at Port-Royal from Jacques Levron.  Andrée gave Jean a dozen children there, eight sons and four daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Thibodeau, Pitre dit Nordest, Boudrot, Doucet, and Mius d'Azy families.  Jean and Andrée's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Chignecto, Minas, and in the French Maritimes, especially at Port-Toulouse on Île Royale.  At least 16 of Jean dit Le Breton's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and Haiti via Cuba in the early 1800s. 

Oldest son Pierre l'aîné married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Doucet and Marie Comeau and the sister of one of his sister's husbands, at Beaubassin in February 1722. 

Jean's second son Jean-Baptiste married Marie, daughter of Pierre Gaudet le jeune and Marie Blanchard, at Annapolis Royal in February 1716.

Jean's third son François moved to the French Maritimes and married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Vrignaud and Jeanne Aubert, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1722. 

Jean's fourth son Joseph married Marie-Louise, daughter of Abraham Comeau and Marguerite Pitre, at Annapolis Royal in September 1723.

Jean's fifth son Nicolas married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Broussard and Marguerite Bourg and widow of Michel dit Miquetau Boudrot, in c1733, remarried to Anne, also called Jeanne, daughter of Michel Samson and Anne Testard dit Paris, in c1752 at Port-Toulouse, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Euphrasie or Euphrosine, daughter of Antoine Labauve and Catherine Lejeune and widow of Jacques Beaulieu dit Convenance, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in January 1760 while in exile. 

Jean's sixth son Charles married Catherine-Josèphe, daughter of François Broussard and Catherine Richard and widow of Charles Landry, at Annapolis Royal in February 1729, remarried to Françoise, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Cécile LeBlanc, at Grand-Pré in August 1732, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Marguerite, daughter of André Simon dit Boucher and Marie Martin, at Annapolis Royal in January 1739. 

Jean's seventh son Pierre le cadet married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Brun and Anne Gautrot, at Annapolis Royal in November 1743.

Jean's eighth and youngest son Honoré moved to the French Maritimes and married Marie, another daughter of Pierre Broussard and Marguerite Bourg, at Port-Toulouse in c1740.412

Bastarache

Jean Bastarache dit Le Basque, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Huguette Vincent created a small family in the colony.  Between 1685 and 1702, Huguette gave the Basque five children, three sons and two daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Orillon dit Champagne and Girouard families.  Jean and Huguette's descendants remained at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, among the few Acadian families who did not branch out to other communities or retreat to the French Maritimes.  Three of Jean dit Le Basque's daughters emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, establising no line of the family there, so all of his descendants who carried the family's name remained in greater Acadia or in Canada after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son François-Marie, born at Port-Royal in c1687, married Agnès, daughter of Louis-Noël Labauve and Marie Rimbault, at Annapolis Royal in January 1714 and died there in October 1751, in his mid-60s.  Between 1714 and 1725, Agnès gave François-Marie five children, two sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Hébert and Richard families.  Neither of François-Marie's sons married, so only the blood of this family line survived in the colony. 

Older son François, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1720, died at St.-Charles-sur-Richelieu, near Montréal, in December 1790, age 70, still a bachelor. 

François-Marie's younger son Jean-Baptiste, born at Grand-Pré in December 1721, also became an adult but did not marry.

Jean's second son Jean, fils married Angélique, daughter of Alexandre Richard and Isabelle Petitpas, at Annapolis Royal in November 1721.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1742, Angélique gave Jean, fils nine children, two sons and seven daughters.  Their daughters married into the Gaudet, Guillemette, Mouton, Daigre, and Roy families.  Three of the daughters who married Moutons from Chignecto emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.  The other daughters settled in Canada.  One of Jean, fils's sons created his own family. 

Older son Anselme, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730, married Marguerite Melanson in c1755 on the eve of Le Grand Dérangment.  They escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1760 and 1766, Marguerite gave Anselme four children, three sons and a daughter.  They settled at Yamachiche on the north shore of Lac St.-Pierre above Trois-Rivières.  Two of Anselme's three sons established their own families. 

Older son Joseph, born in Canada in c1764, married Françoise, daughter of Charles Lesieur and Ursule Bouvier-Dupont, at Yamachiche in May 1789.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1789 and 1805, Françoise gave Joseph seven children, two sons and five daughters.

Anselme's third and youngest son Joseph-Firmin, born in Canada in c1766, married Marie-Louise, daughter of Robert Rivard-Bellefeuille and Marie-Josèphe Deslauniers, at Yamachiche in November 1789.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1791 and 1804, Marie-Louise gave Joseph-Firmin seven children, three sons and four daughters. 

Jean's third and youngest son Pierre married Marguerite, daughter of René Forest and Françoise Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in January 1724.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1725 and 1744, Marguerite gave Pierre nine children, three sons and six daughters.  Pierre died at Annapolis Royal in May 1751, age 48.  The family may or may not have escaped the British in 1755.  After Le Grand Dérangement, with permission of the British overlords, Marguerite took her family to Baie Ste.-Marie on the southwest coast of Nova Scotia and settled there with other Acadian refugees.  Three of her Pierre's daughters married into the Gaudet dit Veronel, Belliveau, and Comeau families before and during exile.  All three of her and Pierre's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in c1725, married Anne, daughter of Jean Gaudet and Madeleine Brun, at Annapolis Royal in January 1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1754, Anne gave Pierre, fils three children, two sons and a daughter.  Both of his sons created their own families probably on Baie Ste.-Marie. 

Older son Isidore, born at Annapolis Royal in c1752, married Rosalie, daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Anne Belliveau, in c1775. 

Pierre, fils's younger son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in c1754, married Marie, daughter of Joseph Girouard dit Bistet and Anne Belliveau, in c1777. 

Pierre, père's second son Jean-Baptiste, born at Annapolis Royal in c1726, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Comeau and Marie-Madeleine Lord, in c1760 while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1774, Marie-Josèphe gave Jean-Baptiste seven children, two sons and five daughters.  They settled on Baie Ste.-Marie. 

Pierre, père's third and youngest son Michel, born at Annapolis Royal in c1730, married Marie, another daughter of Jean Gaudet and Madeleine Brun, at Annapolis Royal in June 1753.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1769, Marie gave Michel four children, two sons and two daughters.  They settled on Baie Ste.-Marie.414

Bézier

Pierre Bézier dit Joan dit Larivière, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Brun created a small family in the colony.  Madeleine gave Pierre only one child, daughter Susanne, who married Pierre, son of Jean Comeau l'aîné and his first wife Françoise Hébert, at Port-Royal in January 1704, so the blood of this family survived in the colony.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.426

Roy

Jean Roy dit La Liberté, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Marie-Christine Aubois created a good-sized family in the colony.  Marie-Christine gave him nine children, five sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Clémenceau, Comeau dit Grandjean, Girouard, Fontaine dit Beaulieu, and Trahan families.  Four of Jean's five sons created their own families.  He, Marie-Christine and their descendants settled not only at Cap-Sable and Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Minas, Pigiguit, and in the French Maritimes.  At least three of La Liberté's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765. 

Oldest son Jean, fils married Jeanne, daughter of Pierre Lejeune and Marie Thibodeau, at Grand-Pré in October 1712, and remarried to Françoise, daughter of Martin Corporon and Marie-Josèphe Viger, in c1743, place unrecorded.  First wife Jeanne gave Jean, fils five children, a son and four daughters.  Second wife Françoise gave him nine more children, four sons and five daughters.  Four of his daughters by both wives married into the Michel, Deneau dit Dennero, Bergeron, and Keny families, two of them in Canada after Le Grand Dérangement.  Only one of Jean, fils's five sons created a family of his own, and not in greater Acadia.   

Oldest son Charles, by first wife Jeanne Lejeune, died young. 

Jean, fils's second son Joseph and third son Alexandre, by second wife Françoise Corporon, evidently died young.   

Jean, fils's fourth son Charles, by second wife Françoise Corporon, married Marie-Louise Minet, daughter of an Indian from Rivière Rouge, at Repentigny, near Montréal, in February 1802, when Charles was in his late 40s.   

Jean, fils's fifth and youngest son Pierre-Paul, by second wife Françoise Corporon, evidently died young. 

Jean's second son François married Marie, daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise and Geneviève Serreau de Saint-Aubin, at Annapolis Royal in January 1717.  Marie gave François a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters.  Their daughters married into the Part, D'Amours de Chauffours, Boucher, Lefebvre dit Lacroix, Godin, Tremblay, and Levreau de Langis families, the youngest of them in Canada during and after Le Grand Dérangement.  Four of François's five sons created their own families.   

Oldest son François, fils married Marguerite Godreau, perhaps Gautrot, dit Bijou dit Barthélemy in c1740, place unrecorded.   

François's second son Joseph married Agnès, daughter of Louis D'Amours de Chauffours and Ursuline d'Abbadie de St.-Castin, in c1749, and remarried to Marie-Anne, daughter of Jacques Barrieau and Anne-Marie Turpin and widow of Eustache Lejeune, in c1759 while in exile.   

François's third son Jean-Baptiste married Marie Benoit in c1726.   

François's fourth son Benoît married Euphrosine, daughter of Minas notary Alexandre Bourg dit Belleheumeur and Marie Hébert, in c1728.   

François's fifth and youngest son Abraham married Anne Aubois in c1754, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax, and remarried to Marie-Madeleine-called Madeleine, daughter of Germain Doucet and his first wife Françoise Comeau and widow of Pierre Gaudet, at Cabahannocer on the Mississipppi above New Orleans in June 1768.  Abraham and two of his children were, as far as the records show, the only Acadian Roys to go to Louisiana. 

Jean's third son Philippe married Cécile, daughter of Louis Mazerolle and Geneviève Forest, at Grand-Pré in August 1718. 

Jean's fourth son Charles may have died young, unless, as genealogist Bona Arsenault insists, he was the Charles Le Roy who married Marie-Charlotte, daughter of Charles Chauvet and Agnès-Edmée Lejeune, in c1723 perhaps at Annapolis Royal.  Charles Le Roy took his family to the French Maritimes, where he and his family were counted at Baie-des-Espagnols in April 1752.  The French official who counted them there called him a "native of Paris," which tends to nullify Arsenault's thesis. 

Jean's fifth and youngest son René dit Renaud married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Daigre and Madeleine Gautrot, in c1743, place unrecorded, and moved to the French Maritimes.417

Moyse

François Moyse dit Latreille, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Vincent created a good-sized family in the colony.  Madeleine gave him six children, four sons and two daughters.  One of their daughters married into the Pouget dit Lapierre family.  Three of their four sons married.  Latreille and Madeleine and their descendants settled at Passamaquoddy, on Rivière St.-Jean, at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, and in the French Maritimes, where they could be found as early as the late 1710s.  One of Latreille's sons married in the French West Indies on the eve of the Acadian Grand Dérangement, but he may not have settled there.  They were, then, not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  At least four of François dit Latreille's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son François dit Latreille, fils married Marie, daughter of Sébastien Brun and Huguette Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in September 1713, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  Marie gave François, fils 10 children, three sons and seven daughters.  Six of their daughters married into the Ozelet, Pitre, Dugas, Bourg, Blanchard, LeBlanc, and Guédry families.  All of François dit Latreille, fils's sons married.  

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Blanchard and Anne Dupuis and sister of one of his sister's husbands, in c1744 perhaps at Annapolis Royal, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  

François, fils's second son François III married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Ambroise Hébert and Marie-Madeleine Bourg, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, in September 1758, on the eve of the islands' Grand Dérangement, and remarried to Ursule, daughter of Joseph Bourg and Françoise Dugas, at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, France, in November 1761, during exile 

François, fils's third son Joseph married Marie Hébert in c1758 probably on Île St.-Jean. 

François, père's second son Louis dit Latreille left Rivière St.-Jean or Annapolis Royal and moved to the French Maritimes, where he married Marie-Louise, daughter of Claude Petitpas and his Mi'kmaq wife Marie-Thérèse, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1718. 

François, père's third son Pierre married Marie-Rose, daughter of Paul Daniel and ____ and widow of ____ Mercier, at Grand-Bourg, Guadeloupe, in the French West Indies, in January 1753, so he likely was a sailor or merchant. 

François, père's fourth and youngest son Joseph died at Annapolis Royal, age 15, in September 1714, before he could marry.419

Saulnier

Sailor Louis Saulnier, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Louise Bastineau dit Peltier created a good-sized family in the colony.  Louise gave Louis 14 children, six sons and eight daughters.  Louis died probably at Minas after April 1730, in his late 60s or early 70s.  Five of his daughters married into the Boudrot, Boisseau dit Blondin, Lapierre, Oudy, and Hébert families, and one of them perished with her entire family in the deportation to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Five of Louis's six sons created their own families.  His and Louise's descendants settled at Minas, especially on Rivière-de-la-Vielle-Habitation and Village-des-LeBlanc; at Cap-Sable; Chignecto; Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto; and in the French Maritimes.  At least 16 of the sailor's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and France in 1785, but a substantial number of them could be found in Canada, Nova Scotia, the French Antilles, and France after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Jacques, born in c1685 probably at Minas, married Anne, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Anne Doucet, in c1724 probably at Minas.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1724 and 1732, Anne gave Jacques three children, three sons and a daughter.  Other sources give them two more daughters born probaby at Petitcoudiac.  Their daughters married into the Babin and Cormier families, and two of them emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax.

Louis's second son Marcel, born probably at Minas in c1691, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Vincent Breau and Marie Bourg, at Grand-Pré in November 1710 and lived for a time at Cap-Sable.  Between 1712 and the late 1720s, Élisabeth gave Marcel six children, two sons and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Hébert, Labauve, and Semer families, and one of them died in French Guiana in 1765.  Both of Marcel's sons created their own families.   

Older son Pierre le jeune, born at Minas in March 1721, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Vincent and Anne-Marie Doiron, at Grand-Pré in October 1740.  They settled at Rivières-aux-Canards.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave Pierre a daughter, Françoise, in 1741.  Other records show that, between 1742 and 1754, she gave him six more children, four sons and another daughter.  The British deported the family to Virginia in 1755 and sent them on to England in 1756.  They were held at Liverpool, where Marguerite died.  Daughter Françoise married into the Hébert family there.  Pierre remarried to Dorothée, daughter of François Trahan and Angélique Melanson, in September 1762 probably at Liverpool.  In the spring of 1763, Pierre and his family were repatriated to France with other Acadians held in England.  He took his family to French Guiana in 1765, where they were counted at Sinnamary in March.  With them was his older sister Anne, widow of Joseph Hébert.  With him also was oldest daughter Françoise, now a widow, who the census taker noted was suffering from fever (she died 11 days after the census); oldest son Pierre, fils, his wife, and their 2-year-old daughter; and four of Pierre, père's younger children by first wife Marguerite Vincent, one of whom--Marie, age 11--also was suffering from fever.  Pierre, père, perhaps a widower again, returned to France later in the decade, but at least three of his four sons remained in the South American colony.  Pierre, père remarried again--his third marriage--to Frenchwoman Marie-Marguerite, daughter of Dominique Coulogne or Collongues and Madeleine Ferret and widow of André Pibaud, in Notre-Dame Parish, Rochefort, France, in August 1769.  Pierre, père died probably at Rochefort between January 1773 and April 1776, in his early or mid-50s.  Three of his four sons created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1742, followed his family to Virginia and England, where he married Élisabeth Trahan in the early 1760s.  Their daughter Marguerite was born in England in c1763 on the eve of their repatriation to France that spring.  They followed his family to French Guiana in 1765 and were counted with them at Sinnamary that March.  Despite the death of his older sister Françoise later that month, of their daughter Marguerite in April, and of his aunt Marie Saulnier in May, when Pierre, fils's father returned to France later in the decade, Pierre, fils and Élisabeth remained in French Guiana.  From 1767 to 1782, in the tropical colony, she gave him several sons named Jean-Baptiste, Jérôme, and Jean-Pierre.  Jérôme died at Sinnamary in May 1781, age 6.  Jean-Pierre died at Sinnamary in October 1785, age 3.  Pierre died at the King's hospital, Sinnamary, in July 1787, age 45.  Wife Élisabeth died in August. 

Pierre, père's second son Charles, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1746, followed his family to Virginia, England, France, and French Guiana, where he was counted with them at Sinnamary in March 1765.  One wonders what happened to him after the census.

Pierre, père's third son Joseph, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1748, followed his family to Virginia, England, France, and French Guiana, where he was counted with them in March 1765.  When his father returned to France later in the decade, Joseph remained in Guiana with two of his brothers.  At age 25, he married 23-year-old Madeleine (the recording priest called her Marguerite), daughter of Joseph Trahan and Anne Boudrot of Rivière-aux-Canards and widow of André-Joseph Jacquet, at Sinnamary in January 1773.  Joseph and Madeleine may have known one another since chldhood.  She gave him a daughter soon after their marriage.  Madeleine died at Sinnamary in July 1775, age 25.  Joseph, who did not remarry, died at Iracoubo, near Sinnamary, in May 1784, age 36.  His family line died with him. 

Pierre, père's fourth and youngest son Étienne, born at Minas in c1749, followed his family to Virginia, England, France, and French Guiana, where he was counted with them at Sinnamary in March 1765.  When his father returned to France later in the decade, Étienne remained in Guiana with two of his older brothers.  He married Marie-Jeanne, 20-year-old daughter of Yves Quimine and Marie Grossin and widow of Jean-Louis Busson, at Sinnamary in April 1776.  Their daughter Perrine was born at Sinnamary in October 1777 but died on Anse Mapbo, near Sinnamary, in July 1780, age 3; their son Joseph le jeune was born at Anse Mapbo the following October; and Antoine in February 1782. 

Marcel's younger son Charles, born at Minas in the 1720s, married Euphrosine, daughter of Pierre Lalande and Anne Prétieux, in c1746 probably at Minas.  They, too, may have been exiled to Virginia in 1755 and deported to England in 1756.  A daughter, Marguerite, was born to them in c1758, perhaps in England.  They, too, may have been repatriated to France in 1763 and remained there.  Charles died before September 1772, place unrecorded.  Daughter Marguerite married into the Hamon family in France and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Louis's third son René, born probably at Minas in c1695, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean-Charles Trahan and Marie Boudrot, at Grand-Pré in October 1714.  Between 1716 and the late 1720s, Marie-Josèphe gave René six children, four sons and two daughters.  One of their daughters married into the Maillet family.  All four of René's sons created their own families.   

Oldest son Pierre le jeune, born probably at Minas in c1716, married Marie, daughter of Joseph Boudrot and Françoise Comeau, at Grand-Pré in May 1739.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave Pierre a son in c1756.  Pierre remarried to Marie-Josèphe dite Josette, daughter of Canadians François-Xavier de Lavoie and Marguerite Savard, at St.-Joachim below Québec City in May 1762 while in exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1762 and 1764, Josette gave Pierre two more sons.  They remained at St.-Joachim, where two of their sons created their own families.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Marie Boudrot, born in exile in c1756, followed his family to the lower St. Lawrence valley, where he married Geneviève, daughter of Joseph Poulin and Thérèse Poulin, at St.-Joachim in 1779. 

Pierre le jeune's third and youngest son Jean-Baptiste-Joachim, by second wife Josette de Lavoie, born probably at St.-Joachim in c1764, married Thérèse, daughter of Noël Guay and Marie-Josèphe Tremblay, at Baie St.-Paul, on the north bank of the St. Lawrence below St.-Joachim, in 1788, and remarried to Marie, daughter of Denis Laforêt and Madeleine Tremblay, at Baie St.-Paul in 1801.  According to Bona Arsenault, Jean-Baptiste-Joachim and his family lived near a hill at Baie St.-Paul the locals called "couline," so the family became known as the Saulniers de la couline.  As a result, some of their descendants began to call themselves Lacouline.

René's second son Joseph, born at Minas in June 1720, married Isabelle, another daughter of Joseph Boudrot and Françoise Comeau, in c1738 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1754 and 1755, Isabelle gave Joseph two sons.  According to Arsenault, they settled at Petiticoudiac on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement. They escaped the British there in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Joseph died at Québec in December 1757, age 37, victim, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadian refugees there that winter. 

René's third son René, fils, born on Rivière-des-Habitants, Minas, in c1723, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Maillet and Madeleine Hébert, at Annapolis Royal in November 1753.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1771, Marie-Madeleine gave René, fils five children, three sons and two daughters.  After Le Grand Dérangement, they were counted at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, in 1767 and moved on Baie Ste.-Marie, on the peninsula's south shore, in 1769.  René, fils died at Pointe-de-l'Église, today's Church Point, Nova Scotia, on the Baie Ste.-Marie, in May 1821, age 98.  His three sons created their own families on the bay.

Oldest son Charlitte-Cajetan, born during exile in c1761, followed his family to Windsor and Baie Ste.-Marie and married Marie, daughter of Claude Boudreau and Judith Landry, probably on the bay in c1782.  Charlitte remarried to Marie-Austère Bastarache, widow of Joseph Deveau, date unrecorded, and settled at Baie Ste.-Marie. 

René, fils's second son René III, born in c1769, married Anne, daughter of Jacques Deveau and Madeleine Robichaud, at Baie Ste.-Marie in c1790, and remarried to Victoire-Euphrosine, daughter of Michel Boudreau and Anne Pothier and widow of Paul Duon, probably at Baie Ste.-Marie in c1800. 

René, fils's third and youngest son Pierre le jeune, born probably at Baie Ste.-Marie in c1771, married Madeleine, another daughter of Claude Boudreau and Judith Landry, probably at Baie Ste.-Marie in c1795. 

René, père's fourth and youngest son Claude, born at Minas in c1724, married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Aucoin and Catherine Comeau, in c1752 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault (who insists that Claude was a son of Rene's older brother Jacques), between 1754 and 1769, Françoise gave Claude six children, three sons and three daughters.  After Le Grand Dérangement, Claude and his family were counted at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, Nova Scotia, in 1768 and moved on to Baie Ste.-Marie, where they were counted in 1769.  Claude died at Pointe-de-l'Église, Nova Scotia, in May 1801, age 77.  According to Arsenault, Claude's oldest son created his own family. 

Oldest son Joseph, born during exile in c1760, married Marguerite, daughter of Paul Dugas and Brigitte Melanson, in c1786 perhaps on Baie Ste.-Marie. 

Louis's fourth son Pierre, born at Minas in c1696, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Comeau le jeune and Catherine Babin, in c1716 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1717 and 1734, Madeleine gave Pierre five children, three sons and two daughters.  They evidently settled at Petitcoudiac.  Their two daughters married into the Léger and Aucoin families and emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax and France.  Two of their sons created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born at Minas in c1717, married Madeleine, daughter of Michel Haché dit Gallant, fils and Madeleine LeBlanc of Chignecto in c1738.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1739 and 1745, Madeleine gave Pierre, fils eight children, two sons and six daughters.  Pierre, fils remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Hébert and Jeanne Corporon at Annapolis Royal in June 1753.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1754 Marguerite gave Pierre, fils another son.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  His three oldest daughters by first wife Madeleine Haché--Anne & Marie-Madeleine, perhaps twins, age 18; and Marie, age 15--died at Québec in 1757, victims, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadian refugees there that winter.  Two of his younger daughters by first wife Madeleine married into the Drapeau, Lecossier, and Layur families in Canada and Louisiana.  His two older sons emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax and created their own families in the Spanish colony. 

Oldest son Joseph, by first wife Madeleine Haché, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1739, evidently was captured by, or surrendered to, the British in the early 1760s and was held as a prisoner in Nova Scotia.  In August 1763, British officials counted Joseph, "his wife," and two "children," probably his younger siblings Jean-Baptiste and Marguerite, in the prison compound on Georges Island, Halifax.  Perhaps now a widower, he emigrated to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Dominique, in 1764-65 with two younger siblings and settled at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Joseph married--or remarried to--Marie Landry, widow of Alexis Granger, at Cabahannocer in November 1767.  Their daughter married into the Bourgeois family.  Joseph remarried--again?--to Marie Braud, widow of Amand Richard, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in August 1777.  Their daughter married into the Lanoux family.  Joseph died in St. James Parish in December 1812, age 73.  His two sons by two of his wives married, the older one to a woman whose name has been lost to history, the younger one into the Arceneaux family.  The younger son moved from the river to upper Bayou Lafourche during the antebellum period. 

Pierre, fils's second son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Madeleine Haché, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1746, followed his older brother to Nova Scotia and Louisiana and also settled at Cabahannocer.  He married Marie, daughter of Abraham Roy and his first wife Anne Aubois, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in May 1773.  During the 1780s, they joined other river Acadians on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Cuvillier, Duval, Henrique, Martin, and Nopper families.  Jean-Baptiste's two sons married into the LeBlanc and Saucier families and joined their cousins in the Bayou Teche valley during the antebellum period. 

Pierre, père's second son Charles, born at Minas in c1721, married Marie Savoie perhaps at Petitcoudiac in c1742.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1744 and 1766, Marie gave Charles three children, two sons and a daughter.  After Le Grand Dérangement, Claude and his family settled at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, Nova Scotia, in 1768 and moved on to Rivière St.-Jean in present-day New Brunswick. 

Louis's fifth son Étienne, born in c1702 probably at Minas, married Jeanne, daughter of Abraham Comeau and Marguerite Pitre, in c1729 probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1730 and 1732, Jeanne gave Étienne two children, both daughters.  Louisiana records hint that she may have given him a son as well in 1736.  Two of their daughters married into the Thibodeau and Lalande families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax.  Étienne remarried to Anne, daughter of Jérôme Darois and Marie Gareau, at Beaubassin in June 1740.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Étienne a son in 1755.  Louisiana records indicate that she may have given him another son and a daughter in 1747 and 1752.  The family evidently settled at Petitcoudiac and escaped the British roundup there in 1755.  They sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  In the early 1760s, they either surrendered to, or were captured by, the British and held in prison compounds in Nova Scotia.  British officials counted Étienne, who would have been age 61, second wife Anne, and nine "children" at Halifax in August 1763.  Étienne may have died at Halifax soon after the census.  At least four of his children, a daughter and three sons, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.   His daughter by second wife Anne married into the Chrétien family there.  Two of his three sons by both wives created their own families in the Spanish colony. 

Oldest son Sylvain, by first wife Jeanne Comeau, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1736, followed his family into exile, was captured by, or surrendered to, the British in the early 1760s, and was held in a prison compound in Nova Scotia.  With four of his younger siblings, he emigrated to Louisiana in 1765 and settled at Opelousas west of the Atachafalaya Basin, where he married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Charles Bourg and Anne Boudrot of Île St.-Jean, in the late 1760s.  He died at Opelousas in January 1801, age 65.  His daughters married into the Comeaux, Dugas, Martin, Missonnier, and Thibodeaux families.  Four of his seven sons married into, or cohabitated with women in, the Comeaux, Bello, and Guidry families and created vigorous lines on the prairies. 

Étienne's second son Olivier, by second wife Anne Darois, born probably at Petitcoudiac in c1752, followed his family into exile, to Halifax, and Louisiana.  He, too, settled at Opelousas, but he did not marry.

Étienne's third and youngest son Joseph, born during exile in c1756, followed his family to Halifax and Louisiana and also settled at Opelousas.  He married Marie, daughter of Olivier Thibodeau and Madeleine Broussard, at nearby Attakapas in January 1779.  They settled at Carencro, at the northern edge of the Attakapas District.  Joseph died near Carencro, St. Martin Parish, in October 1820, age 64. His daughters married into the Chiasson, Constantin, Dugas, and Guilbert families.  Five of his six sons married into the Arceneaux, Breaux, Dugas, and Parr families and created vigorous lines in the prairie parishes. 

Louis's sixth and youngest son Jean, born at Minas in December 1707, likely died young.420

Bertrand

Claude Bertrand, an early 1680s arrival, and his wife Catherine Pitre created a fairly large branch of the family in the colony.  Catherine gave him 10 children, at least seven sons and two daughters.  Both of their daughters married into the Comeau, Le Breton, Martin, and Blanchard families.  Four of their seven sons married, two of them to sisters.  Claude, Catherine, and their descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Port-Razoir near Cap-Sable on the Atlantic coast, and in the French Maritimes.  At least 13 of Claude's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but only one family line survived there.  Most of Claude's descendants could be found in Canada after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Claude, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1686, survived childhood but did not marry.

Claude, père's second son René, born at Port-Royal in c1688, also survived childhood but did not marry. 

Claude père's third son Jean l'aîné, born at Port-Royal in c1692, married Marie-Françoise, daughter of Jacques Léger dit La Rosette and Madeleine Trahan, in c1722.  They settled at Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1739, Marie-Françoise gave Jean l'aîné three sons at Chepoudy.  Records show that a fourth son was born there in c1743.  Jean l'aîné and members of his family escaped the British in 1755 and made their way up to Canada, while others evidently found refuge in the French Maritimes.  Jean l'aîné died at Québec in late December 1757, victim, perhaps, of the smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadian refugees there that fall and winter.  An older son created his own family in Canada.  One of Jean l'aîné's younger sons was deported to France in 1758 and created his own famliy there. 

Jean l'aîné's third son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Chepoudy in c1739, escaped the British with his family in 1755 and moved on to Canada.  He married Marie-Geneviève, daughter Daniel Chevigny and Marie-Rose Guertin, at Lavaltrie on the upper St. Lawrence below Montréal in July 1768.   

Jean-Baptiste, fils married Josephte, daughter of François Filion and Marguerite Sarazin, at Ste.-Thérèse, near Montréal, in February 1803. 

Olivier married Julienne Welch of Ireland. 

Olivier, fils married Basilice, daughter of Olivier Nepveau and Angèle Richer, at Ste.-Scholastique, near Montréal, in November 1864.  One of their daughters, Bernadette, married Lorenzo-Calixte, son of Honoré Bertrand and Élise Mathieu, at Notre-Dame d'Ottawa in July 1908; Lorenzo-Calixte was from a French-Canadian branch of the Bertrand family.  Their son Jean-Jacques Bertrand served as the twenty-first premier of Québec Province from October 1968 to May 1970. 

Jean l'aîné's fourth and youngest son Eustache, born probably at Chepoudy in c1743, was deported to France in 1758 and became ship's carpenter.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Benjamin Landry and Marguerite Babin, at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in March 1764.  She gave him at least three children, a son and two daughters, at Cherbourg between 1768 and 1772, but two of them died in infancy.  The family was part of the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s.  Marguerite gave Eustache another daughter in Poitou in October 1774.  They retreated to Nantes with dozens of other Acadians in December 1775.  Marguerite gave him at least five more children, three sons and two daughters, at Nantes between 1776 and 1784, but three of them died young.  Eustache, Marguerite, and four of their children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marguerite gave him no more children in the Spanish colony.  His oldest daughter married into the LeBlanc and Dubois families on Bayou Lafourche.  His only remaining son Louis-Martin survived childhood but did not marry, so, except for its blood, this line of the family did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Claude, père's fourth son Jean le jeune, also called Jean-Baptiste, born at Port-Royal in c1696, married Anne, daughter of Toussaint Doucet and Marie Caissie and widow of Denis Gaudet, in c1731.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1732 and 1740, Anne gave Jean le jeune two children, a son and a daughter, at Chepoudy.  The family evidently escaped the British in 1755, retreated to the French Martimes, and the British deported them to France in 1758.  Jean le jeune died probably in France before September 1763, and wife Anne died there before February 1771.  Their only son created his own family there. 

Jean, born probably at Chepoudy in c1732, married first cousin Marguerite, daughter of Toussaint Blanchard and Angélique Bertrand, in France in c1762.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1767, Marguerite gave Jean four children, two sons and two daughters.  Records show that she gave him another daughter at Cherbourg in 1769.  The family was part of the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s and retreated to Nantes with dozens of other disgruntled Acadians in December 1775.  Jean died at Chantenay near Nantes in November 1781, age 49.  His widow and a son emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where the created his own family.

Only surviving son Jean-Nicolas, called Nicolas or Colas, born in France in c1765, married Marguerite-Tarsille, daughter of Amand Pitre and Geneviève Arcement, at New Orleans on Chrismas Day, 1785, soon after they reached Louisiana from France on separate ships.  She gave him a son at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans in January 1789, and they settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jean-Nicolas died at Opelousas, west of the Atchafalaya Basin, in February 1804, age 42, but his succession inventory was filed at the Interior Parish courthouse on Bayou Lafourche in December 1805, so he evidently was still a resident of that parish at the time of his death.  His only son Jean-Baptiste married into the Rassicot family on upper Bayou Lafourche and had a son of his own.  Nicolas's, in fact, was the only line of Acadian Bertrands to survive in the Bayou State.

Claude, père's fifth son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in c1698, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Gabriel Moulaison and Marie Aubois, in c1731.  They setteld at Chignecto before moving to Pobomcoup near Cap-Sable in 1734.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre two children, a daughter and a son, in 1732 and 1734.  Pierre died probably at Pobomcoup between 1734 and 1739, in his late 30s or early 40s.  The family may have moved on to the French Maritimes after 1752.  The British evidently deported them to France in 1758.  Daughter Marie married into the Lamoureux dit Rochefort family of Île St.-Jean at Cherbourg in October 1763 and chose to remain in France in 1785.  Pierre's only son also created his own family in France but chose to resettle in Louisiana. 

Pierre-Jacques, born at Pobomcoup in c1734, became a sailor in France and married Catherine, daughter of Charles Bourg and Marguerite Landry, at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in February 1764.  They lived for a time at Le Havre before returning to Cherbourg.  Between 1764 and 1772, Catherine gave Pierre-Jacques at least four children, three sons and a daughter, at Le Havre and Cherbourg.  They were part of the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s.  Catherine gave Pierre-Jacques another daughter in Poitou in March 1774.  In December 1775, they retreated to Nantes with other disgruntled Poitou Acadians.  They buried a son at Nantes in November 1777, and Catherine gave Pierre-Jacques four more children, two sons and two daughters, there between 1777 and 1785.  Pierre-Jacques, Catherine, and seven of their children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Catherine gave him no more children in the Spanish colony.  Three of their daughters married into the Caillier, Boudreaux, and Bourg families on Bayou Lafourche.  Only one of Pierre-Jacques's sons survived childhood, but he did not marry, so, except for its blood, this line of the family did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Claude, père's sixth son Jacques, born in c1704, married Madeleine, another daughter of Gabriel Moulaison and Marie Aubois, perhaps at Cap-Sable in c1740.  They may have moved on to the French Maritimes after 1752, and the British evidently deported them to France in 1758.  Jacques died in France before April 1766.  Wife Madeleine died in Poitou in August 1782, age 72.  Daughter Marie-Anne, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1742, died in Poitou less than a week later, age 40. 

Claude, père's seventh and youngest son Charles, born perhaps at Point-Razoir near Cap-Sable in c1706, evidently died young.415

Maissonat

Privateer Pierre dit Baptiste Maissonat, a 1680s arrival, and his three wives, Judith Soubiran, Madeleine Bourg, and Marguerite Bourgeois, created a small but influential family in the colony.  First wife Judith gave him five children, three sons and two daughters.  Second "wife" Madeleine gave him only one child, a daughter.  Third wife Marguerite gave him only one more child, a daughter.  His daughters married into the Cahouet, Le Grange, Tréguy or Treilli, Winniett, and Vincent dit Desmarets families.  None of Pierre dit Baptiste's sons married, so only the blood of this family survived in the colony.  If any of the privateer's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

But the privateer left more than his "blood" in the colony.  Baptiste's and Madeleine Bourg's "marriage" was annulled, date unrecorded, when it was discovered that his first wife was still alive.  First wife Judith, in fact, gave him his three sons during the late 1690s!  (Madeleine legitimately married Pierre, son of Daniel LeBlanc and Françoise Gaudet and widower of Marie Thériot, probably at Port-Royal in c1697.  She gave him eight more children.)  At age 16, in c1711, Baptiste and Madeleine's daughter Marie-Madeleine dit Baptiste married William, also called Guillaume, Winniet, a lieutenant in the British garrison at Annapolis Royal.  William, who may have been born to Huguenot parents in France, was a decade older than his bride at the time of their wedding.  He resigned his commission soon after his marriage and settled in the community, where he became an important merchant and ship owner.  He fathered 13 children by Marie-Madeleine dit Baptiste, including three daughters who married prominent Britons in the colony.  Winniet served on the Nova Scotia colonial Council during the 1730s and drowned probably on a business venture at Boston, Massachusetts, in April 1741.  Marie-Madeleine dit Baptiste remained at Annapolis Royal, where, as a widow, she wielded as much political influence as her husband and sons-in-law. 

In 1714, after Queen Anne's War had ended, the old privateer was living at Chignecto with his third wife Marguerite Bourgeois, likely having put some distance between himself and the British authorities in Annapolis Royal.421

Savary

Mason and stone cutter François Savary, a 1680s arrival, and his wife Geneviève Forest created a small family in the colony.  Geneviève gave him only one child, a son, who married.  Their descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Minas, and on Île St.-Jean in the French Maritimes.  At least one of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Son André, born probably at Port-Royal in c1690, married Marie-Marthe, daughter of Bernard Doucet and Madeleine Corporon, at Annapolis Royal in February 1712.  They moved on to Minas and then to the French Maritimes.  Between 1714 and 1739, Marie-Marthe gave André 11 children, five sons and six daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Doiron and Horne families, one on Île St.-Jean, the other two in Canada.  Three of André's fives sons created families of their own.  A French official counted André, now a widower, with some of his children at Petite-Ascension on the south coast of Île St.-Jean in August 1752.  Others were counted ont he island at Anse-à-Dubuisson and Anse-aux-Morts.  He and some of his children evidently left Île St.-Jean before the island's dérangement in late 1758.  André died in St.-Jean Parish on Île d'Orléans downriver from Québec City in November 1757, in his late 60s. 

Oldest son Bernard, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1714, married Marie, also called Madeleine, daughter of François Michel dit La Ruine and Marguerite Meunier, in c1734 perhaps at Minas, and moved on to Île St.-Jean, where they were counted with his widowered father at Petite-Ascension in August 1752.  The British deported them to Cherbourg, France, in late 1758.  One of Bernard's daughters, Anne-Marie-Madeleine, born probably at Minas in c1742, settled near St.-Malo, where she married.  She emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785 as a young widow.  

André's second Joseph, born at Minas in February 1721, married Françoise, daughter of Antoine Barrieau and Angélique Thibodeau, in c1747, place unrecorded.  They, too, moved on to the French Maritimes.  In August 1752, a French official counted Joseph and his family at Anse-à-Dubuisson in the interior of Île St.-Jean.  He died at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse across from Québec City in January 1758, age 37, victim, perhaps, of a smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadians in the Québec area that fall and winter. 

André's third Charles, born probably at Minas in c1727, was counted with his family at Petite-Ascension on Île St.-Jean in August 1752.  Charles married Louise-Geneviève, daughter of Louis Closquinet and Marguerite Longuépée, in c1755 probably on Île St.-Jean.  He and his family were deported to France aboard the British transport Supply in late 1758.  Charles died at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in April 1759, soon after his arrival. 

André's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Minas in c1732, was counted with his family at Petite-Acension on Île St.-Jean in August 1752 and then disappears from history. 

