APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

BENOIT

[BEN-wah]

ACADIA

Martin Benoit or Benoist dit Labrière, born probably at Rochefort, France, in c1643, came to Acadia perhaps aboard L'Oranger in 1671.  The following year he married Marie Chaussegros at Port-Royal.  Martin dit Labrière and his family were first counted at Port-Royal in 1678, when they already had four children, two daughters and two sons--the oldest, a daughter, born soon after their marriage.  In c1708, Martin took his family to Pigiguit in the Minas Basin.  He and Marie eventually had 10 children, including five sons, all born at Port-Royal, who produced families of their own.  Four of their daughters married into the Forest, Trahan, LePrince, Lejeune, and Thibodeau families.  Martin dit Labrière died at Port-Royal, date and age unrecorded.  

Oldest son Pierre, called Pierre l'aîné, born in c1675, married Marie, daughter of Michel Forest, at Port-Royal in c1695.  They had five children, including two sons who married into the Lejeune and Gaudet families.  One of their daughters married into the Hamet family.  One son moved across the river at Pigiguit to the parish of Ste.-Famille and then on to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in c1749, before moving again to Baie des Espangnols on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, in the early 1750s, probably to escape British rule.  Pierre l'aîné's other son remained at Pigiguit.  

Clément, born in c1677, married Anne, daughter of Antoine Babin and widow of Abraham Doiron, probably at Port-Royal in c1705 and settled at Pigiguit.  They had seven children, including two sons who married into the Comeau family.  Two of their daughters married into the Labauve and Rivet families.  Clément died probably at Pigiguit after June 1748.  

Jean, born in c1681, married first to Marie-Anne, daughter of Antoine Breau, probably at Port-Royal in c1704, and then to Marie, daughter of Francois Amireau, at Port-Royal in May 1731.  They settled at Cobeguit.  Jean and his first wife had 14 children, including four sons who married into the Thériot, Comeau, Part, Thibodeau, and Girouard families.  Eight of their daughters married into the Dugas, Marcadet, LeBlanc, Thériot, Hébert, Bourg, and Henry families.  He had no children by his second wife.  In c1752, Jean took his family from Cobeguit to Île Royale and settled at Pointe-à-la-Jeunesse, today's Grand Narrows, and Baie de Mordienne.  

Pierre, called Pierre le jeune, born in c1683, married Élisabeth or Isabelle, daughter of Guillaume LeJuge, at Port-Royal in c1703.  They had 12 children, including six sons who married into the Trahan, Viger, Gautrot, Vincent, Lejeune, and Thériot families.  Their six daughters married into the Lejeune dit Briard, Doiron, LeBlanc, Guédry dit Labrador dit Labine, and Hébert families.  Pierre le jeune's sons outdid their cousins in escaping British rule.  One moved his family to Grande-Ascension on Île St.-Jean in c1750.  Another one also moved to Île St.-Jean; according to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, however, this son moved to Île Royale in the early 1750s, where he built a windmill at Petit-Bras d'Or.  Another of Pierre le jeune's sons settled on Rivière du Moulin-a-Scie and at Port-Lajoie on Île St.-Jean.  Two other sons took their families to L'Anse-aux-Matelot on Île St.-Jean in the early 1750s.  Another son moved to Louisbourg on Île Royale in c1751.  None of them remained at Pigiguit.  

Youngest son, Claude, born in c1686, married Jeanne, daughter of Etienne Hébert, fils, at Grand-Pré in January 1711.  They settled on Rivière-des-Habitants and Rivière-aux-Canards at Minas and had 12 children, including six sons who married into the LeBlanc, Girouard, Bourgeois, Savoie, Babin, Daigle, and Thibodeau families.  Their six daughter married into the Melanson, Landry, Vincent, LeBlanc, and Hébert dit Manuel families.  

Thus, in only three generations, descendants of Martin Benoit dit Labrière had established roots in nearly a dozen settlements in greater Acadia: at Port-Royal, which the British called Annapolis Royal; in the Minas Basin, including Pigiguit; at Cobeguit; Memramcook; on Île St.-Jean; and on the Atlantic shore of Île Royale, including the fortress of Louisbourg. 

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Other Benoit families lived in greater Acadia, but none of their descendants emigrated to Louisiana:

Pierre, son of master apothecary François Benoit and Marie-Anne Tibierge, was born at St.-Médard-de-Verteuil, Poitiers, France, in c1695.  He came to Acadian as a young soldier and married Anne, daughter of François Levron, at Port-Royal in c1713.  They had two daughters and no sons.  Pierre became an officer, which was unusual for the son of an apothecary.  In May 1723, he was a second ensign.  By 1730, he was serving as an ensign of foot.  In April 1738, he was promoted to lieutenant.  In April 1750, he became a captain.  A decade later, in February 1760, he became a Chevalier de St.-Louis, one of the most prestigious awards in the French army, so his service must have been exceptional.  While Pierre was serving in the French fortress at Louisbourg on Île Royale, Anne died in January 1733.  He remarried to Marie-Anne, daughter of Thomas Jacau de Fiedmont and Anne Melanson, in January 1734.  Marie-Anne gave him six more children, including two sons.  The family resided at Port Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in 1738, was back at Louisbourg in 1739, and lived at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in the early 1740s.  Pierre's oldest daughter married into the Dupleix dit Sylvain family at Louisbourg in the early 1750s.  His other children may not have married, so, except for its blood, this Acadian line of the Benoit family may not have survived.  Pierre died at Tonnay-Charente, France, in August 1763; he was 68 years old.  

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Pierre, son of François Benoit and Marie-Anne Tibierge of Verteuil, St.-Medard, Poitier, France, widower of Mae-Anne Levron, married Anne, daughter of Thomas Jacaud of Port-Dauphin, Québec, at Louisbourg in January 1734.  Their daughter Geneviève married Silvain, son of Claude Dupleix, at Louisbourg in February 1753. 

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Martin, son of master surgeon Étienne Benoit and Jeanne Peyrelongue of Barsac, Guyenne, France, became a capitaine de navire marchand, or ship's captain, and married Jeanne, daughter of Antoine Perre of Louisbourg, at Louisbourg in December 1734. 

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In 1752, Jean Benoist, age 42, native of La Rochelle, was a fisherman at Lorembec on Île Royale. 

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered the descendants of Martin Benoit dit Labrière even farther from their family base at Port-Royal:

When the British rounded up the settlers at Pigiguit in the fall of 1755, René, the one son of Pierre Benoit l'aîné who did not leave Pigiguit, ended up in Massachusetts, as did some of his nieces and nephews, including Alexis Benoit and his wife Hélène Comeau.  Other Benoits at Pigiguit found themselves on transports bound for Maryland.  

But the majority of Martin dit Labriere's descendants, who had moved to French-controlled Acadia before Le Grand Dérangement, escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Benoits who had settled at Memramcook in present-day southeastern New Brunswick took refuge along the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and also moved on to the St. Lawrence valley.  

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On the Maritime islands, meanwhile, the respite from British oppression for the Benoits who lived there was tragically short-lived.  The fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758 gave the victorious British easy access to the remaining Acadian communities in the region.  Later that year, British forces rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale and deported them to France.  Among these Acadian exiles were dozens of Benoits, who soon found themselves in a mother country that tended to neglect them:  

Two Benoit families, those of Paul, age 54, and Abraham, age 49, sons of Pierre le jeune, did not make it to France in 1758; they perished with hundreds of other Acadians when two of the ships bound for St.-Malo sank in an Atlantic storm in mid-December.  Marie-Josèphe Thériot, widow of Jean Benoit, took four children aboard the British transport Duke William, which suffered a shipboard explosion in December on the way to St.-Malo; Marie-Josèphe died at sea, but her Benoit children who crossed with her--Joseph, age 27, a carpenter, Jean-Louis, age 18, a sailor, Paul, and Baptiste, also a sailor--survived the crossing.  After they reached St.-Malo, Jean-Louis and Baptiste moved to Lorient, on the other side of Brittany.  Jean-Louis died on the island of Guadaloupe in March 1764.  Newly-wed Charles Benoit, age 36, his wife Marie Girouard, age 27, Charles's brother Pierre, nephew Augustin Benoit, age 17, and niece Osite Pitre, also crossed on Duke William; Pierre and Osite died at sea, but Marie and Augustin made it to St.-Malo.  Madeleine Benoit, widow of Jean-Baptiste Marcadet, took four children with her aboard Duke William; Madeleine, age 18, Lucas, and Modeste, survived the crossing, but Louison died at sea, and Madeleine died in a hospital at St.-Malo soon after the ship reached port in November.  Augustin Benoit, age 32, and his wife Marguerite Lejeune, age 28, crossed on the British transport Supply, and lost all three of their children--Marguerite, age 8, Simon, and Élisabeth, called Aizahy--at sea before the ship reached St.-Malo in March 1759; the voyage and the rigors of childbirth proved fatal to Marguerite, who was pregnant when she made the crossing; she died at Châteauneuf, near St.-Malo, two months later, after giving birth to daughter Pérrine-Jeanne at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in May 1759; Pérrine-Jeanne lived only 6 days, and then Augustin had no more family.  Anne Benoit, age 31, wife of Pierre Hébert, age 27, lost one of her two children, daughter Élisabeth, age 1, in a hospital at St.-Malo two months after they reached the French port aboard Supply; the girl no doubt died from the rigors of the crossing.  Françoise Benoit, age 37, wife of Jean Bourg, age 43, crossed with seven of their children on Supply;  Françoise, Jean, and son Théodore, age 5, died in the hospital at St.-Malo in June and July 1759, several months after completing the crossing, leaving the other six children, ranging in age from 18 to 7, as orphans.  Charles Benoit, age 47, wife Marie-Madeleine Thériot, age 47, and their four unmarried children--Francoise, age 18, Judith, age 14, Jean-Charles, age 11, and Pierre, age 7--and Élisabeth or Isabelle LeJuge, Charles's 70-year-old mother, crossed on the English transport Tamerlan, which reached St.-Malo in mid-January 1759; every member of the family survived the voyage except for Pierre, who died at sea; however, mother Élisabeth, weakened no doubt by the rigors of the crossing, died at Châteauneuf, near St.-Malo, in July 1759, six months after she reached the mother country.  Anne Benoit, age 21, and her husband Charles LeBlanc, age 22, also survived the crossing aboard Tamerlan; they brought no children.  However, Marguerite Benoit, wife of Étienne Hamel, age 59, died along with their three children, ages 14, 12, and 10, aboard one of the five English transports that reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Marie Benoit, wife of Charles Dugas, lost her husband and two of their 10 children aboard one of the Five Ships.  At least one other Benoit family crossed not to St.-Malo in 1758 but to Rochefort in Aunis.  Grégoire, Daniel, and Marguerite, ages 14, 11, and 5, children of Claude Benoit and Élisabeth Thériot, reached Rochefort with the family of brother-in-law Yves Crochet, husband of their older sister Pélagie, in October 1759, but they did not remain there. 