André's fifth and youngest son Charles-Olivier, born probably at Minas in c1739, was counted with his family at Petite-Acension on Île St.-Jean in August 1752.  He became a carpenter but evidently did not marry.  Along with other members of his family, he was deported to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  In February 1760, perhaps having become a sailor, he embarked on the ship Le Prince-Édouard and disappears from history.422

Babineau

Nicolas Babineau dit Deslauriers, a 1680s arrival, and his wife Marie-Marguerite Granger created a fairly large family in the colony.  They were counted at Pentagöuet, present-day Maine, in 1693 during King William's War, but returned to Port-Royal by July 1701, when they purchased from Martin Bourg, who had moved on to the new Acadian settlement at Cobeguit, a homestead along Rivière-au-Dauphin "on the estate of the late M. d'Entremont," below and across from the port.  Between the late 1680s and 1709, Marie-Marguerite gave Nicolas six children, four sons and two daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Savoie and Forest families.  Marie-Marguerite died at Annapolis Royal in April 1719, age 51.  Nicolas did not remarry.  He died probably at Annapolis Royal before November 1723, in his 60s.  His and Marie-Marguerite's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area.  They were among the Acadian families who did not move on to the French Maritimes.  At least five of Nicolas's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and French St.-Domingue in the late 1760s or 1770s, but only one of them created a family line there.  After the Great Upheaval, even more of Nicolas's descendants could be found in greater Acadia and Canada.  They were especially numerous in the Trois-Rivières area between Québec and Montréal and in present-day eastern New Brunswick.   

Oldest son René dit Renaud dit Deslauriers, born in greater Acadia in the late 1680s, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Germain Savoie and Marie Breau, at Annapolis Royal in April 1711.  Between 1713 and 1740, Marie-Madeleine gave René 11 children, four sons and seven daughters.  Marie-Madeleine, a widow, died at the Hôtel-Dieu, Québec, in March 1770, age 76.  Three of her daughters married into the Egan, Doucet, Comeau, Lanphere, and Chane dit Ladéroute families, some of them in Canada.  Three of her and René dit Renaud's four sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste dit Deslauriers, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1719, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Darois and Marguerite Breau, in c1746.  They evidently escaped the British in 1755 and found refuge in Canada.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1760 and 1773, Marguerite gave Jean-Baptiste two daughters.  He died at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet, on the upper St. Lawrence across from Trois-Rivières, in November 1807, age 88.  His daughters married into the Morin and Laure families at Nicolet. 

René, père's second son Charles dit Deslauriers, born Annapolis Royal in October 1722, married Cécile, daughter of François Comeau and Marie-Madeleine Lord, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1771, Cécile gave Charles seven childen, four sons and three daughters, all of whom married.  They moved to Petitcoudiac on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement, evidently escaped the British in 1755, and took refuge in Canada.  They were counted at Bécancour on the upper St. Lawrence across from Trois-Rivières in 1771 and at nearby Pointe-du-Lac in 1773.  Charles died probably in Canada before February 1777.  His daughters married into the Doucet, Prince, and Dumont families at Pointe-du-Lac and Bécancour.  All four of his sons created their own famiies in Canada. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste dit Deslauriers le jeune, born in c1755, married Marie-Rose, daughter of Étienne Dumont and Ursule Feuilleteau, at Bécancour in January 1793. 

Charles's second son Charles, fils, born in exile in c1760, married Thérèse, daughter of Athanase Godin and Thérèse Piché, at Bécancour in March 1785. 

Charles, père's third son François, born in c1770, married Cécile, daughter of Antoine Rattier-Raymond and Marie-Josèphe Coltret, at Nicolet, across from Pointe-du-Lac,  in April 1795. 

Charles, père's fourth and youngest son Antoine-Dominique, born in c1771, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Louis Beaubien and Louise Manseau, at Nicolet in September 1796. 

René, père's third son René, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1725, married Marguerite, daughter of Abraham Bourg and Marie Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in January 1755.  Soon after their marriage, they were deported to one of the New England colonies.  René, fils remarried to Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Michel and Jeanne Breau, in New England in May 1759 while still in exile.  After the war with Britain ended, they chose to go to Canada.  They settled at Beauport, near Québec City, where their marriage was blessed in April 1769.  René, fils drowned at Beauport in December 1775, age 50. 

René, père's fourth and youngest son Claude-Poncy, called Poncy, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1737, evidently did not marry. 

Nicolas's second son Clément married Renée dite Renoche, daughter of Bernard Bourg and François Brun, at Annapolis Royal in January 1717.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1718 and 1728, Renée gave Clément seven children, five sons and two daughters, including a set of twins.  One of their daughters married into the Bernard family.  Members of the family escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  At least two of Clément's sons created their own families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Annapolis Royal in c1720, married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Bourg and Judith Guérin, at Annapolis Royal in January 1748.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1752, Marguerite gave Jean-Baptiste three children, two sons and a daughter. 

Clément's third son Paul, born at Annapolis Royal in c1726, evidently escaped the British in 1755 and may have married Madeleine Michel in c1758 during exile.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him a son. 

Only son Paul, fils, born in exile in c1760, married Jeanne, daughter of Claude Arsenault and Marguerite Thériault, at Carleton, on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs in present-day Québec Province, in January 1786.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1786 and 1808, Jeanne gave Paul, fils 10 children, two sons and eight daughters.

Clément's fifth and youngest son Louis-Charles, called Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1728, married Marguerite, daughter of René Doucet and Marie Broussard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1745.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1745 and 1753, Marguerite gave Charles four children, two sons and two daughters.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Marguerite and perhaps their children died in exile.  Charles remarried to Anne, daughter of Joseph dit L'Officier Guilbeau and Madeleine Michel of Annapolis Royal, at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs in February 1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1774, Anne gave Charles six more children, four sons and two daughters, at Fort Edward, formerly Pigiguit, Halifax, and in Louisiana.  The British captured Charles and Anne at Restigouche the summer after their marriage and held them as prisoners in Nova Scotia for the next several years.  They and their two older sons emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1764-65 and followed Anne's family and the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche.  Charles's line of the family was the only one established in Louisiana.  His neighbors called him "Grand Louis."  He died at Attakapas in the mid-1770s, in his 40s.  Older daughter Scholastique married into the Poirier family at Attakapas.  All four of Grand Louis's sons, by second wife Anne, married into the Thibodeaux, Cormier, Dugas, and Melançon families and settled on the western prairies. 

Nicolas's third son Joseph dit Deslauriers, born probably at Port-Royal in c1700, married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Dugas and Jeanne Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in November 1723.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1725 and 1741, Marguerite gave Joseph eight children, four sons and four daughters.  Members of the family were deported to Connecticut in 1755 and moved on to French-St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, in 1763.  Joseph died at La Mirebalais, French St.-Domingue, in January 1765, age 65.  Two of his daughters, who used the surname Deslauriers, married into the Comeau family and emigrated to Louisiana in 1766 or 1767 from St.-Domingue.

Nicolas's fourth and youngest son Jean-Pierre, called Jean, dit Deslauriers, born at Port-Royal in February 1709, married Isabelle, daughter of Pierre Breau and his second wife Anne LeBlanc, in c1730.  They settled at Rivière-aux-Canards, Minas, the first of the family to leave the Annapolis valley before Le Grand Dérangement.  In the early 1750s, they moved on to Terre-Rouge, on upper Rivière Petitcoudiac, now Moncton, New Brunswick.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1732 and 1753, Isabelle gave Jean seven children, four sons and three daughters.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Jean's daughters married into the Maillet, Thibodeau, Richard, and Surette families. All four of his sons created their own families.

Oldest son Paul, born at Annapolis Royal in c1740, married Marguerite Richard at Halifax in July 1768.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1770 and 1775, Marguerite gave Paul four children, two sons and two daughters.  Paul remarried to Ludivine Belliveau in c1780.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1782 and 1786, Ludivine gave Paul three more children, all daughters.  The family settled at Richibouctou in present-day eastern New Brunswick.  Paul's five daughters married into the Allain, Henry, and Caissie families in the Richibouctou area.  At least one of his sons created his own family. 

Older son Hilarion, born in c1773, married Marie, daughter of Charles Maillet, probably at Richibouctou. 

Jean's second son Jean, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in c1747, married Anne Bastarache in c1770.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1771 and 1780, Anne gave Jean, fils eight children, two sons and six daughters.  The family settled at Bouctouche in present-day eastern New Brunswick.  Jean, fils's daughters married into the Richard, Maillet, and Robichaud families at Bouctouche.  His two sons also created their own families. 

Older son Joseph, born in c1771, married Marie Melanson and was one of the first settlers at St.-Louis-de-Kent, up the coast from Bouctouche. 

Jean, fils's younger son Thaddée, born in c1773, married Blanche Johnson

Jean, père's third son Sylvain, born at Annapolis Royal in c1750, married Marguerite Léger, remarried to Geneviève, daughter of Gervais Girouard, and likely settled in eastern New Brunswick. 

Jean, père's fourth and youngest son Dominique, born at Annapolis Royal in c1753, married Rosalie Gaudreau, perhaps Gautrot, and settled at Richbouctou, where Dominique died in March 1813, age 60. 

Babineau

Jean Babineau, perhaps also a 1680s arrival, evidently was Nicolas dit Deslaurier's younger brother.  Jean and his wife Marguerite Boudrot created a small family in the colony.  Marguerite gave him two children, daughters Marie and Marguerite, who married, respectively, Claude, fils, son of Claude Landry and Marguerite Thériot, at Annapolis Royal in April 1711, and Claude, son of Charles Melanson and Marie Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in January 1714, so the blood of this line of the Babineau family survived in Acadia.  Jean and Marguerite's daughters and their families remained at Annapolis Royal.  Marguerite, who was a dozen years older than Jean, who was her second husband, died at Annapolis Royal in November 1718, age 70.  Jean died at Annapolis Royal in September 1741, age 81.  If any of their descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none carried the family's name there.

Jean and Marguerite's daughters and their families escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge in Canada.  First Marie and then Marguerite died at Québec in November and December 1757, probably in a smallpox epidemic that struck hundreds of Acadian refugees there.  Marie was age 65 and Marguerite age 63 when they died.423

Petitot dit Saint-Seine

Master surgeon Denis Petitot dit Saint-Seine, a 1680s arrival, and his wife Marie Robichaud created a small family in the colony.  Marie gave the surgeon four children, a son and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Melanson and Landry families.  Denis and Marie's son created his own family.  The surgeon and his descendants remained at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, among the Acadian families who did not branch out to other communities or retreat to the French Maritimes.  If any of the surgeon's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none carried the family's name there. 

Only son Denis dit Saint-Seine, fils married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Landry and Marguerite Thériot, at Annapolis Royal in April 1711.  Marguerite gave Denis, fils eight children, two sons and six daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Doucet, Boudrot, Raymond, Gourdeau, and Bouillé families.  Both of Denis, fils's sons created their own families.  

Older son Denis III dit Jean-Baptiste dit Saint-Seine married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Claude Granger and Jeanne Guilbeau, at Annapolis Royal in November 1737.  

Denis, fils's younger son Joseph dit Saint-Seine married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Surette and Jeanne Pellerin, at Annapolis Royal in October 1753.425

Allain

Louis Allain, the blacksmith, sawmill owner, and merchant, a 1680s arrival, and his wife Marguerite Bourg created a small but influential family in the colony.  In 1691 and 1693, Marguerite gave Louis two children, a son and a daughter.  Daughter Marie married Joseph-Nicolas, called Nicolas dit Bellaire, Gauthier or Gautier of Rochefort, France, at Annapolis Royal in March 1715.  In part because of his wife's inheritance, Nicolas dit Bellaire became one of the wealthiest men in the colony.  He also became a leader of the Acadian resistance during King George's War of the 1740s, which led to his forced resettlement on French-controlled Île St.-Jean.  Louis and Marguerite's descendants settled at Annapolis Royal, Minas, Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivière area, and in the French Maritimes.  At least six of Louis's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in the late 1760s, but the great majority of Acadian Allains remained in greater Acadia or Canada after Le Grand Dérangement.  

Only son Pierre married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine LeBlanc and Marie Bourgeois, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1717 and settled at Minas, where, according to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave Pierre 13 children, five sons and eight daughters, between 1718 and 1742.  Four of their daughters married into the Hébert, Beaugrand, Samson, and Hamel families.  Four of Pierre and Marguerite's five sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Louis le jeune, born at Minas in c1722, settled at Petitcoudiac, where he married Anne, daughter of Jacques Léger and Anne Amireau, in June 1748; the marriage was recorded by the priest at nearby Beaubassin.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1766, Anne gave Louis le jeune nine children, four sons and five daughters, either at Petitcoudiac or, after they escaped the British in 1755, on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Four of Louis le jeune's daughters married into the Richard, Landry, and Savoie families in present-day eastern New Brunswick.  All five of his sons created families of their own in eastern New Brunswick. 

Oldest son Michel, born at Petitcoudiac in c1754, married Marie-Josette, daughter of Jean Savoie and Marie Bastarache, at Miramichi, New Brunswick, in May 1786.  One wonders how many children they had.  Michel died at nearby Négouac in January 1823, age 69. 

Louis le jeune's second son Jean-Baptiste, born in exile in c1756, married Marie, daughter of Paul Babineau and Marguerite Richard of Annapolis Royal, in c1777.  They settled at Bouctouche, New Brunswick.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1778 and 1790, Marie gave Jean-Baptise, seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Bastarache, Henry, Girouard, and LeBlanc families.  All three of his sons married. 

Oldest son Amable, born at Bouctouche in c1780, married Rosalie, daughter of Joseph-Jani Richard, at Bouctouche in November 1818. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Michel le jeune, born at Bouctouche in c1786, married Marie Bastarache probably at Bouctouche. 

Jean-Baptiste's third and youngest son Léon, born at Bouctouche in c1790, married Élisabeth, daughter of François LeBlanc, probably at Bouctouche in c1820. 

Louis le jeune's third son Benjamin le jeune, born in exile in c1762, married Élisabeth LeBlanc in c1783.  They also settled at Bouctouche.  According to Bona Arsenault, Élisabeth gave him four children, two sons and two daughters, between 1785 and 1788.  One of Benjamin le jeune's daughters married into the Bastarche family.  Both of his sons created families of their own. 

Older son Joseph, born at Bouctouche in c1785, married Marie, daughter of Jean Desroches, probably at Bouctouche. 

Benjamin le jeune's younger son Bénoni, born at Bouctouche in c1786, married Modeste, daughter of Joseph Bastarache

Louis le jeune's fourth son Louis, fils, born in c1764, married Marie Richard in c1785.  They also settled at Bouctouche.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1786 and 1800, Marie gave him nine children, five sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Cormier, Bastarache, and LeBlanc families.  Four of Louis, fils's five sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Joseph, born at Bouctouche in c1786, married a Babineau probably at Bouctouche. 

 Louis, fils's second son Louis III, born at Bouctouche in c1793, married Henriette, daughter of Pierre Girouard, probably at Bouctouche. 

Louis, fils's third son Élie, born at Bouctouche in c1794, married Clothilde, daughter of Charles LeBlanc, probably at Bouctouche. 

Louis, fils's fifth and youngest son Germain, born at Bouctouche in c1800, the second of the name, married Geneviève, another daughter of Pierre Girouard, probably at Bouctouche. 

Louis le jeune's fifth and youngest son Pierre le jeune, born in c1766, married Marie-Henriette, another daughter of Paul Babineau and Marguerite Richard, at Richibouctou, New Brunswick, in July 1798, when he was in his early 30s.  They joined his family at Bouctouche.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie-Henriette gave Pierre le jeune six children, two sons and four daughters, between 1799 and 1808.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc, Breau, and Belliveau families.  Both of Pierre le jeune's sons created their own families. 

Older son Urbain, born at Bouctouche in c1799, married Blanche, daugher of François LeBlanc, probably at Bouctouche. 

Pierre le jeune's younger son Sylvain, born at Bouctouche in c1806, married Marcelline, daughter of Grégoire Cormier, probably at Bouctouche. 

Pierre's second son Pierre, fils, born at Minas in c1723, remained at Minas, where he married Catherine, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Marguerite Landry, probably at Grand-Pré in c1750.  Catherine gave Pierre, fils two children, a son and a daughter, at Grand-Pré in 1751 and 1752.  They were deported to Maryland in 1755.  Between 1760 and 1766, Catherine gave Pierre, fils three more children, two sons and a daughter, in the British colony.  In 1767, Pierre, fils took his family to Louisiana, where Catherine gave him two more children, both daughters, in 1771 and 1774.  They were the only Acadian Allains to go to the Spanish colony.  They settled at San Gabriel on the Mississippi above New Orleans, where Pierre, fils died in December 1807, age 85.  His two daughters married into the Landry and Foret families in the Spanish colony.  All three of his sons married into the Blanchard, Babin, and Gautreaux families and settled at San Gabriel.  

Pierre, père's third son Joseph-Antoine, born at Minas in c1729, evidently did not create a family of his own. 

 Pierre, père's fourth son Benjamin, born at Minas in c1732, remained at Minas and married Marie-Rose, daughter of Joseph Bugeaud and Marie-Josèphe Landry, in c1752.  Like older brother Louis and his family, Benjamin and Marie-Rose escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St.-Lawrence shore.  According to Bona Arsenault, after escaping the British again, this time at Restigouche in 1760, Marie-Rose gave Benjamin six children, five sons and a daughter, between 1762 and 1778.  They settled at Carleton on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, present-day Québec Province.  Their daughter married into the Laviolette family at Carleton.  Four of Benjamin's five sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Pierre-Bénoni, born at Carleton in c1770, married Marthe, daughter of Hilaire Poirier and Angélique Dugas, at Carleton in January 1794.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marthe gave Pierre-Bénoni three children, a son and two daughters, at Carleton between 1795 and 1799. 

Benjamin's second son Louis le jeune, born at Carleton in c1772, married Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste LeBlanc and Marguerite Boudreau, at Carleton in in January 1794.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1795 and 1820, Madeleine gave Louis le jeune 13 children, nine sons and four daughters, at Carleton.  Their daughters married into the Thibodeau, Bourdages, Bujold, and Boudreau families at Carleton.  Seven of Louis le jeune's nine sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Félix, born at Carleton in c1795, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Saint-Coeur and Euphrosine LeBlanc, at Carleton in January 1823.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Félix two daughters at Carleton in 1823 and 1825.  One of them married into the Bernard family at Carleton. 

Louis le jeune's second son Jean-Louis, born at Carleton in c1797, married Victoire, daughter of Jean LeBlanc and Charlotte Bujold, at Carleton in November 1827.  According to Bona Arsenault, Victoire gave Jean-Louis six children, three sons and three daughters, between 1828 and 1840 at Carleton. 

Louis le jeune's fourth son Charles, born at Carleton in c1802, married Anastasie, daughter of Joseph Arsenault and Marguerite Bujold, at Carleton in August 1824.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anastasie gave Charles six children, five sons and a daughter, between 1825 and 1845 at Carleton. 

Louis le jeune's fifth son Constant-Aimé, born at Carleton in c1804, married Angélique, daughter of François Laviolette and Marie Gauthier, at Carleton in February 1828.  According to Bona Arsenault, Angélique gave Constant-Aimé seven children, five sons and two daughters, at Carleton between 1829 and 1846. 

Louis le jeune's seventh son Joseph-Bénoni, born at Carleton in c1808, married Esther, daughter of Charles Boudreau and Élisabeth LeBlanc, at Carleton in February 1836.  According to Bona Arsenault, Esther gave Joseph-Bénone five children, a son and four daughters, at Carleton between 1838 and 1847. 

Louis le jeune's eighth son André, born at Carleton in c1813, married Julie, daughter of Éphrem Cormier and Geneviève LeBlanc, at Cascapédia, today's New Richmond, near Carleton, in January 1841.  According to Bona Arsenault, Julie gave André five children, four sons and a daughter, probably at Cascapédia between 1842 and 1850. 

Louis le jeune's ninth and youngest son Fréderic, born at Carleton in c1820, married Constance, daughter of Édouard Bourg and Félicité Audet, at Carleton in February 1843.  According to Bona Arsenault, Constance gave Fréderic four children, two sons and two daughters, at Carleton between 1843 and 1849. 

Benjamin's third son Lazare, born at Carleton in c1773, married Luce, daughter of Jean Landry and Marthe Dugas, at Carleton in January 1800.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1801 and 1820, Luce gave Lazare a dozen children, eight sons and four daughters, at Carleton.  Their daughters married into the Bujold, Arsenault, Landry, and Allard families at Carleton.  Four of Lazare's sons created families of their own, and another son became a priest. 

Oldest son Gilbert, born at Carleton in c1804, married Salomée, daughter of Augustin Allard and Rose Landry, at Carleton in April 1831.  According to Bona Arsenault, Salomée gave Gilbert seven children, six sons and a daughter, at Carleton between 1832 and 1843. 

Lazare's second son Joseph, born at Carleton in c1810, married Henriette, another daughter of Augustin Allard and Rose Landry, at Carleton in April 1836.  According to Bona Arsenault, Henriette gave Joseph six children, a son and five daughters, at Carleton between 1838 and 1847.

Lazare's fifth son Jean-Louis, born at Carleton in c1813, became a priest. 

Lazare's seventh son Jean-Lazare, born at Carleton in c1816, married Louise Porlier at Carleton in October 1841. 

Lazare's eighth and youngest Théophile, born at Carleton in c1820, married Joséphine, daughter of Charles-Marie Labillois and Émilie Meagher, at Carleton in September 1846.  According to Bona Arsenault, Joséphine gave Théophile two sons at Carleton in 1847 and 1850. 

Benjamin's fifth and youngest son Fabien, born at Carleton in c1778, married Céleste, another daughter of Jean Landry and Marthe Dugas, at Carleton in January 1814, when he was in his mid-30s.  One wonders if he and Céleste had any children.  At age 54, Fabien remarried to Agathe, daughter of Gabriel Audet and Charlotte LeBlanc, at Carleton in July 1832.  She evidently gave him no children. 

Pierre, père's fifth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Minas in c1741, escaped the British in 1755, when he was only a teenager, took refuge in Canada, and married Marguerite dite La Blanche, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Marie Cyr of Chignecto, at Bécancour, across from Trois-Rivières, in January 1762.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1773, La Blanche gave Jean-Baptiste six children, four sons and two daughters.  They settled at St.-Ours, on the lower Richelieu, farther up the St. Lawrence valley, in 1782.  One of their daughters married into the Vincennes-Porlier family at St.-Ours.  At least one of Jean-Baptiste's sons created his own family.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born at Bécancour in c1764, married Marguerite Thibault at St.-Ours in October 1792.427

Michel dit La Ruine

François Michel dit La Ruine, an early or mid-1680s arrival, and his second wife Marguerite, daughter of Jean Meunier and Marguerite Housseau, whom he married in c1695, nearly a decade after he came to the colony, created a small family in the colony.  Marguerite gave La Ruine a dozen children, at least four sons and seven daughters.  Six of their daughters married into the Cyr, Bourg, Poirier, Vincent dit Clément, Doiron, and Savary families.  Only two of La Ruine's sons created their own families.  His and Marguerite's descendants settled not only at La Hève, but also at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Minas, Pigiguit, and in the French Maritimes.  At least one of François dit La Ruine's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son, unnamed, died young.

François's second son Louis married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Forest and Marie Petitpas, in c1722, place unrecorded.  Their daughter Anne emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

François's third son Paul dit La Ruine married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Clément Vincent and Madeleine Levron, at Annapolis Royal in June 1726 and died by May 1751, in his late 40s, place unrecorded.

François's fourth and youngest son, name unrecorded, died young.416

Le Juge

Guillaume Le Juge, a late 1680s arrival, and his wife Marie Mercier created a small family in the colony.  She gave Guillaume two children, both daughters, Élisabeth/Isabelle and Chrisinte, one of whom, Élisabeth, married first to Pierre le jeune, son of Martin Benoit and Marie Chaussegros, probably at Minas in c1703, and then to François, son of Jacques Michel dit Saint-Michel and Catherine Comeau and widower of Marie-Anne Léger, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in November 1751, so the blood of this family survived in the colony.  Élisabeth settled on Rivière-de-l'Ascension, Minas, and on Île St.-Jean.  If any of Guillaume's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.429

Simon dit Boucher

André Simon dit Jacques Le Boucher, the butcher, a late 1680s arrival, and his wife Marie Martin dit Barnabé created a fairly large family in the colony.  Marie gave him nine children, four sons and five daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Dubois dit Dumont, Viarrieu dit Duclos, Petitpas, Des Roches, and Préjean families, some of them in the French Maritimes.  Three of their sons created families of their own.  André and Marie's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also in the French Maritimes and on Newfoundland.  They were especially numerous at Port-Toulouse on Île Royale.  If any of André's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there, Bona Arsenault's assertions notwithstanding. 

Oldest son Pierre dit Pierrot dit Boucher, born probably at Port-Royal in c1689, became a carpenter and a fisherman.  He married Marie, daughter of Philippe Pinet and Catherine Hébert, in c1714 probably at Annapolis Royal, and moved on to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale.  He died probably on the island after October 1742.  Marie gave Pierrot eight children, three sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Gaffé, Bernard, Hervé, Dubordieu, Des Roches, and Le Breton families, all in the French Maritimes or in Newfoundland.  Only one of Pierrot's sons married.  

Oldest son Michel, born at Port-Toulouse in c1715, likely died young. 

Pierre dit Pierrot dit Boucher's second son François, born probably on Île Royale between 1724 and 1726, married cousin Anne, daughter of Charles Doucet and Madeleine Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752.   

Pierre dit Pierrot dit Boucher's third and youngest son Nicolas, born "dans le bois" on Île Royale in May 1733, probably died young.

André's second son Charles dit Boucher, born probably at Port-Royal in c1696, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Pitre and Anne Préjean, at Annapolis Royal in February 1730, moved on to the French Maritimes, and died on Île Royale in September 1743, in his late 40s.

André's third son Paul, born probably at Port-Royal in c1699, evidently died young.

André's fourth and youngest son André dit Boucher, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1713, married Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Doucet dit Maillard and Marie Pellerin, at Annapolis Royal in February 1742, and likely remained there.  He and his family evidently escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  André, fils died at St.-Michel-de-Bellechasse across from Québec City in January 1758, age 46, victim, perhaps, of a smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadians in the Québec area that fall and winter.430

Bernard

René Bernard, a late 1680s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Doucet created a fairly large branch of the family in the colony.  Between 1690 and the early 1700s, Madeleine gave René eight children, five sons and three daughters.  He died probably at Chignecto after 1707, in his late 40s, and Madeleine died there in February 1740, age 68.  Their daughters married into the Girouard, Poirier, and Arseneau families.  Four of René's five sons created their own families.  His and Madeleine's descendants settled at Chignecto, where they were especially numerous, and at Minas.  One family moved on to Île St.-Jean in the 1750s.  At least 10 of René's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and France in 1785, but more of them could be found in greater Acadia and Canada after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son René dit Renochet, born probably at Chignecto in c1690, married Anne, daughter of Jacques Blou and Marie Girouard, at Beaubassin in July 1713 and settled there.  Between 1717 and the early 1740s, Anne gave Renochet 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore before moving on to Canada.  Renochet and Anne died at Québec in late November and early December 1757, victims perhaps of a smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadian refugees that fall and winter.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois, Hébert, Mignot, and Richard families; two of them--Anne, wife of Jean-Baptiste Bourgeois; and Madeleine, wife of Jean-Baptiste Richard--died at Québec in June and November 1757.  Four of Renochet's six sons created their own families. 

Oldest son René III, born probably at Chignecto in 1718, married Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Jeanne Gautrot, at Beaubassin in November 1740.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1741 and 1755, Marguerite gave René III three daughters.  Records hint that she may have given him four daughters.  The family evidently moved to Île St.-Jean after 1752, were captured by the British in 1758, and deported to Cherbourg, France.  Two of their daughters married into the Henry and Doiron families in France.  René III died between 1764 and 1766, a widower, probably in France.  One of his daughters emigrated to Louisiana in 1785. 

Renochet's second son François, born probably at Chignecto in the 1720s, married Madeleine Richard in c1748 probably at Chignecto.  One wonders what became of them.   

Renochet's third son Jean, born probably at Chignecto in c1727, married Françoise, daughter of Martin Richard and Marie Cormier, in c1754 probably at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1768, Françoise gave Jean three children, a son and two daughters.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge in Canada.  Jean died at Lotbinière, on the St. Lawrence between Trois-Rivières and Québec, in September 1829, age 102. 

Renochet's fourth son, name and birth date unrecorded, died young.   

Renochet's fifth son Pierre, born probably at Chignecto in c1737, escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He was counted at Restigouche in 1760, evidently escaped the British again, and moved to Canada.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Étienne Hubert and Catherine Gauthier, at Lotbinière, between Trois-Rivières and Québec, in January 1764.  Pierre died at Lobinière in February 1815, age 78. 

Renochet's sixth and youngest son, name and birth date unrecorded, died young. 

René's second son Joseph, born probably at Chignecto in c1692, died young. 

René's third son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Chignecto in c1696, married Cécile, daughter of Claude Gaudet and Marguerite Blou, at Beaubassin in November 1719 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1747, Cécile gave Jean-Baptiste a dozen children, seven sons and five daughters.  They escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Some of them remained at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs, while others, including Jean-Baptiste, wife Cécile, and their two younger sons, moved on to Canada.  Jean-Baptiste died at Québec in December 1757, victim, perhaps, like older brother Renochet, of a smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees in Canada that fall and winter.  Four of Jean-Baptiste's daughters married into the Mignault, Bourgeois, Cormier, Burel, and Langlois families, most of them at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly on the lower Richelieu east of Montréal.  Five of his seven sons created their own families, three in Canada and greater Acadia, and two in Louisiana. 

Oldest son Paul, born at Chignecto in c1728, married Marguerite Gaudet probably at Chignecto in c1754.  They escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge at Restigouche, where they were counted in 1761, having evidently escaped the British for a second time.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave Paul a son, Jean, in c1761 probably at Restigouche.  One wonders what happened to them after Le Grand Dérangement.  They did not go to Louisiana. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Pierre, born at Chignecto in c1731, married Marguerite Arseneau probably at Chignecto in c1752.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1760, Marguerite gave Pierre three children, two sons and a daughter.  They family escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge at Restigouche.  They may have been captured there in 1760 and imprisoned in Nova Scotia.  They were counted at Halifax in August 1763.  They followed other Acadians from Halilfax to Louisiana via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, in 1764-65.  They settled at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans, where Marguerite died before 1769.  Pierre remarried to Cécile, daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise, fils and Marguerite Dugas and widow of Joseph Dugas and Nicolas Lahure, at Cabahannocer in June 1770.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1773 and 1774, Cécile gave Pierre two more children, a son and a daughter.  Pierre and his family remained on the river.  His daughter by his second wife married into the Poirier family at St.-Jacques.  His three sons by both wives married into the Dugas, Breau, Blanchard, and Poirier families and settled on Bayou Lafourche, in the Attakapas District, and on the river, but the line on the river did not survive.  As a result, by the early 1800s, Acadian Bernards could be found on Bayou Lafourche and in the prairie parishes, but not on the river above New Orleans. 

Jean-Baptiste's third son Michel, born at Chignecto in c1734, followed his family to Restigouche, where he married Marie, daughter of Joseph dit L'Officier Guilbeau and Madeleine Michel of Annapolis Royal, in January 1761.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1774, Marie gave Michel seven children, four sons and three daughers, but Louisiana records hint that she gave him five sons.  They followed her family into imprisonment in Nova Scotia and were counted at Halifax in Auguste 1763.  They followed her family and the Broussards to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in 1764-65 and settled at La Pointe on Bayou Teche in the Attakapas District.  Michel died at La Pointe, St. Martin Parish, in August 1809, in his late 70s.  His daughters married into the Broussard, Préjean, and Thibodeaux families.  Three of his five sons married into the Broussard and LeBlanc families on the prairies, but not all of the lines endured.

Jean-Baptiste's sixth son François, born at Chignecto in c1740, escaped the British in 1755 and followed his family to Restigouche and on to Canada.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Denis Petitot dit Saint-Seine III dit Jean-Baptiste and Marie-Josèphe Granger of Annapolis Royal, at L'Assomption on the upper St. Lawrence below Montréal in February 1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1763 and 1777, Marguerite gave François eight children, six sons and two daughters.  François remarried to Marguerite Métivier, widow of Antoine Caron, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly on Rivière Richelieu east of Montréal in January 1780, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Josèphe Archambault, widow of Henri Archambault, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in August 1796.  According to Bona Arsenault, he had children only by his first wife. 

Jean-Baptiste's seventh and youngest son Joseph, born at Chignecto in c1742, escaped the British in 1755 and followed his family to Restigouche and Canada.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Louis Deguire and Thérèse Arpin, at St.-Antoine-de-Chambly in April 1766.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave Joseph 16 children at St.-Antoine, St.-Denis, and St.-Ours on the lower Richelieu 

René's fourth son Joseph, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1700s, married Marie-Josèphe, another daughter of Claude Gaudet and Marguerite Blou, in c1729 probably at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1747, Marie-Josèphe gave Joseph five children, three sons and two daughters, including a set of twins.  Joseph remarried Marguerite, daughter of Charles Arseneau and Françoise Mirande and widow of Pierre Poirier, in c1752 probably at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, from the early 1750s to 1765, Marguerite gave Joseph four more children, three sons and a daughter.  The family escaped the British in 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  They were at Restigouche in 1760 and evidently escaped the British again that year.  They were counted again at Restigouche in 1765 and settled at nearby Bonaventure in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Two of his daughters by both wives married into the Bujold family at Bonaventure and nearby Carleton.  Four of his six sons by both wives created their own famliies.

Second son Charles, by first wife Marie-Josèphe Gaudet, born at Chignecto in c1741, married Élizabeth, daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Madeleine Girouard of Minas, in c1767 and settled at Carleton.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1768 and 1793, Élizabeth gave Charles a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Boudreau, Jeanson, LeBlanc, and Audet families at Carleton.  Four of Charles's five sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Isaïe, born probably at Carleton c1770, married Rachel, daughter of Charles Bourg and Théotiste Savoie, at Carleton in January 1798.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1798 and 1822, Rachel gave Isaïe a dozen children, a son and 11 daughters.  Six of their daughters married into the Audet, Allard, Babin, Bourdages, and Cormier families, including two brothers, at Carleton.  Isaïe's only son created his own family.

Son Édouard, born at Carleton in c1800, married Henriette, daughter of Fréderic Loubert and Adélaïde Landry, at Carleton in November 1830.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1831 and 1848, Henriette gave Édouard eight children, fives sons and three daughters. 

Charles's second son Simon, born probably at Carleton in c1777, married Séraphine, daughter of Claude Landry and Hélène Dugas, at Carlton in May 1804, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Pierre-Amable Jacques and Françoise Petit, at Carlton in August 1838. 

Charles's third son Magloire, born probably at Carleton in c1783, married Anne, another daughter of Claude Landry and Hélène Dugas, at Carleton in January 1810. 

Charles's fifth and youngest son Isaac le jeune, born probably at Carleton in c1789, married Geneviève, yet another daughter of Claude Landry and Hélène Dugas, at Carleton in January 1812.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1813 and 1831, Geneviève gave Isaac le jeune 10 children, seven sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Boudreau and Arsenault families at Carleton.  Three of Isaac le jeune's seven sons created their own families.

Second son Joseph, born at Carleton in c1815, married Marguerite, daughter of Wencelas LeBlanc and Félicité LeBlanc, at Carleton in January 1845. 

Isaac le jeune's fourth son Otho-Némésie, born at Carleton in c1820, married Aglaée, daughter of Hyppolite LeBlanc and Marguerite Bujold, at Carleton in January 1850. 

Isaac le jeune's fifth son André-Vital, born at Carleton in c1825, married Angélique, daughter of Félix Allain and Reine Saint-Coeur, at Carleton in April 1850. 

Joseph's son Louis, by second wife Marguerite Arseneau, born at Chignecto in the early 1750s, married Louise, daughter of Aubin LeGouffe and Louise Baudot, at Bonaventure in May 1774.  They lived there from 1774 to 1790 and then moved to Carleton.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1775 and 1790, Louise gave Louis seven families, four sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Savoie, Létourneau, and Goulet families.  Three of Louis's four sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Louis-Bénoni, born probably at Bonaventure in c1775, married Geneviève, daughter of Gabriel Audet and Félicité Hautbois, at Carleton in November 1799, and remarried to Rose, daughter of Jacques Labrecque and Marie Thériault, at Carleton in April 1822. 

Louis's third son Fréderic, born probably at Bonaventure in c1782, married Suzanne, another daughter of Jacques Labrecque and Marie Thériault, at Carleton in October 1805.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1806 and 1827, Suzanne gave Fréderic 10 children, five sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Roy, Allard, Parent, Berthelot, Duret, and Létourneau families.  Four of Fréderic's five sons created their own families. 

Second son Aimé, born at Carleton in c1818, married Adélaïde, daughter of Isaac LeBlanc and Marie Quirion, at Carleton in January 1843. 

Fréderic's third son Nicolas, born at Carleton in c1820, married Louise-Élizabeth, daughter of Paul Philippe and Marie-Louise Savoie, at Carleton in April 1843. 

Fréderic's fourth son Joseph-Alfred, born at Carleton in c1824, married Virginie, daughter of Joseph Savoie and Marguerite Lebrecque, at Carleton in January 1847.

Fréderic's fifth and youngest son Édouard, born at Carleton in c1827, married Esther, daughter of Louis Dagneau and Ludivine Arsenault, at Carleton in February 1848. 

Louis's fourth and youngest son Édouard, born at either Bonaventure or Carleton in c1790, married Geneviève, daughter of Étienne Bergeron dit d'Amboise and Claire Couroit, at Carleton in May 1813.  According to Bona Arsenault, Geneviève gave Édouard a son in 1814.  Édouard remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Porlier and Lucie Arsenault, probably at Carleton in February 1817.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1818 and 1825, Marie gave Édouard four children, two sons and two daughters.  Édouard remarried again--his third marriage--to Lucille, daughter of Patrice Burn and Anne Elslegar, probably at Carleton in February 1827.  According to Bona Arsenault, Lucille gave Édouard another daughter in 1827.  One of Édouard's sons by his second wife created his own family.

Son Édouard, fils, the second with the name, by second wife Marie Porlier, born at Carleton in c1821, married Émilie, daughter of Prosper Savoie and Esther Leclerc, at Carleton in January 1850. 

Joseph's son Jean-Marie, by second wife Marguerite Arseneau, born in c1760, married Marie-Lutine, daughter of Ambroise Babin and Anne Cyr of Minas, at Bonaventure in November 1780 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1781 and 1782, Marie-Lutine gave Jean-Marie two sons.  He remarried to Marie-Osite, another daughter of Ambroise Babin and Anne Cyr, in c1788 probably at Bonaventurre.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1789 and 1802, Marie-Osite gave Jean-Marie nine more children, two sons and seven daughters.  Their daughters married into the Comeau, Bourdages, Gauthier, Cavanaugh, Cayouette, Bourque, Arsenault, and Henry families.  Three of Jean-Marie's four sons created their own families.  