The Benoits who survived the terrible crossing to France subsisted as best they could in a mother country that largely neglected them.  Most of them ended up in the St.-Malo area, but others landed at or moved to other ports, including Boulogne-sur-Mer, Rochefort, La Rochelle, and Nantes:

Charles, son of Pierre Benoit and Élisabeth LeJuge, and his wife Marie-Madeleine Thériot lived at Châteauneuf, near St.-Malo, where Charles died in January 1760, age 50.  Daughter Judith, age 15, died at Châteauneuf the following March.  Meanwhile, daughter Françoise married fellow Acadian Honoré, son of Ignace Carret, at nearby St.-Servan in March 1759.  Marie-Madeleine and son Jean-Charles moved to St.-Servan, where Jean-Charles married Anne-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Haché, in January 1770.  Jean-Charles and Anne-Marie had at least four children in France--Jean-Marie was born at St.-Servan in November 1770, Paul-Frédéric at Châtellerault, in the Poitou region, in October 1775, François-René at Nantes in c1778, and Sophie-Renée in c1783.  As Paul-Frédéric's 1775 birth reveals, Jean-Charles and his family were part of an attempt in the early 1770s to settle hundreds of land-hungry Acadians on a French nobleman's marginal land in the Poitou region near the city of Châtellerault.  The venture failed after only a couple of years of effort, and Jean-Charles, Anne-Marie, and their two children retreated with most of the other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Jean-Charles's mother Marie-Madeleine Thériot did not remarry. 

The younger Charles Benoit, husband of Marie Girouard, also did not last long in France.  He and Marie lived on the Rue des Bouchers in St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, after they disembarked from Duke William.  Charles never recovered from the rigors of the crossing; he died in late November 1758 at the Hotel-Dieu in St.-Malo, age 36.  Marie's fate is anyone's guess. 

Augustin, son of Claude Benoit, who had crossed with Uncle Charles and Aunt Marie on the ill-fated Duke William, was only a teenager when he reached St.-Malo in late 1758.  He was 19 years old when he married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Thériot, at St.-Servan in February 1760.  They had at least half a dozen children, not all of them born in France--Nicolas-Jean-Sébastien, called Sébastien, was born at St.-Servan in November 1760.  In 1763, Augustin and Françoise, with little Sébastien in tow, signed on to a risky scheme--a long, arduous voyage aboard the ship L'Aigle to the Falkland Islands near the southern tip of South America.  There, three more children were born to them--François in c1764, Adélaïde in c1765, and Anne in c1767.  By the time of Anne's birth, they had had enough of the desolate islands.  They returned to St.-Malo in April 1768 and settled again at St.-Servan, where two more daughters were born to them--Louise-Marie in October 1769, and Anne-Marie in January 1773.  Anne died at St.-Servan at age 5. 

Joseph, son of Claude Benoit, probably Augustin's older brother, described as a "Canadian who died in England in the service of the King," was "buried" at St.-Nicolas, Boulogne-sur-Mer, in March 1763.  He was only 23 years old.  He may have been one of the young Acadians who signed up to serve on a French corsair soon after they reached France and paid dearly for it. 

Catherine Benoit, widow of François LePrince, died at Boulogne-sur-Mer in January 1760.  She was 74 years old. 

Élisabeth Benoit, wife of Jean Foretier, died at St.-Louis, Rochefort, in November 1760.  She was only 33 years old. 

Marie-Marthe Benoit of Cobeguit and Louisbourg, widow of carpenter Jean Clément, married Nicolas-Gabriel Gerbert or Albert of Île d'Oléron and widower of Marie Garsant, at St.-Louis, Rochefort, in January 1761.  The priest who recorded the marriage noted that Nicolas had lived at Louisbourg and had resided at Rochefort for 10 years before the marriage. 

The older Augustin, son of Pierre Benoit, who had lost his entire family to the terrible crossing in 1758, lived at Châteauneuf, where his wife died, from 1759 to 1760.  In April 1760, he embarked on the corsair Le Hercules and fell into the hands of the British, who held him as a prisoner of war in England for three long years.  Back in France after the war ended, he moved to St.-Servan and created a second family when he remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Gautrot of Grand-Pré, at St.-Servan in July 1763.  Augustin and Marie-Madeleine had at least eight children in France, half of whom died young--Mathurin was born at St.-Servan in May 1764, François-Jean-Baptiste in October 1765, Jean-Marie-Augustin in January 1767 but died at age 2 in December 1768, Marie-Jeanne was born in January 1769 but died at age 15 months in March 1770, Françoise-Apollonie was born in October 1770 but died at age 2 in September 1772, Victoire-Marie was born in November 1772, Joseph-Marie at Châtellerault, Poitou, in November 1774, and Jean-Marie-Augustin at St.-Similien, Nantes, in June 1777 but died a few days later.  They, too, were part of the failed settlement venture in Poitou and retreated to Nantes with other Acadians in late 1775.  Augustin died at St.-Similien, Nantes, in September 1783; he was 55 years old.  

Grégoire, son of another Claude Benoit, was 14 years old when he landed at Rochefort with relatives in October 1759.  He followed them to Megrit, near St.-Malo, later that year and then to nearby St.-Servan, where he married Marie-Rose, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Carret, in February 1770.  They had five children in France--Joseph-François, born at St.-Servan in October 1771, died at age 1 in December 1772, Jean-Marie was born in September 1773, Marie-Rose at Châtellerault, Poitou, in May 1775, Donatien at Nantes in c1777, and Rémond-Grégoire at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in July 1783.  Grégoire and Marie-Rose also were part of the failed settlement in Poitou and retreated to Nantes. 

Grégoire's younger brother Daniel followed his relatives to Megrit and then to St.-Servan, where he married Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadian François Legendre, in February 1768.  They had three children in France--Daniel-Henry, born at St.-Servan in October 1769 but died at Châtellerault, Poitou, at age 4 1/2 in June 1774, Jeanne-Eléonore-Anastasie was born at St.-Malo in January 1772 but died there 7 months later, and Henriette-Renée was born at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in June 1778.  Daniel and Henriette also went to Poitou and then to Nantes.  

Marie Benoit, widow of Jacques Catron, married labourer à bras Pierre, fils, son of Pierre Renard of Thonny-Routonne, Saintonge, at Notre-Dame, Rochefort, in June 1764. 

Jacques Benoit, a journalier du port, widower of Angélique Blay, married Suzanne Sicard, widow of Pierre Gainault, at Notre-Dame, Rochefort, in April 1773. 

Marie-Anne Benoit, wife of Antoine Giroir, died at St.-Nicolas, La Rochelle, in February 1782.  She was only 40 years old. 

When, in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a better life in faraway Louisiana, a number of Benoits agreed to take it.  Like the majority of their fellow Acadians in France, Jean-Charles, Sébastien, François-Jean-Baptiste, Grégoire, and Daniel, as well as cousin Marie-Marthe, were fed up with life in a mother country that seemed to care so little for its Acadian children.  

Some of the Benoits remained in France, especially the ones who had taken French spouses.  Anne-Marie, daughter of Augustin Benoit, married fellow Acadian Joseph, son of Jean-Baptiste Vigneaux, at Ingouville, Le Havre, in May 1800; Joseph was a sailor; the priest who married them noted that Anne-Marie had been "deported from Isles of St.-Pierre et Miquelon," which may explain why she had not accompanied her older brother Sébastien to Louisiana in 1785. 

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Benoits also appeared in the Caribbean Basin, on Guadeloupe and Martinique and perhaps on St.-Domingue, during Le Grand Dérangement

Orphan sisters Anne and Élisabeth, born in Massachusetts, where their parents, Alexis Benoit and Hélène Comeau, had been exiled in 1755, may have gone to St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, with other Acadians from New England during the early 1760s. 

Jean-Louis, son of Jean Benoit of Île Royale, died "in the home of Mr. Pécou, master surgeon, at Petit-Bourg, Guadeloupe, in March 1764.  Jean-Louis, a sailor, who had crossed from the Maritimes to France with his widowed mother and brothers in 1758, was only 24 years old at the time of his death. 

Clément Benoit, arpenteur du roi, or land surveyor for the King, and his wife Catherine Eveillard, were living at Petit-Bourg, Guadeloupe, when their daughter Marie-Louise died at age 4 months in April 1764.  They were still there in January 1768, when another daughter was born to them. 

Joseph Benoit of Louisbourg, perhaps also a sailor, died at Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe, in April 1764.  He was only 26 years old. 

Catherine Benoit of Cobeguit died at Fort Royal, Martinique, in November 1766.  She was 55 years old. 

Anne, daughter of Jean Benoit of Cobeguit and widow of Gabriel Darein, ended up at Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe, where she married merchant Jean Maillard of Petit-Loupy, Lorraine, in April 1768. 

Jacques, son of Jean Benoit and Marie Bertin, born at Blaye, near Bordeaux, a master blacksmith, married Marie-Élisabeth, called Élisabeth, daughter of Zacharie Richard of Acadia, at Le Mouillage, Martinique, in February 1771; Élisabeth had been born in Acadia.  They were still at Le Mouillage when their son Pierre was born in December 1789. 