Oldest son Alexandre, by first wife Marie-Lutine Babin, born at Bonaventure in c1781, married Élizabeth, daughter of Jean Arsenault and Anne-Blanche Robichaud, at Bonaventure in May 1809.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1810 and 1813, Anne-Blanche gave Alexandre two children, a son and a daughter.  Alexandre remarried to Julie, daughter of Grégoire Arsenault and Théotiste Bourg, at Bonaventure in November 1814.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1815 and 1831, Julie gave Alexandre nine more children, six sons and three daughters.  Three of Alexandre's daughters by both his wives married into the Bujold, Bourg, Poirier, and Babin families probably at Bonaventure.  Three of his seven sons by both of his wives created their own families. 

Oldest son Janvier, born at Bonaventure in c1813, married Marie, daughter of Nicolas Arsenault and Léa-Marguerite Arbour, at Bonaventure in October 1841. 

Alexandre's second son Alexandre le jeune, by second wife Julie Arsenault, born at Bonaventure in c1815, married cousin Olivette, daughter of François Paquet and Olive-Sophie Bernard, at Bonaventure in February 1848.

Alexandre's son Camille, by second wife Julie Arsenault, born at Bonaventure in c1824, married Rose, daughter of Louis Lepage and Vénérade Landry, at Bonaventure in c1852.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1853 and 1859, Rose gave Camille four children, three sons and a daughter. 

Jean-Marie's second son Hubert, by first wife Marie-Lutine Babin, born at Bonaventure in c1782, married Reine, daughter of Charles Cavanaugh and Marguerite Arsenault, at Bonaventure in January 1814.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1814 and 1831, Reine gave Hubert eight children, a son and seven daughters.  Three of his daughters married into the Hébert, Bujold, and Lepage families at Bonaventure. 

Jean-Marie's third son Félix, by second wife Marie-Osite Babin, born at Bonaventure in c1797, married Angèle, daughter of François-Placide Bujold and Apolline Poirier, at Bonaventure in June 1825.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1826 and 1829, Angèle gave Félix four children, two sons and two daughters, including a set of twins.  Félix remarried to Anne-Nathalie, daughter of Joseph Cayouette and Élisabeth Robichaud, probably at Bonaventure in January 1833.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1835 and 1850, Anne gave Félix seven more children, a son and six daughters. 

Joseph's third son Isaac, by second wife Marguerite Arseneau, born in c1765, married Victoire, daughter of Pierre Robichaud and Anne Michel of Cobeguit, at Bonaventure in April 1788 and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1789 and 1811, Victoire gave Isaac a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters.  Their daughters married into the Poirier, Lepage, Paquet, and Bujold families.  Only one of Isaac's five sons created his own family.

Fourth son Jean-Alexandre, born at Bonaventure in c1801, married Geneviève, daughter of Joseph Lepage and Geneviève Bujeau, at Bonaventure in May 1833.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1834 and 1847, Geneviève gave Jean-Alexandre eight children, seven sons and a daughter.  Jean-Alexandre remarried to Symphorose, daughter of Charles Bujold and Marguerite Bernier, probably at Bonaventure in May 1848.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1851 and 1853, Symphorose gave Jean-Alexandre two more children, a son and a daughter. 

René's fifth and youngest son Michel, born probably at Chignecto in c1705, married Marie, daughter of Mathieu Brasseur dit La Citardy and Jeanne Célestin dit Bellemère, at Grand-Pré in June 1729.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1748, Marie gave Michel seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Some of the family may have escaped the British in 1755.  Michel, Marie, and three of their children did not.  The British deported them to South Carolina.  Michel remarried to Anne, daughter of Clément Babineau and Renée Bourg of Annapolis Royal, in the southern colony.  In August 1763, colonial officials counted Michel, second wife Anne, and his daughter Madeleine by first wife Marie still in South Carolina.  According to Bona Arsenault, two of his sons, who evidently escaped the British in 1755, took refuge in Canada and created their own families on the upper St. Lawrence.

Older son Augustin, by first wife Marie Brasseur, born at Chignecto in c1744, married Élizabeth Dufaux in c1766.  They were counted at Bécancour, across from Trois-Rivières in 1770 and 1776 before settling at nearby Gentilly.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1768 and 1776, Élizabeth gave Augustin five children, a son and four daughters.

Michel's younger son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Marie Brasseur,born at Chignecto in c1748, married Geneviève Poisson in c1772.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1775 and 1784, Geneviève gave Jean-Baptiste two sons.  They also settled at Gentilly.  Jean-Baptiste remarried to Marie-Anne Demers, date and place unrecorded.431

Michel dit Saint-Michel

Sr. Jacques Michel dit Saint-Michel, a late 1680s arrival, probably was not kin to François Michel dit La Ruine, who had come to the colony a shore time before.  Jacques and his wife wife Catherine Comeau created a larger branch of the family in the colony.  Catherine gave Jacques 13 children, eight sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Savoie, Martin, Breau, Guilbeau dit L'Officier, and Egan families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax.  Only four of Jacques's eight sons created their own families.  His and Catherine's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also in the French Maritimes.  At least 10 of Jacques dit Saint-Michel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and France in 1785. 

Oldest son François married Marie-Anne, daughter of Jacques Léger and Madeleine Trahan, at Annapolis Royal in February 1715, moved to the French Maritimes, and remarried to Élisabeth, also Isabelle, daughter of Guillaume Le Juge and Marie Mercier and widow of Pierre Benoit le jeune, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in November 1751.  One of François's sons by his first wife emigrated to Louisiana from France. 

Jacques's second and third sons Jean and Charles evidently died young.

Jacques's fourth son Joseph moved to the French Maritimes and married Marie-Anne, daughter of François Boudrot and Madeleine Belliveau, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1724. 

Jacques's fifth son Jacques, fils married Jeanne, daughter of Jean Breau and Anne Chiasson, at Annapolis Royal in February 1730.  Two of their children, a son and a daughter, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax. 

Jacques's sixth son Michel died an infant.

Jacques's seventh son Pierre married Anne, daughter of Charles Guilbeau and Anne Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in November 1731. 

Jacques's eighth and youngest son Paul died at Annapolis Royal in January 1735, age 20, before he could marry.432

Cellier

Pierre Cellier dit Normand, a late 1680s arrival, and his wife Marie-Josèphe-Aimée Lejeune created a small family in the colony.  Marie-Josèphe gave him 10 children, six sons and four daughters.  Two of his daughters married into the Guénard or Gainer dit Gaudereau and Deguilla dit Villeneuve families, one of them on Île Royale.  Only two of their sons married, to sisters.  Pierre and Marie-Josèphe descendants settled at Chignecto, Minas, and on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale in the French Maritimes.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

The oldest and second sons, name unrecorded, born probably at Minas in the 1690s, died young.

Pierre's third son Jacques dit Normand, born probably at Minas in c1701, married Marie-Blanche, called Blanche, daughter of Louis Hébert and Anne-Marie Labauve, at Grand-Pré in August 1744, and moved on to Île St.-Jean, where they were counted in August 1752 on the south side of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  Jacques dit Normand died before July 1761, place unrecorded, during Le Grand Dérangement.

Pierre's fourth son, unnamed, , born probably at Minas in the early 1700s, died young.

Pierre's fifth son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1706, married Anne, another daughter of Louis Hébert and Anne-Marie Labauve, at Grand-Pré in November 1741, and also moved on to Île St.-Jean, where they were counted on the south side of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752. 

Pierre's sixth and youngest son Antoine, born posthumously at Minas in February 1710, evidently died young.433

Célestin dit Bellemère

André Célestin dit Bellemère, the blacksmith, and his wife Perrine Basile, late 1680s arrivals, created a small family in the colony.  Between 1686 and the late 1690s, Perrine gave André seven children, two sons and five daughters.  André died by 1707 probably at Minas, in his late 50s.  Four of his daughters married into the Forest, Brasseur dit La Citardy, Landry, and Pinet families; one of them followed her husband to Île Royale in the 1720s and died there later in the decade.  Both of his sons created their own families at Minas.  At least two of André's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but no family line was established there.  Following Le Grand Dérangement, the majority of André's descendants could be found where the British had deported them, in Maryland and France, not in Canada or greater Acadia--unusual for a family so long established in Acadia. 

Older son Jacques dit Jacob dit Bellemère, born at Port-Royal or Minas in c1686, married Marie, daughter of Claude Landry and Catherine Thibodeau, at Grand-Pré in February 1719 and remained there.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1720 and 1740, Marie gave Jacques dit Jacob a dozen children, three sons and nine daugthers, at Minas.  Other sources hint that four sons were born to them at Minas.  Jacob's descendants used the family dit Bellemère as their surname.  His family was deported to Virginia in 1755, sent on to England in 1756, where they were held at Southampton.  Two of Jacques dit Jacob's daughters married into the LeBlanc and Boudrot families in England, and two of his sons also married there.  In May 1763, the family was repatriated to France aboard L'Ambition and settled at St.-Servan near St.-Malo.  Daughter Félicité gave birth to a "natural" son, Jean-Jacques Bellemère, at St.-Servan in June 1768.  Jacques dit Jacob's daughter Anastasie remarried to a Comeau widower at Nantes in August 1784.  She, her family, and a Bellemère niece--brother Bruno's only surviving daughter--emigrated to Louisiana from France the following year and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jacques dit Jacob's other children and grandchildren chose to remain in the mother country. 

Second son Bruno, born probably at Grand-Pré in c1722, followed his family to Virginia and England, where he married Anne Breau, widow of ____ Gautrot in c1759.  In c1760 and c1763, Anne gave Bruno two children in England, a son and a daughter.  Their son died a month after their repatriation to St.-Malo, France, aboard L'Ambition.  They settled at St.-Servan near St.-Malo, where, between 1765 and 1773, Anne gave Bruno five more children, a son and four daughters--seven children in all.  All but one of these children died young.  Bruno, Anne, and their two surviving children, both daughters, went to Poitou in 1773.  They buried their oldest daughter there in August 1774.  Bruno died there the following December, in his early 50s.  Anne likely died there as well.  In November 1775, daughter Josèphe Marie, described as an orphan, followed other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  In 1785, now age 19 and still unmarried, she chose to emigrate to Louisiana in 1785.  She married twice in the Spanish colony, into the Lambert and Pallaquin families, settling first on the river above New Orleans and then on upper Bayou Lafourche, where she died in October 1746, age 79, a widow again. 

Joseph, perhaps Jacques dit Jacob's third son, who would have been born at Grand-Pré in c1728, followed his family to Virginia and England, where he married Marguerite Boudrot in c1759.  She gave him two children, a son and a daughter, in c1760 and c1762.  In France, they settled near Joseph's relatives at St.-Servan.  Between 1763 and 1767, Marguerite gave him three more children, a son and two daughters.  The second daughter and their younger son died as infants.  In 1765, they took in 10-year-old Joseph, only child of widower Jean-Zacharie Boudrot, one of Marguerite's kinsmen, who had died at St.-Servan in April of that year.  Joseph Bellemère died at St.-Servan Hôtel-Dieu, St.-Malo, in August 1767, age 39.  Marguerite died at St.-Servan the following month, age 30.  They left three children, a son and two daughters, along with 12-year-old Joseph Boudrot, to be raised by relatives.  One wonders what happened to Joseph and Marguerite's children after their parents' death. 

André's younger son Antoine, born probably at Minas in c1695, married Marie, daughter of Charles Gautrot and François Rimbault, at Grand-Pré in November 1718 and remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1721 and 1745, Marie gave Antoine 13 children, nine sons and four daughters.  Antoine's descendants preferred the surname Célestin.  The family was deported to Maryland in 1755.  In July 1763, colonial officials counted a number of Célestins at Annapolis.  Antoine and Marie were not among them.  Three of the male Célestins counted there, all probably Antoine's sons, were married with children.  Two of Antoine's sons were still unmarried.  Two of Antoine, père's daughters counted at Annapolis also were unmarried.  Amazingly, when more than 600 Maryland Acadians emigrated to Louisiana in the late 1760s, no Célestin was among them.

Oldest son Charles, born at Grand-Pré in c1728, married Anne ____ either at Minas or in Maryland.  She gave him at least one daughter, Marie.  They remained in Maryland. 

Antoine's son Honoré, born probably at Minas in c1735, may have married in Maryland after Le Grand Dérangement.

Antoine's son Antoine, fils, born probably at Minas in c1739, also may have married in Maryland after Le Grand Dérangement.

Antoine, père's eighth son Pierre, born probably at Minas in c1745, married Françoise ____ pobably in Maryland.  She gave him at least three children, Madeleine, Marguerite, and Pierre, fils.  They also remained in Maryland.

Antoine, père's ninth and youngest son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1746, married Marie ____ probably in Maryland.  She gave him at least two children, Baptiste and Joseph, fils.  They remained in Maryland.434

Bugeaud

Sr. Alain Bugeaud, surgeon, notary, churchwarden, a late 1680s arrival, and his wife Élisabeth Melanson created a small but influential family in the colony.  Between 1695 and the early 1700s, Élisabeth gave the surgeon six children, fives sons and a daughter.  Their daughter married into the Gautrot family.  Four of their sons created families of their own.  His oldest son's line was especially vigorous.  Sadly, the Great Upheaval destroyed two of his younger sons' family lines.  Sr. Alain died in c1708 probably at Minas, in his late 30s or early 40s.  His and Élisabeth's descendants settled not only at Grand-Pré, but also at Pigiguit and on Île St.-Jean after 1748.  Called sieur, dame, or madamoiselle when addressed by French officials, there was nothing "typically" Acadian about the members of this family.   At least 11 of Alain's descendants, all from his oldest son, emigrated to Louisiana from Pigiguit via Maryland in 1766, but the great majority of Sr. Alain's descendants, again from the oldest son, could be found at the northwestern edge of greater Acadia after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Joseph, born probably at Minas in c1699, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Abraham Landry and Marie Guilbeau, in c1720 probably at Minas, settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1721 and 1746, Marie-Josèphe gave Joseph 15 children, eight sons and seven daughters.  When Joseph took his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749, his four oldest son, three of them married, remained in peninsula Acadia.  In August 1752, a French official counted Le sieur Joseph, his wife, and nine of their children on the north bank of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the interior of the island.  Joseph died on Île St.-Jean in c1758 in his late 50s on the eve of the island's dérangement.  The British deported members of the family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Five of Joseph's daugthers married into the Gauthier, Arsenault, Allain, Gravois, and Dugas families on Île St.-Jean and in greater Acadia.  All eight of Joseph's sons created their own families in greater Acadia, Louisiana, and France, but not all of the lines survived. 

Oldest son Alain le jeune, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1721, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Chiasson and Marie Boudrot, at Beaubassin in October 1741.  One wonders what became of them after 1755. 

Joseph's second son Joseph, fils, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1723, married Anne, daughter of Jean LeBlanc and Jeanne Bourgeois, probably at L'Assomption in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1751 and 1767, Anne gave Joseph, fils six children, two sons and five daughters.  The British deported them to Maryland in 1755.  Officials counted Joseph, fils, Anne, and four of their children at Oxford, on Maryland's Eastern Shore, in July 1763.  They emigrated to Louisiana in 1766 and settled at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Joseph's daughters married into the Constant, Vives, Buquoy, Prevost, Verret, and Landry families in Louisiana.  Reflecting the family's status in old Acadia, Joseph's youngest daughter Marie-Madeleine, born in Maryland in c1765, married Auguste, son of district commandant Don Nicolas Verret, at Ascension on the river in February 1784.  Oldest daughter Marguerite's two husbands also were colonial shakers and movers.  Both of Joseph's sons married into the Landry and Picou families and settled on the river and the western prairies.

Joseph, père's third son Étienne, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1724, may have remained at Pigiguit when his parents and younger siblings left for Île St.-Jean in 1749.  He married Brigitte, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Chênet and Anne Pothier of Île St.-Jean, in c1750 or 1751 perhaps at L'Assomption.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1752 and 1761, Brigitte gave Étienne four children, two sons and two daughters, including a set of twins.  The British deported them to Maryland in 1755, and they, too, were counted by colonial officials at Oxford in July 1763.  Brigitte died soon afterwards, and Étienne was a widower with four children when he followed older brother Joseph to Louisiana in 1766.  They also settled at Cabahannocer.  His twin daughters married into the Blanchard and Bourg families at Ascension and St.-Gabriel on the river.  Étienne remarried to fellow Acadian Anne Forest, widow of Pierre Babin, at New Orleans in c1768 and returned to Cabahannocer.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him another son in c1768.  Two of his three sons by both wives married into the Landry, Bourg, and Lambremont families, but only one of the lines survived, on the river. 

Joseph, père's fourth son Paul le jeune, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1726, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Agnès Cormier of Chignecto, at Beaubassin in June 1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1748 and 1770, Marie gave Paul le jeune six children, three sons and three daughters.  They remained at Chignecto, escaped the British in 1755, and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  They were counted at Restigouche in 1759 and were still there in May 1760, when daughter Marguerite, born the previous October was baptized at the French outpost.  When the British attacked Restigouche that summer and defeated the French and Acadian forces there, evidently the family escaped again.  They took refuge on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs in Gaspésie and settled with other refugees at Bonaventure.  Paul le jeune's daughters married into the Poirier, Savoie, and Bourdages families at Bonaventure.  Two of his three sons created their own families there.

Second son Firmin, born in c1766, married Marie-Esther, daughter of Raymond Bourdages and Esther LeBlanc, probably at Bonaventure in c1789.  Firmin worked as a navigator at Bonaventure.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1791 and 1811, Marie-Esther gave Firmin 15 children, eight sons and seven daughters.  Firmin died at Bonaventure in 1839, age 73.  Four of his daughters married into the Gauthier, Henry, Poirier, and Belliveau families at Bonventure.  Five of his eight sons created their own families. 

Third son Théophile, born at Bonaventure in c1799, married Reine, daughter of Isaac Bernard and Olive-Victoire Robichaud, at Bonaventure in January 1824.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1824 and 1840, Reine gave Théophile 11 children, seven sons and four daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Firmin's fourth son Jacques-Triphon, born at Bonaventure in c1800, married Élizabeth, daughter of Fabien Poirier and Angélique Gauthier, at Bonaventure in January 1826.  According to Bona Arsenault, between in 1828 and 1829, Élizabeth gave Jacques two children, a son and a daughter.  Jacques remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Jean Goulet and Apolline Comeau, at Bonaventure in September 1830.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1833 and 1846, Marguerite gave Jacques seven more children, three sons and four daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Firmind's fifth son Joseph-Léonard, called Léonard, born at Bonaventure in c1802, married Marguerite Poirier.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marguerite gave him a son in 1833.  Léonard remarried to Émilie, another daughter of Jean Goulet and Apolline Comeau, at Bonaventure in May 1834.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1835 and 1840, Émilie gave Léonard five more children, three sons and two daughters.  Léonard remarried again--his third marriage--to Séraphie, daughter of Jean-Urbain Bourg and Julienne Poirier, at Bonaventure in January 1841.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1842 and 1852, Séraphie gave Léonard seven more children, three sons and four daughters, at Bonaventure.  He father 13 children in all. 

Firmin's seventh son François-Xavier, born at Bonaventure in c1808, married Angèle, another daughter of Isaac Bernard and Olive-Victoire Robichaud, at Bonaventure in January 1833.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1834 and 1845, Angèle gave François-Xavier five children, four sons and a daughter.  François-Xavier remarried to Rose, daughter of Romuald Boudreau and Geneviève Mercier, at Bonaventure in April 1849.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1850 Rose gave François-Xavier another son. 

Firmin's eighth and youngest son Lazare, born at Bonaventure in c1811, married Charlotte, daughter of Joseph Couture and Anne Ferguson, at Grande-Rivière, near Percé in Gaspésie, in January 1839.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1839 and 1850, Charlotte gave Lazare seven children, six sons and a daughter, at Grande-Rivière. 

Paul le jeune's third and youngest son Charles le jeune, born in c1767, married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Bernier and Euphrosine LeBlanc, at Bonaventure in April 1790.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1792 and 1815, Marguerite gave Charles le jeune 14 children, eight sons and six daughters, including a set of twins.  Five of their daughters married into the Fournier, Vallée, Boutin, Pagé, and Bernard families at Bonaventure.  Four of Charles le jeune's eight sons created their own families. 

Second son Pierre-Hubert, born at Bonaventure in c1795, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Saint-Coeur and Euphrosine LeBlanc, at Bonaventure in January 1825.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1825 and 1829, Marie gave Pierre three children, two sons and a daughter.  Pierre-Hubert remarried to Élizabeth, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Labrecque and Marguerite-Suzanne Deslauriers dite Babineau, at Bonaventure in January 1842.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1843 and 1849, Élizabeth gave Pierre three more children, a son and two daughters. 

Charles le jeune's fourth son Charles, fils, born at Bonaventure in c1799, married cousin Scholastique, daughter of Joseph-Alexis Porlier and Marthe Bujold of Carleton, at Bonaventure in August 1825.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1826 and 1839, Scholastique gave Charles, fils seven children, three sons and four daughters, at Bonaventure.

Charles le jeune's sixth son Jacques, born at Bonaventure in c1803, married Sara, daughter of Hugh Colter and Brigit Kelly of Armagh, Ireland, at Bonaventure in September 1841.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1842 and 1856, Sara gave Jacques seven children, fives sons and two daughters, at Bonaventure. 

Charles le jeune's seventh son Jules, born at Bonaventure in c1805, married Basilice, daughter of Louis-Régis Essiambre dite Sans-Façon and Sophie Mercier of Carleton, at Bonaventure in September 1838.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1842 and 1858, Basilice gave Jules eight children, fives sons and three daughters, including a set of  twins, at Bonaventure. 

Joseph, père's fifth son Jean, born at L'Assomption, Piguiguit, in c1729, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749 and married Anne, daughter of island pioneer François Douville and Marie-Élisabeth Roger, at Port-La-Joye in January 1751.  A French official counted them on Rivière-du-Nord-Est near his parents in the island's interior in August 1752; they had no children.  Between 1753 and 1756, Anne gave Jean three children, two sons and a daughter.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Their sons died at sea.  Jean died at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in March 1759, age 30, probably from the rigors of the crossing.  His line of the family died with him.  One wonders what happened to daughter Marie-Rose, born on Île St.-Jean in c1753, and Jean's widow Anne Douville.  Did she return to North America or remain in France? 

Joseph père's sixth son Charles, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1731, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749, was counted with them on Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752, and married Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Cormier and Marie Thériot of Chignecto in c1758 either in exile or on Île St.-Jean on the eve of the island's dérangement.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1759 and 1776, Marguerite gave Charles eight children, all daughters.  If Charles and Marguerite were on Île St.-Jean in 1758, they escaped the British and sought refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Daughter Marguerite-Pélagie was born at Restigouche in late December 1759 and baptized there the following May.  The British attacked the outpost that summer of 1760 and defeated the French and Acadian force there.  Charles and his family evidently escaped again and joined other refugees at Bonaventure in Gaspésie.  Charles died there in December 1798, age 65.  Seven of his daughters married into the Dugas, Doucet, Henry, LeBlanc, Boudreau, and Porlier families at Bonaventure, so the blood of this family line survived. 

Joseph, père's seventh son François-Placide, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1736, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749 and was counted with them at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752.  He evidently escaped the British in 1758, sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, and married Marie-Josèphe Bernard in c1763.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1795, Marie-Josèphe gave François 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  François and his family also settled at Bonaventure in Gaspésie, where he died in 1807, age 71.  His daughters married into the Bourdages, Arsenault, Poirier, and Hébert families at Bonaventure.  All four of his sons created their own families.

Oldest son Louis, born in c1766, married Modeste, daughter of François Arsenault and Anne Poirier, at Bonaventure in November 1791.  According to Bona Arsenault, Modeste gave Louis two children, a daughter and a son, in 1793 and 1795.

François-Placide's second son François-Placide, fils, born probably at Bonaventure in c1773, married Apolline, daughter of Pierre dit Cliche Poirier and Marguerite LeBlanc, at Bonaventure in January 1799.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1799 and 1812, Apolline gave François-Placide, fils seven children, three sons and four daughters.  François-Placide, fils remarried to Agathe, daughter of Jean-Baptiste-Michel Lepage and Rose Arsenault, probably at Bonaventure in November 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1816 and 1829, Agathe gave François-Placide, fils seven more children, six sons and a daughter, so he fathered 14 children in all at Bonaventure.  Four of his daughters, all from his first wife Apolline, married into the Bernard and Lepage families at Bonaventure.  Six of his nine sons by both wives created their own families. 

Oldest son Sébastien, by first wife Apolline Poirier, born at Bonaventure in c1801, married Rose, daughter of Isaac Bernard and Olive-Victoire Robichaud, probably at Bonaventure in January 1827.  According to Bona Arsenault, Rose gave Sébastien a daughter in 1828.  Sébastien remarried to Angélique, daughter of Amant Babin and Ursule Poirier, at Bonaventure in January 1833.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1834 and 1835, Angélique gave Sébastien two sons.  He remarried again--his third marriage--to Mélanie, daughter of Vital Poirier and Louise Gauthier, at Bonaventure in May 1840.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1841 and 1854, Mélanie gave Sébastien seven more children, four sons and three daughters.  He fathered 10 children in all. 

François-Placide, fils's second son Paul, by first wife Apolline Poirier, born at Bonaventure in c1805, married Rose, daughter of Alexandre Bernard and Élizabeth Amirault, at Bonavenure in May 1831, but he died at Bonaventure in the following October before he could father any children.

François-Placide, fils's third son François, by first wife Apolline Poirier, born at Bonaventure in c1812, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Marguerite Bernard, at Bonaventure in May 1839.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1840 and 1853, Marie gave François seven children, five sons and two daughters. 

François-Placide, fils's fourth son Marcel, by second wife Agathe Lepage, born at Bonaventure in c1816, married Geneviève, daughter of Hubert Bernard and Marie-Reine Cavanaugh and widow of Jean Hébert, at Bonaventure in January 1845.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1845 and 1856, Geneviève gave Marcel five children, a son and four daughters. 

François-Placide, fils's fifth son Fabien, by second wife Agathe Lepage, born at Bonaventure in c1821, married Véronique, daughter of Ange Poirier and Louise Arbour, at Bonaventure in January 1847.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1848 and 1849, Véronique gave Fabien two children, a son and a daughter.  Fabien remarried to Élizabeth, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Marguerite Bernard, probably at Bonaventure in 1853.  According to Bona Arsenault, Élizabeth gave Fabien two more children, a son and a daughter, in 1855 and 1856. 

Oldest son François, by first wife Véronique Poirier, born at Bonaventure in c1848, married Marie Anglehart in 1872.  Their son Fabien le jeune represented Bonaventure in the Québec legislature from 1921 to 1924, after which he served as provincial court judge for many years. 

François-Placide, fils's sixth and youngest son Olivier, by second wife Agathe Lepage, born at Bonaventure in c1825, married Agnès, daughter of Joseph Cayouette and Lucie Bernard, probably at Bonaventure in 1856. 

François-Placide, père's third son Étienne, born probably at Bonaventure in c1775, married Marie, daughter of Jean Hébert and Rose Cyr, at Bonaventure in July 1799.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1800 and 1823, Marie gave Étienne 11 children, six sons and five daughters, at Bonventure.  Two of their daughters married into the Poirier family at Bonaventure.  Five of Étienne's six sons created their own families.

Oldest son Étienne, fils, born at Bonaventure in c1800, married cousin Marie, daughter of Maxime Poirier and Scholastique Bujold, at Bonaventure in January 1826.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1829 and 1840, Scholastique gave Étienne, fils six children, four sons and two daughters. 

Étienne, père's second son Jules, born at Bonaventure in c1802, married Marie, daughter of François Laviolette and Marie Gauthier of Carleton, at Bonaventure in January 1827.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1827 and 1844, Marie gave Jules six children, three sons and three daughter, at Bonaventure.

Étienne, père's third son Joseph, born at Bonaventure in c1808, married cousin Charlotte, daughter of Joseph Lepage and Geneviève Bujold, at Bonaventure in January 1835.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1835 and 1849, Charlotte gave Joseph seven children, three sons and four daughters. 

Étienne, père's fourth son Nicolas, born at Bonaventure in c1812, married cousin Marie, another daughter of Joseph Lepage and Geneviève Bujold, in January 1835, three days after his brother Joseph's marriage.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1839 and 1858, Marie gave Nicolas eight children, fours sons and four daughters. 

Étienne, père's sixth and youngest son Alexandre, born at Bonaventure in c1823, married Rose, daughter of Augustin Pitre and Marguerite Boudreau of Bathurst, formerly Nepisiguit, New Brunswick, in 1856.  According to Bona Arsenault, Rose gave Alexandre three children, two sons and a daughter, before 1860. 

François-Placide, père's fourth and youngest son Joseph-Alain, called Alain, born probably at Bonventure in c1792, married Geneviève, daughter of Joseph Cayouette and Élisabeth Robichaud, at Bonaventure in January 1814.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1814 and 1834, Geneviève gave Alain 11 children, six sons and five daughters, at Bonaventure.  Two of their daughters married into the Garant and Bourque families at Bonaventure.  Three of Alain's six sons created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre-Alain, born at Bonaventure in c1814, married Marie, daughter of Cyrille-Joël Lepage and Modeste Bernard, at Bonaventure in January 1842.

Joseph-Alain's second son Moïse, born at Bonaventure in c1816, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Fortin and Appoline Glazer, at Bonaventure in November 1850.

Joseph-Alain's third son François-Placide, born at Bonaventure in c1821 or 1825, married Sophie, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Marguerite Bernard, at Bonaventure in August 1846. 

Joseph, père's eighth and youngest son Mathurin, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1742, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in 1749 and was counted with them at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752.  He evidently escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and in Gaspésie.  He married Marie, daughter of Joseph Bernard and Marguerite Arsenault of Chignecto, at Carleton, near Bonaventure in November 1773.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1778 and 1799, Marie gave Mathurin 10 children, four sons and six daughters, at Carleton.  Five of his daughters married into the Landry and Forest families, including five brothers, at Carleton.  Three of Mathurin's four sons created their own families.

Oldest son Romain-Sébastien, born probably at Carleton in c1778, married Vénérande, daughter of Claude Landry and Hélène Dugas and sister of five of his brothers-in-law, at Carleton in January 1801.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1801 and 1819, Vénérande gave Romain 11 children, six sons and five daughters, at Carleton.  Four of their daughters married into the Nadeau and Arsenault families, including two brothers, at Carleton.  All six of Romain's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Fidèle-Joseph, born at Carleton in c1801, married Marguerite-Nabée, daughter of Florent Arsenault and Nathalie-Rosalie Landry, at Carleton in January 1828.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1828 and 1846, Marguerite gave Fidèle 11 children, four sons and seven daughters, at Carleton.  Fidèle remarried to Félicité, daughter of Gabriel Audet and Charlotte LeBlanc, at Carleton in April 1847.  According to Bona Arsenault, she evidently gave him no more children.  

Romain-Sébastien's second son Fabien, born at Carleton in c1804, married Mélanie, daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Marguerite Landry, at Carleton in January 1836.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1837 and 1846, Mélanie gave Fabien five children, two sons and three daughters, at Carleton.

Romain-Sébastien's third son Frédéric, born at Carleton in c1806, married Rosalie, daughter of Louis Allain and Madeleine LeBlanc, at Carleton in January 1836.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1837 and 1849, Rosalie gave Frédéric seven children, four sons and three daughters, at Carleton. 

Romain-Sébastien's fourth son Joseph, born at Carleton in c1807, married Olympiade, daughter of Louis Vienneau and Marguerite Rochichaud, at Caraquet, New Brunswick, in May 1832 and remained at Caraquet. 

Romain-Sébastien's fifth son Charles, born at Carleton in c1808, married Julie, daughter of Sévérin LeBlanc and Angélique Nadeau, at Carleton in August 1840.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1840 and 1849, Julie gave Charles five children, three sons and two daughters, at Carleton.

Romain-Sébastien's sixth and youngest son Louis-Lazare, born at Carleton in c1814, married Rose, daughter of Florent Arsenault and Nathalie-Rosalie Landry, at Carleton in February 1839.  According to Bona Arsenault, Rose gave Louis-Lazare seven children, six sons and a daughter by 1850. 

Mathurin's second son Frédéric, born probably at Carleton in c1787, married Hélène, another daughter of Claude Landry and Hélène Dugas, at Carleton in January 1815.  According to Bona Arsenault, Hélène gave Frédéric a son at Carleton in 1815 who created his own family. 

Only son André, born at Carleton in c1815, married Joséphine, daughter of Sébastien Landry and Émérance Painchaud, at Carleton in February 1844.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1844 and 1849, Joséphine gave André five children, two sons and three daughters. 

Mathurin's fourth and youngest son Pierre, born probably at Carleton in c1799, married Rose, daughter of Lazare Allain and Luce Landry, at Carleton in January 1824.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1826 and 1843, Rose gave Pierre seven children, four sons and three daughters, at Carleton. 

Sr. Alain's second son Louis-Amand, called Amand, born probably at Minas in c1701, married Catherine, daughter of Pierre Granger and Isabelle Guilbeau, at Grand-Pré in February 1728.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1728 and 1730, Catherine gave Amand two children, a daughter and a son.  Amand remarried to Claire, daughter of Jean Doucet and Françoise Blanchard, at Grand-Pré in December 1730.  According to Bona Arsenault, Claire gave Amand another son in 1732, but he died an infant.  Amand moved his family to Île St.-Jean in 1748, the first of his siblings to go there.  The same French official counted Le sieur Amand, second wife Claire, and his son Amand-Louis from his first marriage on the north bank of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in August 1752.  In 1758, Amand and his family were among the island Acadians who escaped the British.  They found refuge at Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where they were counted in 1759.  The escaped the British again in 1760 and found refuge in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs.  They were counted there at Bonaventure in 1765.  Amand's line of the family did not survive. 

Son Amand-Louis, born at Minas in c1730, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, Restigouche, and Gaspésie, where, as the only remaining son, he was counted with them at Bonaventure in 1765 and 1774.  After 1777, he disappears from the historical record, evidently not having married or fathered any children.   

Sr. Alain's third son Paul, born probably at Minas in c1701, married Marguerite, another daughter of Jean Doucet and Françoise Blanchard, at Grand-Pré in July 1726, and settled there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1749, Marguerite gave Paul 13 children, six sons and seven daughters.  At least two of their children, a son and a daughter, moved on to Île St.-Jean in the late 1740s or early 1750s.  The daughter, Mare-Madeleine, married into the Jousseaume family there, and they were deported to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Meanwhile, in 1755, the British deported Paul and the rest of his family to Pennsylvania.  In June 1763, Pennsylvania officials counted Paul, Marguerite, and three of their children, as well as one of their sons and his family, still in the colony.  They may have remained there.  Paul's daughter Marguerite married into the Dreux family at Philadelphia in September 1772. 

Fifth son Jean-Baptiste, born at Minas in c1743, was deported with his family to Pennsylvania in 1755.  He married Natalie, daughter of Pierre Girouard and Jeanne Martin of Annapolis Royal, at Philadelphia in February 1763.  Colonial officials counted them in the colony with an unnamed child the following June.  One wonders what became of them. 

Sr. Alain's fourth son Alain, fils, born probably at Minas in c1704, married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Boudrot and Marie Corporon, at Grand-Pré in July 1727 and settled at nearby Pigiguit before moving on to Île St.-Jean in 1751.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1752, Madeleine gave Alain, fils 10 children, fours sons and six daughters.  In August 1752, the same French official counted Alain, fils, his wife, nine of their children, oldest son Alain III, his wife, and their infant son, at Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Sci, a tributary of Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior.  Two of their daughters married into the Thériot family of Cobeguit on the island.  Alain, fils and his family did not escape the British in 1758.  In December of that year, Alain, fils, wife Madeleine, and most of their children perished aboard the British transport Duke William, which sank in a North Atlantic storm on its way to St.-Malo. 

Oldest son Alain III, born in c1728, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Granger and Angélique Richard, probably at Pigiguit in c1750 or 1751 and followed his family to Île St.-Jean.  In c1751 and c1756, Marie-Madeleine gave Alain III two children on the island, a son and a daughter.  They, too, were deported to St.-Malo in 1758, but not aboard the Duke William.  The crossing aboard one of the so-called Five Ships nevertheless devastated the family.  Daughter Marie-Louise, age 2, died at sea, and Alain III and 8-year-old son Simon le jeune died at St.-Servan in February and March 1759, soon after reaching the Breton port.  With the death of young Simon, this line of the family ceased to exist.  A year later, in June 1760, Alain III's widow Marie-Madeleine remarried to widower Joseph Bourg and emigrated to Louisiana with her new family in 1785. 

Sr. Alain's fifth and youngest son, name unrecorded, born probably at Minas before1707, died young.435

Brassaud

Pierre Brassaud, an early 1690s arrival, and his wife Gabrielle Forest created a small family in the colony.  Gabrielle gave Pierre nine children, two sons and seven daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Boudrot, Guédry dit Grivois, Longuépée, and Robichaud dit Cadet families.  Only one of Pierre's sons created his own family.  Pierre died by October 1729, in his 60s, place unrecorded.  His and Gabrielle's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and Minas, but also at Pigiguit and in the French Maritimes.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Older son, name unrecorded, died young.

Pierre's younger son Pierre, fils married in c1735, place unrecorded, a woman whose name has been lost to history.436

Gravois

Joseph Gravois, an early 1690s arrival, and his wife Marie Mingier dit La Gassé created a small family in the colony.  Marie gave Joseph one child, a son, who left Annapolis Royal and settled at Chignecto.  The date and place of Joseph's death has been lost to history, but it must have been soon after the birth of his son; Marie remarried to René Martin dit Barnabé before the census at Port-Royal was taken in 1693, so Joseph, fils would not have remembered his father.  At least 12 of Joseph and Marie's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and from Île St.-Pierre off the southern coast of Newfoundland in 1788.  Some of Joseph's descendants also could be found in greater Acadia after Le Grand Dérangement.  None seem to have resettled in British Canada. 

Only son Joseph, fils, born at Port-Royal in c1692, did not remain there.  He married Marie, daughter of Pierre Cyr and Claire Cormier, at Beaubassin in October 1718 and remained at Chignecto.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1720 and 1748, Marie gave Joseph, fils nine children, five daughters and four sons.  In the fall of 1755, Joseph, fils and his family escaped the British rounup at Chignecto and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By 1760, they were at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  No Joseph Gravois appears on at list of 1,003 Acadian refugees at Restigouche dated 24 October 1760, so he and other members of his family may have been among the 300 Acadians the Royal Navy captured that summer.  If not, sometime in the early 1760s, Joseph, fils and members of his family either surrrendered to, or were captured by, British forces in the region, and they, too, ended up as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia.  Joseph, fils died in exile, perhaps at Halifax, before before the counting there in August 1763, in his late 60s or early 70s.  Three of his daughters married into the Haché dit Gallant and Hébert families.  

Oldest son Pierre, born at Chignecto in c1730, married Marie-Rose, called Rose, daughter of Claude Bourgeois and Anne Blanchard, probably at Chignecto in c1750.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1751 and 1755, Rose gave Pierre three sons.  Other records give them two more children.  In the fall of 1755, the family escaped the British roundup at Chignecto and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By 1760, Pierre and his family were at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  When the Royal Navy attacked the French stronghold there in the summer of 1760, Pierre, a lieutenant in the Acadian militia, escaped another British roundup that bagged 300 more Acadians.  Pre. Gravois and six members of his family appear twice on a list of 1,003 Acadians at Restigouche dated 24 October 1760, evidence that they escaped the British that summer.  Sometime in the early 1760s, however, they either surrrendered to, or were captured by, British forces in the region and ended up as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia.  In August 1763, British officials counted Pierre, wife Marie-Rose, and five of their children in the prison compound on Georges Island, Halifax, in August 1763.  Pierre died soon after the counting.  His widow and three of his sons emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765-65, and Marie-Rose remarried in the Spanish colony. 

Oldest son Paul, born at Chignecto in c1751, followed his family into exile and into the prison compound at Halifax in the early 1760s, followed his widowed mother to Louisiana in 1765, and settled with her and her second husband at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Paul was still at Cabahannocer in March 1779, in his late 20s.  He evidently did not marry. 

Pierre's second son Joseph le jeune, born at Chignecto in c1753, followed his family into exile and into the prison compound at Halifax in the early 1760s, followed his widowed mother to Louisiana in 1765, and settled with her and her second husband at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Joseph le jeune married Louise-Françoise, called Françoise, daughter of his stepfather Philippe Saint-Julien de Lachaussée and his first wife Rosalie Godin, at Cabahannocer in June 1777.  Louise was a native of lower Rivière St.-Jean, where her father, a French-born surgeon, had lived with his first family before Le Grand Dérangement.  Joseph le jeune died probably at Cabahannocer by January 1781, when his wife remarried there.  His daughters married into the Prejean and De Roussel families.  One of them settled on Bayou Lafourche, and another died in St. Martin Parish in the late 1860s.  Only one of his two sons married, to a Bourgeois cousin at Cabahannocer, but he may not have fathered any sons. 

Pierre's third son Jean le jeune, born at Chignecto or in exile in c1755, followed his family into exile and into the prison compound at Halifax in the early 1760s, followed his widowed mother to Louisiana in 1765, and settled with her and her second husband at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Jean le jeune married Bibianne, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bourg and his second wife Marie LeBlanc, at Cabahannocer in June 1790.  Jean le jeune died in Ascension Parish in November 1844, in his late 80s.  His daughters married into the Gautreaux, LeBlanc, and Mollere families.  Four of his seven sons married into the LeBlanc, Richard, and Landry families on what came to be called the Acadian Coast.  All of the Acadian Gravoiss of South Louisiana descend from Jean le jeune and three of his sons. 

Joseph, fils's second son Jean, born at Chignecto in c1735, followed his family into exile and married fellow Acadian Marie-Anne Bujold in c1757.  Marie-Anne gave Jean a son, Jean, fils, born at Restigouche in November 1759.  They also escaped the British roundup there the following summer, but they, too, ended up in a prison-of-war camp in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s.  British officials counted Jean, wife Marie-Anne, and two of their children on Georges Island, Halifax, in August 1763.  One wonders what happened to them after the counting.  None of them followed their kinsmen to Louisiana. 

Joseph, fils's third son Joseph III, born at Chignecto in c1739, must have left Chignecto for Minas while he was still in teens.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported him to Virginia with other Minas Acadians, and Virginia authorities sent them on to England the following spring. In May 1763, he was repatriated to St.-Malo, France, with other Acadians in England aboard La Dorothée and settled in the suburb of St.-Suliac, where he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Bourg and Anne Hébert of Minas, in August 1763. They settled at nearby St.-Servan, where French authorities counted them in 1767.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1764 and 1784, Marie-Madeleine gave Joseph III eight children, six daughter and two sons.  In February 1767, Joseph III took his family to England.  British authorities counted them at Windsor on the upper Thames in 1770.  One wonders what he was doing there.  By 1771, he had taken his family from England to Baie Ste.-Marie on the western coast of Nova Scotia, where his younger brother had settled.  Joseph III and his family were still on St. Mary's Bay in 1774, but, again, they moved on.  From 1775 to 1784, Joseph III and his family resided at Carleton in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, not far from where his brothers had found refuge during Le Grand Dérangement.  Joseph III and his growing family were living on Île St.-Pierre, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland, in the mid-1780s.  It was from there, in 1788, that they sailed to Louisiana on Joseph's schooner, the Brigitte--perhaps the only Acadians who emigrated to Spanish Louisiana directly from greater Acadia.  Joseph III's daughters married into the Bertrand, Braud, Frederick, and Mulford families in Louisiana.  One daughter settled at New Orleans, and three followed their husbands to the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  Neither of Joseph's sons married, so this line of the family, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State.  

Joseph, fils's fourth and youngest son Augustin, born at Chignecto in c1748, followed his family into exile and married fellow Acadian Françoise Jeanson in c1770, no place given.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1775 Françoise gave Augustin a son, Jean-Dominique, in 1775.  They were living on Baie St.-Marie in Nova Scotia that year.437

Longuépée

Vincent Longuépée, an early 1690s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Rimbault created a small family in the colony.  Madeleine gave him six children, a son and five daughters, all of whom created families of their own.  Their daughters married into the Dahy, Lambert, Papon dit Sans Regret, Closquinet dit Desmoulins, and Bénard families, many of them in the French Maritimes.  Vincent died by October 1714 probably at Minas, in his late 30s or early 40s.  His and Madeleine's descendants settled not only at Minas, but also at Cobeguit and in the French Maritimes; they were especially numerous at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale.  At least 12 of Vincent's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Only son Louis married Anne, daughter of Pierre Brassaud and Gabrielle Forest, in c1720, place unrecorded, and moved on to the French Maritimes.  Two of their sons emigrated to Louisiana from France.438

Mazerolle

Louis Mazerolle dit Saint-Louis, an early 1690s arrival, and his wife Geneviève Forest created a small family in the colony.  Geneviève gave Louis four children, a son and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Roy, Darembourg, and Philippe dit La Roche families.  Louis and Geneviève's son created his own family.  Louis died by January 1748, place unrecorded, in his mid- or late 80s.  His and Geneviève's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Minas and in the French Maritimes.  At least five of Louis's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.   

Only son Joseph married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Doiron and Anne LeBlanc, in c1735 probably at Minas, and remarried to Anne, daughter of Joseph Daigre and Madeleine Gautrot, at Grand-Pré in January 1748.  One of Joseph's sons by first wife Marie-Josèphe emigrated to Louisiana from France.439

Prétieux

Joseph Prétieux, later called Précieux, and his French wife Anne Gautrot, perhaps early 1690s arrivals, created a small family in the colony.  Anne gave Joseph two children, a son and a daughter, both of whom married.  Their daughter Anne married into the Lalande alias Des Brousses dit Bonappétit family.  However, three years before her marriage, Anne gave birth to a "natural" son, Jacques, who, if he survived childhood, may have taken his mother's family's name.  Joseph, père and Anne were counted at Minas in 1693, and Joseph died perhaps soon after the census was taken, age unrecorded.  Joseph, père and Anne's only son also created a family of his own.  They and their descendants settled not only at Minas, but also at Annapolis Royal, Chignecto, and in the French Maritimes.  At least one of Joseph's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Only son Joseph, fils married Anne, daughter of Michel Haché dit Gallant and Anne Cormier, at Beaubassin in January 1719.  In c1724, they followed Anne's family to Île St.-Jean; the Hachés, in fact, were among the first Acadians to settle on the island.  A French official counted Joseph, fils and Anne on upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est, in the center of the island, in August 1752.  With them were four of their children:  Louise-Marguerite, age 18; Pierre, age 15; Joseph, age 13; and Louis, age 11.  Next to them lived their oldest daughter, Marie-Anne, age 20, and her husband Augustin dit Justice Doucet, age 29.440

Poirier dit de France

Michel Poirier dit de France, Jean Poirier's nephew, perhaps was an early 1690s arrival.  Michel dit de France and wife Marie Chiasson created another large branch of the family in the colony.  Marie gave Michel a dozen children, eight sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Doucet, Caissie, Buote, and Comeau families.  Five of Michel's eight sons created their own families.  Michel dit de France died probably at Chignecto by November 1740, in his late 60s or early 70s.  His and Marie's descendants settled not only at Chignecto, but also in the French Maritimes.  At least one of Michel dit de France's descendants may have emigrated to Louisiana. 

Oldest son Michel, fils married Jeanne, daughter of Charles Bourgeois and Marie Blanchard, at Beaubassin in February 1718 and remained there.

Michel dit de France's second son François married Marguerite, daughter of Louis Doucet and Marguerite Girouard, in c1726 probably at Chignecto and died there by January 1752, in his late 40s or early 50s.

Michel dit de France's third son Joseph married Jeanne, daughter of Abraham Arseneau and Jeanne Gaudet, in c1730 probably at Chignecto and died there by January 1752, age unrecorded.

Michel dit de France's fourth and fifth sons, names unrecorded, died young.

Michel dit de France's sixth son Pierre married Louise, daughter of Michel Caissie and Madeleine Gaudet, at Beaubassin in October 1733 and remained there.

Michel dit de France's seventh son René married Anne, daughter of Denis Gaudet and Anne Doucet, at Beaubassin in November 1740 and remained there.

Michel dit de France's eighth and youngest son Philippe evidently died young.441

Lavergne

Pierre Lavergne, an early 1690s arrival, and his wife Anne Bernon created a small family in the colony.  Anne gave Pierre five children, a son and four daughters.  Thee of their daughters married into the Petitpas, Lavandier, Clergé, and Haché dit Gallant families.  Pierre's only son also created his own family.  The date and place of Pierre's death has been lost to history.  His and Anne's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and in the French Maritimes.  At least five of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.   

Only son Jacques married Françoise, daughter of Claude Pitre and Marie Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in November 1727 and likely moved on to the French Maritimes.442

Deveau

Michel Deveau dit Dauphiné, an early 1690s arrival, and his Canadian wife Marie-Madeleine Martin created a good-sized family in the colony.  Marie-Madeleine gave Dauphiné six children, four sons and two daughters, including a set of twins.  One of their daughters married into the Henry family.  All four of Michel's sons created their own families.  The date and place of Michel dit Dauphiné's death has been lost to history.  His and Marie-Madeleine's descendants settled at Chignecto and in the French Maritimes.  If any of Michel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Pierre married Marie, daughter of Roger Caissie and Marie-Françoise Poirier, at Beaubassin in February 1715 and died probably at Chignecto by 1751, in his mid-or late 50s.  In August 1752, a French official counted Marie, a widow, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, with two of her younger Deveau children--Pierre, age 18, and Anne, age 13--living with older daughter Marie Deveau, age 22, her husband André Templet of Normandy, and their 3-month-old daughter Marie-Marguerite.  The official noted that widow Marie had been "in the country since the month of August last," probably soon after Pierre's death. 

Michel's second son Jacques dit Dauphiné, a twin, married Marie, daughter of Jean Pothier and Anne Poirier, at Beaubassin in October 1719 and moved on to the French Maritimes in c1724.  A French official counted them at Havre-aux-Sauvages, on the north coast of Île St.-Jean, in August 1752.  With them were three of their younger children, Jean, Joseph, and Marie.  Nearby lived son Jacques, fils and wife Madeleine Robichaud, who had no children.  A week or so earlier, the same French official had counted three of Jacques and Marie's married children--son Michel, his wife Marie Poirier, and their three children; son Pierre, his wife Marie Haché, and their three children; and daughter Anne and her husband Charles dit Charlit Haché--on upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the middle of the island. 

Michel's third son Jean, Jacques's twin, married Cécile, daughter of Pierre Caissie and Marie-Thérèse Mirande, in c1723 probably at Chignecto. 

Michel's fourth and youngest son Augustin married Marie, another daughter of Pierre Caissie and Marie-Thérèse Mirande, in c1732 probably at Chignecto.443

Léger

Drummer Jacques Léger dit La Rosette, an early 1690s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Trahan created a good-sized family in the colony.  Madeleine gave Jacques 11 children, four sons and seven daughters.  Four of their daughters married into the Michel dit Saint-Michel, Robichaud dit Cadet, Bertrand, and Doucet families.  Three of Jacques's sons created their own families.  Jacques dit La Rosette died at Annapolis Royal in March 1751, in his late 80s.  His and Madeleine's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, among the few Acadian families who did not branch out to other settlements.  At least 10 of Jean dit La Rosette's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax and French St.-Domingue in 1765 and France in 1785. 

Oldest son Jacques, fils married Anne, daughter of François Amireau and Marie Pitre, at Annapolis Royal in January 1717.  One of their sons emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax. 

Jacques's second son, unnamed, died young.

Jacques's third son Jean married Marie-Marguerite, daughter of Abraham Comeau and Marguerite Pitre, at Annapolis Royal in May 1730.

Jacques's fourth and youngest son François married Madeleine, another daughter of Abraham Comeau and Marguerite Pitre, at Annapolis Royal in May 1739.  A son and two daughters emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax.445

Bergeron

Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Geneviève Serreau de Saint-Aubin created a good-sized family in the colony.  Between 1696 and 1710, on Île d'Orléans near Québec, at Port-Royal, and Boston, Massachusetts, Geneviève gave the sailor-turned-merchant six children, three sons and three daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Roy and Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjeur and dit Bellefeuille families.  The date and place of Barthélemy dit d'Amboise's death has been lost.  His and Geneviève's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and on Rivière St.-Jean and were among the few Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  At least 30 of Barthélemy's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, but a substantial number of them also could be found in greater Acadia and Canada after Le Grand Dérangement.   

Oldest son Barthélemy dit d'Amboise, fils, born at St.-Françoise, Île d'Orléans, in January 1696, married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Dugas and Marguerite Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in April 1721.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1722 and 1743, Marguerite gave Barthélemy, fils four children, three sons and a daughter.  Other records say she gave him twice that many children, four sons and four daughters.  The family evidently was captured by the British on Rivière St.-Jean in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  Barthélemy dit d'Ambroise died probably in Nova Scotia while in exile.  His daughters married into the Godin dit Bellefontaine, Dugas, Lahure, Bernard, and Arseneau families in greater Acadia and Louisiana.  All four of his sons created their own families, but one of the lines did not survive.  After the war with Britain finally ended, Barthélemy, fils's widow and all of his children emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1764-65.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste dit d'Amboise, born at Annapolis Royal in c1722, married Marguerite Bernard.probably on Rivière St.-Jean in the late 1740s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1750 and 1772, Marguerite gave Jean-Baptiste six children, three sons and three daughters, in greater Acadia and Louisiana.  The family evidently was captured by the British on Rivière St.-Jean in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  After the war with Britain ended, Jean-Baptiste, Marguerite, their three sons and a daughter, with other Acadians under Jean-Baptiste's leadership, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingne, in 1764-65.  They settled at Cabahannocer on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Their oldest daughter married into the De St.-German de Gournondage family at Cabahannocer and settled at New Orleans.  Two of Jean-Baptiste's three sons married into the Forest and Gaudin dit Bellefontaine families, one of them to a first cousin, and settled in what became St. James Parish.  

Barthélemy dit d'Amboise, fils's second son Charles, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1728, married Isabelle, daughter of Jean Arceneau and Ann-Marie Hébert of Chignecto, probably on Rivière St.-Jean in the late 1740s or early 1750s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1753 and 1763, Isabelle gave Charles three children, two sons and a daughter, on Rivière St.-Jean and at Halifax.  The family evidently was captured by the British on Rivière St.-Jean in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia.   They followed brother Jean-Baptiste dit d'Amboise to Louisiana from Halifax in 1764-65 and settled at Cabahannocer.  Charles died there in c1766, age 38, soon after the family's arrival.  Isabelle also died that year.  Daughter Marguerite married into the Melançon family in the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin but returned to the river.  Only one of Charles's two sons married, into the Forest family, and settled on Bayou Lafourche.

Barthélemy dit d'Amboise, fils's third son Barthélemy III, born probably at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas on Rivière St.-Jean in c1740, followed his family into exile and imprisonment and married Anne, another daughter of Jean Arseneau and Anne-Marie Hébert, probably at Halifax in c1762.  In 1764-65, they followed the Broussards from Halifax to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, and settled on Bayou Teche.  Both Barthélemy III and his infant son died on the Teche in late October, victims of an epidemic that struck the settlement that summer and fall, so this line of the family did not survive.  Anne, along with dozens of other Teche Acadians, fled to Cabahannocer on the river after the death of her loved ones and remarried to a LeBlanc there in November 1767. 

Barthélemy dit Amboise, fils's fourth and youngest son Germain, born probably at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas on Rivière St.-Jean in c1743, followed his family into exile and imprisonment.  He followed his widowed mother to Louisiana in 1764-65 and settled at Cabahannocer, where he married Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of Bénoni LeBlanc and Marguerite Hébert, in May 1768.  They moved to upper Bayou Lafourche in the 1780s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1770 and 1774, Marguerite gave Germain three children, a son and two daughters.  Louisiana records show that she gave him at least seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Germain died on the upper Lafourche by November 1796, when his wife remarried there.  His daughters married into the Gautreaux and Metra families.  Two of his sons married into the Doiron and Thériot families on upper Bayou Lafourche and created vigorous lines.  One of Germain's grandsons may have been the only Acadian Bergeron who settled west of the Atchafalaya Basin during the antebellum period. 

Barthélemy, père's second son Michel dit de Nantes married in c1721 a woman whose name has been lost to history. According to Bona Arsenault, in 1722 and 1723, his wife gave Michel two children, a son and a daughter.  Michel remarried to Marie, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marie-Madeleine Landry, in c1727.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1741, Marie would have given Michel seven more children, five sons and two daughters.  Michel remarried again--his third marriage--in c1743 to another woman whose name had been lost to history, again at a place unrecorded.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1743 and 1747, his new wife would have given Michel two more daughters.  Michel remarried yet again--his fourth marriage!--to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Jeanne Gautrot and widow of Jean Arseneau, in c1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1759, Marie-Jeanne would have given Michel four more children, two sons and two daughters--15 children in all.  According to Bona Arsenault, Michel dit de Nantes and his two youngest sons, Jean-Baptiste and Charles, went to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, but church and civil records there say otherwise.  Michel and his family evidently were captured by the British on Rivière St.-Jean in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  Four of his daughters married into the Landry, Godin dit Lincour, Louvière, Hébert, Part, and Bourgeois families in greater Acadia, Canada, and Louisiana.  Six of his eight sons created their own families.  Three of his daughters by his second and fourth wives emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1764-65. 

Oldest son Pierre dit Nantes, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1722, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Bourg and Marie Cormier of Chignecto, probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1748.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1749 and 1772, Marguerite gave Pierre 10 children, four sons and six daughters.  The British evidently captured the family in 1758 and held them as prisoners in Nova Scotia.  When the war with Britain finally ended, they chose to go not to Louisiana but to Canada.  They settled at Bécancour, on the upper St. Lawrence across from Trois-Rivières, in 1764 and moved to nearby St.-Grégoire-dit-Nicolet in 1767.  At age 60, Pierre remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Lesieur-Duchesne and Françoise Moreau and widow of Jean-Baptiste Rivard-Bellefeuille, at Yamachiche, on the north shore of Lac-St.-Pierre, across from Nicolet, in October 1782.  She gave him no more children.  Five of his daughters married into the Prince, Massé, and Trudel families at Bécancour.  All four of his sons marrried. 

Oldest son David, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1749, married Angélique, daughter of Jean Morisette and Marie-Josèphe Houde, at Bécancour in November 1777.  They remained at Bécancour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1778 and 1788, Angélique gave David five sons.  David remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Poirier and Marie Gaudet, at nearby Nicolet in February 1792.  According to Bona Arsenault, Marie gave David another son.  All six of these sons created their own families. 

Oldest son David-Joseph, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1778, married cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles-André Bergeron and Madeleine Poirier, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in January 1807. 

David's second son Pierre, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1781, married cousin Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Poirier and Madeleine Bergeron, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in May 1809. 

David's third son François-Sylvestre, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1783, married Esther, daughter of fellow Acadians Timothée Prince and Anne Richard, at Nicolet in April 1812. 

David's fourth son Charles le jeune, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1786, married Agathe, daughter of Ignace Pinard and Claire Richer, at Nicolet in August 1808, and remarried to Marie-Louise, daughter of Joseph Bourg, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in November 1824. 

David's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Angélique Morisette, born probably at Bécancour in c1788, married Geneviève, daughter of Gabriel Martel and Marie-Anne Lyonnais, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in April 1812, and remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Belliveau and Marie Prince, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in February 1819. 

David's sixth and youngestson Joseph, by second wife Marie Poirier, born probably at Nicolet in the early 1790s, married cousin Marie-Victoire, another daughter Charles-André Bergeron and Madeleine Poirier, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in January 1807. 

Pierre dit Nantes's second son Charles, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1751, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Alexis LeBlanc and Marie-Josèphe Provencher, at Bécancour in April 1777.  They remained at Bécancour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1779 and 1802, Marie-Josèphe gave Charles 15 children, seven sons and eight daughters.  At age 68, Charles remarried to Marie-Louise Baril, widow of Antoine Houde, at nearby Gentilly in January 1820, but they settled at Bécancour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1821 and 1826, into Charles's mid-70s, Marie-Louise gave him four more daughters.   Between 1779 and 1826, then, Charles's two wives gave him 19 children, seven sons and 12 daughters.  Seven of his daughters married into the Tourigny, Doucet, Bourgeois, Pellerin, Belliveau, and Prince families at St.-Grégoire and Nicolet.  Six of his seven sons created their own families.

Oldest son Jean-Charles, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1780, married cousin Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles-André Bergeron and Madeleine Poirier, at nearby St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in May 1807. 

Charles's second son Joseph-Isaac, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1788, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians François Pellerin and Marie-Josèphe Poirier, at St.-Grégoire in October 1809.

Charles's third son Grégoire-Fabien, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1791, married Josephte, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Poirier and Rosalie Bourg, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in November 1818. 

Charlers's fourth son Michel-Élisée, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably Bécancour in c1795, married Thérèse, daughter of Jérôme Baril and Madeleine Kerbec, at Gentilly in July 1819. 

Charles's fifth son Jean-Hubert, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1797, married Marguerite, daughter of Augustin Hamel and Madeleine Prince, at St.-Grégoire in November 1818. 

Charles's sixth son Jean-Élisée-Isaïe, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1801, married Euphrosine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Prince and Élizabeth Hébert, at St.-Grégoire in November 1824. 

Pierre dit Nantes's third son Raphaël, born in c1758, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Amant Thibeau and Rosalie Cormier, at Bécancour in January 1780.  They remained at Bécancour.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1781 and 1794, Marie-Josèphe gave Raphaël four children, a son and three daughters.  At age 69, Raphaël remarried Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Desruisseaux and Marie-Madeleine Boucher, at Bécancour in October 1827.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him no more children.  One of his daughters married into the Beaudon family at nearby St.-Grégoire.  His only son created a family of his own. 

Pierre, born probably at Bécancour in c1791, married Marie-Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Belliveau and Geneviève Morin, at Nicolet in November 1801, and remarried to Esther Belliveau, widow of Joseph Hébert, probably at Nicolet in November 1840. 

Pierre dit Nantes's fourth and youngest son Pierre, fils, born in c1772, married Charlotte, daughter of Claude Bourgeois and Marie Vignault, at Bécancour in February 1794. 

Michel dit de Nantes's second son François, born perhaps on Rivière St.-Jean in c1733, followed his family into imprisonment and to Canada, where he married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Bourg and Marie Belliveau, at Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, on the lower St. Lawrence, in August 1764.  They moved to Bécancour, on the upper St. Lawrence, in 1766.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1776, Rosalie gave François seven children, six sons and a daughter.  François remarried to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Joseph Richer and Jeanne Veillet, at Bécancour in August 1783.  The moved to nearby Nicolet in 1790.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1784 and 1794, Marie-Jeanne gave François four more children, two sons and two daughters.  Three of François's daugthers by both wives married into the Belliveau and LeBlanc families at Nicolet and nearby St.-Grégoire.  Three of his eight sons by both wives created their own families.

Oldest son François, fils, by first wife Rosalie Bourg, born in c1766, married Agathe, daughter of Pierre Pellerin and Françoise Morin, at Nicolet in January 1792. 

François's fourth son David le jeune, by first wife Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, born probably at Bécancour in c1772, married Marie-Louise, daughter of Pierre Belliveau and Félicité Richard, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in November 1812.

François's son Joseph-Marie, by second wife Marie-Jeanne Richer, born probably at Bécancour in ,1786, married Pélagie, daughter of Joseph Lesieur-Desaulniers and Marguerite Tessier, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in October 1814. 

Michel dit de Nantes's third son Michel, fils, born perhaps on Rivière St.-Jean in c1736, followed his family into imprisonment and married Madeleine, another daughter of François Bourg and Marie Belliveau, probably in Nova Scotia in c1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1774, Madeleine gave Michel, fils seven children, two sons and five daughters.  After the war with Britain finally ended, they followed his family to the lower St. Lawrence and settled at Kamouraska in 1764.  They resettled at Bécancour on the upper St. Lawrence in 1768 and at nearby Nicolet in 1787.  Their daughters married into the Poirier, MacDonnell, and Desilets families, including three Poirier brothers, at Nicolet.  Both of Michel, fils's sons created their own familiies.

Older son François le jeune, born probably at Kamouraska in c1766, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Blanchard and Catherine Forest, at Nicolet in October 1789. 

Michel, fils's younger son Michel III, born probably at Bécancour in c1769, married Marguerite, daughter of Étienne Hébert and Marie-Josèphe Babin, at Nicolet in January 1797. 

Michel dit de Nante's fourth son Simon, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1738, followed his family into imprisonment and married Marie, daughter of Michel Saindon and Marie Godin dit Bellefontaine, probably in Nova Scotia in c1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1784, Marie gave Simon a dozen children, eight sons and four daughters.  They, too, followed his family to the lower St. Lawrence in 1764 and settled at Kamouraska before moving to Bécancour in 1767 and Nicolet in 1793.  One of Simon's daughters married into the Michel family at Nicolet.  Four of his eight sons created their own families.

Oldest son Charles le jeune, born in c1761, married Angélique, daughter of Régis Part and Marie Belliveau, at Bécancour in November 1788. 

Simon's second son André, born in c1763, married Josèphe, daughter of François Élie and Josette Desrosiers, at Trois-Rivières in December 1787. 

Simon's third son Simon, fils, born in c1764, married Marie-Rose, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Hébert and Marie-Rose LeBlanc, at Nicolet in June 1793.

Simon, père's fourth son Joseph le jeune, born probably at Bécancour in c1768, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Hébert and Marie Arsenault, at Nicolet in November 1799. 

Michel dit de Nante's fifth son Joseph dit d'Amboise, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1739, followed his family into imprisonment and married Angélique, another daughter of Michel Saindon and Marie Godin dit Bellefontaine, probably in Nova Scotia in c1762.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1768, Angélique gave Joseph five children, three sons and two daughters.  They followed his family to the lower St. Lawrence in 1764 and settled at Kamouska before moving farther down to L'Isle-Verte in 1770.  His daughters married into the Hudon, Simon, and Dubé families at L'Isle-Verte.  Two of his three sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born in c1762, married Marie-Judith, daughter of Pierre Hudon and Marie-Madeleine Dubé, at L'Isle-Verte in February 1786, and remarried to Geneviève Marquis at nearby Cacouna in January 1822.  They remained at Cacouna. 

Joseph dit d'Amboise's third son Michel le jeune, born probably at Kamouraska in c1768, married Anastaise Côté at L'Isle-Verte in June 1798. 

Michel dit de Nante's sixth son Étienne dit d'Amboise, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1741, may have followed his family into imprisonment in the late 1750s but did not follow them to the St. Lawrence valley after the war ended.  He married Claire, daughter of Pierre Couroit and Angélique Vautour, at Carleton on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs in Gaspésie in February 1777.  They remained there.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1778 and 1793, Claire gave Étienne six children, a son and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the McIntyre, O'Connors, Cormier, Bernard, and Ahier families at Carleton.  Étienne's only son created his own family.

Nicolas dit d'Amboise, born probably at Carleton in c1793, married Marguerite-Olivette, daughter of François-Alexis Porlier and Euphrosine Landry, at Carleton in February 1821.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1821 and 1841, Marguerite-Olive gave Nicolas eight children, two sons and six daughters. 

Michel dit de Nantes's seventh son Charles, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1754, may have followed his family into imprisonment.  According to Bona Arsenault, he and younger brother Jean-Baptiste accompanied their father to Louisiana in 1764-65, but Louisiana records say otherwise.  One wonders what really became of Charles.

Michel dit de Nante's eighth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean, in c1756, may have followed his family into imprisonment.  According to Bona Arsenault, he and older brother Charles accompanied their father to Louisiana in 1764-65, but Louisiana records say otherwise.  One wonders what really became of Jean-Baptiste.

Barthélemy, père's third and youngest son Augustin, born probably at Port-Royal in c1710, married Marie, another daughter of Claude Dugas and Marguerite Bourg, in c1730 probably at Annapolis Royal.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1735 and 1752, Marie gave Augustin three children, two sons and a daughter.  Other records show that Marie may have given him another son in c1730.  The family evidently was captured by the British in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia until the end of the war.  Daughter Élisabeth followed two of her brothers to Canada, where she married into the Boucher family at Kamarouska on the lower St. Lawrence in September 1771.  Meanwhile, Augustin, Marie, oldest son Jean-Baptiste, and Jean-Baptiste's family followed the Broussards to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in 1764-65 and settled with them on Bayou Teche in the spring of 1765.  Augustin died on Bayou Teche in late August 1765, age 55, victim of an epidemic that struck the Teche valley Acadians that summer and fall.  Widow Marie retreated to Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans that fall and lived with a widowed niece.  All three of Augustin's sons created their own families, one in Louisiana, the others in Canada.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730, evidently followed his family to Rivière St.-Jean and married Catherine, daughter of Michel Caissie dit Roger and his first wife Catherine Poirier of Chignecto, in c1750 probably at Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas.  Between 1750 and 1765, Catherine gave Jean-Baptiste six children, three sons and three daughters.  The family likely was captured in 1758 and held as prisoners in Nova Scotia till the end of the war.  Instead of going to Canada with his younger siblings, Jean-Baptiste followed his parents to Louisiana via Cap-François in 1765-65 and settled with them on Bayou Teche in the spring of 1765.  Catherine was pregnant on the voyage from Halifax to Louisiana and gave birth to daughter Marianne on the Teche at the end of May.  The baby died in late August.  Jean-Baptiste and Catherine's year-old-son Joseph died on the Teche in late October 1765, probably a victim of the epidemic that had killed his paternal grandfather and perhaps his younger sister two months earlier.  Jean-Baptiste died on the Teche in early November 1765, one of the last victims of the epidemic.  After his death, Catherine retreated with her mother-in-law and her remaining four children to Cabahannocer on the river.  Her older daughter Madeleine married into the Renauld at New Orleans and settled on Bayou Lafourche.  Two of Jean-Baptiste's three sons married into the Babin, Forest, and Benoit families and created vigorous lines on Bayou Lafourche. 

Augustin's second son Pierre, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1735, followed his family into imprisonment.  He married Genevièvie Poitevin probably in Nova Scotia in c1760.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1770 and 1790, Geneviève gave Pierre seven children, three sons and four daughters.  When the war with Britain finally ended, Pierre did not follow his parents and oldest brother to Louisiana but chose to remain in greater Acadia.  He and his family were counted at Miramichi, present-day eastern New Brunswick, in 1776, moved on to Percé in Gaspésie in 1779, and settled at Bonaventure on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs, where he died in March 1823, age 88.  One of his daughters married into the Allain and Cormier families at Bonaventure and nearby Paspébiac.  Two of his three sons created their own families.

Oldest son Pierre, fils, born in c1770, married Marie-Josette Huard, widow of Joseph Labrasseur, at New-Carlisle, near Bonaventure, in August 1795. 

Pierre, père's second son Jean-Baptiste, born in c1779, married Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Vienneau and Marie Marquis, at New-Carlisle in May 1802. 

Augustin's third and youngest son Charles-André, born probably on Rivière St.-Jean in c1743, followed his family into imprisonment but not to Louisiana in 1764.  When the war with Britain ended, Charles-André also chose to remain in greater Acadia, probably following his older brother Pierre to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Poirier and Marie Gaudet of Chignecto, in c1771 and moved on to Canada.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1772 and 1789, Madeleine gave Charles-André eight children, three sons and five daughters.  He died at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet, on the upper St. Lawrence across from Trois-Rivières, in 1825, age 82.  Three of his daughters married into the Bergeron and Bourg families at Nicolet.  Two of his three sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Charles-Alexis, born in c1772, married Marie-Madeleine Desrosiers dit Dargy at Trois-Rivières in June 1802, and remarried to cousin Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Bourque and Marie Bergeron, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet, across from Trois-Rivières, in April 1809.

Charles-André's second son Raymond, born in c1775, married Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Thibodeau and Josèphe Lavigne, at St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet in October 1803.446

Coste

François Coste, carpenter, navigator, coastal pilot, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Martin dit Barnabé created a small family in the colony.  Madeleine gave him eight children, five sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Le Roy dit L'Espérance, Bois, Petitpas, and Dugas families.  Only two of François's sons created families of t their own.  François died at either Port-Toulouse or L'Ardoise, Île Royale, by 1753, in his late 80s or early 90s.  His and Madeleine's descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, and in the French Maritimes, where they were especially numerous at Port-Toulouse and L'Ardois.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisina, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest François, fils, born probably at Port-Royal in c1700, died young. 

François, père's second son Jean, born at Port-Royal in June 1703, died there in June 1705, age 2. 

François, père's third son Jacques dit Jacob, born at Port-Royal in November 1705, married Françoise, daughter of Claude Petitpas, fils and his Mi'kmaq wife Marie-Thérèse, at Port-Toulouse in c1727.  A French official counted Jacob and his family at Port-Toulouse in February 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

François, père's fourth son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in September 1707, evidently died young.

François, père's fifth and youngest son Jean, born at Annapolis Royal in May 1713, married Madeleine, daughter of Joannis Lefargue and Marie-Anne Ozelet, at Port-Toulouse in c1740.  A French official counted them at L'Ardois, near Port-Toulouse, in February 1752.  Jean died there by October 1758, in his mid-40s, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.447

Chauvet dit La Gerne

Charles Chauvet dit La Gerne, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Aimée Joseph dit Lejeune created a good-sized family in the colony.  Aimée gave Charles eight children, four sons and four daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Roy or Le Roy and Planson families and followed their husbands to the French Maritimes.  Three of Charles's four sons created their own families.  Charles and his sons, while residing at Pigiguit, became active members of the Acadian resistance in 1749 and promptly ran afoul of British authorities.  As a result, the family settled not only on Rivière St.-Jean and at Minas and Pigiguit, but also in the French Maritimes, where the British forced them to emigrate.  Charles died by 1752, probably in his 70s, at either Pigiguit or in the French Maritimes.  If any of Charles's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Odest son, name unrecorded, died young. 

Charles's second son Charles dit La Gerne, fils married Isabelle LeBlanc in c1735 and settled at Pigiguit before moving on to the French Maritimes. 

Charles's third son Jean dit Petit Jean married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Hébert and Marguerite Dugas, at Grand-Pré in August 1710, settled at Pigiguit, and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Charles's fourth and youngest son Alexandre dit Misgucess dit La Gerne married Catherine-Josèphe, daughter of François Leprince, in c1746 probably at Pigiguit and moved on to the French Maritimes.448

Poitevin

Étienne Poitevin dit Parisien, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Anne Daigre created a small family in the colony.  Anne gave him a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters.  Five of their daughters married into the Le Prieur dit Dubois, Fouquet, Petit, Despoués, and Royer dit Leroy families, the younger ones on Île St.-Jean, where the family went in the 1720s, among the first Acadians to go to there.  Only one of Étienne's sons married, in Canada, where he remained.  Étienne died at Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, in June 1742, in his late 60s, and Anne promptly remarried to a Norman fisherman/habitant.  As a result of the family's early departure from British Nova Scotia, they were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  In fact, only this family's blood survived in greater Acadia.  If any of Étienne's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.

Oldest son Jacques-Christophe dit Cadien, born probably at Port-Royal in the late 1690s or early 1700s, moved to Canada, where he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Michel Viau dit Lespérance and Hélène Charles, at Longueil across the river from Montréal in January 1731.  He died at Montréal in July 1747, in his late 40s. 

Étienne's second son Louis, born at Port-Royal in October 1703, died there on the haute rivière in April 1713, age 9.  

Étienne's third son, name unrecorded, born at Port-Royal in April 1706, died on the day of his birth.

Étienne's fourth son Louis, the second with the name, born at Port-Royal in September 1707, moved to Havre-St.-Pierre on the north shore of Île St.-Jean by 1734.  He died at Hôtel-Dieu de Nantes, France, in June 1753, age 46, and did not marry.  Was he a sailor?  Why else would he have been at Nantes years before his family was deported to France from Île St.-Jean.

Étienne's fifth and youngest son Étienne, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1712, became lost in the woods probably near his home at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, when he was eight years old.  He was never found.  His death was recorded in the local parish register three weeks after his disappearance.449

Chênet dit La Garenne

Louis Chênet dit La Garenne, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Martin dit Barnabé created a small family in the colony.  Jeanne gave him two children, a son and a daughter, both of whom married.  Their daughter married into the Charpentier and Morel families and settled at Havre-St.-Pierre on the north shore of Île St.-Jean.  Louis died probably at Port-Royal by April 1704, when his wife remarried there; he would have been in his late 20s that year.  Louis and Jeanne's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also on Île Royale and at Havre-St.-Pierre and Havre-aux-Sauvages on Île St.-Jean, to which they emigrated early.  As a result, they were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  One of Louis and Jeanne's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in August 1785. 

Only son Jean dit La Garenne, born probably at Port-Royal in c1700, married Anne, daughter of Jean Pothier and his second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, in October 1728.  A French official counted them at nearby Havre-aux-Sauvages in August 1752.  The British deported them to France in late 1758. 

Jean's son Jean-Baptiste, born at Havre-St.-Pierre in October 1732, married Anne-Hippolythe, daughter of Paul Doiron and Marguerite Michel, either on Île St.-Jean or in France, and emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.450

Garceau

Jean Garceau dit Tranchmontagne, former soldier, a 1690s arrival, and his wife Marie Levron created what could have been a good-sized family in the colony.  Marie gave Jean three children, all sons, all of whom married.  The time and place of Jean's death has been lost to history, but his youngest son was born in March 1710, and his wife remarried at Annapolis Royal in December 1711, so Jean likely died there, age unrecorded, not long after the town fell to the British in October 1710.  His and Marie's descendants remained at Annapolis Royal or moved on to Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area and to nearby Chignecto.  They were among the few Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  If any of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Pierre-Jean dit Boutin married Agnès, daughter of Laurent Doucet and Jeanne Babin, at Annapolis Royal in January 1728. 

Jean's second son Daniel married Anne, or Jeanne, daughter of René Doucet and Marie Broussard, in c1730 probably at Annapolis Royal.