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Back in North America, several Benoit families managed to escape the 1758 roundup on the Maritime islands and elude the tenacious British.  After the war with Britain finally ended, these Benoits settled at Arichat on Île Madame, off the southern coast of Cape Breton Island; at Petit-Bras d'Or and D'Escousse on Cape Breton; and on Île St.-Pierre, an island retained by France off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Some of the Benoits on Île St.-Pierre came there from exile in France.  In the 1790s and early 1800s, Benoits from Cape Breton and Île St.-Pierre moved north to Newfoundland, where they settled in the Codroy Valley, at Baie d'Espoir, and especially on Baie St.-George.  Some of these Newfoundland Benoits married Anglophone wives and anglicized their surname to Bennett.  Others retained the French spelling of their name, which sometimes appears in the records as Benoite.  

The Benoits who left New England after the war made their way to the St. Lawrence valley and settled above Québec City at Trois-Rivière, St.-Michel-d'Yamaska, and Yamachiche, and on the lower Richelieu east of Montréal at Chambly and St.-Ours. 

Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, they may even have forgotten the others existed. 

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The Benoits in Maryland endured life among English colonists who, despite their Catholic roots, did not care much for the French "papists" who had been thrust upon them.  In August 1763, a few months after the French and Indian War finally ended, colonial authorities counted one Benoit family, a couple of Benoit wives, and half a dozen Benoit orphans at Port Tobacco on the lower Potomac River, all of them refugees from Pigiguit.  Pierre-Olivier, called Olivier, Benoit was counted with his wife Susanne Boudrot, their son Jean-Charles, and daughters Marie and Madeleine (called Marguerite by the British scribe).  Also in the same small community were Olivier's brother Jean-Baptiste's widow Anne Trahan, now the wife of Louis Latier, Olivier's nieces Marguerite, Marie-Anne, and Marie-Rose Benoit, and orphans Anne and Natalis, probably Nathalie, Benoit.  Marie Benoit, wife of Jean-Charles Breau of Pigiguit, also was at Port Tobacco with her husband, two children, and a Boudrot orphan.  Étienne, orphan son of Claude Benoit of Pigiguit, also may have been living with Marie and the Breaus.  Having heard good reports from their kinsmen in Louisiana who had gone there in 1765, hundreds of Maryland Acadians, first in June 1766 and again in April 1767, hired their own vessels, filled them with their families, and headed for New Orleans.  The Benoits were not among them.  Not until December 1767 did any of them book passage for the Spanish colony, this time with the large extended family at Port Tobacco led by Alexis and Honoré Breau of Pigiguit.  Nearly a year later, in January 1769, Olivier Benoit, his wife and children, and his former sister-in-law Anne Trahan and her family, including her Benoit daughters, booked passage from Port Tobacco on the English schooner Britannia bound for the lower Mississippi.  

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

Descendants of Martin dit Labrière Benoit came early to Louisiana.  The first of them to reach the colony were residents of Pigiguit whom the British had deported to Maryland in the autumn of 1755.  They reached New Orleans in February 1768 with the large extended family led by the Breau brothers of Pigiguit.  The previous contingents of Maryland exiles who had reached Louisiana in 1766 and 1767 had gone first to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, now St. James Parish (the original Acadian community on the river above New Orleans) and to St.-Gabriel d'Iberville, also called Manchac, not far above Cabanocé--both settlements known collectively as the Acadian Coast.  Spanish Governor Ulloa insisted that the Breau party--which numbered nearly 150 individuals in 29 families--go to the new Spanish outpost, San Luìs de Natchez, far upriver from the other Acadian settlements.  The Breau brothers refused and went into hiding to avoid deportation at the hands of the angry governor.  The members of the Breau party reluctantly moved to the new settlement.  This dispute was one reason why Acadians joined the French Creoles in a revolt against Ulloa in October 1768.  The next year, after he suppressed the rebellion, Ulloa's successor, General Alejandro O'Reilly, allowed the Natchez Acadians to leave Fort San Luìs and move to other settlements closer to their relatives:  

Étienne Benoit came as an 18-year-old orphan with the Breau clan.  After the Spanish authorities gave the Natchez Acadians permission to leave the settlement, Étienne moved to St.-Jacques on the Acadian Coast, where he married a Breau.  Soon after his marriage, he crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Attakapas District, where he created a family of his own.  

Descendants of Étienne BENOIT (c1751-1787; Martin dit Labrière, Jean)

Étienne, son of Claude Benoit and Anne Comeau, born probably at Pigiguit in c1751, came to Louisiana from Maryland as a teenaged orphan.  After leaving Fort San Luìs de Natchez, he married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Breau of l'Assomption, Pigiguit, at St.-Jacques in January 1771.  Madeleine also had come to Louisiana from Maryland in 1768 and had lived at Natchez.  After their wedding, they lived for a time at St.-Gabriel de Manchac and Ascension, upriver from St.-Jacques.  Later in the 1770s, they crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled at Carencro, at the northern edge of the Attakapas District.  Their daughter married into the Huval family.  They had seven sons, but only the younger ones perpetuated this line of the family.  Étienne died at Carencro in December 1787; he was only 36 years old.  His widow became the third wife of Michel Cormier of Opelousas in February 1789, but a year and a half later she was a widow again.  