Jean's third and youngest son Joseph dit Richard married Marie, daughter of Philippe Lambert and Marie-Madeleine Boudrot, in c1730 probably at Annapolis Royal and moved on to Chepoudy and Chignecto.468

LaVache

François LaVache, a late 1690s "arrival" (he was born probably at Port-Royal in c1697, illigimately) and his wife Anne-Marie Vincent created a small family in the colony.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1726 and 1750, Marie gave François at least eight children, half of them sons, two of whom created families of their own, but other sources say she gave him six sons and three daughters between 1726 and 1753.  François took his family, including a married son, to Île St.-Jean in c1750 and settled at Anse-au-Matelot on the island's southeast coast.  The British deported most of the family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758.  François and three of his children died there the following year, victims, perhaps, of an epidemic that struck the port city.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Honoré, born in Nova Scotia in c1726, married Madeleine Daigle in c1746 perhaps at Minas.  They followed his father to Île St.-Jean in c1750 and were counted at Anse-au-Matelot near his parents in August 1752.  According to Bon Arsenault, Madeleine gave Honoré at least four sons between 1747 and 1757, but other sources say only two sons were born to them in 1755 and 1767.  Other sources say she gave him a daughter as well in c1750.  Honoré and his family either left Île St.-Jean before the island's dérangement in the summer of 1758, or they escaped the British roundup there that autumn.  According to Arsnenault, they made their way to the Gulf of St. Lawrence Shore, and, after Le Grand Dérangement, settled at Caraquet in present-day northeastern New Brunswick and at Bonaventure on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs in present-day Québec Province.

François's second son Alexis, born in Nova Scotia in c1730, was counted with his family at Anse-au-Matelot in August 1752.  He married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Pierre Aucoin and Isabelle Breau of Cobeguit, at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in February 1754.  According to Bona Arsenault, she gave him at least two daughters, in 1754 and 1756. 

François's third son Jean-Charles, born in Nova Scotia in c1732, was counted with his family at Anse-au-Matelot in August 1752.  He was deported with his family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758 and died there, age 27, in November 1759, before he could marry. 

François's fourth son Joseph, born in Nova Scotia in c1742, was counted with his family at Anse-au-Matelot in August 1752.  He was deported with his family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758 and died there, age 17, in December 1759.

François's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, born probably in Nova Scotia in c1749, was counted with his family at Anse-au-Matelot in August 1752.  He was deported with his family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758.  After the death of his father and three of his older siblings, he sailed aboard the brigantine Le Hazard with his mother and a younger brother to St.-Malo, where they arrived in May 1766. They settled at nearby St.-Servan.  According to Bona Arsenault, Jean-Baptiste was born in c1747 and was the son not of François but oldest son Honoré.  Arsenault also says Jean-Baptiste married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Zacharie Doiron and Anne Vicaire, at Bonaventure on the Baie des Chaleurs in January 1793, and that, between 1794 and 1806, she gave him seven children there, three sons and four daughters. 

François's sixth and youngest son Firmin-Grégoire, born probably at Anse-au-Matelot in c1753, was deported with his family to Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in late 1758.  After the death of his father and three of his older siblings, he sailed aboard the brigantine Le Hazard with his mother and an older brother to St.-Malo, where they arrived in May 1766. They settled at nearby St.-Servan.12

Darois

Jérôme Darois, a late 1690s arrival, and his wife Marie Gareau created a small family in the colony.  In 1706, during Queen Anne's War, the British captured Jérôme at Minas and held him as a prisoner of war in Boston, Massachusetts.  After the war, Jérôme returned to his home at Rivière-des-Habitants, Minas, and moved his family to Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area, still under French "control," probably to escape British authority.  Marie gave him 10 children, five sons and five daughters.  Their daughters married into the Breau, Gaudet, Trahan, Saulnier, and Pitre families.  Only two of Jérôme's fives sons created their own families.  Jérôme died at Petitcoudiac, date unrecorded.  His and Marie's descendants settled not only at Minas and Petitcoudiac, but also in the French Maritimes.  At least eight of Jérôme's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and France in 1785. 

Oldest son Jean married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Breau and Marguerite Babin, in c1722 probably at Petitcoudiac. 

Jérôme's second son Pierre-Jérôme died at Hôtel-Dieu de Québec in September 1757, in his late 50s, while in exile but did not marry.

Jérôme's third son Étienne married Anne, another daughter of Antoine Breau and Marguerite Babin, in c1725 probably at Petitcoudiac.

Jérôme's fourth and fifth sons Paul and Joseph evidently died young.452

Naquin

Jean Naquin dit L'Étoille, master tailor, a late 1690s arrival, and his wife Marguerite Bourg created a small family in the colony.  Marguerite gave Jean five children, at least three sons and a daughter.  Two of their sons created families of their own.  Jean died at Béllair, near Port-Royal, in February 1706, in his mid-40s.  His and Marguerite's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Cobeguit and on Île St.-Jean.  At least 12 of Jean dit L'Étoille's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.   

Oldest son Louis probably died young.

Jean's second son Jacques married Jeanne, daughter of Pierre Melanson and Marie Blanchard, in c1725 perhaps at Cobeguit and followed his younger brother to the French Maritimes in 1751.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jacques, now a widower, his six younger children, and his father-in-law, at Anse-à-Pinnet, on the south shore of Île St.-Jean.  Also there was Jacques's son Ambroise, now age 27, his wife Élisabeth/Isabelle, daughter of Claude Bourg and Judith Guérin, and Ambroise and Élisabeth's daughter Isabelle, age 2.  Ambroise and his sister Anne-Marie emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Jean's third and youngest son François married Angélique, daughter of René Blanchard and Anne Landry, in c1728 perhaps at Cobeguit and moved on to the French Maritimes in 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted them with 10 of their children and a grandson at Anse-à-Pinnet.  Son Charles and daughter Anne emigrated to Louisiana from France.453

Pothier

Jean Pothier, a late 1690s arrival, and his wives Anne Poirier and Marie-Madeleine Chiasson created a good-sized family in the colony.  First wife Anne gave him three children, two sons and a daughter.  Second wife Marie-Madeleine gave him seven more children, three sons and four daughters.  Five of his daughters by both of his wives married into the Deveau dit Dauphiné, Chênet dit La Garenne, Renaud dit Arnaud, Oudy, and Lamoureaux dit Rochefort families, many of them in the French Maritimes.  Five of Jean's sons by both of his wives created families of their own.  Jean died in 1724 or 1725, in his early 50s, place unrecorded, but it likely was on Île St.-Jean.  His children and grandchildren settled not only at Chignecto, but also on Île St.-Jean, where they lived at Havre-à-l'Anguille and Havre-St.-Pierre.  At least 10 of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Pierre, by first wife Anne Poirier, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1700s, married Marie Doucet in c1730 probably at Tintamarre, Chignecto, and moved on to Île St.-Jean.  Their son Pierre, fils emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Jean's second son Jean-Baptiste, by his first wife Anne Poirier, born probably at Chignecto in the early 1700s, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Hébert and Anne-Marie Boudrot, in c1729 probably at Chignecto, and died by 1752, place and age unrecorded.

Jean's third son Louis, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, born probably at Chignecto in c1710, married Cécile, daughter of Jean-Jacques Nuirat and Marie-Jeanne Bourgeois and widow of Pierre Poirier, at Beaubassin in February 1733, and settled at Havre-à-l'Anguille on Île St.-Jean soon after their marriage.  Louis died by January 1751, when Cécile remarried to Norman fisherman/habitant Julien Compagnon at Port-La-Joye on the island.  In August 1752, a French official counted Cécile, her second husband, and four of Louis's children--Christophe le jeune, age 18; Louis, fils, age 16; Marie-Henriette, called Henriette, age 13; and Suzanne, age 5--at Havre-aux-Sauvages on the north shore of the island west of Havre-St.-Pierre.  Louis's daughter Marie-Henriette emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Jean's fourth son Jacques-Christophe, called Christophe, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, born probably at Chignecto in c1713, married Anne, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Anne Landry, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre, on the north side of Île St.-Jean, in February 1740.  In August 1752, a French official counted Christophe, Anne, and five of their daughters at Havre-au-Sauvage, on the coast west of Havre-St.-Pierre.  Their daughter Charlotte emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Jean's fifth and youngest son Charles, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, born posthumously on Île St.-Jean in January 1725, married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Jean Caissie and his second wife Cécile Hébert, at Beaubassin in February 1746, but returned to his native Île St.-Jean.455

Tillard

François Tillard, a late 1690s arrival, and his wife Marguerite Leprince created a small family in the colony.  Marguerite gave him four children, a son and three daughters, all of whom married.  Their daughters married into the Trahan and Doiron families, two of them to brothers, and they all moved on to the French Maritimes.  François and Marguerite's only son also created his own family.  François died probably at Minas by June 1732, age unrecorded.  His and Marguerite's descendants settled not only at Minas, but also in the French Maritimes.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Only son François, fils married Marie, daughter of Jean Denis and Cécile Berteau, at Grand-Pré in June 1732 and remained there.  Marie gave him only daughters.456

Boutin

Joseph, also called Jean, Boutin, the fisherman, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie-Marguerite Lejeune dit Briard created what could have been a large family in the colony.  Between 1710 and 1732, Marie-Marguerite gave Joseph eight children, six sons and two daughters.  Neither of their daughters married, but five of their sons did.  The place and date of Joseph's death has been lost to history, but he was still alive in 1752, at age 76.  He, Marie-Marguerite, and their descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, where they were counted in 1703 and 1707; but also at La Hève on the Atlantic coast, where they were counted in 1708; at Pigiguit, where they were counted in 1714; and on Baie-des-Espagnols on Île Royale, where they settled in 1749-50.  At least eight of the fisherman's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born probably at Pigiguit in April 1710, married Françoise, daughter of Jean Pitre and Françoise Babin, in c1731 probably at Pigiguit.  They lived at Pigiguit and then followed his father and brothers to Baie-des-Espagnols.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1732 and 1751, Françoise gave Joseph, fils eight children, five sons and three daughters.  In April 1752, a French official counted Joseph at Baie-des-Espagnols.  The official noted that Joseph, a ploughman, was age 42, that his wife also was age 42, and that they lived with eight children:  Joseph III, age 20; Euphrosine, age 18; Ambroise, age 15; Bernard, age 13; Paul le jeune, age 9; Marie, age 6; Anne, age 5; and Michel, age 1.  The offical also noted that their "land was verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost [Des Herbiers was the King's commissioner, or commandant, for Île Royale, and Prevost was the colony's financial commissary]."  Joseph, fils died on Île Royale in June 1755 of an abcès qui a crévez dans le corps (an abscess that burst in his body).  One wonders what happened to the family after 1758. 

Joseph's second son Eustache, born probably at Pigiguit in January 1712, married Agathe, daughter of François Viger and Marie Mius d'Azy, in c1734 probably at Pigiguit and followed his family to Baie-des-Espagnols.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1735 and 1750, Agathe gave Eustache (Arsenault calls him Antoine) six children, four sons and two daughters, but other records give them another daughter.  In April 1752, a French official counted Antoine Boulin, as he called him, and his family at Baie-des-Espagnols on Île Royale.  The official noted that Antoine was a ploughman, age 40, wife Agathe, who he called a Bige, also was age 40, and that they were living with seven children:  Jean-Baptiste, age 17; Ruffine, age 15; Qualier, age 12; Angélique, age 9; Joseph, age 7; François, age 5; and Agathe, age 18 months.  The official also noted that the family had been "Three years in the Colony come September," that "They have rations for 33 mos., and that their "land was given verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost."  One wonders what became of the family after 1758. 

Joseph's third son, unnamed, died young.

Joseph's fourth son Pierre, born in the late 1710s or early 1720s probably at Pigiguit, married Marie-Marcelle, daughter of Claude Trahan l'aîné and Marie-Louise Tillard, in c1745 probably at Pigiguit.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1746 and 1749, Marie gave Pierre three children, a son and two daughters.  Pierre died before April 1752 probably at Baie-des-Espagnols.  That month, a French official counted Marie-Marcelle there with three of their children--Marie-Josèphe, age 6; Anne, also called Gillette-Théotiste, age 5; and Alexis, age 3.  Marie-Marcelle remarried to Jean Pineau probably on the island in the 1750s.  The British transported her, her second husband, and her Boutin daughters aboard the Duke William to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  Marie-Marcelle and daughter Marie-Josèphe Boutin died at sea.  Daughter Anne Boutin, age 12 now, made it to the port, but she died in a St.-Malo hospital in November 1758 probably from the rigors of the crossing.  Pierre's only son Alexis, who would have been age 9 in 1758, was not with his mother and sisters when they crossed on the Duke William, so he may have died on the island before deportation.  If so, his father's line of the family died with him. 

Joseph's fifth son Charles, born in c1723 probably at Pigiguit, married Marie-Josèphe, called Josèphe, daughter of Paul Guédry and Anne Mius d'Azy, in c1746 probably at Pigiguit and followed his family to Baie-des-Espagnols.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1747 and 1752, Marie-Josèphe gave Charles three children, a son and two daughters.  In April 1752, a French official counted Charles and his family at Baie-des-Espagnols.  Charles, called a ploughman, was age 29, his wife, called Josèphe, was age 28, and they lived with three children--Jean-Charles, age 5; Olivé or Olivier, age 3; and Marie-Françoise, age 3 months--and Josèphe's sister Eleine, age 28.  The official also noted that their "land was given verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost."  In c1754, Charles, his family, and younger brother Paul and his family returned to British Nova Scotia.  After taking an unqualified oath of allegiance at Halifax, British officials sent them to Lunenburg down the coast, where they were living on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  In December 1755, the British deported Charles, Paul, and their families to North Carolina.  Charles died during exile.  His son and a daughter emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767.  The daughter, Marie-Françoise, married into the Segovia family at San Gabriel on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Charles's son survived childhood, but he did not create a family of his own.

Only son Pierre-Olivier, called Olivier, born at Pigiguit or Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, in c1749, followed his family to British Nova Scotia, Lunenburg, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Maryland and his sister and uncle to Louisiana in 1767.  He settled at Ascension on the Mississippi above New Orleans, where he was counted on the left, or east, bank of the river in August 1770.  He was still single.  He evidently was the Boutin who died at New Orleans in February 1773, in his early 20s.  His father's line of the family died with him. 

Joseph's sixth and youngest son Pierre-Paul, called Paul, born probably at Pigiguit in c1727, married Ursule, daughter of Augustin Guédry and Jeanne Hébert of L'Assomption, Pigiguit, probably at Baie-des-Espagnols in November 1750.  They settled near his older brother Charles.  In April 1752, a French official counted Paul and his family at Baie-des-Espagnols.  Paul, described as a ploughman, was age 25, his wife, called Eustache, was age 21.  They had no children but were living with Pierre Guédry, "their brother," age 11, Ursule's younger brother.  The official also noted that the couple's "land was given verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost."  They followed brother Charles to Lunenberg and Georges Island, Halifax, British Nova Scotia; North Carolina; Pennsylvania; and Maryland.  In 1767, Paul and his family, which now included four children--Marguerite, age 15; Joseph, age 14; Susanne-Catherine, age 5; and Paul, age 3--emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland and settled at San Gabriel on the Mississippi above New Orleans.  Ursule was pregnant on the voyage from Maryland, which lasted from April to mid-July; daughter Marie-Julienne was born at San Gabriel in February 1768, seven months after the family reached the Spanish colony.  Oldest daughter Marguerite married into the Savoie family in Louisiana.  In the late 1760s or early 1770s, Paul took his family to the Opelousas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin, where, in his late 40s or early 50s, he remarried to Madeleine Ducrest.  He died at Opelousas in February 1801, age 74.  His two sons by first wife Ursule married into the Trahan and Teller families and settled at Opelousas.  One of their lines endured on the prairies, and all Acadian Boutins in the Bayou State descend from that line.457

Bonnevie

Jacques Bonnevie dit Beaumont, retired corporal in the troupes de la marine, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Françoise Mius d'Azy created a small family in the colony.  Françoise gave Jacques five children, two sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Hélie dit Nouvelle, Lord, and Duguay families, one of them on Île St.-Jean.  Only one of the corporal's sons created his own family.  In December 1732, when he was reported as "not in condition to serve, nor to earn his living, because of a wound to his thigh he received in the King's service," Jacques was placed on half-pay at age 72 by French authorities on Île Royale and died at Hôpital de Louisbourg the following April.  His and Françoise's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and in the French Maritimes, but also at Chignecto.  At least one of Jacques dit Beaumont's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but no family line was established in the Spanish colony. 

Older son Jacques dit Jacquot dit Beaumont married Marguerite, daughter of Alexandre Lord and Marie-Françoise Barrieau, in c1729 perhaps at Chignecto; remarried to Françoise, daughter of Jean Comeau and Madeleine Amireau, in c1745, probably at Chignecto, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Anne dite Nannette, daughter of Paul Melanson and Marie Thériot and widow of Jacques-François Thébeau, in c1755 probably at Chignecto on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  One of Jacquot's daughters by first wife Marguerite emigrated to Louisiana from France via South Carolina, Restigouche, Halifax, and Île Miquelon. 

Jacques's younger son Charles evidently died young.458

Vigneau dit Maurice

Maurice Vigneau, the carpenter and fishing master, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marguerite Comeau created what could have been a large family in the colony.  Marguerite gave Maurice 11 children, seven sons and four daughters.  One of their daughters married into the Poirier family.  Six of Maurice's sons married, three of them to sisters.  Along with other Port-Royal fishermen, Maurice was compelled by colonial authorities in late 1717 to take an unqualified oath of allegiance to the British king in order to fish in Acadian waters.  A few years later, between 1719 and 1722, he took his family to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, where he was addressed by French authorities as Sr. Maurice Vigneau.  Outspoken about religious matters, he ran afoul of an officious priest there but was exonerated by the Bishop of Québec.  The old fishing master died between February 1746 and November 1747, in his early 70s, probably at Port-Toulouse.  His and Marguerite's descendants settled at Annapolis Royal, on Île Royale, and at Chignecto.  Some of his sons took their father's given name Maurice as their surname.  If any of Maurice's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none carried the family's name there. 

Oldest son Jacques dit Jacob Maurice returned to Nova Scotia and married Marguerite, daughter of Abraham Arseneau and his first wife Jeanne Gaudet, after 1726 probably at Chignecto, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Michel Bourg and Élisabeth Melanson and widow of Guillaume Cyr, in c1740 likely at Chignecto, where they remained.  At Beaubassin, Jacques worked as a merchant with his own vessel.  During King George's War, he cooperated with both the French and the British, maintaining his own version of Acadian neutrality.  Unlike most of his fellow Acadians, Jacques dit Jacob was literate.  He also was fluent in English as well as French and Mi'kmaq, which stood him in good stead during Le Grand Dérangement

Maurice's second son Jean dit Maurice married Louise-Isabelle, another daughter of Abraham Arseneau and Jeanne Gaudet, in c1733, probably at Chignecto and returned to the French Maritimes. 

Maurice's third son François died young.

Maurice's fourth son Joseph dit Maurice married Catherine, yet another daughter of Abraham Arseneau and Jeanne Gaudet, at Beaubassin in January 1735 and moved on to the French Maritimes.

Maurice's fifth son Jean-Baptiste dit Maurice married Agnès dite Anne, daughter of Michel Poirier and Madeleine Bourgeois, in c1739, perhaps at Chignecto and moved on to the French Maritimes. 

Maurice's sixth son Simon married Marie-Anne, daughter of Charles Arseneau and Françoise Mirande, at Beaubassin in January 1745. 

Maurice's seventh and youngest son Charles left his native Port-Toulouse, married Félicité-Cécile, daughter of Pierre Mignot and Marie-Catherine Ouellet, at Beaubassin in February 1746 and died by January 1753, in his late 20s or early 30s, place unrecorded.459

Brasseur

Mathieu Brasseur dit La Citardy, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Célestin dit Bellemère created what could have been a large family in the colony.  Between the early 1700s and the late 1720s, Jeanne gave Mathieu 11 children, five sons and six daughters, all of whom created their own families.  Their daughters married into the Doucet, Bernard, Henry dit Robert, Poyer dit Lapintade, Doiron, Benoit, Aucoin, and Poirier families, and one of them emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland.  Mathieu, who was fathering children by his young wife while in his late 70s, died at Minas in May 1733, in his early 80s.  His and Jeanne's descendants settled at Minas, Chignecto, Chepoudy, and on Île St.-Jean.  Three of their sons favored different surnames.  Eleven of Mathieu dit La Citardy's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in the late 1760s and from France in 1785.  After Le Grand Dérangement, members of the family, some of whom called themselves LeBrasseur, also could be found in Gaspésie on the Baie des Chaleurs, once a part of greater Acadia.

Oldest son Mathieu dit Le Brasseur, born probably at Minas in c1705, married Anne-Marie, daughter of Jean Pitre and Françoise Babin, in c1727, probably at Minas.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1728 and 1752, Anne-Marie gave Mathieu 11 children, five sons and six daughters.  They family moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Mathieu, Anne-Marie, and their 11 children at Anse-du-Nord-Ouest on the south shore of the island.  They escaped the British in 1758 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and then at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  When the British attacked the French stronghold there in the summer of 1760, they rounded up 300 of the Acadians at Restigouche.  Mathieu and his family were not among them.  They were among the famille ordinaires counted at Restigouche in October 1760.  After the war with Britain finally ended, members of the family settled in nearby Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs in present-day Québec Province.  Five of Mathieu's daughters married into the Lejeune, Laroque, Tessier, Cyr, Dickson, and Chapados families on Île St.-Jean, at Restigouche, and in Gaspésie.  Four of his five sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre, born at Minas in c1731, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and married Marguerite-Josèphe, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Gaudet and Marie-Josèphe Darois, at Port-La-Joye on the island in late August 1752, soon after being counted with his family at Anse-du-Nord-Ouest.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1754 and 1778, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre six children, two sons and four daughters.  After escaping the British in 1758, they followed his family to Restigouche.  After the war with Britain ended, they settled at Paspébiac in Gaspésie.  Pierre's daughters married into the Duguay, Langlois, Lenteige, and Laviolette families in Gapésie.  One of his sons created his own families. 

Older son Joseph, born probably at Restigouche in c1759, married Marie Huard probably in Gaspésie in the 1780s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1786 and 1792, Marie gave Joseph four children, a son and three daughters.  Their son survived childhood but did not marry.

Only son Joseph, fils, born at Gaspésie in 1788, died in 1833, age 45, still a bachelor.  His father's and grandfather's family lines may have died with him. 

Mathieu's second son François, born at Minas in c1737, followed his family to Île St.-Jean.  He died on the island in February 1757, age 20, before he could marry. 

Mathieu's third son Mathurin, born at Minas in c1739, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, Restigouche, and Gaspésie.  He married Catherine-Thérèse, daughter of René Duguay and Marguerite LeBreton, at Paspébiac in c1764.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1780, Catherine gave Mathurin five children, two sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Denis, Roussy, and Loiselle families at Paspébiac.  Mathurin's two sons created their own families.

Older son Joseph-Mathurin, born probably at Paspébiac in c1777, married Tharsile-Euphrosine, daughter of Jacques Duguay and Véronique Chapados, in a civil ceremony at Paspébiac in September 1801.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1802 and 1813, Tharsile gave Joseph six children, two sons and four daughters.

Mathurin's younger son Emmaneul, born probably ast Paspébiac in c1780, married Angélique, daughter of Léon Roussy and Anne Chapados, at Paspébiac in November 1802.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1804 and 1823, Angélique gave Emmanuel nine children, two sons and seven daughters. 

Mathieu's fourth son François-Xavier, born at Minas in c1741, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, Restigouche, and Gaspésie.  He married Louise, daughter of Joseph Gauthier and Marguerite Bujold, at Bonaventure near Paspébiac in March 1780.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1782 and 1796, Louise gave François-Xavier four children, two sons and two daughters.  One of their daughters married into the Ferrand family at Paspébiac.  Both of François's sons created their own families. 

Older son François, fils, born in Gaspésie in c1782, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Castilloux and Jeanne Chapados, at Paspébiac in January 1809.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1808 and 1809, Marguerite gave François, fils two sons. 

François-Xavier's younger son Nicolas, born in Gaspésie in c1790, married Élizabeth, daughter of Robert Loiselle and Anne-Élizabeth Roussy, at Paspébiac in February 1817.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1819 and 1837, Anne-Élizabeth gave Nicolas nine children, two sons and seven daughters. 

Mathieu's fifth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Minas in c1746, followed his family to Île St.-Jean, Restigouche, and Gaspésie.  According to Arsenault, Jean-Baptiste married Charlotte Aubry probably at Paspébiac, date unrecorded, and died there in February 1818, age 72. 

Mathieu's second son Cosme or Côme dit Brasseux, born at Minas in December 1712, married Élisabeth, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau le jeune and Anne-Marie Aucoin, at Grand-Pré in January 1738.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1738 and 1746, Élisabeth gave Cosme four children, two sons and two daughters, but other records give them two more sons and three more daughters, nine children in all.  The British deported the family to Maryland in 1755.  Their older surviving son married there.  Cosme's widow and seven of her children, including her married son, emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767.  Both of Cosme's surviving sons created vigorous family lines in the Spanish colony.

Older son Pierre, born at Minas in c1742, followed his family to Maryland, where he married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, Richard.  They and their infant daughter Marguerite followed his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana in 1767.  They settled with them at San Gabriel on the Mississippi above New Orleans, where Élisabeth gave Pierre more children.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Capdeville, and LeBlanc families.  Two of Pierre's three sons, all born in Louisiana, married into the Gautreaux and Landry families on the river, where their name evolved into Brasset.  Two of Pierre's grandsons joined their cousins on to the western prairies during the early antebellum period. 

Cosme's younger son Blaise, born at Minas in c1752, followed his family to Maryland and his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana in 1767.  He settled with them at San Gabriel on the river, but he did not remain there.  Later in the decade or in the early 1770s, he crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Opelousas District and married Marie-Anne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Préjean and his first wife Madeleine Martin, probably at Opelousas in the mid-1770s.  Their daughters married into the Landry, Prather, Richard, Smith, and Wood family.  Two of Blaise's four sons married into the Carmouche and Porché families and settled in what became St. Landry Parish. 

Mathieu's third son Jean, born at Minas in December 1719, married Madeleine, daughter of Philippe Roy and Cécile Mazerolle, in c1750 probably at Minas.  One wonders what happened to them after 1755. 

Mathieu's fourth son Claude dit Paul dit Mathieu, born probably at Minas in c1722, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Bertrand l'aîné and Marie-Françoise Léger, at Beaubassin in August 1746.  They evidently escaped the British in 1755 and found refuge in Canada.  Claude died Ste.-Thérèse de Blainville northwest of Montréal in August 1799, in his late 70s.    

Mathieu's fifth and youngest son Joseph, born at Minas in March 1726, married Marie-Rose, daughter of Jean Daigre and Marie-Madeleine Landry, at Grand-Pré in October 1748.  Between 1750 and 1763, Marie-Rose gave Joseph three children, all daughters.  The British deported the family to Virginia in 1755 and sent them on to England in 1756, where they languished at Southampton for seven years.  In May 1763, Joseph, Marie-Rose, and their three daughters, along with dozens of other Acadians in England, were repatriated to St.-Malo, France, aboard the transport L'Ambition.  The family settled at nearby St.-Suliac.  They were part of the settlement scheme in Poitou during the early 1770s and retreated to Nantes with other Poitou Acadians in March 1776.  Marie-Rose died at Nantes in June 1781, age 50.  Two of her and Joseph's daughters, Marie and Osite, emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.  Marie married into the Trahan family in the Spanish colony, sothe blood, at least, of this line of the family endured in the Bayou State.460

Carret

Pierre Carret, the former soldier, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Angélique Chiasson created what could have been another large family in the colony.  Angélique gave her soldier 13 children, six sons and seven daughters.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard dit Gentilhomme, Doucet, Hugon, Martin, Landry, and Henry families.  Four of Pierre's six sons created their own families.  Pierre died by October 1754, age and place unrecorded.  His and Angélique's descendants settled not only at Chignecto, but also in the French Maritimes.  None of the soldier's descendants seems to have emigrated to Louisiana. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils married Anne, daughter of Pierre Caissie dit Roger and Marie-Thérèse Mirande, in c1733 probably at Chignecto.

Pierre's second son Jacques evidently died young.

Pierre's third son Jean married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Michel Poirier and Françoise Arseneau, at Beaubassin in November 1740. 

Pierre's fourth son Joseph married in c1748 a woman whose name has been lost to history, and remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Lapierre and Marie-Josèphe Caissie, in August 1763, place unrecorded. 

Pierre's fifth son Germain married Catherine, daughter of Charles Bourgeois and Madeleine Cormier, at Chignecto in October 1754. 

Pierre's sixth and youngest son Charles-Ignace, soon after he was pronounced a lunatic in South Carolina, died in January 1756 while in exile evidently before he could marry.461

Moulaison

Gabriel Moulaison dit Recontre, an early 1700s arrival, and his legitimate wife Marie Aubois created what could have become a good-sized family in the colony.  Marie gave him nine children, four sons and five daughters, all of whom created families of their own.  Gabriel's natural daughter Marie, by Marie Daigre, married into the Henshaw or Hansole family.  His daughters by Marie Aubois married into the Bertrand, Mius d'Entremont, Doucet, and Viger families.  Gabriel died by July 1753, place unrecorded, perhaps at Pobomcoup, in his mid- or late 60s.  His descendants settled at Pobomcoup, Cap-Sable, and Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal.  They were among the few Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  A least six of Gabriel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Oldest son Pierre married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Doucet and Marie-Madeleine Robichaud, in c1750, place unrecorded.  Pierre's widow and one of his sons emigrated to Louisiana from France. 

Gabriel's second son Jacques married Cécile, daughter of Ambroise Melanson and Marguerite Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in November 1743.  One of theirs sons and one of their daughters emigrated to Louisiana from France.

Gabriel's third son Joseph married Jeanne, daughter of Augustin Comeau and Jeanne Levron, at Cap-Sable in July 1753.

Gabriel's fourth and youngest son Gabriel, fils married Anne-Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Porlier and Anne-Marie de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, at Cap-Sable in July 1753.462

Gentil

Élie Gentil, mason, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Cécile Martin dit Barnabé, created a small family in the colony.  Cécile gave him only two children, a daughter and a son.  Daughter Anne-Marie, or Marie-Anne, born at Port-Royal in February 1704, married Jean-Baptiste, daughter of Michel Haché dit Gallant and Anne Cormier of Chignecto, at Beaubassin in February 1719.  Anne followed her husband to Île St.-Jean in the early 1720s, among the first Acadians to go there.  A French official counted her, now a widow, on upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior in August 1752, age 48.  With her were seven of her younger Haché children, including a son, Louis, then age 11, who emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

Élie's son, name unrecorded, born probably at Port-Royal before 1717, died young, so the blood of this family, at least, survived in greater Acadia.463

Clémenceau

Jean Clémenceau, the retired sergeant of troupes de la marine, an early 1700s arrival, created with his wives Anne Roy and Marguerite Corporon a small family in the colony.  First wife Anne gave him six children, two sons and four daughters.  Second wife Marguerite gave him another son.  His daughters married into the Martin, Héon, Lavigne, and Lejeune dit Briard families.  Two of sergeant's three sons created their own families.  The place and date of Jean's death has been lost to history.  His descendants settled at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, Minas, and in the French Maritimes.  At least two of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.   

Oldest son Louis married Anne, daughter of Jean Caissie and Cécile Hébert, in c1739, place unrecorded.

Jean's second son Jean, fils evidently died young.

Jean's third and youngest son Jean-Pierre, by second wife Marguerite Corporon, married Marie, daughter of René Martin and Marie Mignier and widow of François Richard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1735, and remarried to Françoise, daughter of Claude Gautrot and Marguerite Landry, at Grand-Pré in October 1747.  Two of Jean-Pierre's daughters by his second wife emigrated to Louisiana from France.464

Maucaïre

Yves Maucaïre, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Élisabeth Levron created a small family in the colony.  Élisabeth gave Yves three children, a son and two daughters, but only the older daughter married, into the Forest family.  Yves died at Annapolis Royal in June 1727, age 50.  His and Élisabeth's descendants remained at Annapolis Royal.   If any of them emigrated to Louisiana, none carried the family's name there. 

Only son Charles evidently died young.465

Orillon dit Champagne

Charles Orillon dit Champagne, mason, soldier, and caretaker, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie-Anne Bastarache created what could have been a good-sized family in the colony.  Marie-Anne gave Charles nine children, seven sons and two daughters, including a pair of twins.  Their younger daughter married into the Hébert family.  Five of their seven sons created their own families.  Charles dit Champagne died at Annapolis Royal in December 1742, age 90.  His and Marie-Anne's descendants settled at Annapolis Royal and Chignecto and were among the few Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  Some of Charles dit Champagne's sons used their father's dit as their surname.  At least two of Charles's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from French St.-Domingue in 1765. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste dit Champagne married Cécile, daughter of René Labauve and Anne Lejeune, in c1735 probably at Annapolis Royal. 

Charles's second and third sons Jean and Joseph, twins, died in infancy. 

Charles's fourth son Charles dit Champagne married Anne, daughter of François Richard and Anne Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in September 1743, and remarried to Marie, daughter of Louis Doucet and Marguerite Girouard and widow of Jean-Baptiste Gaudet, at Nicolet, across from Trois-Rivières, Canada, in June 1763. 

Charles's fifth son Pierre dit Champagne married Brigitte, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Brun dit Le Brun and Anne Gautrot, at Annapolis Royal in January 1742. 

Charles's sixth son Joseph married Marguerite, daughter of François Dugas and Claire Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in February 1746.  One of their sons and one of their daughters emigrated to Louisiana probably from French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti.

Charles's seventh and youngest son Jean-Baptiste dit Champagne married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Deveau and Cécile Caissie, at Beaubassin in October 1746.466

Mouton

Sr. Jean Mouton, surgeon, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie Girouard created a good-sized family in the colony.  Marie gave the surgeon 10 children, seven sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Hébert and Richard families.  Five of Sr. Jean's seven sons married, two of them to sisters.  The place and date of Sr. Jean's death has been lost to history, but it probably was at Chignecto.  His and Marie's descendants remained at Chignecto, among the few Acadian families in the area who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  At least eight of the surgeon's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and Martinique in the late 1760s. 

Oldest son Jean, fils married Marguerite, daughter of Louis Poirier and Cécile Mignot, at Beaubassin in January 1734. 

Jean's second son Jacques married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Caissie and Marie-Thérèse Mirande, at Beaubassin in November 1734.  One of their sons emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax. 

Jean's third son Charles married Anne, daughter of Pierre Comeau and Susanne Bézier and widow of Sylvain Bourgeois, in c1755 probably at Chignecto.  He, his wife, and a son emigrated to Louisiana from Martinique.

Jean's fourth and fifth sons Justinien and Pierre died young.  

Jean's sixth son Salvator married Anne, daughter of Jean Bastarache and Angélique Richard, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752, settled at Chignecto, found refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Forest and ____, at New Orleans in 1768. 

Jean's seventh and youngest son Louis married Marie-Modeste, another daughter of Jean Bastarache and Angélique Richard, at Restigouche in October 1760 while in exile and emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax.467

Thébeau

Pierre Thébeau, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie-Jeanne Comeau created a small family in the colony.  Marie-Jeanne gave Pierre two children, a son and a daughter, both of whom married.  Their daughter Marguerite, in fact, was the second wife of René LeBlanc, fils, notary of Grand-Pré, who was 22 years her senior.  She gave him 17 children, including a set of triplets and three sets of twins!  The time and place of Pierre's death is unrecorded, but it probably was at Minas, where his and Marie-Jeanne's descendants settled.  They were among the few Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Only son Jacques-François married Anne dite Nannette, daughter of Paul Melanson and Marie Thériot, at Grand-Pré in August 1733, remained there, and died probably at Minas before 1755, in his 40s.  Nannette gave him at least eight children, four sons and four daughters.469

Samson

Gabriel Samson, fils, navigator and carpenter, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Martin dit Barnabé created a small family in greater Acadia.  Jeanne gave him 11 children, three sons and eight daughters, including two sets of twins, at Port-Royal and they moved on to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in the early 1720s.  Four of their daughters married into the Richard, La Chaume, Lécuyer dit Le Bénécat, Le Large, and Pinet families, all on Île Royale.  All of Gabriel's sons created families of their own on the island.  Gabriel, fils died at Port-Toulouse by 1757, in his 70s, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.  The British deported his family to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  If any of his descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Michel, born at Port-Royal in July 1706, followed his family to Port-Toulouse in the early 1720s.  He married Anne dite Jeanne, daughter of François Testard dit Paris and Marie Doiron, at Port-Toulouse in c1729.  A French official counted them there in February 1752.  Oldest daughter Anne married a Prejean widower probably at Port-Toulouse after February 1752.  The British deported Michel and his family to France in 1758; they were living at La Rochelle in 1761.  Daughter Anne, along with her younger son, died at sea aboard the British transport Queen of Spain.  After the war ended, Michel and what remained of his family returned to North America and settled on Île St.-Pierre off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Michel drowned in the sinking of the Neptune, perhaps a fishing boat, in April 1764, age 57. 

Oldest son Jean, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1734, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Gervais Bricette and Marie L'Esperance, probably at Port-Toulouse in c1755.  According to Albert J. Robichaux, Jr., Marie-Josèphe gave Jean two sons--Jean, fils and Michel--on the island in 1756 and 1758.  The British deported the family to St.-Malo aboard the Queen of Spain in 1758.  Both of the sons died at sea, Marie-Josèphe died in the hospital at St.-Malo within a week of her arrival, and Jean, père died at St.-Malo the following March, age 25, probably from the rigors of the crossing. 

Michel's second son Jean-Fabien, called Fabien, born probably at Port-Toulouse in c1741, was likely the Jean, age 17, who was counted with his family at Port-Toulouse in February 1752.  Fabien also was deported to France in 1758 aboard the Queen of Spain, but, unlike his older brother and sister, he survived the crossing.  He settled at St.-Malo probably with relatives.  In 1760, he volunteered for privateer duty.  The British took him prisoner that June aboard Le Hardy, after which he disappears from history.

Gabriel's second son Mathieu, born at Port-Royal in August 1709, followed his family to Port-Toulouse.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Pouget dit Lapierre and Françoise Moyse, in c1730 probably at Port-Toulouse.  A French official counted them there in February 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Gabriel's third and youngest son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1717, followed his family to Port-Toulouse, where he married Marie, daughter of Nicolas Préjean and his first wife Marguerite Broussard, after August 1752; Marie's father remarried to Charles's niece Anne Samson probably at Port-Toulouse after August 1752.  The British deported Charles and Marie to St.-Malo, France, aboard the transport Queen of Spain in late 1758.  Charles died at sea, and Marie died at her father's home in St.-Malo three and a half months after her arrival.473

Pouget

Pierre Pouget dit Lapierre, coppersmith and retired soldier, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Françoise Moyse created a small family in greater Acadia.  Françoise gave the coppersmith 11 children, four sons and seven daughters, at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and Port-Toulouse, Île Royale.  Six of their daughters married into the Martel, Samson, Marchand dit Poitiers, Langlois, Bois, Josse, and Petitpas families, most of them at Port-Toulouse.  Two of Pierre's sons created families of their own.  Pierre and Françoise settled at Port-Toulouse, where the family was counted as early as 1726.  As a result, they were not "typical" Fundy Acadians.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Pierre-Jacques, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1714, followed his family to Île Royale and married Madeleine, daughter of François Langlois and Madeleine Comeau and sister of one of his sister's husbands, at Port-Toulouse on the island in c1737.  A French official counted them on the north side of Île Madame off the southern coast of Île Royale in Feburary 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Pierre's second Charles-François, born at Annapolis Royal in December 1715, evidently died young.

Pierre's third son Joseph, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1720, also died young. 

Pierre's fourth and youngest son Jean, born at Annapolis Royal in June 1722, followed his family to Port-Toulouse and married Marguerite, another daughter of François Langlois and Madeleine Comeau, there in c1750.  A French official counted them on Île Madame in February 1752.  Jean remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Claude Girouard and Madeleine Vincent, at Port-Toulouse in c1753.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758.  Jean died before 1770, no place given.471

Marchand

Louis Marchand or Marcheguy dit Poitiers, former corporal, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie Godin dit Châtillon created a small family in greater Acadia.  Marie gave him five children, two sons and three daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Pinet and Briand families, both at Port-Toulouse.  Both of Louis's sons created families of their own.  The time and place of Louis's death has been lost to history, but it likely was at Port-Toulouse, where he took his family by c1716 and where most of his descendants settled.  One of his sons also settled in Canada before Le Grand Dérangement.  One of Louis's Pinet granddaughters emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785, but none of his other descendants took the Marchand family's name there. 

Older son François-Louis, called Louis, born at Port-Royal in July 1706, probably followed his family to Port-Toulouse, but he did not remain there.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Vigneau and Madeleine Pichet, at Québec in June 1728.  They were still living there in 1744. 

Son Joseph, born probably at Québec in the late 1720s or early 1730s, left Canada and "returned" to Île Royale.  Described as a "second capitaine de navire," he married Jeanne, daughter of Pierre Arrichoury Le Blanc and Anne Raux, at Louisbourg in October 1751.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

Louis's younger son Jean dit Poitiers, born at Annapolis Royal in December 1711, followed his family to Port-Toulouse and married Marie-Geneviève, called Geneviève, daughter of Pierre Pouget and Françoise Moyse, at the port in c1740.  A French official found them still there, with two young sons, in February 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758.474

Picot

Michel Picot dit La Rigeur, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Élisabeth Levron created a small family in the colony.  Élisabeth gave him two children, a son and a daughter, both of whom married.  Their daughter married into the Thibeau family.  Michel dit La Rigeur died in c1711 probably at Annapolis Royal, age unrecorded.  His and Élisabeth's descendants remained at Annapolis Royal and were among the few Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes.  If any of Michel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Only son Michel, fils, born posthumously, married Anne, "natural" daughter of Louis Blin and Marie Daigre, at Annapolis Royal in February 1731 and settled there.  Their daughter Marguerite married Jean, son of Pierre Guédry dit Grivois and Marguerite Brassaud, pobably at Annapolis Royal in c1755.  The young couple were deported to Massachusetts soon after their marriage and resettled at St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan, Canada, in 1767.475

Flan

Jean-François Flan, former military clerk for the Port-Royal garrison, an early 1700s arrival, created with his wife Marie Dupuis a small family in the colony.  Marie gave Jean-François five children, a son and four daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the LeBlanc and Landry families.  Jean-François's son did not marry.  The date and place of the former clerk's death has been lost to history, but it probably was at Minas, where he moved his family in the late 1710s.  They were among the few Acadian families who did not retreat to the French Maritimes before Le Grand Dérangement.  At least one of Jean-François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767, but no family line was established there. 

Only son François-Marie evidently died young.472

Testard

François Testard dit Paris, carpenter and navigator, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie Doiron created a small family in greater Acadia.  Marie gave François seven children, three sons and four daughters.  Their daughters married into the Pinet, Daigre, Samson, Fizel, and Frétel families, all on Île Royale.  Only one of François dit Paris's sons created his own family.  François died in 1726 probably on Île Royale, where he had moved his family from Annapolis Royal by 1715.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son François, fils, born at Port-Royal in November 1708, died at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in January 1733, age 24, before he could marry.

François's second son Pierre-Joseph, born at Port-Royal in November 1710, died by October 1734, in his early 20s, probably on Île Royale before he could marry.

François's third and youngest son Jean-Baptiste dit Paris, born at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1725.  In 1768, the British deported him to Cherbourg, France, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Granger and Marie LeBlanc and widow of Augustin Landry, at Cherbourg, France, in May 1759, but they did not remain in France.  Jean-Baptiste died at Fort-Royal on the French-controlled island of Martinique in September 1763, in his late 30s.  One wonders if he fathered any children.476

Part

Pierre Part dit La Forest, the soldier turned blacksmith, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Dugas created a small family in the colony.  Jeanne gave him six children, four sons and two daughters.  Their daughters married into the Jobelet dit Bistoury and Benoit families, one of them at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale.  Three of Pierre's sons created families of their own.  Pierre and Jeanne left Port-Royal soon after it fell to the British and were among the earliest Acadians to move to the French Maritimes.  They and their descendants settled at Louisbourg and at Niganiche and Port-d'Orléans, far up the Atlantic coast, and on Rivière St.-Jean in present-day New Brunswick.  At least six of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and France in 1785. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils married Angélique, daughter of Gabriel Godin and Andrée-Angélique Jeanne, in c1737 probably on Rivière St.-Jean.  Five of their children, all born on Rivière St.-Jean, emigrated to Louisiana as orphans. 

Pierre's second son Jean married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Roy and Marie Bergeron, in c1735 probably on Île Royale, and died in late May 1758, on the eve of the islands' dérangement

Pierre's third son Eustache married Anastasie, daughter of Joseph Godin dit Bellefontaine dit Beauséjour and Marie-Anne Bergeron, in c1750, probably on Rivière St.-Jean.  In late winter of 1759, during Le Grand Dérangement, Moses Hazen's New-English Rangers murdered wife Anastasie and three of her and Eustache's children in a raid on St.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas.  Eustache likely was a witness to the killing of his loved one.  The rangers spared at least one of his children and transported them, along with other captives, to the prison compound on Georges Island at Halifax.  The following November, Governor Charles Lawrence deported them, along with Acadians captured at Cap-Sable, to England, but British authorities sent them on to Cherbourg, France, where they arrived in mid-January 1760.  After Church authorities certified his status as a widower, Eustache remarried to cousin Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Melanson and Marie-Madeleine Petitot dit Saint-Seine, at Cherbourg in February 1761.  One of Eustache's daughters by his first wife married into the Delaune family at Cherbourg and emigrated to Louisiana from France.477

Langlois

François Langlois, goldsmith and navigator, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Madeleine Comeau created a large family in greater Acadia.  Madeleine gave him a dozen children, five sons and seven daughters.  François moved his family from Annapolis Royal to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, by 1722, and they remained in the French Maritimes.  Six of their daughters married into the Josse dit Saint-Brieuc, Lécuyer dit Langlois, Detcheverry dit Miquemak, Maillet, Pouget, Bénard, and Barrieau families, most of them at Port-Toulouse.  Four of François's sons created families of their own.  In February 1752, François and Madeleine were living on the north coast of Île Madame south of Île Royale, but their descendants settled also on Île St.-Jean.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Pierre-François, also called François-Marie, born at Annapolis Royal in January 1712, married Henriette, daughter of Pierre Bénard and Cécile Longuépée and sister of one of his sister's husbands, on Île Royale in July 1740.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1741 and 1751, Henriette gave François two children, a son and a daughter.  A French official counted them on Île Madame in February 1752.  Pierre-François died there between 1753 and 1758, on the eve of the islands' dérangement.  In late 1758, the British deported his widow and two young children, a daughter and a son, on the British transport Duke William, which suffered a shipboard mishap on its way to St.-Malo.  The daughter died at sea, and Henriette and her son André died at the St.-Malo hospital in December soon after they reached the port, so this line of the family did not endure. 

François's second son Jacques dit Jacqui, born at Annapolis Royal in August 1818, married Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Prétieux and Anne Haché, at Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in November 1742, and remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Darembourg and Marie Mazerolle, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre on the north shore of Île St.-Jean, in April 1744.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1746 and 1751, Marie-Josèphe gave Jacqui three children, a daughter and two sons, on the island.  A French official counted Jacqui and his family on the north bank of Rivière-de-Nord-Est in the island's interior in August 1752.  The British deported the family to Cherbourg, France, in 1758.  Older son Amable evidently died from the rigors of the crossing soon after they reached the French port.  Daughter Cécile, called Clothilde by the recording priest, married into the Henry family at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in August 1763 and died there in August 1770, age 24.  Jacqui, age 54, remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Susanne Pouquet in c1772, place unrecorded, but it may have been at Cherbourg.  One wonders what happened to him and his family after 1772. 

François's third son Nicolas, born at Port-Toulouse in c1723, married Isabelle, daughter of Pierre Pouget and Françoise Moyse and sister of one of his sister's husbands, at Beaubassin in March 1747.  According to Bona Arsenault, Isabelle gave Nicolas a son at Chignecto in c1750.  They did not remain there but returned to Île Royale, where they joined his family on Île Madame.  A French official counted them there on land owned by his father in February 1752.  One wonders what happened to them in 1758. 

François's fourth and youngest son Joseph, born at Port-Toulouse in c1734, was counted with his aging parents at Île Madame in February 1752.  Joseph evidently escaped the British roundup on the islands in 1758.  He took refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs and escaped the British again in the summer of 1760 after the British attacked the Acadians there.  Joseph married Henriette, daughter of Pierre Arseneau and Marguerite Cormier of Malpèque, Île St.-Jean, at Restigouche in January 1761.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1762 and 1770, Henriette gave Joseph three children, a daughter and two sons.  By 1772, they had settled at Port-Toulouse, renamed St.-Pierre, Joseph's birthplace on Île Royale, which the British had renamed Cape Breton Island.  Joseph died after 1811, place unrecorded.478

Raymond

François Raymond, former soldier turned master carpenter, an early 1700s arrival, created with his wife Anne Comeau a large family in the colony.  Anne gave François 10 children, eight sons and two daughters.  Their younger daughter married into the Landry dit Fraule family.  Five of the master carpenter's eight sons created families of their own.  François died at Annapolis Royal in May 1751, in his mid-70s.  Most of his and Anne's descendants remained at Annapolis Royal, but some moved on to Minas and the French Maritimes.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Oldest son Pierre died at Annapolis Royal in his late teens, before he could marry.

François's second son Charles died an infant. 

François's third son Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Mius d'Azy and Marie Amireau, at Annapolis Royal in October 1730 and likely remained there. 

François's fourth son François, fils married Cécile, daughter of René Landry and Marie-Madeleine Melanson, at Grand-Pré in April 1748 and moved on to Île St.-Jean in the French Maritimes.

François's fifth son Joseph married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Landry dit Toc and Marguerite Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in January 1747 and likely remained there.

François's sixth son Charles, the second with the name, married Madeleine, daughter of Denis Petitot dit Saint-Seine and Marguerite Landry, at Annapolis Royal in November 1749 and likely remained there. 

François's seventh son Jacques married Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Pellerin and Marie Martin, at Annapolis Royal in February 1749 and likely remained there.

François's eighth and youngest son Pierre, the second with the name, died an infant.479

Turpin

Jean Turpin dit La Giroflée, also called Jasmin, former sergeant, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Catherine Bourg created a small family in the colony.  Catherine gave the former sergeant seven children, two sons and five daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Barrieau, Robichaud, and Comeau families.  Only one of the sergeant's sons created his own family.  Jean died at Annapolis Royal by 1717, age unrecorded.  His and Catherine's married daughters settled at Minas and in the French Maritimes.  The fate of the couple's married son and his progeny has been lost to history.  If any of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there. 

Older son Jean, fils survived childhood but evidently did not marry. 

Jean's younger son, whose name has been lost to history, married in c1741, place unrecorded, a woman whose name also has been lost.  One of their daughters may have been the Philippe Turpin, age 10, living with relatives on Île Madame in February 1752.480

Surette

Pierre Surette the sailor, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Jeanne Pellerin created a small family in the colony.  Jeanne gave Pierre nine children, three sons and six daughters, including a set of twins.  Four of their daughters married into the Doucet, Mius d'Azy, Long, Petitot dit Saint-Seine, and Gignac families.  All of the sailor's three sons created their own families.  Pierre died at Annapolis Royal in October 1749, age 70.  His and Jeanne's descendants settled not only in the Annapolis River valley, but also at Minas and Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area.  At least three of the sailor's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, but no family line endured there.   

Oldest son Pierre, fils married Catherine, daughter of Pierre Breau and Anne LeBlanc, at Grand-Pré in September 1732.

Pierre's second son Joseph married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Thériot and Marguerite Cormier, at Grand-Pré in October 1730, moved on to Petitcoudiac, and died there in c1750, in his late 30s. 

Pierre's third and youngest son Paul, a twin of his sister Madeleine, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of ____ Landry and Élisabeth Thériot and widow of Jean Landry, in c1758 while in exile.482

Bodart

François Bodart, navigator, an early 1700s arrival, and his wife Marie Babin created a small family in the colony.  Marie gave him five children, all of them daughters.  Two of them married, so the blood of the family survived in the colony.  Oldest daughter Marie-Josèphe, born at Grand-Pré in September 1710, married into the Tessé family at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1728 and remained on the island, where a French official counted them at Miré in April 1752.  Younger sister Marguerite married into the Vincent family at Minas in c1745, remained there with her parents and other sisters, was deported with her husband and children to Virginia and England in 1755-56, and repatriated to France in May 1763.  Now a widow, Marguerite followed other Acadian exiles to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany in November 1765.  She and her children settled at Kervarigeon near Bangor on the island. 

No member of this family took the name to Louisiana.  However, Marguerite Bodart's son Pierre Vincent, as well as her deceased daughter Marguerite Vincent's children--four sons and two daughters from her union with Frenchman Guillaume Monté or Montet of Périgaux, France, whom she had married at Liverpool, England, in c1763--did to go Louisiana in 1785 aboard two of the Seven Ships from France.20

Duon

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais, son of Jean-Louis Duon and Jeanne Clémenson, born at St.-Nizier de Lyon in c1684, emigrated to French Acadia in the early 1700s and served as a notary, so he must have had some formal education.  At age 30, he married Agnès, 17-year-old daughter of Antoine Hébert le jeune and Jeanne Corporon, at Annapolis Royal in c1713.  Between 1714 and 1739, Agnès gave Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais 13 children, 10 sons and three daughters, all born at Annapolis Royal.  Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais died at Annapolis Royal in May 1746, age 65.  Their daughters married into the Mius, Vincent, Landieu, and Loustaneau families.  Eight of their 10 sons also created families of their own in the colony.  At least 16 of Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and France in 1785.  Smaller numbers of them also could be found in greater Acadia, France, the French Antilles, and perhaps in Canada after Le Grand Dérangement

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in June 1714, married Madeleine, daughter of Michel Vincent and Anne-Marie Doiron, at Rivière-aux-Canards in January 1736.  They remained at Minas.  According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1737 and 1743, Madeleine gave Jean-Baptiste, fils four children, a son and three daughters.  The British deported the family to Virginia in the fall of 1755, and Virginia officials sent them on to England in the spring of 1756.  They were held at Liverpool for seven years.  Jean-Baptiste, fils died probably at Liverpool before March 1760.  His three daughters married into the Trahan and Aucoin families at Liverpool.  His son also married there.  Members of the family were repatriated to Morlaix, France, in May 1763, went to Belle-Île-en-Mer in November 1765 and settled at Martha near Bangor, moved on to Nantes by September 1784, and to Louisiana in 1785. 

Only son Honoré le jeune, born at Minas in c1737, followed his family to Virginia and England, where he married Anne-Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians François Trahan and Angélique Melanson of Pigiguit, at Liverpool in October 1758.  A daughter was born there in c1761.  In the spring of 1763, the family was repatriated to Morlaix, France, where, in 1764, Anne gave Honoré le jeune another daughter and a son, but the boy died at age 20 months in October 1765.  They following month, they joined other Acadian exiles from England on Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany.  They settled near Bangor, where, between 1766 and 1777, Anne gave Honoré le jeune three more sons and another daughter.  Their oldest daughter married into the Maitrejean family at Bangor in June 1777.  They moved on to Nantes by September 1784, when they were counted there with four sons, so their younger daughters evidently had died by then.  Honoré le jeune, Anne, and their three surviving son emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  They were among the hand full of Acadians who chose to settle on the river below New Orleans.  They had no more children in the colony.  Honoré le jeune died at San Bernardo, today's St. Bernard Parish, in October 1796, in his late 50s.  Two of his sons married into the LeBlanc and Autran families at New Orleans and evidently remained at San Bernardo.  A grandson married on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's second son Honoré, born at Annapolis Royal in July 1716, married Anne-Marie, another daughter of Michel Vincent and Anne-Marie Doiron, c1742, probably at Minas.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1744 and 1750, Anne-Marie gave Honoré six children, three daughters and three sons.  They escaped the British roundup at Annapolis Royal in the fall of 1755 and sought refuge at Miramichi on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By the early 1760s, they were being held in the British prisoner-of-war compound at Fort Edward, Pigiguit.  Honoré and Anne-Marie took three of their unmarried children, a daughter and two sons, to Louisiana in 1765 and settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Their daughter married into the Blanchard family there.  Their sons also married, into the LeBlanc, Landry, and Darois families, and settled on the river, but some of Honoré's descendants moved on to the western prairies. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's third son Pierre, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1720, married Angélique, daughter of Martin Aucoin and Catherine Thériot, at Grand-Pré in November 1745.  According to Bona Arsenault, in 1747 and 1749, Angélique gave Pierre two daughters.  The British deported the family to Virginia in the fall of 1755, and Virginia officials sent them on to England in the spring of 1756.  Pierre remarried to Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Aucoin and Anne Trahan, in c1757 at Bristol, England.  According to Arsenault, Marguerite gave Pierre two more children, another daughter and a son, in 1757 and 1761.  They were at Southampton in the spring of 1763 when they, along with hundreds of other Acadians, were repatriated to St.-Malo, France, that May aboard La Dorothée.  They settled at nearby Plouër, where Marguerite gave Pierre two more sons in 1765 and 1770.  The younger son died 10 months after his birth.  They did not join their kinsmen on Belle-Île-en-Mer.  Pierre's second daughter Marguerite, by first wife Angélique, married into the Doiron family at Plouèr in August 1766.  Perhaps as a reaction to the ill-treatment of Acadians in the mother country, Pierre, wife Marguerite, daughters Marguerite and Françoise, and son Cyprien-Pierre, returned to North America via the Channel Islands and England in 1773.  One wonders if they re-settled in greater Acadia or Canada and if Cyprien-Pierre created a family of his own. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's fourth son Abel dit Tibel, born at Annapolis Royal in May 1722, was still unmarried when he was deported to Massachusetts in the fall of 1755.  He married Anne, daughter of Jacques Mius d'Entremont and Marguerite Amireau of Pobomcoup, at Boston in c1756.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1757 and 1772, Anne gave Abel seven children, four daughters and three sons.  They were counted at Medfield in 1757 and were still in the Bay Colony in August 1763.  In 1766, most of the Acadians in Massachusetts chose to move on to Canada, but Abel and Anne returned to her native Cap-Sable by 1767.  Abel died at Ste.-Anne-du-Ruisseau near Pubnico, formerly Pobomcoup, in January 1807, age 84.  Two of his daughters married into the Surette and Boudreau families at Cap-Sable.  Two of his sons also married there. 

Oldest son Paul, born in Massachusetts in c1763, followed his family to Cap-Sable and married Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Boudreau and Marguerite Pothier, there in October 1800.

Abel's third and youngest son Augustin, born probably at Cap-Sable in c1768, married Nathalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Ange Amireau and Nathalie Belliveau, in c1794 and "rehabilitated" the marriage at Cap-Sable in November 1799. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's fifth son Jean-Jacques, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1724, died there at age 3 in April 1727.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's sixth son Louis-Basile, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1727, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Augustin Comeau and Jeanne Levron, at Annapolis Royal in the summer of 1754.  The British deported them to New York in the fall of 1755.  They were still there, with four children, in 1763.  By 1766, they had moved on to Champflore, Martinique, in the French Antilles.  Louis-Basille remarried to Anne, daughter of Charles Savoie and Françoise Martin, probably on the island in c1766.  One wonders if she gave him anymore children. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's seventh son François, born at Annapolis Royal in February 1729, if he survived childhood did not marry.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's eighth son Cyprien, born at Annapolis Royal in April 1730, followed several of his older brothers to Minas and was still unmarried when the British deported him to Virginia in the fall of 1755, and Virginia officials sent them on to England in the spring of 1756.  Cyprien married Marguerite, daughter of René Landry and Marie-Rose Rivet, at Liverpool in January 1758.  In 1759 and 1761, Marguerite gave Cyprien a son and a daughter at Liverpool.  The family was repatriated to Morlaix, France, in May 1763 and went to Belle-Île-en-Mer in November 1765, where they settled at Calestrene near Bangor.  Between 1766 and 1771, Marguerite gave Cyprien two more sons and another daughter there.  Their older daughter Marie died on the island in October 1781, age 20.  In 1785, Cyprien, Marguerite, their youngest son Jean-Pierre and younger daughter Marie-Élisabeth, chose to remain on Belle-Île-en-Mer.  Their two older sons, however, ages 25 and 19 and still unmarried, followed Duon kin to Louisiana.  Cypiren and his family were still on the island in 1792, during the French Revolution.  He died at Calestrene in c1798, in his late 60s. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Liverpool, England, in October 1759, followed his family to Morlaix, France, and Belle-Île-en-Mer, and accompanied Duon relatives to Louisiana in 1785.  He followed the majority of his fellow passengers to Baton Rouge but did not marry.

Cyprien's second son Joseph, born on Belle-Île-en-Mer in April 1766, followed his older brother to Louisiana in 1785, but he did not join him at Baton Rouge.  He settled, instead, at Attakapas on the western prairies, where he married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Hébert and Théotiste Hébert, in February 1791.  Joseph's neighbors called him Joseph dit Gros, or Big Joseph, to distinguish him from a younger cousin also named Joseph, whom they called Joseph dit Petit, or Little Joseph.  Big Joseph's daughters married into the Broussard, Duhon, and Lapointe families.  Six of his nine sons married into the Trahan, Granger, Cormier, Duhon, and Hébert families on the prairies, and most of the lines endured.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's ninth son Charles, born at Annapolis Royal in May 1734, remained there and was still unmarried when he eluded the British roundup there in the fall of 1755.  He followed his older brother Honoré to Miramichi on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Charles Préjean and Françoise Boudrot, in c1759.  By the early 1760s, they, too, were being held in the British prisoner-of-war compound at Fort Edward, Pigiguit.  Charles, Marie-Josèphe, and their two young children, a son and a daughter, followed two of his brothers Honoré to Louisiana in 1765.  They settled at Cabahannocer on the river but moved on to Attakapas west of the Atchafalaya Basin in the 1770s.  Their daughters married into the Dugas, Guidry, LeBlanc, and Montet families.  Charles's two sons married into the Gautreaux and Broussard families and created vigorous lines on the prairies. 

Jean-Baptiste dit Lyonnais's tenth and youngest son Claude-Amable, born at Annapolis Royal in February 1736, also remained at Annapolis Royal.  After escaping the British roundup there in 1755, he followed older brothers Honoré and Charles, to Miramichi, where he married Marie-Josèphe dite Josette, yet another daughter of Michel Vincent and Anne-Marie Doiron, at Miramichi in c1757.  By the early 1760s, they, too, were being held in the British prisoner-of-war compound at Fort Edward, Pigiguit.  Claude-Amable, Josette, and a Pitre orphan followed his older brothers to Louisiana in 1765.  They also settled at Cabahannocer before moving on to Attakapas.  Their only son married into the Trahan and Bourg families and created a vigorous line on the prairies.202 

The Families of Greater Acadia:  After the Fall

More francophone families appeared in the Nova Scotia after the fall of Port-Royal in October 1710, something evidently tolerated by the colony's new administrators.  Most of the new arrivals came from France, but a few slipped in from Canada.  Most of them married into established families, and many of them settled in the Minas Basin, which was clearly British territory.  Others settled at Chignecto in territory claimed by both powers.  And many moved on to the French Maritimes:117 

Joseph-Nicolas, called Nicolas, son of Nicolas Gauthier or Gautier of Aix-en-Provence and Jeanne Moreau, was born at Rochefort in 1689 and came to French Acadia in c1710, in his early 20s.  Nicolas married Marie, only daughter of blacksmith and sawmill owner-turned-merchant Louis Allain and Marguerite Bourg, at Annapolis Royal in March 1715.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, between 1716 and 1741, Marie gave Nicolas seven children, four sons and three daughters.  His daughters married into the Dupont de Gourville et Duvivier, Bergeron, and Bourdon de Dombourg families.  Nicolas dit Bellaire, as he was called, became a successful farmer, merchant, and navigator.  By the 1730s, through inheritance from his father-in-law and by his own efforts, Nicolas had become one of the richest men in the colony--by Acadian standards, at least, one historian quips, he was "a veritable tycoon."  His home, Bellaire, named for the site on the Annapolis River where it was located, was the source of his dit and one of the finest estates in all of Acadia.  Risking all in the struggle against the British in Nova Scotia, Nicolas dit Bellaire became an Acadian partisan during the 1740s.  He was so active in the fight against Britain, in fact, that he became a wanted man and was financially ruined by the end of King George's War.  Marie also paid a price for her husband's activities.  In 1745, with son Nicolas, fils, only in his teens, she spent 10 long months in the Fort Anne dungeon, much of the time with "'their feet in irons.'"  The family resettled on Île St.-Jean in 1749, where Nicolas, père died three years later, age 63.  Widow Marie Allain settled on Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the island's interior, where a French official counted her and her family in August 1752.  Oldest son Joseph, born in c1717, a navigator like his father, had married Dlle. Marguerite, daughter of Sr. Joseph Bugeaud and Marie-Josèphe Landry, in c1747 during the war and settled near his mother.  Nicolas and Marie's second son Pierre, born in c1728, also a navigator, married Jeanne, daughter of Marc-Antoine de La Forest and his second wife Marie-Anne Courthau of Île Royale, at Louisbourg in June 1752 and also settled near his mother.  Living with Marie that August was Joseph, age 19, probably third son Joseph-Nicholas, called Nicolas, fils, actually age 22, who had spent time with his mother in the Fort Anne dungeon seven years earlier; Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, age 11; Élisabeth, age 15; and Marie, age 12.  If any of Nicolas's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, they did not take the family's name there.318 

Jean-Baptiste dit Dumont, son of carpenter René Dubois and Anne-Julienne Dumont of Montréal, married Marie, daughter of André Simon dit Boucher and Marie Martin, at Port-Royal in May 1710.  Jean-Baptiste died at Grand-Pré in November 1713, but not before fathering a son, Joseph dit Dumont, born at Annapolis Royal in March 1712.  Joseph chose as his surname not Dubois but his father's dit and his paternal grandmother's surname, Dumont.  He followed his mother and stepfather, Dominque Viarrieu dit Duclos, to the French Maritimes, where he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Vécot and Marie Chiasson, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord on Île St.-Jean in February 1739.  Marie-Madeleine died probably on Île St.-Jean in the early or mid-1750s.  Joseph did not remarry.  One of his six daughters emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.316

François, son of merchant Jean Richard and Anne Christin of d'Auray, bishopric of Vannes, Brittany, probably not kin to Michel Richard dit Sansoucy, married Anne, daughter of Jean Comeau l'aîné and Françoise Hébert, at Port-Royal in October 1710, only a few weeks after the fort at Port-Royal fell to a British force from Boston.  François and Anne remained at Port-Royal, which the British promptly renamed Annapolis Royal.  Anne gave François five children, including two sons who created families of their own.  François remarried to Marie, daughter of René Martin dit Barnabé and Marie Mignier dit Lagassé, at Annapolis Royal in October 1722.  Marie gave him three more children, including another son who created his own family.  One wonders if any of the 67 Richards who emigrated to Louisiana was a descendant of François.196 

Pierre Lalande, alias Blaise des Brousses dit Bonappétit, a soldier in the King's service, married Anne, daughter of Joseph Prétieux and Anne Gautrot, at Port-Royal in November 1710, only a month after the Acadian capital fell.  Anne gave Bonappétit eight children, including four sons who created families of their own.  At least three of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and France in 1785.197 

Jacques Oudy, a farmer born probably in France in c1680, married Cécile, 28-year-old daughter of Jacques Blou and Marie Girouard of Chignecto, in c1710.  They settled at Chignecto, where Cécile gave him two children, son Claude, born in c1711, and daughter Cécile, born in c1713.  Cécile died by August 1717, when Jacques remarried to Marguerite, 20-year-old daughter of Louis Saulnier and Louise Bastineau dit Peltier, at Grand-Pré.  Marguerite gave Jacques a dozen more children:  Marguerite, born at Chignecto in March 1719; Marie-Josèphe in March 1720; Jacques, fils in August 1721; Jean-Baptiste in May 1723; Pierre in c1726; Anne born at Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, in August 1728; Joseph in August 1731; Louis in May 1733; Marie-Madeleine in June 1735; Charles in January 1738; Étienne in November 1739; and Cécile in July 1741.  As the birthplace of his children indicate, Jacques took his family to Île St.-Jean in the 1720s, among the earliest peninsula Acadians to settle on the island.  Oldest son Claude married Marie-Angélique, daughter of Jean Pothier and Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre, in October 1739.  Second son Jacques, fils married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Doucet and Marie Doiron, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in January 1751; they settled at Havre-St.-Pierre.  Third son Jean-Baptiste married Marie, daughter of François Blanchard and Marguerite Carret, at Port-Lajoie in November 1750.  Fourth son Pierre did not marry.  Fifth son Joseph married Marguerite, another daughter of François Blanchard and Marguerite Carret, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in November 1754.  Sixth, seventh, and eighth sons Louis did not marry.  Jacques's four oldest daughters married into the Lacroix dit Caniche, Beaulieu, D'Etcheverry dit Savate, and Le Breton families, all at Havre-St.-Pierre, where the family was counted in August 1752.  Sadly, Marguerite, now a widow, and her entire family, including Jacque's children by his first and second marriages and all of their grandchildren, perished aboard the British transport Violet on its way to St.-Malo in December 1758.  Needless to say, none of Jacques's descendants emigrated to Louisiana.488

François dit Blondin, son of Nicolas Boisseau and Anne Bouchotait of Montargis, Orléanais, France, born at Paris in c1686, married Marie-Anne, daughter of Louis Saulnier and Louise Bastineau dit Peltier, at Grand-Pré in October 1711.  Marie-Anne gave the Parisian eight children, five daughters and three sons, all born at Minas:  Marie, born in August 1712; Claire in c1713; Anne in June 1717; François in July 1720; Pierre in c1722; Marguerite in c1726; Augustin; and Jeanne, born in March 1731.  Four of their daughters married into the Girouard, Hébert, Doiron, and Boudrot families and settled at Minas and on Île St.-Jean.  Blondin's and Marie-Anne's three sons married, two of them into the Boudrot and LeBlanc families, the other into a family whose name has been lost to history.  They also settled on Île St.-Jean.  In August 1752, a French official counted François dit Blondin, now a widow, son Pierre and daughters Claire, Marguerite, and Jeanne, with Claire, Pierre, and Marguerite's families, at Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Scie in the interior of the island.  If any of Blondin's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.198 

Guillaume, son of Henri Le Prieur dit Dubois of Falaise, diocese of Séez, and Marguerite Basile of Meudon, Rouen, was born at Caen, France, in c1689.  He married Madeleine, daughter of Étienne Poitevin and Anne Daigre, at Annapolis Royal in February 1712.  In the 1710s, Guillaume took his family to Île Royale and then to Île St.-Jean by 1720.  He was one of the first peninsula Acadians to settle on Île St.-Jean, where he worked as a fisherman/habitant.  Madeleine gave him 11 children, seven sons and four daughters:  Joseph was born at Annapolis Royal in January 1713; Jacques at Îles Michaud off Île Royale in c1718; Marie at Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean in c1720; Pierre l'aîné at Port-Lajoie,Île St.-Jean in March 1725; Élisabeth, also Isabelle, at Havre-St.-Pierre March 1727; Pierre le jeune in c1728; Jean-Baptiste in February 1729; Marguerite in August 1731; Guillaume, fils in June 1734; Marie in May 1739; and Pierre-Louis in April 1741.  His married sons carried their father's dit, Dubois.  Guillaume, père died probably at Havre-St.-Pierre in the 1740s.  Madeleine did not remarry.  In August 1752, a French official counted her at Havre-St.-Pierre with her three youngest sons.  She died with seven of her children aboard the British transport Violet during the deportation to France in late 1758.  Son Joseph married four times, first to Marie, daughter of Jacques Quimine and Marie-Josèphe Chiasson, in c1736, the place unrecorded.  He remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Olivier and Françoise Bonnevie, at Beaubassin in January 1743 but settled on Île St.-Jean.  The same French official counted them at Havre-de-la-Fortune, on the southeast coast of the island, in August 1752; he called Joseph a navigator.  Joseph remarried again--his third marriage--to Madeleine-Anastasie, daughter of Claude Gautrot and Geneviève-Salomé Hébert, on the island in c1757, and remarried yet again--his fourth and final marriage--to Marguerite, daughter of Jean Caissie and Cécile Hébert and widow of Christophe Delaune, at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, France, in October 1759, during Le Grand Dérangement.  Joseph was, in fact, the only member of his immediate family who survived the deportation to France, but he did not survive Le Grand Dérangement.  He died at Cherbourg in January 1772, age 58.  Brother Jacques married only once, to Marguerite, daughter of Paul Michel dit La Ruine and Marie-Josèphe Vincent, at Port-Lajoie in November 1751.  The following August, the same French official counted them on a parcel of land near the source of Rivière-du-Nord-Est that belonged to his mother.  Jacques and his family also died aboard the Violet.  Pierre l'aîné married Judith, daughter of Gabriel Chiasson and Marie Savoie and widow of Charles Lacroix dit Durel, at Beaubassin in September 1748 but also settled at Havre-de-la-Fortune, where he was counted with his older brother Joseph in August 1752.  Guillaume and Madeleine's three youngest sons--Pierre le jeune, Guillaume, fils, and Pierre-Louis--survived childhood but, thanks to the fate of the Violet, did not live long enough to create families of their own.  Two of Guillaume and Madeleine's four daughters, Marie and Marguerite, married into the Laborde and Fricour dit Picard families.  Marie was counted with her family at Havre-de-la-Fortune in August 1752, and Marguerite with her family at Havre-St.-Pierre.  The two sisters, along with their families, also perished with their mother and five brothers on the deportation to France.  Guillaume and Madeleine's other two daughters, Élisabeth and another Marie, evidently did not survive childhood.   If any of Guillaume's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.25

Louis, son of Jean Cyr and Marguerite Rimbault of St.-Éloi, Dunkerque, France, no kin to gunsmith Pierre Cyr who had come to the colony decades earlier, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Michel and Marguerite Meunier, at Grand-Pré in May 1712.  Marie-Josèphe gave Louis eight children, including four sons who created families of their own at Chignecto, where the other Cyrs had settled.  Louis took his family to the French Maritimes in c1749.  If any of Louis's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.198a

François Blanchard dit Gentilhomme from St.-Marc-le-Blanc, Brittany, France, not kin to Jean or Toussaint Blanchard, reached Acadia in c1712.  He married Anne, daughter of Jacques Corne and Marie Renaud, at Grand-Pré in c1719.  She gave him no children, at least none who appear in Bona Arsenault's genealogie.  François remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Carret and Angélique Chiasson of Chignecto, in c1725.  According to Bona Arsneault, Marguerite gave François at least eight children, two sons and six daughters:  Marie, born in c1730; Marguerite in c1733; Catherine in c1734; François, fils in c1738; Cécile in c1740; Jean in c1742; Rosalie in c1744; and Agathe in c1746.  François took his family to Île St.-Jean in c1737 and settled at Malpèque on the island's northwest coast.  A French official counted them there in August 1752.  Four of François's daughters married into the Audy, Lapierre, and Porlier families on Île St.-Jean and Île Miquelon.  Both of his sons married, into the Deveau and Haché dit Gallant families, one of them on Île Miquelon.  In 1798, older son François, fils settled at Rustico on the north shore of St. John's Island, formerly Île St.-Jean, now Prince Edward Island, not far from his boyhood home at Malpèque.  One wonders if any of the 59 Acadian Blanchards who emigrated to Louisiana was a descendant of François dit Gentilhomme.199 

Philippe Lambert, probably not kin to Radegonde and René Lambert but likely a native of France, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Michel Boudrot and Marie-Madeleine Cormier, in c1712 and settled at Chignecto.  Marie-Madeleine gave Philippe five children, all born at Chignecto, including two sons who created families of their own.  If any of Philippe's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.200 

Jean-Jacques, twin son of Alexandre Nuirat, Nuyratte, or Nuiratte and Anne Audier, Augier, or Hodiers, born at Martigues, bishopric of Arles, France, in July 1682, married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Charles Bourgeois and Marie Blanchard, at Beaubassin in c1712, and remained at Chignecto.  Marie-Jeanne gave Jean-Jacques 10 children, three sons and seven daughters, all born at Chignecto:  Cécile in c1713; Anne-Marie; Anne, born in June 1719; Marguerite in August 1721; Michel; Ignace; Geneviève; Catherine; Jean-Jacques in January 1734; and Marie in November 1740.  Six of their daughters married into the Poirier, Pothier, Compagnon, Girouard, Levasseur dit Chaverlange; Arseneau, Bertrand, and Painchaud family, some at Chignecto, others on Île St.-Jean, in France, and in Canada before and after Le Grand Dérangement.  Oldest son Michel married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Denis Gaudet and Anne Doucet, at Beaubassin in October 1746, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Aucoin and Marguerite Dupuis, at Restigouche in November 1759 while in exile.  Second son Ignace married in c1749 to a woman whose name has been lost to history.  Youngest son Jean-Jacques married Françoise, daughter of Jean Bertrand le jeune and Anne Doucet, in c1758 probably in the French Maritimes on the eve of the islands' dérangement.  If any of Jean-Jacques's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.201 

Bernard Marres or Mars dit La Sonde, native of Bordeaux and surgeon-turned-fisherman at Mouscoudabouet or Muquodoboit, on the Acadian Atlantic coast, lived for a time at Plaisance, Newfoundland, in the early 1700s.  He married Judith, daughter of Claude Petitpas, fils and his Mi'kmaq wife Marie-Thérèse, in c1712, place unrecorded.  Bernard took his family to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, late in the decade and died between 1730 and 1734 probably at Port-Toulouse.  Judith gave him 11 children, seven sons and four daughters.  Two of their daughters married into the Dantin dit Lajoye, Boucher dit Villedieu, and Lejeune dit Briard families.  Only one of his sons married.  Sixth son Jean-Baptiste dit La Sonde married Marie-Blanche, daughter of Pierre Boudrot and Marie Doiron, at Port-Toulouse in c1753.  If any of Bernard's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.201a