1

Oldest son Joseph-Simon, called Simon, born on the river in c1771, married Élisabeth or Isabelle-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Aucoin of Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, at Attakapas in January 1793.  Simon died in Lafayette Parish in August 1834; he was 64 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following January.  He and his wife may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  

2

Bénoni, born on the river in the early 1770s, died at St.-Gabriel in September 1779, age unrecorded.  

3

Étienne, fils, born at Ascension on the river in June 1773, probably died young.  

4

Charles, baptized at the St.-Jacques church in April 1777, age unrecorded, also may have died young.  

5

François-Xavier, called Xavier, born at Ascension in March 1779, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Michel Trahan of the lower Vermilion valley, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1807.  Their son Michel was born at Carencro in August 1808, François Rosémond died 8 days after his birth in July 1816, and François Octave, called Octave, was born in November 1820 but died in August 1826 (the priest who recorded his burial said that Octave was 10 1/2 years old when he died, but he was 5 1/2).  Their daughters married into the Granger, Hébert, and Lagrange families.  Xavier's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in July 1823; he would have been 44 years old that year.  

Michel, living in the Calcasieu area at the time, married Elise, Lise, or Elodie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Granger of Calcasieu, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1829.  Their son Michel, fils was born at Calcasieu and baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 10 months, in November 1834, Jean Baptiste was baptized at age 6 months in May 1837, Julien le jeune was born in February 1842, and Jacques in July 1850.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted a single slave--a 30-year-old female mulatto--on Michel Benoit's farm. 

Michel, fils married Marie Cléonise, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Babineaux, probably in Calcasieu Parish in February 1854.  During the War Between the States, Michel, fils served in Company A of Daly's/Ragdale's Battalion Texas Cavalry, a unit that recruited heavily in Calcasieu Parish later in the war. 

Jean Baptiste married Marie Onesia, daughter of fellow Acadian Lucien Cormier, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1858.  Their son Clément Dupré was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1859.  

Julien "of Calcasieu" married Marie Emeline or Emelina, daughter of fellow Acadian Laisan Broussard, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1861.  They settled probably at Carencro.  Their son Jean Théophile was born in October 1863, and Cleopha in March 1866 but died at age 1 in August 1867.  During the War Between the States, Julien served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, a local unit raised in Lafayette Parish that fought against prairie Jayhawkers during the final months of the war.  

6

Éloi, baptized at St.-Jacques in June 1781, age unrecorded, married Marie-Eugènie, called Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadian François Louvière, at Attakapas in May 1801.  Their son François le jeune was born at Fausse Point on the Teche in August 1802, and Éloi dit Désiré, also called Éloi, fils, in January 1820.  Their daughters married into the Bonin and Melançon families.  Éloi, père remarried to Christine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Labauve and widow of Agricole Landry, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1821.  Their child, perhaps a son, name unrecorded, died in August 1822, and another child, perhaps a son, name unrecorded, died 12 days after its birth in October 1823.  Éloi, père died in Lafayette Parish in October 1846; the priest who recorded his burial said that Éloi was 70 years old when he died, but he was "only" 65; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following month.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 5 slaves--1 male and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 30 to 5--on the Widow Éloi Benoit's farm in the parish's western district.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 9 slaves--1 male and 8 females, 2 blacks and 7 mulattoes, ranging in age from 57 to 2, the 6-year-old female mulatto "deaf & dumb," living in 2 houses--on the Widow Éloi Benoit's farm.  

6a

François le jeune, by first wife, married French Creole Anne Cléonise, called Cléonise, Montet probably in Lafayette Parish in the late 1820s.  Their son Valsin was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1830, Éloi le jeune was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 7 days, in January 1835 but died 3 days later, Jean Baptiste was born in February 1836, Désiré in July 1841, and Abraham or Abram in January 1847.  Their daughter married into the Comeaux family.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--a 20-year-old black male--on François Benoit's farm next to Valsin Benoit.  

Valsin married Adélaïde Idea, called Idea, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Evariste Broussard, at the St. Martinville church in April 1851.  They settled probably near Youngsville.  Their son Numa was born in June 1856, Joseph Albert, called Albert, in March 1859 but died at age 1 in June 1860, Gustave was born in January 1866, and Filias, also called Filia, in March 1870 but died 9 days after his birth.  Their daughter married into the Domingue family.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--an 18-year-old black female--on Valsin Benoit's farm next to François Benoit

Désiré married Émelia, called Melia, daughter of fellow Acadian Édouard Isidore Broussard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in September 1861.  They settled probably at Carencro.  Their son Éloi le jeune was born in August 1862, and William in November 1863.  During the War Between the States, Désiré served in Company E of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Lafayette and St. Martin parishes, which fought in Louisiana. 

Abram married cousin Idea, daughter of Julien Benoit, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1870. 