Louis-François, called François, son of Sr. Louis Mangeant, Meaugent, Mongeon, or Mongeau dit Saint-Germain and Anne Deschamps of St.-Paul Parish, Paris, married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Caissie dit Roger and Anne Bourgeois, at Beaubassin in April 1713, and moved to Québec probably as a merchant.  He also worked as a scribe.  Marguerite gave him seven children, most of them born at Québec.  Only one of their sons married and created a family his own.   In September 1726, François appeared before the colonial Council at Annapolis Royal "in order to solicit permission to settle at Beaubassin, having left Québec after having fatally wounded a man named Lesage, who had insulted and provoked him."  Not only did Mangeant receive permission to remain in the colony after taking the unqualified oath of allegiance to King George II, but the Parisian became a favorite of Lieutenant-governor Armstrong, who appointed him collector of quit-rents at Minas, supplanting Alexandre Bourg dit Bellehumeur, in 1737.  Despite Mangeant's connection with the Caissies, a prominent Chignecto family, most of his fellow Acadians thought little of him.  After Armstrong's suicide in December 1739, Mangeant wisely gave up his position at Minas and moved to the fishing port of Canso, where he was captured by a French force from Louisbourg at the beginning of King George's War in 1744.  If any of François's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none of them took the family's name there.202a

Jean, fils, son of Jean Fougère and Marie Barré of Poupry, Beauce, Diocese of d'Orléans, France, married Marie, daughter of Abraham Bourg and Marie Brun, at Annapolis Royal in November 1713 and moved on to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in the early 1720s, where he worked as a navigator and a fisherman as well as a farmer.  Between 1715 and 1726, Marie gave him eight children, five daughters and three sons.  Three of their daughters married into the Dugas and Boudrot families.  Two of his and Marie's sons married into the Coste and Dugas families.  Jean, fils remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Belliveau and Cécile Melanson, at Port-Toulouse in c1728.  Between 1728 and 1744, Marie-Madeleine gave Jean, fils 10 more children, three sons and seven daughters.  Four of his daughters married into the Bonin, Boudrot, and Petitpas families.  Two of his three sons married into the Landry and Martel families.  If any of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.203 

Pierre dit Des Roches, son of Pierre Boucher and Hélène Gaudry dit Bourbonnière of St.-Nicolas Parish, Québec, born at Québec in c1688, emigrated to French Acadia and married Anne, daughter of Étienne Hébert, fils and Jeanne Comeau of Minas, at Grand-Pré in February 1714.  Soon after their marriage, Pierre took his bride to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, where, in 1715 and 1716, she gave him two children, a daughter and a son.  Pierre returned to Québec and died there in January 1718, so his children did not know him.  Anne returned to Île Royale and remarried to Jean-Baptiste Villedieu, widower of Anne Michel, at Port-Toulouse in c1721.  Her Boucher daughter Marguerite married into the Touquerand family at Louisbourg on the island.  Her Boucher son Honoré dit Villedieu married Marie-Anne, daughter of Bernard Marres dit La Sonde and Judith Petitpas, at Port-Toulouse in c1743.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.203b

Sébastien dit L'Espérance, son of Jacques Le Roy and Barbe Raymond of Montmidi, Parish of St.-Joseph, Lorraine, not kin to Jean dit La Liberté Roy, married Marie-Catherine, daughter of François Coste and Madeleine Martin dit Barnabé, at Annapolis Royal in February 1714.  They promptly moved to Île Royale, where their only child, daughter Marie-Josèphe, was born at Port-Toulouse in c1716.  Sébastien died the following year, and Marie-Catherine remarried to Pierre Bois of Coutances, France.  Marie-Josèphe survived childhood, married into the Brisset family, and settled with the Costes at L'Ardois, on the Atlantic side of island.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.14

Jean-Baptiste, son of merchant Claude Porlier and Marie Bissot, born at Québec in October 1685, moved to Port-Royal probably during the final days of French control of the colony and served as a pilot in the King's service.  Jean-Baptiste married Anne-Marie, daughter of Jacques de Saint-Étienne de La Tour, former governor Charles Latour's older surviving son, and Anne Melanson, at Annapolis Royal in February 1714, and remained there.  Anne-Marie gave Jean-Baptiste seven children, including four sons who married Granger sisters and cousins and created families of their own.  If any of Jean-Baptiste's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.203a

Jean dit Jolycoeur, son of Jean Lebert and Marie DuFay of St.-Laurent, Paris, reached Annapolis Royal by May 1714, when he married Jeanne, 30-year-old daughter of Vincent Breau dit Vincelotte and Marie Bourg.  Jean dit Jolycoeur and Jeanne moved to Minas in c1720.  Despite her age, Jeanne gave the Parisian eight children, including four sons who created families of their own.  At least eight of Jolycoeur's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.204

Jean-Baptiste, son of François Vécot, also Veco, Vescot, Bécot, and Bécault, and Françoise Poirier of Boucherville, Canada, born at Ste.-Anne-de-Beaupré in December 1690, married Marie, daughter of Sébastien Chiasson and Marie Blou, at Beaubassin in June 1714.  Jean-Baptiste took his family to Île St.-Jean in the late 1720s and settled at Havre-St.-Pierre, on the island's north shore.  Marie gave Jean-Baptiste a dozen children at Chignecto and on Île St.-Jean:  François was born in c1715; Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, in December 1716; an unnamed son in c1718; Jacques in c1722; Marie in c1724; Cécile in c1726; Angélique in August 1728; Jean-Baptiste in c1730; Anne in November 1732; Rosalie in May 1734; Pierre in June 1736; and Joseph in January 1739.  Five of their daughters married into the Dubois dit Dumont, Viarrieu dit Duclos, Boudrot, Bourg, and Poirier families.  Only two of Jean-Baptiste's six sons created families of their own.  François married Anne-Marie, daughter of Pierre Arseneau and Marguerite Cormier, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre, in May 1743.  They settled on Rivière-du-Nord-Est on the island, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  Jacques married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Bourg and Marie-Josèphe Landry, at Port-Lajoie on the island in February 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jean-Baptiste, Marie, and their six younger children at Havre-St.-Pierre.  Sadly, they, along with daughter Marie and her family, perished aboard the British transport Violet on its way to St.-Malo in December 1758.  If any of Jean-Baptiste's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.205 

Pierre Bertaud dit Montaury, who, according to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, was born in France, came to Nova Scotia in the early 1700s, where he worked as a fisherman and a maître de grave.  Pierre married Marie, daughter of Pierre Martin and Anne Godin of Port-Royal, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1714.  They moved on to Île Royale by 1717 and settled at Port-Toulouse.  In the early 1720s, they moved to Île St.-Jean, where they settled at Havre-St.-Pierre on the north shore of the island.  Marie gave Pierre seven children, two sons and five daughters; only the oldest was born in British Nova Scota:  Marie-Josèphe perhaps at Annapolis Royal, date unrecorded; Jacques at Port-Toulouse in c1718; Marguerite in c1720; Anne-Agathe at Havre-St.-Pierre in September 1724; Françoise in c1727; Jean-François, called François, in July 1729; and a second Marie-Josèphe in November 1732.  Pierre's daughters married into the Gallon, Martin, Petitpas, and Longuépée families.  Older son Jacques dit Montaury, also called Jacques dit Breto, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Quimine and Marie Chiasson, at Beaubassin in April 1741, but they settled at Havre-St.-Pierre, where a French official counted them with four children in August 1752.  Pierre and Marie's younger son François survived childhood but evidently did not marry.  Pierre dit Montaury died by February 1734, when Marie remarried to Mathieu de Glain dit Cadet of Bayonne, France, at Havre-St.-Pierre.  They settled on Rivière-de-Peugiguit, in the center of the island, where the same French official counted them in August 1752.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.206

Jacques, son of Daniel Kimin, Kimine, or Quimine and Marie Torel of Pennemart, Nantes, France, born in the late 1690s, came to Nova Scotia by February 1715, when he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Gabriel Chiasson and Marie Savoie, at Chignecto.  Marie-Josèphe gave Jacques eight children, all born at Chignecto:  Marie in c1718; Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, in c1721; Anne in c1722; Pierre in c1726; Jean-Jacques in c1729; Judith in c1732; and Françoise in c1733; Marguerite in c1738.  Jacques took his family to Île St.-Jean in c1742.  Four of their daughters married into the Prieur dit Dubois, Bertaud dit Montaury, Aubin dit Le Buffe, and Douville families on the island.  Son Jean-Jacques married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Thériot and Angélique Doiron of Cobeguit, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre, on the north shore of the island, in November 1751.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jacques, Marie-Josèphe, four of their unmarried children, including oldest son Pierre, and younger son Jean-Jacques and his family, at Étang-St.-Pierre, on the coast west of Havre-St.-Pierre.  The same official counted daughter Madeleine, her husband Jacques Bertaud dit Montaury, and their four children at the harbor.  Jacque and Marie-Josèphe's daughter Anne, her husband Sr. Louis Aubin dit Le Buffe, and their two daughters were counted at nearby Nigeagant.  Jacques and Marie-Josèphe's older son Pierre married Marie-Louise, daughter of Michel Grossin and Marie Caissie, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in February 1755.  At least five of Jacques's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.207 

Jean-Baptiste, son of Jean David and Jeanne Bell, probably not kin to the other Davids in Acadia, was born at Château-Richer, Québec, in c1693.  Jean-Baptiste married Marguerite, daughter of François Lapierre dit Laroche and Jeanne Rimbault, at Grand-Pré in March 1715.  They were living at Annapolis Royal in 1716-17 but settled at Minas in 1718.  Jean-Baptiste and Marguerite had 10 children, three sons and seven daughters, all born at Grand-Pré.  Two of their daughters married into the Richard and Dugas families.  Jean-Baptiste's sons married into the Landry, Thériot, and Belliveau families at Minas.  At least two of his descendants emigrated to Louisiana, probably from Maryland in the late 1760s.208 

Nicolas, son of Claude Lavigne and Françoise Le Dorez, born at St.-Denis, near Paris, in c1684, came to Nova Scotia by March 1715, when he married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Doucet and Huguette Guérin, at Annapolis Royal.   Madeleine gave him at least two sons:  Joseph, born in 1717; and Charles in 1718.  He took his family to Île Royale in the 1710s or 1720s.  Madeleine died at Port-Toulouse in c1727, and Nicolas remarried to Marie-Anne, daughter of Jean Clémençeau and Anne Roy, at Port-Toulouse in c1732.  They settled at Port-Toulouse, where he worked as a coaster.  Marie-Anne gave him six more children:  Anne, born in c1733; Marguerite in c1737; Nicolas, fils, in c1738; Madeleine in c1741; Barbe in c1745; and Geneviève in c1750.  Son Charles by his first wife married into the Petitpas and Lafargue families and settled at L'Ardoise, east of Port-Toulouse.  Three of Nicolas's daughters by his second wife married into the Blaquière, Poirier, and Gauthier families.  If any of Nicolas's descendants emigated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.280

Joseph dit Lanoy, son of Geoffroi Le Mordant and Guillemette Lorange, married Marie, 20-year-old daughter of Michel Hébert and Isabelle Pellerin, at Grand-Pré in January 1715.  They emigrated to the French Maritimes soon after their marriage and settled at Petit-Bras-d'Or, on the coast above Louisbourg, where at least two daughters were born to them:  Marie in c1720, and Perrine in c1729.  Joseph died by c1750, when Marie remarried on the island.  Joseph and Marie's daughters married into the Le Breton and Dauphin families.  In April 1752, a French official counted the daughters and their families, as well as their mother and stepfather, at Baie-de-l'Indienne, near Peitit-Bras-d'Or.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.21

Jacques, son of Étienne Dingle or Dengle and Anne Laseux, a surgeon from Ville de Grauelline, Flanders, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Landry and Cécile Melanson, at Grand-Pré in July 1716.  They resettled on Île Royale during the early 1730s, at Niganiche, Havre Fourché, and Louisbourg.  In August 1752, their 18-year-old daughter Madeleine, "native of Niganiche," was living with her uncle Benjamin Landry at Rivière-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean.  If any of Jacques's descendants emigrated to Lousiana, none took the family's name there.209 

Thomas, son of Jacques LeSauvage and Élisabeth Recie of St.-Goudard, Rouen, France, was born there in c1683 and became a blacksmith.  Thomas came to Nova Scotia by September 1717, when he married Anne, daughter of François Lapierre dit Laroche and Jeanne Rimbault, at Grand-Pré.  Anne gave him at least five children, a daughter and four sons:  Françoise, born in c1718; Pierre in c1719; Michel in c1721; a second Pierre in c1725; and Jacques-Christophe in c1728.  The family moved on to Chignecto, where Thomas died in c1730.  His widow remarried on Île St.-Jean.  Daughter Françoise married into the Massé, Doucet, and Comeau families and was deported to New York in 1755.  Son Michel married into the Léger dit La Rosette family and evidently remained at Chignecto.  Son Pierre le jeune married into the Pinet family and moved to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, where he worked as a coaster.  Youngest son Jacques-Christophe married into the Couture family at Québec during exile.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.03

Jean, fils, native of the isle of Guernsey, son of Jean Semer, also called Lemaire and Lemer, and Marguerite Héron, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Vincent and Marie-Josèphe Richard of Pigiguit, at Grand-Pré in November 1717.  The priest who recorded the marriage called Jean, fils a Lemer.  Marguerite gave him at least three sons, all born at Grand-Pré.  A least seven of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 and especially from France in 1785.210 

Louis dit Provençal, son of Antoine Arnaud dit Renaud and Marie Samson of St.-Martin, Marseille, came to British Nova Scotia by c1718, the year he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Lapierre dit Laroche and Jeanne Rimbault, at Grand-Pré.  They raised a large family of 16 children, all born at Grand-Pré:  Charles in c1720; Ursule in c1721; Louis in c1722; François in c1723; Marie-Josèphe-Marguerite in c1725; Jean-Baptiste in c1726; Laurent-Sylvain in c1731; Alexis in c1732; Jean-Joseph in c1733; Pierre in c1734; Grégoire in c1735; Judith in c1736; Angélique in c1737; Anne in c1739; Louis-Étienne in c1741; and Anselme in c1743.  Louis took his family to Île St.-Jean probably to escape British authority on the peninsula.  The move proved fatal for him; he drowned off Cap-St.-Louis, on the north shore of the island, date unrecorded.  In August 1752, his widow Marie was living on Rivière-de-Peugiguit, in the middle of the island, with her oldest daughter, a son-in-law, and four of her unmarried children--Ursule, age 30, married to Joseph Poirier; Pierre, age 18; Judith, age 16; Anne, age 13; and Anselme, age 8.  Charles married Catherine Humer probably on Île St.-Jean in c1750.  François married Françoise Comeau, widow of ____ Tompique, probably in the early 1750s and settled at Rivière-des-Blonds, on the south coast of the island, where a French official counted them in August 1752; two of the three children counted with them were daughters Théotiste, age 20 months, and Rose, age 5 months.  Marguerite married into the Levron family at Grand-Pré, date unrecorded.  Jean-Joseph married Marie-Josèphe, daugher of Nicolas Barrieau and Ursule Gautrot, at Port-Lajoie on Île St.-Jean in January 1755.  Alexis married Françoise, daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carret, probably on Île St.-Jean in c1760.  Angélique married into the Boissy family, place and date unrecorded.  If any of Louis's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.211

Ignace dit Saint-Jacques Carret, born in France, probably was not kin to soldier Pierre Carret who had come to French Acadia in c1702.  Ignace dit Saint-Jacques arrived in Nova Scotia by c1718, the year he married Cécile, daughter of Robert Henry and Madeleine Godin of Cobeguit.  They settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, before moving on to the French Maritimes in the early 1750s.  Cécile gave Ignace at least 10 children, eight sons and two daughters, all born in British Nova Scotia:  Charles in c1724; Jean in c1725, Pierre in c1726; Joseph in c1727; Honoré in c1729; Marie in c1732; François in c1734; Zenon in c1736; Anne-Marie in c1740; and Ignace, fils in c1744.  In the late 1740s, son Joseph married into the Lapierre family, and son Pierre married into the Gautrot family and settled on Île St.-Jean.  In the early 1750s, Ignace, père took his family to Île Royale, where a French official counted them at Pointe-à-la-Jeunesse in March 1752.  In the early and late 1750s, daughters Marie and Anne-Marie married into the Lejeune family.  At least eight of Ignace's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.212 

Pierre Olivier, a tailor from the Parish of St.-Mederic, Paris, came to Nova Scotia by c1718, the year he married Françoise, daughter of Jacques Bonnevie and Françoise Mius, at Annapolis Royal.  They had eight children, five daughters and three sons, all born at Annapolis Royal:  Marie-Josèphe, born in c1719; Marguerite in c1720; Anne in c1721; Madeleine in c1722; Paul in c1727; Jean-Baptiste in c1729; Joseph in c1730; and Françoise in c1732.  Daughters Mariee-Josèphe, Marguerite, Anne, and Françoise married into the Caissie, Le Prieur dit Dubois, and Haché dit Gallant families.  Pierre and Françoise's three sons settled at Chignecto.  Oldest son Paul moved on to Île St.-Jean in 1749 and Marguerite, daughter of François Poirier and Marie Haché dit Gallant, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in September 1749.  They settled on upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  With them were two children, a son and a daughter.  Middle son Jean-Baptiste also moved to Île St.-Jean and married Susanne Pitre there in c1749.  He remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Haché dit Gallant and Marie Gentil of Île St.-Jean, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in January 1767, during Le Grand Dérangement.  Youngest son Joseph married Marguerite, daughter of Paul Martin dit Barnabé and Marguerite Cyr of Chignecto, probably at Chignecto in c1752.  Pierre's second daughter Marguerite also settled on Île St.-Jean, where the same French official counted her with husband Joseph Le Prieur at Havre-de-la-Fortune, on the island's southeast coast, in August 1752.  At least three of the tailor's descendants--daughter Anne, son Joseph, and Joseph's son Jean-Baptiste le jeune--emigrated to Louisiana from French St.-Domingue in the late 1760s and France in 1785.213 

Henri and René Guillot dit L'Angevin, brothers born at Doix in the diocese of Angers in c1693 and c1695, respectively, came to Nova Scotia by 1719, when René married Marguerite Doiron probably at Minas.  Henri also married probably at Minas, but the name of his wife has been lost to history.  Henri's wife gave him at least two children, son René le jeune, born in c1722, and daughter Marie-Josèphe, born in c1723.  Henri moved his family to Cobeguit.  Bona Arsenault insists that René le jeune married an Arsement and fathered a daughter in c1751. 

Henri's brother René l'aîné, who also moved on to Cobeguit, fathered at least four children, three sons and a daughter, who created families of their own:  Jean-Baptiste at Minas in December 1720; Marie-Josèphe in c1723; Ambroise at Cobeguit in c1728; and René, fils in c1731.  René, père and Marguerite's daughter married into the Breau family.  Their sons married into the Arcement, Bourg, and Daigre families, and the oldest one settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  René, père evidently died before 1750.  In that year, his sons followed their widowered uncle Henri and cousin Marie-Josèphe to French-controlled Île St.-Jean.  Two of the sons settled at Pointe-Prime near their uncle and the other at Pointe-au-Boulleau on the island's southeastern coast.  At least eight of René, père's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.483

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A circumstance probably discouraged by British authorities in the early years of their control of the colony was the settlement of their own soldiers in francophone Nova Scotia, with predictable results.  It was not usual for young officers to take Acadian brides at Annapolis Royal while pursing their careers--a granddaughter of Charles La Tour married two of them!  At least two British officers chose to settle in the colonial capital after they retired from active service: 

Sr. William Winniett, called Guillaume by his Acadian neighbors, was born perhaps in France of Huguenot parents in c1685.  He came to Boston with Colonel Francis Nicholson in the spring 1709 "as a volunteer in the expedition against Port-Royal," which resulted in the Acadian capital's fall the following year.  William served as an ensign and later as a sub-lieutenant in Walton's New Hampshire regiment.  Volunteering to remain in the garrison at Annapolis Royal, he was promoted to lieutenant.  In c1711, William, now 26, married Marie-Madeleine, the 16-year-old daughter of Pierre Maisonnat dit Baptiste and Madeleine Bourg, in a Protestant ceremony at Annapolis Royal.  Marie-Madeleine's father, a native of Bergerac, Guyenne, and a renown French privateer, remained in Acadia after the British takeover and served as port captain at Annapolis Royal.  Marie-Madeleine's mother was her father's second wife and a daughter of François Bourg and Marguerite Boudrot of Port-Royal.  The year of his marriage, Winniett retired from active service and became a successful merchant and ship owner at Annapolis Royal.  In November 1729, he was appointed to the colonial Council in spite of the wishes of the irascible lieutenant-governor, Lawrence Armstrong, who was a political enemy not only of Winniett, but also of the merchant's influential son-in-law, Alexander CosbyWinniett served the colony for five years, until Armstrong removed him from the Council in November 1734 "on information laid against him, 'and his other disrespectful & Contemptuous behaviour not only in Council but likewise aboard.'"  William nonetheless was a successful businessman and enjoyed a fulfilling family life.  Marie-Madeleine gave him 13 children, including four sons who created families of their own.  Oldest son William, Jr., also called Guillaume, fils, married Louise dite Lisette, daughter of François Robichaud and Madeleine Thériot, at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in October 1742.  William, Sr. and Marie-Madeleine's second Charles never married.  Their third, fourth, and fifth sons Edward, John, and Joseph married fellow Britons:  Edward to Elizabeth, daughter of Timothy Dallor, in England in c1751; John to Elizabeth, daughter of Isaac Winslow, at Boston, Massachusetts, in 1746, where he remained; and Joseph to Mary Dyson in December 1751.  Joseph, like his father and oldest brother William, Jr., also became a successful merchant and engaged in the illegal trade between British Nova Scotia and French Louisbourg, where William, Jr. settled.  After the Seven Years's War, Joseph, who remained at Annapolis Royal, became a member of the Nova Scotia assembly and a judge.  William, Sr. and Marie-Madeleine's sixth son Matthew served as a major of militia and a colonial official in postwar Nova Scotia but did not marry.  William, Sr. and Marie-Madeleine's seventh and youngest son Alexander became an army officer, serving as a lieutenant in the 40th Regiment of Foot, Richard Philipps's old regiment, during the French and Indian War; he also did not marry.  Three of William and Marie-Madeleine's daughters married prominent Britons who played important roles in Acadian history:  Oldest daughter Anne married Alexander Cosby, her father's political ally. Cosby served as interim lieutenant-governor of the colony from 1739-40 after Lawrence Armstrong's suicide.  A native of Ireland, Cosby was age 41 and Anne age 14 at the time of their marriage.  Second daughter Élisabeth married Lieutenant John Handfield, who witnessed the oath of allegiance imposed on the Nova Scotia Acadians by Governor Philipps in 1729-30 and would, as a major, supervise the deportation of the Annapolis Royal Acadians, including relatives of his wife, a quarter of a century later.  Third daughter Marie-Madeleine married Edward How, a widower and prominent merchant at Canso who, like his father-in-law and brothers-in-law, served as a member of the Nova Scotia Council.  How joined the British army as a commissary and Indian interpreter during King George's War and was murdered by Mi'kmaq near Fort Lawrence at the beginning of Father Le Loutre's petite guerre against the British.  Meanwhile, William, Sr. drowned in Boston harbor in April 1741, probably on a business venture; he was 56 years old.  His death left his family burdened with debt.  Wife Marie-Madeleine remained at Annapolis Royal, where, despite her "deplorable circumstances," she wielded influence not only on the garrison's officers, but also on members of the colonial Council.  When, during the autumn of 1755, Major John Handfield oversaw the deportation of the Acadians in the Annapolis valley, including his mother-in-law's relations, the widow Winniett remained unmolested.  She was counted at Annapolis Royal in 1770, in her mid-70s, and probably died there.  If any of Sr. William's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.116

Benjamin, son of John Druce and Anne Turner of Benson, Oxfordshire, England, was baptized an Anglican at Benson on 25 January 1685.  Benjamin came to Acadia by 1710, probably as a soldier.  He converted to Catholicism to marry his Acadian sweetheart, Madeleine, daughter of Acadians Robert Henry and Marie-Madeleine Godin of Minas, at Grand-Pré in February 1711.  Witnesses to his profession of faith, recorded on 6 December 1710, several weeks before his wedding, were Pierre Melanson and Pierre Thériot of Minas.  Benjamin died at Minas in March 1714, only 29 years old.  Daughter Marie-Josèphe, born at Minas in late January 1712, was his only child; she married into the Clément family on Île Royale.  Benjamin's widow, Madeleine Henry, remarried to Jean-Baptiste Radoux in c1715.  If any of Benjamin's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.317  

In July 1712, nearly two years after the fall of Port-Royal, James, son of Andrew Gainier and Margaret Benard of Dublin, Ireland, was serving as a soldier with the British army when he married Cécile, daughter of Pierre Cellier and Marie-Josèphe-Aimée Lejeune of Minas, at Chignecto.  James later called himself Jacques Guénard dit Gaudereau, signifying his entrance into Acadian society.  Jacques and Cécile had three children, including a son, Timothée, who created a family of his own.  At least three of James Gainier's descendants, calling themselves Guénards, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1785.278

William, called "Billy," Johnson, a native of Scotland, came to Port-Royal in the autumn of 1710 as a British soldier.  He got into trouble with his superiors, was branded on the forehead with the crow's foot, the sign of a thief, and expelled from the garrison.  Undaunted, Billy sought refuge in the nearby Acadian community, denounced Protestantism, and became a Catholic.  In c1714, he "married" Isabelle, daughter of Jean Corporon and Françoise Savoie, at Annapolis Royal and "became" an Acadian.  Seven years earlier, in September 1707, Isabelle had given birth to a natural son, Louis dit Beaulieu, by Sr. René Fontaine, "a clerk in M. Raudot's office of the Marine in France," and in September 1713 she gave birth to a natural daughter, Marie, whose father's identity has been lost to history.  She may have borne natural children by Billy before they married.  Among his Acadian in-laws and neighbors, Billy was called Guillaume Johnson dit Jeanson.  Isabelle gave him four children at Annapolis Royal, all sons, all of whom created families of their own: Jean-Baptiste, born in January 1715, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Lord and Jeanne Doucet, at Annapolis Royal in 1743; Charles, born in July 1717, married Marie, daughter of Joseph Aucoin and Anne Trahan, at Annapolis Royal in c1744; Thomas, born in June 1719, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Alexandre Girouard and Marie Le Borgne de Bélisle and widow of Louis Dugas, at Annapolis Royal in January 1742, and remarried to another Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Claude Granger and Jeanne Guilbeau and widow of Denis dit Jean-Baptiste Petitot dit Saint-Seine, at L'Assomption, Québec, in October 1768 after Le Grand Dérangement; and Guillaume dit Billy, born in July 1722, married Marie-Josèphe dite Josette, daughter of Pierre Aucoin and Catherine Comeau, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1743.  Each of them retained their father's dit as their surname.  At least five of William "Billy"'s descendants--a daughter and three sons of Charles, and a son of Jean-Baptiste--emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.279

In early October 1712, Edmund Bradstreet, a native of Port Lahane, Tipperary, Ireland, serving as a lieutenant in the British army, "made an inspection of work carried out at Annapolis Royal," the "first mention of him in Nova Scotia."  Sometime that year, the 25-year-old Irish officer married Marie-Agathe, 22-year-old daughter of Jacques de Saint-Étienne de La Tour and Anne Melanson and granddaughter of former governor Charles La Tour, probably at Annapolis Royal.  Edmund died after a long illness probably in the colonial capital in December 1718; he was only 31 years old.  Marie-Agathe, who remarried to another British officer, Hugh Campbell, four years later, had given Edmund two children, sons Simon and John.  Like their father, they, too, became army officers, mainly through the influence of their well-placed mother.  They also married, but not to fellow Acadians.  If any of the Irisman's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.317a

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The frontier war of the 1720s may have slowed, but it did not halt, French immigration into British Nova Scotia.  New families emerged in a number of settlements when recent arrivals married into established families.  Some of these new families moved on to the French Maritimes:

Louis Hugon, native of Villefagnan, Angouleme, France, married Marie, daughter of Claude Bourgeois and Anne Blanchard, at Chignecto in April 1720.  They had six children, four sons and two daughters. Two of the sons, both born at Chignecto, created families of their own.  At least two of Louis's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from French St.-Domingue in 1765.214 

Jean-Michel, called Michel, Part, probably Apart, a native of France and probably not kin to Pierre Part dit La Forest of Port-Royal and Louisbourg, married Élisabeth, daughter of Michel Hébert and Isabelle Pellerin, probably at Minas in c1720.  They had at least four children there--Jean-Antoine, born in c1721; Joseph in c1723; Alexis in c1725; Brigitte in c1727--before moving on to Cobeguit in the 1730s.  Brigitte married into the Boudrot family at Grand-Pré.  Jean-Antoine married Marguerite-Josèphe Breau in c1745 and moved to Île St.-Jean in 1750.   In August 1752, a French official counted them at Anse-à-Pinnet with two children.  At least one of Michel's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.215 

Pierre-Claude Arcement, born probably in France in c1694, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Thériot and Marie Bourg, in c1722 and settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit.  Between 1724 and 1734, at L'Assomption, Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre-Claude eight children, four sons and four daughters, including a set of fraternal twins.  Oldest daughter Geneviève, born in c1724, married into the Pitre family at Pigiguit in c1744.  Oldest son Jean, born in c1725, married Marie-Josèphe Doiron at Pigiguit in c1745 and fathered at least three children, a son and two daughters, between 1746 and 1750.  Second son Claude, born in c1726, married Angélique, daughter of Louis Doiron and Marguerite Barrieau, at Pigiguit in c1746.  She gave him three children, a son and two daughters, between 1747 and 1750.  Pierre-Claude and his family joined the exodus from Pigiguit to Île St.-Jean in 1750.  One wonders if Generviève, Jean, and their families remained at L'Assomption when their parents and siblings moved to the island.  Pierre-Claude's second daughter Cécile, born in c1727, married Antoine Leprince, widower of Judith Boudrot, at Port-La-Joye on Île St.-Jean in November 1751.  Third daughter Marie-Madeleine, born in c1732, married Jean-Baptiste Guillot at L'Assomption by 1746, followed her family to Île St.-Jean, and died there.  In August 1752, a French official counted Pierre-Claude, who he called a Herrement and a "native of l'Acadie," which he was not, Marie-Josèphe, and three of their younger children at Grande-Anse on the south coast of the island.  The same official counted son Claude, who he called an Arcement, wife Angélique, and three of their children, as well as daughter Marie-Madeleine's husband Jean-Baptiste Guillot, now a widower, and three of his children, at nearby Pointe-Prime.  Pierre-Claude's third son Pierre, born in c1731, married Marie, daughter of Jean Hébert and Madeleine Doiron, on the island in c1757.  One wonders if Pierre-Claude's youngest son François and his twin sister Marie-Josèphe, born in c1734, created families of their own.  At least eight of Pierre-Claude's descendants, son Pierre and seven of his children, emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.217

Pierre Cloistre dit Clouâtre, a French gunsmith, reached Nova Scotia by 1722, the year he married Marguerite, daughter of André LeBlanc and Marie-Jeanne Dugas of Minas.  Pierre and Marguerite settled at Grand-Pré and had at least a dozen children, including five sons, all born at Minas:  Marie-Josèphe was born in April 1723, Louis in August 1724, Georges in November 1727, Dominique in May 1729, Pierre-Sylvain in c1740, Anne in March 1744, Marthe-Marie July 1746, and Joseph in c1750.  Daughter Anne's marriage record calls her a native of "St. Jean, Acadia," so the gunsmith and his wife may have lived on French-controlled Île St.-Jean during the 1740s.  Only one of Pierre and Marguerite's sons seems to have married before Le Grand Dérangement:  Third son Dominique married Françoise, daughter of Claude Boudrot, fils and Catherine Hébert, probably at Minas in c1750.  Oldest daughter Marie-Josèphe married into the Hébert family at Grand-Pré in October 1747.  In 1755, the British deported Pierre and his family to Maryland.  Pierre died there.  At least eight of his descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1768.264 

Charles Le Roy, born at Paris in c1700, not kin to Jean dit La Liberté Roy or to Sébastien Le Roy dit L'Espérance of Lorraine, married Marie-Charlotte, daughter of Charles Chauvet dit La Gerne and Edmée Joseph dit Lejeune of Pigiguit, in c1723, probably at Pigiguit.  Marie-Charlotte gave him at least 10 children:  Pierre, born in c1724; Geneviève in c1726; Marguerite in c1728; Alexandre in c1730; Marie in c1732; Charles, fils in c1734; Anne-Madeleine in c1736; Martine in c1738; Alexis in c1742; and Osite in c1745.  Charles's daughters married into the Fournier, Pitsch, Lejeune, Cabas, Thibault, Benoit, and Lacoste-Languedoc families.  His sons married into the Lejeune, Lanadé, Doiron, and Des Sauteux families.  In the summer of 1750, Charles and his family followed other peninsula Acadians to Île Royale.  In April 1752, a French official counted him and his extended family--including son Pierre and his wife, and daughters Geneviève and Marie and their husbands--at Baie-des-Espagnols with dozens of other refugees from Nova Scotia.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.18

Étienne Hamet, born at St.-Jean Parish, bishopric of Coutances, in c1686, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Benoit l'aîné and Marie Forest, in c1725, place unrecorded but it probably was at Minas.  In c1750, perhaps after their children had grown (unless they were that rare Acadian couple who had no children), Étienne and Marguerite moved on to the French Maritimes and settled on Île Madame, where a French official counted them in February 1752, sans children.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.16

Toussaint, son of Jean Blanchard and Pétronille Ferrier of Évran, near St.-Malo, France, not kin to Jean and François dit Gentilhomme, married Angélique, daughter of Claude Bertrand and Catherine Pitre and widow of François Martin, at Annapolis Royal in c1727.  Like some of Jean Blanchard's descendants, Toussaint settled at Petitcoudiac.  According to Bona Arsenault, Angélique gave Toussaint at least three sons:  Ambroise, born in c1734, Michel in c1741, and Joseph in c1746.  Other records show that Angélique gave Toussaint two daughters as well at Petitcoudianc:  Anne, born in June 1740, and Madeleine in c1744.  His daughters married into the Bertrand, Comeau, and Mondon families at Halifax and in Louisiana.  His youngest son Joseph was deported to France and married Marie, daughter of Jean Granger and Madeleine Melanson, at Très-St.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in August 1769.  Between 1770 and 1775, at Cherbourg and Châtellerault, Marie gave Joseph two sons.  They participated in the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s, where their second son was born.  They retreated with other Poitou Acadians to Nantes in December 1775.  Of the 59 Blanchards who emigrated to Louisiana, three of them who came from France were Toussaint's daughters.265   

Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, Marcadet or Marquadet, born at La Chapelle, France, in c1700, married Madeleine, daughter of Acadians Jean Benoit and his first wife Marie-Anne Breau of Cobeguit, in c1727 probably at Cobeguit.  They had at least 11 children, six sons and five daughters, born between c1728 and c1751, "all natives of la Cadie, with the exception of the last," who was born at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, where the family relocated.  They were counted at Rivière-de-Miré, up the coast from Louisbourg, in April 1752.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.486

François Nogues, born at Piriac, Diocese of Nantes, France, in c1702, came to Nova Scotia by c1729, when he married Madeleine, daughter of Jean Doiron, père and his second wife Marie Trahan, probably at Minas.  Madeleine gave François at least six children:  Marguerite, born in c1730; Catherine-Josèphe in c1733; François, fils in c1737; Anne-Théotiste in c1740; François-Joseph in c1742; and Marie-Madeleine in c1746.  In 1750, they moved to Île St.-Jean and settled at Anse-du-Nord-Ouest on the south shore Île St.-Jean, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  With them was Madeleine's widowed mother, age 80.  None of François's descendants seems to have emigrated to Louisiana.266

Jean dit Nouvelle, son of Étienne Hélie and Marguerite Laporte, France, born at Poitiers, France, in c1706, was a master tailor when he married Anne-Marie, daughter of Acadians Pierre Lalande alias Blaise des Brousse dit Bonappétit and Anne Prétieux, at Grand-Pré in October 1729.  Jean remarried to Françoise, daughter of Jacques Bonnevie dit Beaumont and Françoise Mius d'Azy and widow of Pierre Olivier, at Beaubassin in January 1741.  They moved to Île St.-Jean in c1749 and settled on Rivière-du-Nord-Est, where a French officials counted them on the north side of the river in August 1752.  If any member of Jean dit Nouvelle's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.01

Pierre LeMire dit Mire, born in Paris, came to Nova Scotia in the 1720s and married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Michel de Forest and and his first Marie Petitpas, in c1730.  They settled at Pigiguit.  Marie-Josèphe gave Pierre two children, a daughter and a son.  Pierre dit Mire remarried to Isabelle, daughter of Claude Thibodeau and Isabelle Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in July 1738.  Isabelle gave Pierre five more children, two daughters and three sons.  At least three of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.216

.