6b

Éloi dit Désiré, by his first wife, married Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadian Éloi Landry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1840, and remarried to Celima, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Chevalier Thibodeaux, at the Vermilionville church in January 1843.  Their daughters married into the Broussard and Comeaux families.  Did Éloi dit Désiré father any sons? 

7

Youngest son Augustin, born at Carencro in April 1786, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Dominique Babineaux, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1809.  Their son Edmond or Emond was born at Carencro in September 1809.  Augustin remarried to Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Babineaux and his dead wife's first cousin, at the St. Martinville church in August 1815.  Their son Julien was born at Carencro in February 1817, Émilien in July 1818, Rosémond in July 1823, Hippolyte was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 2 months, in May 1826 but died at age 9 in August 1835, Arvillien was born in October 1827 but died at age 14 in September 1842, Simon died age 3 weeks in December 1829, Augustin, fils was born in January 1831, Emérant Lessaint in August 1832 but died at age 10 in September 1842, and Aurelien was born in March 1834 but died at age 5 months the following August.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Babineaux, and Comeaux families.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 10 slaves--6 males and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 1--on Augustin Benoit's farm in the parish's western district.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 11 slaves--7 males and 4 females, all black except for 1 mulatto, ranging in age from 50 to 3, living in 2 houses--on Augustin Benoit's farm next to Rosémond Benoit.  Augustin died probably at Carencro in August 1868; the Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Augustin died "at age 84 yrs.," but he was "only" 82; Augustin's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse two weeks after his death. 

7a

Edmond, by first wife, married cousin Marie Eugénie, called Eugénie, another daughter of Joseph Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1828.  Their son Edmond, fils was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 2 months, in February 1840 but died at age 2 1/2 in August 1842, and Augustin was born in August 1848.  Their daughters married into the Breaux and Prejean families.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 15 slaves--8 males and 7 females, 9 blacks and 6 mulattoes, ages 40 years to 6 months, living in 3 houses--on Edmond Benoit's farm.  

Augustin married cousin Marie Azelia or Azelida, daughter of fellow Acadian Gérard Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1867.  Their son Théophile Joseph was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1869. 

7b

Émilien, by his second wife, married cousin Elisa, daughter of fellow Acadian Arvillien LeBlanc, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1839; Elisa's mother was a Babineaux.  Émilien's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in September 1855; he would have been 26 years old that year.  Did he father any sons? 

7c

Julien, by his second wife, married cousin Marie Zéolide, called Joline, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Babineaux, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1843, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1844.  Their son Onésime was born in St. Landry Parish in November 1845, and a child, name and age unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in Lafayette Parish in September 1851.  Their daughters married into the Benoit and Leger families.  

7d

Rosémond, by his second wife, married fellow Acadian Anastasie Eremise, called Eremise, Savoy at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1849, and remarried to Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Eugène Breaux, at the Vermilionville church in May 1853.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Simon was born in October 1854 but died at age 15 1/2 in May 1870, Éloi was born in September 1859 but died at age 1 1/2 in February 1861, Félix was born in May 1864, Augustin le jeune in March 1866, and a child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died at birth in June 1868.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 2 slaves--a 24-year-old black male and an 11-year-old black female--on Rosémond Benoit's farm next to Augustin Benoit.   

~

In January 1769, two Benoit families left Port Tobacco, Maryland, aboard the ill-starred English schooner Britannia:

Pierre-Olivier Benoit, called Olivier, age 40, sailed with second wife Marie-Geneviève Brasseur, age 45, whom he had married in Maryland in c1765, and three children by his first wife--Jean-Charles, age 10, Marie-Rose, age 8, and Madeleine, age 6. 

Also aboard were three of Olivier's nieces, daughters of his brother Jean-Baptiste--Marie-Rose, age 22, Marie-Anne, age 15, and Marguerite Benoit, age 9--who traveled with their mother, stepfather, and three step-siblings. 

No group of Acadians who came to Louisiana suffered as much as these folks to get to the promised land.  The Britannia (sometimes spelled Britania) left Port Tobacco, Maryland, for New Orleans on 5 January 1769 with seven Acadian families aboard.  Also on the ship were eight Catholic German families who, for reasons of their own, no longer wanted to live in a British colony.  The crew of the Britannia sighted the coast of Louisiana on February 21, but the captain of the ship, either through bad luck or incompetence, missed the mouth of the Mississippi because of heavy fog.  Strong winds drove the ship westward, and a few days later the Britannia ran onto the Texas coast at Espiritu Santo Bay.  The crew went ashore and located a Spanish officer, who suspected them of being spies or smugglers.  Instead of giving them food and fresh water, he arrested them and ordered his men to escort everyone on the ship to the interior post of La Bahía.  The passengers and crew of the Britannia remained at La Bahía for six long months, waiting for the Spanish authorities to decide their fate.  While at La Bahía, they were forced to work as semi-slaves around the presidio and on nearby ranches.  Finally, in early September, a Spanish officer arrived at the presidio with instructions for the commandant there to send the captives overland to Natchitoches in central Louisiana. They could not return to the abandoned Britannia because the coastal Indians had stripped the vessel so thoroughly it was no longer seaworthy.  On September 11, the Acadians joined the other passengers and the English crew on the 420-mile trek to Natchitoches, which they did not reach until late October.  Louisiana Governor O'Reilly, meanwhile, had decided that the Acadian families in the group would settle at Natchitoches because of their familiarity with the growing of rye and wheat.  Natchitoches settlers welcomed the newcomers and supplied them with food, tools, and animals.  The German families were told that they could continue on to New Orleans via the Red and Mississippi rivers, pick up supplies, and then settle at St.-Gabriel d'Iberville on the Mississippi.  The Germans accompanied the English crew to New Orleans and arrived there on November 9.  Most of the Acadians, meanwhile, refused to remain at Natchitoches, which was too far away from their compatriots to the south.  They, too, left the Red River valley and, after Spanish authorities relented, joined their relatives in the established Acadian communities at St.-Gabriel and Opelousas.  