During the 1730s and early 1740s, the Acadian "golden age," more Frenchmen found their way into British Nova Scotia and married into established families.  Many of them moved on to the French Maritimes:

Michel Join, born at St.-Malo, France, in c1706, perhaps after his service in the troupes de la marine, married Marie Impérisse, widow of ____ André, in c1730.  A native of Port-Royal, Marie was age 24 at the time of their marriage, still a woman of child-bearing age.  Though she had given her first husband at least one daughter, she bore no children for Michel.  In 1750, the family moved to Île St.-Jean and settled at Anse-au-Sanglier, on the south coast of the island, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  With them was Marie-Marthe André, age 20, Marie's daughter from her first marriage, also a widow, and Marie-Marthe's 5-month-old son François-Marie Lecchis.  The official noted that Michel, now a farmer, was "extremely poor."  He and Marie had no livestock, but they had "made a large garden."  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.30

Jean-Baptiste dit Clermont, son of Thomas Le Marquis and Anne Dalvan, born at St.-Malo, France, in c1702, married Anne, daughter of Acadians François Lapierre dit Laroche and Jeanne Rimbault and widow of Thomas Le Sauvage, perhaps at Minas in c1730.  She gave him at least three children:  Jean-Baptiste, fils, born in c1732; Marie-Josèphe in c1734; and Pierre-Paul, called Paul in c1736.  Anne died on Île St.-Jean in May 1751, in her late 50s, and Jean-Baptiste remarried to Marie, daughter of Clément Vincent and Madeleine Levron and widow of Paul Michel dit La Ruine, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in May 1752.  A few months later, in August 1752, a French official counted Jean-Baptiste, his second wife, and their family at Anse-aux-Pirogues, on lower Rivière-du-Nord-Est.  Among the eight children counted with Jean-Baptiste and Marie were the three children from his first marriage.  Jean-Baptiste, fils, who went by the name Marquis, married Marie-Thérèse, daughter of Paul Trahan and Marie Boudrot, at Port-Lajoie in February 1754.  If any of Jean-Baptiste's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.10

Pierre Bonnier or Bonnière, a tailor, born at Raqueil, bishopric of Rennes, Brittany, in c1709, married Madeleine-Josèphe, daughter of Michel Forest, fils and his second wife Marie Célestin dit Bellemère of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, probably at that settlement in c1730.  Madeleine-Josèphe gave the tailor-turned-farmer at least seven children:  Pierre, fils, born in c1731; Marie-Madeleine in c1733; Michel-Joseph in c1735; Jean-Jacques in c1736; Rose in c1738; Rosalie in c1739; Anne in c1741; and Charles in c1744.  Pierre, père took his family to Île St.-Jean in 1750 and settled at Havre-St.-Pierre, on the north shore of the island, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  Pierre, fils married Anne Granger on Île St.-Jean probably on the eve of the census.  Pierre, père died at Plymouth, England, in c1759, age 50, during the deportation of the Maritime islanders to France.  If any of Pierre's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.267 

Joseph-Nicolas Deschamps dit Cloche, born at St.-Martin-de-Ré, diocese of La Rochelle, in c1710, married Acadian Judith Doiron, place unrecorded but probably at Minas, in the early 1730s.  She gave him at least nine children:  Euphrosine, born in c1734; Philippe in c1736; Louis in c1738; Augustin in c1740; Jean-Baptiste in c1746; François in c1748; Élisabeth in 1750; La Blanche in c1752; and Charles-Joseph in c1754.  They moved to Île St.-Jean in c1749 and settled at Anse-au-Comte-St.-Pierre, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, son Philippe married Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Trahan and Catherine-Josèphe Boudrot, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in February 1752, though the census of August 1752 lists Philippe with his parents and siblings and says nothing of his being married.  One wonders what happened to the family after Louisbourg fell in July 1758.  If any of Joseph's descendants emigrated to Louisiana, none took the family's name there.11

François Rullier dit Le Cadien, born at Crédeville, bishopric of Bayeux, in c1709, married Anne, daughter of Michel Forest, fils and his second wife Marie Célestin dit Bellemère of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1734.  In c1747, they moved to the French Maritimes, where a French official counted them at Anse-au-Matelot, Île St.-Jean, in August 1752.  They lived alone, so they may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.13

Claude-Antoine, a surgeon, son of Claude Duplessis and Marie Derivie, born at St.-Jean de St.-Quentin, Noyons, Picardie, France, in c1709, reached Acadia by September 1736, when he married Catherine, daughter of Pierre Lejeune and Marie Thibodeau and widow of Antoine Lanoue, at Grand-Pré; Catherine was eight years older than her surgeon husband and a granddaughter of Pierre Thibodeau of Pré Ronde and Chepoudy.  In the 1740s, Claude-Antoine moved his family to Chignecto, and they were there in 1750 when Canadian soldiers and Abbé Le Loutre's Mi'kmaq burned the villages east of Rivière Missaguash to drive the Acadians into French-controlled territory west of that stream.  Soon after, Claude-Antoine and Catherine moved on to Port-Lajoie on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, probably to escape the chaos at Chignecto.  In August 1752, a French official counted the family at Havre-St.-Pierre on the north shore of the island.  With them were three children:  Anastasie-Adélaïde, born at Grand-Pré in June 1737; Marie-Louise in April 1739; and François-Marin probably at Chignecto in c1749.  Also with them was orphan Louis Labauve, age 12, native of Acadia's Atlantic coast.  At least one of the surgeon's descendants, daughter Marie-Louise, emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.268 

Pierre, son of François Arostey or Arosteguy and Marie Lassalde of Bayonne, Gascogne, came to Louisiana by May 1737, when he married Marie, daughter of Charles Robichaud dit Cadet and his second wife Marie Bourg, at Grand-Pré.  Pierre and Marie settled on the Beauséjour ridge at Chignecto.  They and six of their children emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.269

Jean, son of Guy Cousin of Dol, Brittany, reached Nova Scotia by November 1737, when he married Judith, 16-year-old daughter of Paul Guédry and Anne Mius d'Azy, at Grand-Pré.  Jean and Judith settled near her family at Ministigueshe, near Cap-Sable, where four of their children were born:  Bénony in c1742, Marie-Blanche in c1744, Jean-Baptiste in c1746, and Marie-Madeleine in c1747.  In c1750, Jean took his family to Île Royale, where they settled at Baie-des-Espagnols.  At least one of Jean's descendants emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.270 

François Turcot or Tureaud, a nailer, born at St.-Pierre-du-Doy, Anjou, France, in c1718, married Catherine Doiron at either Pigiguit or Cobeguit in c1740.  She gave him at least four children:  Marie-Josèphe, born in c1741; Anaclet in c1743; Jean-Baptiste in c1745; and François, fils in c1749.  In 1750, they moved to Île St.-Jean and settled at Anse-au-Sanglier, on the south shore of the island, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  The official noted that François was "poor ... not having the means of buying the requisites to work at his trade...."  However, he and Catherine did have a large garden and owned a pig and 12 "fowls or chickens."  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.29

Pierre, son of Paul Bergeron and Benoîte Chapagnon of Craponne, Haute-Loire, France, probably not kin to Barthélemy dit d'Amboise, was born in France in c1720 and became a merchant.  He came to British Nova Scotia by July 1742, when he married Marie-Anne, daughter of Nicolas Gauthier dit Bellaire, a prominent merchant, and Marie Allain of Annapolis Royal.  According to genealogist Bona Arsenault, in 1743 and 1745, Marie-Anne gave Pierre two children, a son and a daughter.  The family settled first at Chignecto and then moved on to Minas in c1745.  Pierre died at Minas in January 1746, age 26.  Daughter Marie married a Gauthier at Rivière-Ouelle, Québec, in c1768 while in exile.  One wonders what happened to their son Maurice.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.32

Étienne-Michel, called Michel, son of Jean-Pierre David dit Saint-Michel of Nantes, France, and Madeleine Monmellian dit Saint-Germain of Québec, was born at the French fortress of Louisbourg in c1720.  Michel probably was not kin to the other Davids in greater Acadia.  He married Geneviève, daughter of Michel Hébert and Marguerite Gautrot, at Grand-Pré in January 1744.  Like his father, Michel was a blacksmith.  Their four oldest children were born at Grand-Pré:  Anne in November1744; Michel-Luc or -Lin in September1746, who probably died young; Joseph in November 1748; and Paul in c1754.  Four more children were born to them during Le Grand Dérangement.  Michel and family emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767.271 

Jean Froiquingont, born at Plouane, bishopric of St.-Malo, France, in c1715, married Anne, daughter of Pierre Lejeune and Jeanne Benoit of Pigiguit, probably at Pigiguit in the early 1740s.  Anne gave him at least three children:  Joseph, born in c1745; Véronique in c1747; and Anne-Marie in c1751.  In 1750, they followed her family to Île St.-Jean and settled at Bédec, on the southwest shore of the island, where a French official counted them in August 1752.  During Le Grand Dérangement, Jean, Anne, their children, and the families of three of Anne's siblings, perished aboard the British transport Duke William on its way to St.-Malo in December 1758.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.28

Jean Olivet, born in 1717, married Josette Hébert in c1745 and settled at Pigiguit, where she gave him three daughters: Marie and Anne-Josèphe, born in c1746; and Anne-Angélique in c1750.  Soon after Anne-Angélique's birth, the family followed other Pigiguit settlers to Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, where son Jean-Fournier was born in early 1752.  A French official counted them there in April 1752.  With them was Josette's mother, Anne-Josette Lejeune, who the French official said was age 110!  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.24

.

Amazingly, new arrivals from France, and even from Spain, appeared in British Nova Scotia during the troubled years of the late 1740s and early 1750s.  Each of them married daughters of long-established Acadian families and created families of their own.  Some moved on to the French Maritimes: 

François Marteau, born at Paris in c1712, married Acadian Françoise Trahan probably in the late 1740s at Pigiguit.  In c1749, they followed other Acadians from the Minas Basin to Île Royale and settled at Baie-des-Espagnols, on the island's Atlantic Coast.  Their son Joseph was born probably on the Spanish Bay in c1751.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.17

Paul Benjamin, perhaps an Englishman, born in Nova Scotia in c1725, married Cécile, daughter of Joseph Lejeune and Cécile Pitre, in the late 1740s.  In c1750, they followed her parents to Île Royale, where they settled at Baie-des-Espagnols, on the Atlantic coast above Louisbourg.  A French official counted them there in April 1752.  With them was their 4-month-old son Jean-Baptiste.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.19

Joseph Lucas, born in c1723, supposedly in British Nova Scotia, married Marguerite Lejeune in c1746, no place recorded, but it probably was at Minas.  In c1750, Joseph and Marguerite moved to Île St.-Jean, where a French official counted them at Anse-au-Matelot in August 1752.  With them were two children:  Marguerite-Thérèse, born in c1746; and Joseph-Marie in c1750.  They also had a daughter named Marie-Blanche, born in c1752, so Marguerite likely was pregnant at the time of the August 1752 census.  One suspects that the birth of daughter Marie-Blanche led to Marguerite's death because Joseph remarried to Marguerite Briard in c1753.  This second Marguerite gave him another son, Jean-Louis, born in c1754 probably on the island.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.305a

Jean-Baptiste, son of François Butteau and Marie Jinchereau, married Jeanne, daughter of Jean Caissie dit Roger and his second wife Cécile Hébert, at Beaubassin in February 1748.  In c1750, they moved to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, where a French official counted them with 8-month-old daughter Marguerite in February 1752.  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.04

Jean Daniqua, born at Gavray, bishopric of Coutances, France, in c1712, married Marie Sire.  She was a "native of la Cadie," born in c1726, so she likely was a Cyr from Chignecto, where she may have married Jean in the late 1740s.  They moved on to the French Maritimes in August 1751 and settled on Île Madame, where he worked as a fisherman.  Marie gave him at least two daughters:  Marie, born in c1750; and Rose in c1751.  A French official counted them on the north shore of Île Madame in February 1752 and noted that "He has been in the colony since the month of August last."  No member of this family emigrated to Louisiana.15

Pierre Boucher married Marie, daughter of Jean Doiron and Anne LeBlanc, probably at Chignecto in the early 1750s.  They had at least one child, daughter Marie-Anne, born at Beaubassin in c1754, on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  Marie-Anne was the only Acadian Bourchers to emigrate to Louisiana.  She went there from French St.-Domingue with her mother and stepfather, Pierre Lambert, in 1765.272

Jean, fils, son of Jean Gousman and Marie Granielle, born probably at St.-Nicolas, Andalusia, Spain, came to British Nova Scotia by c1755, when he married Acadian Marie Barrieau probably at Annapolis Royal.  She died without giving him any children.  In January 1760, while in exile, the Spaniard remarried to Rose, daughter of Acadians Jacques dit Jacquot Bonnevie dit Beaumont, fils and his first wife Marguerite Lord of Annapolis Royal and Île St.-Jean, at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Rose gave him at least two children, a daughter and a son.  All four of them emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.273 

Joseph Marant, born in c1729, married Acadian Angélique Dugas probably at Chignecto in c1755.  They emigrated to Louisiana from French St.-Domingue in 1765 and remained childless.274 

Joseph Dubois, a seaman, probably not kin to the other Duboiss of greater Acadia, married Anne, daughter of Acadians Louis Michel and Marguerite Forest, in c1756 and settled most likely at Cap-Sable.  They had at least one child, daughter Marguerite-Ange, born in c1757 probably at Cap-Sable.  She was the only member of her father's family to emigrate to Louisiana, from France in 1785.275 

Pierre Noël, born perhaps in Acadia in c1725, married a woman whose name has been lost to history probably at Minas and remarried to Marie-Madeleine Barbe, perhaps a fellow Acadian, in England during Le Grand Dérangement.  One wonders who Pierre's parents may have been and if he was the first of his family to settle in British Nova Scotia.  Two of his daughters by his second wife emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.276 

At least one new arrival from France went not to Nova Scotia but to Rivière St.-Jean, which the French considered theirs.  Philippe de Saint-Julien Lachaussée, a surgeon, born in Picardy, France, in c1727, married Françoise, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Godin dit Lincour and Anastasie Bourg, in c1754, settled with her on the river, and became the area's surgeon.  Philippe and a daughter by Françoise emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765.277 

.

Several of these late arrivals chose to move on to the French Maritimes and join the hundreds of Acadians who had gone there over the previous four decades.  Then came 1755, the great turning point in Acadian history.  Six years of petite guerre gave way to organized warfare.  By the end of the year, without the Acadians' consent, the government in Halifax had cleared the province of most of its French inhabitants.  While thousands of their kinsmen were shipped south to the seaboard colonies, hundreds escaped to Île St.-Jean, where they strained that island's already limited resources.  Living in territory controlled by France, they were safe for now from deportation.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  The fourth and final French and Indian War spread like wildfire to the rest of the northern region, and soon even the Acadians' island refuge fell to the determined redcoats. 

 

INTRODUCTION

BOOK ONE:        French Acadia

BOOK TWO:        British Nova Scotia

BOOK FOUR:      The French Maritimes

BOOK FIVE:         The Great Upheaval

BOOK SIX:          The Acadian Immigrants of Louisiana

BOOK SEVEN:     French Louisiana

BOOK EIGHT:      A New Acadia

BOOK NINE:        The Bayou State

BOOK TEN:          The Louisiana Acadian "Begats"

BOOK ELEVEN:  The Non-Acadian "Cajun" Families of South Louisiana

BOOK TWELVE:   Acadians in Gray

 

SOURCE NOTES - BOOK THREE-2

01.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2091; De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:89; White, DGFA-1, 178, 907; Book Four.

03.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1288-89; De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:16; White, DGFA-1, 961. 

04.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 886; De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:21; White, DGFA-1, 307-08.

10.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2129; De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:106-07; White, DGFA-1, 961, 1582

11.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2085-86; De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:108

12.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2123-24; De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:108, 110; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 547-48; White, DGFA-1, 977; Book One.

Arsenault, 2123, says both Jean-Baptiste, born in c1749 (Arsenault says c1747) & Firmin-Grégoire, born in c1753, were sons of Honoré, oldest son of François LaVache.  Robichaux, followed here, says Jean-Baptiste & Firmin-Grégoire were François's youngest sons. 

13.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2139; De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:109-10; White, DGFA-1, 633; Book One.

14.  See De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:12; White, DGFA-1, 418, 1085-86; Roy family page

15.  Quotations from De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:26.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 2001.

16.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2024; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:26; White, DGFA-1, 106-07. 

17.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1443, 1449, 2036; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:49; White, DGFA-1, 1544-45. 

Arsenault, 1443, 1449, insists that wife Françoise was a daughter of Jean Trahan & Marie Girouard, but White says otherwise.

18.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1432-34, 2018, 2033; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:50-51; White, DGFA-1, 336, 1084-86, 1425-26; note 14, above; Roy family page

Arsenault, 1432, says Charles was a son of Jean Roy & Marie Aubois, but White, 1245, followed here, shows no marriage for Charles, son of Jean Roy & Marie Aubois, born at Port-Royal in c1698.  De La Roque is clear about Charles Le Roy's birthplace, so Charles could not have been kin to the other Le Roys/Roys, who bore a common French name. 

19.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2000; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:51. 

20.  See De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:59; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 571, 580; White, DGFA-1, 161-62, 1579; Books Eight & Eleven; Vincent family page; Montet family sketch. 

21.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1938; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:53-54; White, DGFA-1, 807. 

24.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1423; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:46

25.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 736-38, 2093, 2119; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:126-27, 138; White, DGFA-1, 1075-77, 1338-40. 

28.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2093; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:161; White, DGFA-1, 1057; White, DGFA-1 English, 227. 

29.  Quotations from De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:165.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 2143. 

30.  Quotations from De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:165.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 2118.

Once wonders why the families André, Impérisse, & Lecchis cannot be found in Arsenault or White, DGFA-1

32.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1104; Bergeron family page

116.  Quotations from White, DGFA-1 English, 335; Fergusson,"Winniett, William," in DCB, 3:665.  See also William G. Godfrey, "Handfield, John," in DCB, 3:277-78, & online; Hector J. Hébert, "Maissonat, Marie-Madeleine (Winniett)," in DCB, 3:421-22, & online; Barry M. Moody, "Cosby, Alexander," in DCB, 3:143-44, & online; Pincombe, "How," in DCB, 3:297-98; Squires, "Maissonat," in DCB, 2:449-50; White, DGFA-1, 1114-15, 1588-90; note 421, below; Book Two. 

117.  Marriages from 1710-14 may be found in White, DGFA-1.  Marriages after 1714 may be found in Arsenault, Généalogie, which is organized by settlement & then alphabetically by family name. 

See Clark, A. H., Acadia, 203-04, for an analysis of marriages at Annapolis Royal & in the Minas Basin from the late 1720s thru the early 1750s.  Clark concludes:  "... the records of Grand Pré show the precise opposite of bucolic isolation," & "Even the Annapolis records suggest a good deal of contact outside of that settlement...." 

See also Book Four. 

196.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 767-69; White, DGFA-1, 1383-84; White, DGFA-1 English, 291; Richard family page

197.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 611-12; White, DGFA-1, 907-08; White, DGFA-1 English, 192-93; Lalande family page. 

198.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1106-07; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:101-02; White, DGFA-1, 163-64

198a.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1138-43; White, DGFA-1, 438-39.

199.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2067-68, 2208; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:131, 156; notes 265 & 357, below; Blanchard family page. 

200.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1008, 2520-21; White, DGFA-1, 910-11; Lambert family page. 

Philippe's and Marie-Madeleine's younger son, Pierre, was the only member of the family--the only Acadian Lambert, in fact--who emigrated to LA.  See Books Six, Eight, & Ten.

201.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1028-29; White, DGFA-1, 1249-53; White, DGFA-1 English, 265-66.

201a.  See White, DGFA-1, 1120-22; White, DGFA-1 English, 242. 

202.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 535-37; White, DGFA-1, 581-84; White, DGFA-1 English, 125; Books Six, Eight, & Ten; Duhon family page. 

202a.  Quotation from White, DGFA-1 English, 240.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 1261; White, DGFA-1, 1115-17; Book Two. 

203.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 446, 549-50; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:22; White, DGFA-1, 642-44; White, DGFA-1 English, 136; Book Four.

203a.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 730-32; White, DGFA-1, 1343-45; Book Four. 

203b.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1107-08, 2004; White, DGFA-1, 183-84; White, DGFA-1 English, 38; Boucher family page. 

204.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 646-47; White, DGFA-1, 981-82; Lebert family page. 

205.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1070-71; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:92, 132-33; White, DGFA-1, 1558-60; White, DGFA-1 English, 329; Books Four & Five.

206.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2066-67; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:95, 139; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 132-33; White, DGFA-1 English, 30; Book Four. 

207.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1006-07, 2136; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:139-40, 143; Book Four; Quimine family page.

208.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1151-52; Books Six, Eight, & Ten; David family page.

209.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1152-53, 2014-15; De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:83; White, DGFA-1, 927.

210.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1260; White, DGFA-1, 1448, 1578; Semere family page. 

211.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1279-80, 1663; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:96, 162; Renaud family page. 

212.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1481-82; Carret family page. 

213.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 703, 1029; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:95, 126; Books Five & Six; Olivier family page. 

214.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1006; Hugon family page. 

215.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1273; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:123; Part/Apart family page. 

216.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1419-20; Mire family page. 

217.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1319; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:114, 122; Arcement family page. 

264.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1136-37; Books Six, Eight, Ten; Clouâtre family page. 

265.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2207-08; Robichaux, Acadians at Châtellerault, 13; notes 199, above, & 357, below; Blanchard family page. 

266.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2133; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:164; White, DGFA-1, 514. 

For Noguess in colonial LA who have no demonstrable kinship ties to François of NS, see NOAR, vols. 2, 3, 4, 5. 

267.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1335-36, 2070; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:133; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 633; Book Five.

The author is proud to say that he is a direct descendant of Pierre Bonnière & Madeleine-Josèphe Forest

268.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1159-60; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:139; Duplessis family page.

269.  See White, DGFA-1, 1405; Arosteguy family page. 

270.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1593; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:45-46; Cousin family page. 

271.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1834; Books Four, Six, Eight, & Ten; David family page.

272.  See Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 234; Boucher family page. 

273.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 583; Books Eight, Six, & Ten; Gousman family page. 

274.  See Marant family page. 

275.  See Delaney, "Chronology of the Deportations"; Books Six, Eight, & Ten; Dubois family page. 

276.  See Noël family page. 

277.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2119; Lachausée family page. 

278.  See White, DGFA-1, 775; Guénard family page. 

279.  Quotation from White, DGFA-1 English, 130.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 607-09; White, DGFA-1, 416, 620-21, 873-75; White, DGFA-1 English, 93, 185; Book Six; Jeansonne family page. 

280.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 645-46, 2029; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:12-13, 19; White, DGFA-1, 362-64, 532-33. 

305a.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 2128; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:111; Book Four.

316.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 534-35; White, DGFA-1, 554-55; White, DGFA-1 English, 117; Dumont family page. 

317.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1155; White, DGFA-1, 552; White, DGFA-1 English, 117.

317a.  Quotation from White, DGFA-1 English, 59.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 466; W. G. Godfrey, "Bradstreet, John (baptized Jean-Baptiste), DCB, online; White, DGFA-1, 266; online Wikipedia, "John Bradstreet"; Book Two. 

Son John's military career eclipsed that of his father's.  See DCB; online Wikipedia. 

318.  Quotation from Pothier, "Gautier dit Bellair," in DCB, 3:255.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 561-66; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:87-88; Griffiths, From Migrant to Acadian, 292, 342-33, 368, 388; White, DGFA-1, 901; notes 63 & 66, above; Books Two, Four, & Five. 

387.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 391-93, 1538-39, 1585-92; White, DGFA-1, 17-19; White, DGFA-1 English, 5; Book One. 

388.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 393, 827-41, 1653, 2055-63, 2203-06; 2263-64; 2314-15; 2402-05; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:152-59; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 13-14; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 23-31, 391; White, DGFA-1 English, 6-8; Books One, Four, Six, Eight, & Ten; Arceneaux family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

389.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1322-29, 2415; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:27, 102-04; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 5; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 9; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 38-40; White, DGFA-1, 76-77; Books One, Four, Five, Six, Eight, & Ten; Barrilleaux family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

390.  Quotation from Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 54.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 427, 1101-04, 1330-35, 1470, 1948, 2185, 2415-18; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:35, 48-50, 56, 112-13, 118, 121; Hébert, Acadians in Exile, 25-27, 352; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vol. 1-A; Hodson, Acadian Diaspora, 138-40; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 152; Kinniard, "The Revolutionary Period, 1765-81," 141; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 7-9; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 10-11; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 47-53, 55; White, DGFA-1, 105-19; White, DGFA-1 English, 20-26; Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 29, 36, 84-85; Books One, Four, Five, Six, Eight, & Ten; Appendix; Benoit family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

391.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 471-74, 1349-50, 1545-46, 2444-56; Bernard, Teche; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:88; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 60; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Marshall, D., Acadian Resistance; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 25; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 38-39; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 173-78; White, DGFA-1, 284-88; White, DGFA-1 English, 63-64; Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 103-04; Books One, Two, Four, Five, Eight, & Ten; Broussard family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the second generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

392.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 505, 952-53, 1374-82, 1482-84, 2333-34, 2471-73; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A: 9, 27, 86, 101-02, 109, 115, 120-21; "Fort Cumberland, 24 Aug 1763"; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 113-14, 559; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 26, 156, 158, 184, 186, 217, 233-37, 253, 258; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 34-35; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 54-57; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 265-76; White, DGFA-1, 513-26, 1103; White, DGFA-1 English, 109-112; Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 38, 113-14; Books One, Four, Six, Eight, & Ten; Doiron family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the second generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

393.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 665-68, 1565-66; White, DGFA-1, 1092-95; White, DGFA-1 English, 234-35; Levron family page

395.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1086-92, 1465-70, 2264, 2315, 2405-08; BRDR, vol. 3; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:86; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 16, 554; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Jehn, Arsenault Corrections & Additions, 66; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 4; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 7-12, 14-20, 27-28; White, DGFA-1, 41-51; White, DGFA-1 English, 9-11; Books One, Two, Four, Eight, & Ten; Aucoin family page; Appendix

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

396.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 635-43, 1563, 2304, 2535; White, DGFA-1, 1100-05; White, DGFA-1 English, 237; Book One.

397.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 710-17, 1662, 2565-66; White, DGFA-1, 1277-80; White, DGFA-1 English, 271-72; Pellerin family page

399.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 551; White, DGFA-1, 665-66; White, DGFA-1 English, 138; Book One. 

400.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1430-32, 2380, 2581; White, DGFA-1, 1399-1402; White, DGFA-1 English, 182, 293; Rivet family page

401.  See <acadian-home.org>; Arsenault, Généalogie, 634-35; De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:26; White, DGFA-1, 1548-49; White, DGFA-1 English, 327; Book One. 

402.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 610, 1007-08, 1195-98, 1660, 2519-20; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 884-90, 977; White, DGFA-1 English, 188-89; Labauve family page

403.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 983-88, 1659, 2097-2116, 2237, 2302, 2350-51, 2505-07; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:91-92, 95, 146; Hébert, Acadians in Exile, 176-79; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family Nos. 108, 116; Robichaux, Acadian in Châtellerault, 50-53; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 78-82; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 428-40; White, DGFA-1, 791-94; White, DGFA-1 English, 162-63; Books One, Four, Five, Seven, & Eight; Achée family page.

The Haché family in Canada--they are still very numerous on PEI--call themselves Gallant.  In LA, they use the family name Achee.  Same folks, different names. 

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

404.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1019-20, 2038, 2196, 2247; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905 1905, 2A:73; White, DGFA-1, 1198-1201; White, DGFA-1 English, 255; Books One, Two, & Four. 

405.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1014-18; White, DGFA-1, 1188-94; White, DGFA-1 English, 254; Book One. 

406.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1010-11, 1215-16, 1562, 2241, 2281-82; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 961-64; White, DGFA-1 English, 205-06; Book One. 

407.  Quotation from West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 81.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 588-92, 1490-92, 2236, 2499-2502; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A: 40, 46-47, 61, 111, 160; "Fort Cumberland, 24 Aug 1763"; Guidry, "Guédrys Exiled to North Carolina," The Guédry-Labine Family website; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 173, 566; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 152, 218, 239; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Supply.htm>, Family Nos. 14, 18; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family Nos. 103, 184; "Ristigouche, 24 Oct 1760"; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 46-47; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 74-76; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 376-81; 560; White, DGFA-1 English, 158; West, 79-80, 169-70; Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 120-22; Books One, Two, Four, Six, Eight, & Ten; Guidry family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

409.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 606, 1496-1504, 2116, 2191, 2302; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 840-45; White, DGFA-1 English, 177-78; Henry family page

412.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 733-36, 1568-69, 1663, 2570-73; White, DGFA-1, 1351-52; White, DGFA-1 English, 286; Préjean family page

414.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 401-05; White, DGFA-1, 80-82; White, DGFA-1 English, 17; Books One, Six, Eight, & Ten; Bastarache family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

415.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 429-30, 1105, 1539-40, 1685, 2185, 2207; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 30-32; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 10-11; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 11-13; White, DGFA-1, 138-39, 536; White, DGFA-1 English, 30; Books One, Four, Six, Eight, & Ten; Bertrand family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

416.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1421-22; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 1182-83; White, DGFA-1 English, 253; Michel family page

417.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 785-89, 1432-34, 2253, 2584-85; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:51; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 1425-28; White, DGFA-1 English, 298; Roy family page; Ulysse Roy, descendant. 

418.  See White, DGFA-1, 910; White, DGFA-1 English, 193; Lambert family page.

419.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 701-02, 2131-32, 2193, 2247; White, DGFA-1, 1241-44; White, DGFA-1 English, 263-64; Moïse family page

420.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1285-88, 1569-72, 2585-88; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:107, 132; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 402-03, 589; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 249, 251, 307-08, 310-13, 315-20, 322; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 82; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 11-12; White, DGFA-1, 1446-51; White, DGFA-1 English, 304-05; Books One, Six, Eight, & Ten; Sonnier family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

421.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 671-72; Charles Bruce Fergusson, "Winniett, William," in DCB, 3:665-66, & online; Hector J. Hébert, "Maissonat, Marie-Madeleine (Winniett)," in DCB, 3:421, & online; W. Austin Squires, "Maissonat, dit Baptiste, Pierre," in DCB, 2:449-50, & online; White, DGFA-1, 223, 1114-15; White, DGFA-1 English, 240; note 116, above; Books One & Two. 

422.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 793-94, 2139-40; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:104-06; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; <pagesperso-orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/AutresPorts.htm>; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 725-27; White, DGFA-1, 1454-56; White, DGFA-1 English, 305-06; Savary family page

423.  Quotation from White, DGFA-1 English, 50.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 395-401, 1654, 2413-14; White, DGFA-1, 65-69; White, DGFA-1 English, 14-15; Books One, Six, Eight, & Ten; Babineaux family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

425.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 718-21; White, DGFA-1, 1292-94; White, DGFA-1 English, 275; Book One. 

426.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 430; White, DGFA-1, 140-41; Book One. 

427.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 391, 1081-86, 1535-38, 2054, 2401; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:88; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 12-14; White, DGFA-1 English, 3-4; Books One, Two, Five, Seven, & Eight; Allain family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

429.  See De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 1059; White, DGFA-1 English, 228; Book One. 

430.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 441, 1107-08, 1806; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 182-84, 1469-72; White, DGFA-1, English, 38, 309; Books One, Three, & Six; Boucher family page

431.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 428-29, 846-58, 1654, 2421-23; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 27-28; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 232, 236, 251-52; Milling, Exile Without End, 40; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 35, 58-59; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 57, 95; White, DGFA-1, 126-29, 821; White, DGFA-1 English, 29; Books One, Six, Eight, & Ten; Bernard family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

432.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 695-700, 2557-58; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 1183-85; White, DGFA-1 English, 253; Michel family page

433.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1135-36; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A: 99-100; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 327-28; White, DGFA-1 English, 73; Book One. 

434.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1133-34; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 154; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 7, 15, 17; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 42, 115; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 45-47, 104-05, 107, 341, 350; White, DGFA-1, 325-26; Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 105-06; Books Two, Five, Seven, Eight, & Ten; Bellemère family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

435.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1132-33, 1350-64, 1656, 2456-57; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:87-88, 100; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 156, 217; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 179-80; White, DGFA-1, 301; White, DGFA-1 English, 67; Books One, Four, Six, Eight, & Ten; Bijeaux/Bujole family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

436.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1347; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 267-68; White, DGFA-1 English, 59; Book One; Brasseaux/Brasset family page

437.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 587, 982-83, 1659; 2498-99; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 251, 257; "Ristigouche, 24 Oct 1760"; White, DGFA-1, 770-71; White, DGFA-1 English, 157; Gravois family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

438.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1505-06; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A;  <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 1098-99; White, DGFA-1 English, 236; Longuépée family page

439.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 686, 1261-62; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 1144-45; White, DGFA-1 English, 247; Mazerolle family page

440.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1278-79; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:90; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 1353; Book Four; Précieux family page.

441.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1051-54, 2251-52; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 1329-31; White, DGFA-1 English, 283; Poirier family page

442.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 643-45, 2535-36; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 978-79; Lavergne family page.

443.  Quotation from De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:21.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 947-52, 2229, 2277-78, 2298-99, 2332; De La Roque, 2A:91, 141-42; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 508; Books One & Four. 

445.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 660-62, 1564-65, 2244-45, 2546-47; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html>; White, DGFA-1, 1041-44; White, DGFA-1 English, 221-22; Léger family page

446.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 427-28, 1104, 1614-26, 2418-21; White, DGFA-1, 122-24; White, DGFA-1 English, 26-27; Books One, Six, Eight, & Ten; Bergeron family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

447.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 495-99, 2222-23, 2297; White, DGFA-1, 418-20; White, DGFA-1 English, 94; Books One & Four. 

448.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1364-65, 1401, 2080; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 336-37; White, DGFA-1 English, 74-75; Books One & Two. 

449.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 729-30; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:133; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 1338-40; White, DGFA-1 English, 284; Books One & Four. 

450.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 482, 2081; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:137; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 341; White, DGFA-1 English, 76; Books One, Five, Six, Eight, & Ten; La Garenne family page. 

452.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1150-51, 1558-59; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 469-71; Darois family page.

453.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 702-03, 1506-07, 2564; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:123-24; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 1247-48; White, DGFA-1 English, 265; Book Four; Naquin family page

455.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1054-57, 1955-56, 2082, 2135-36, 2569-70; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:142-43; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 1252-53, 1346-48; White, DGFA-1 English, 285-86; Books One, Four, & Eight; Potier family page

456.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 815, 1308; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 1527; White, DGFA-1 English, 323; Books One. 

457.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1346-47, 2004, 2437; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:47; White, DGFA-1, 264-65; White, DGFA-1 English, 58; Books One, Four, Six, Eight, & Ten; Boutin family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the second generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

458.  Quotation from White, DGFA-1 English, 37.  See also Arsenault, Généalogie, 437-41, 1654-55, 2209, 2271; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 37-39, 117; White, DGFA-1, 178-79; Books One, Four, Six, & Eight; Bonnevie family page

459.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 818, 1071-77, 1664, 2201, 2255-60, 2287-90, 2309; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:18, 20; Faragher, A Great & Noble Scheme, 186-87, 270-71, 293, 385-87; Griffiths, From Migrant to Acadian, 279; Plank, Unsettled Conquest, 9, 23, 64, 90, 98-99, 103, 113-14, 123-24, 130-31, 135-35, 141-44, 152-57; White, DGFA-1, 1567-71; White, DGFA-1 English, 332; Book One. 

460.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1121-25, 1656, 2437-38; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:164; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Supply.htm>, Family Nos. 16, 27; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 34; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 161; White, DGFA-1, 268-70; Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 92-93; Brasseaux/Brasset family page

Keep in mind that, beginning with the third generation of this family, the author relies largely on Bona Arsenault's research with all of its omissions and mis-attributions.  Not until Stephen White publishes his DGFA-2 can the "complete" genealogy of this Acadian family be recounted with any confidence. 

461.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 895-96, 1481-82; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 319-21; White, DGFA-1 English, 71-72; Carret family page

462.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1607-08; White, DGFA-1, 1236-38; White, DGFA-1 English, 262; Molaison family page

463.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 567; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A: 91; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 713, 791; White, DGFA-1 English, 149; Books One & Four. 

464.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 483, 908; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 362-64; White, DGFA-1 English, 82; Clémenceau family page

465.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 672; White, DGFA-1, 1143; Book One. 

466.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 482, 703-07, 896, 1030-31, 2457, 2564; White, DGFA-1, 1254-56; White, DGFA-1 English, 267; Orillion family page

467.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 702, 1026-27, 2247-48, 2306, 2560-64; White, DGFA-1, 811, 1238-40; White, DGFA-1 English, 263; Mouton family page

468.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 551-54, 1561; White, DGFA-1, 664-65; Book One. 

469.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 813-15, 1308; White, DGFA-1, 1483; Book One. 

471.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 732-33; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A: 24; White, DGFA-1, 1348-50; White, DGFA-1 English, 286; Books One & Four. 

472.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 542-43; White, DGFA-1, 619-20; White, DGFA-1 English, 130; Flan family page.

473.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 792-93; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:15-16, 19; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 682-84, 724-25; White, DGFA-1, 1351, 1443-45; White, DGFA-1 English, 304; Books One & Four. 

474.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 672-73, 1927; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:16, 20; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 14, 313; White, DGFA-1, 1118-19; White, DGFA-1 English, 241; Books One & Four. 

475.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 590, 725-26; White, DGFA-1, 157, 447, 759, 1236, 1306, 1466; White, DGFA-1 English, 34, 262; Book One. 

Evidently Marie-Jeanne Picot's husband Louis, fils, son of Louis Thibeau and Françoise Maucaïre, whom she married at Annapolis Royal in Apr 1723, was the same Louis Thibeau who was assaulted by future Acadian resistance leader Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil in late 1725.  A year later, Beausoleil was hauled before the colonial Council again, this time for refusing to support an illegitimate daughter he supposedly fathered by one of Marie Daigre's natural daughters, perhaps Anne, born at Pigiguit in December 1708 before her parents were married; Anne's parents, in fact, married or remarried to others, her father, Louis Blin, to Marguerite Mineau dit Lumina at Rivière-Ouelle, Canada, in April 1709, her mother, a widow when Anne was born, to Jacques Gouzil in c1711.  Anne, therefore, was a natural child--her mother's second in fact; Marie Daigre had a natural daughter, also named Marie, by Gabriel Moulaison dit Recontre in April 1703, when she was a widow (her first husband Pierre Sibilau's death date is unrecorded) & three years before Recontre Moulaison married Marie Aubois at Port-Royal in July 1706.  Marie the daughter went on to marry an Englishman named John Henshaw in c1726.  Evidently it was Anne who gave birth to a natural daughter of her own in c1726, several years before she married Michel Picot, fils; the father was declared to be not her future husband, however, but Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil, recently married to Agnès Thibodeau.  When Anne married Michel Picot, fils in Feb 1731, Louis Thibeau became her brother-in-law, so there evidently was a family connection between these 2 incidents involving the future resistance leader.  See White, DGFA-1, 157, 447, 759, 1236, 1466; White, DGFA-1 English, 34, 262; Book Two. 

476.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 803-04; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 165, 413; White, DGFA-1, 1480-82; White, DGFA-1 English, 312; Books One & Four. 

477.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 708-10, 2565; Delaney, "Chronolgoy of the Deportations"; White, "Acadians on the St. John River 1755-1760," in <acadian-home.org>; White, DGFA-1, 1268-70; White, DGFA-1 English, 269-70; Part/Apart family page. 

478.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 626-28, 1010, 1660-61; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:24-25, 88; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 275; <islandregister.com/1752.html.>; White, DGFA-1, 953-55; Books One & Four.

Evidently the many Langloiss of South LA are not descendants of this Acadian family. 

479.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 750-52; White, DGFA-1, 1367-68; White, DGFA-1 English, 289; Book One.

480.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 817, 1531-32, 2192, 2201; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:26; White, DGFA-1, 1548, 1552-53; White, DGFA-1 English, 328; Book One.

482.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 802-03, 1289-93, 2594; White, DGFA-1, 1476-78; White, DGFA-1 English, 309-10; Books One, Six, & Eight; Surette family page.

483.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1493-94, 2504-05; De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:199, 122; Books One, Six, Eight, & Ten; Guillot family page. 

484.  See Arsenault, Généalogie, 1007, 2355; White, DGFA-1, 882; Book One. 

486.  Quotaton from De La Roque "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:59.  See also White, DGFA-1, 111; Book Five.

488.  See De La Roque, "Tour of Inspection," Canadian Archives 1905, 2A:131-32; White, DGFA-1, 1257-60; White, DGFA-1 English, 267-68; Books Four & Five. 

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