After their harrying adventure in Spanish Texas, the Benoits lived at St.-Gabriel for a while and then crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the western prairies:  

Olivier and Marie-Geneviève had no more children in Louisiana.  Olivier died at Opelousas in December 1787; he was 58 years old.  His daughter Marie-Rose married twice, first to Marin, son of fellow Acadian Amand Prejean, probably at Attakapas in the late 1770s, and to Daniel, son of Anglo American Jonathan Boone of North Carolina and Kentucky, at Attakapas in July 1800.  Olivier's daughter Madeleine married three times, first to Amand, son of French Canadian Dol Martin, at Attakapas in September 1787, then to André-Guillaume, son of Bernard Favron of St.-Malo, France, at Opelousas in October 1789, and finally to fellow Acadian Augustin-Rémi, called Rémi, son of probably Pierre Boudreau of Pigiguit and widower of Judith-Philippe Martin, in St. Landry Parish in July 1815.  Son Jean-Charles followed his parents to the Opelousas District, where he married.

Two of Olivier's three Benoit nieces also married and settled on the western prairies.  Marie-Rose, called Rose or Rosalie, married twice, first to Romain, son of French Creole Pierre Delafosse of Natchitoches, at Natchitoches Post in December 1769.  They moved to the Opelousas District.  Marie-Rose remarried to Joseph, son of Spanish Creole Charles Campos, at Opelousas in January 1796.  She died at Opelousas in April 1801, in her early 50s.  Marguerite married Louis, son of fellow Acadian Urbain Broussard of Pigiguit probably at Opelousas in c1775.  Marie-Anne may have remained at Natchitoches and settled there.  

Descendants of Jean-Charles BENOIT (c1759-1813; Martin dit Labrière, Pierre l'aîné, Pierre, fils)

Jean-Charles, called Charles, only son of Pierre-Olivier Benoit of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, and his first wife Susanne Boudreaux, was born in Maryland in c1759.  He came to Louisiana in 1769 aboard the ill-fated Britannia.  After his adventure in Texas and the long trek to Natchitoches, he followed his father, stepmother, and sisters to the western prairies, where he married Anne, called Nanette, daughter of fellow Acadian François Savoie of St.-Jacques and Attakapas, at Attakapas in September 1785.  They settled at first in the Opelousas District.  In the early 1800s, they moved to Le Petite-Anse, now Avery Island, at the southern edge of the Attakapas District near New Iberia, and then to Grand Bois, also in the old Attakapas District.  Their daughter married into the Stouts family.  Jean Charles died at Grand Bois in January 1813; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jean-Charles was about 50 years old when he died, but he was closer to his mid-50s.  His sons created some of the most prolific lines of the family. 

1

Their oldest son, name unrecorded, died at Opelousas at age 1 month in October 1786.  

2

Jean-Baptiste, baptized at Opelousas in October 1789, age unrecorded, married Hélène, daughter of French Canadian Louis Roger dit Brisbois of Carencro, at the home of Sylvère Mouton of Carencro in March 1812; Hélène's mother was a Landry.  They moved southwest to Bayou Queue de Tortue on the prairie west of the Vermilion valley.  Their son Jean Baptiste, fils was born in March 1822.  They also had a son named Théodule.  Their daughter married into the Jagneau family.  Jean Baptiste, père died probably at Carencro in July 1858; the Grand Coteau priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Jean Baptiste died "at age 75 yrs.," so this probably was him.   

2a

Jean Baptiste, fils may have married Anglo American Rosalie Strickland, widow of Anare Meche, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1840, and remarried to Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Lebert, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1842.  Their son Adolphe died probably at Carencro at age 2 months in October 1843, Jean was born in December 1849 but died at age 3 1/2 in March 1853, Charles was born in October 1852, Joseph Doustan in July 1855, and Jules in April 1860.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux and Bourgeois families.  

2b

Théodule married French Creole Emma, sometimes called Anne, Forestier in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1854.  Their son Joseph Homere had been born probably at Carencro in March 1848, Jean Baptiste Honoré in December 1849, Antoine Aurelien in November 1857, and Henri Auvignac in September 1862.  Their daughters married into the Bourque and Richard families. 

3

Joseph, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in June 1791, married Marcelline or Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Bourque, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1816.  Their son Joseph Durelle, called Joseph, fils, was born at Carencro in March 1820, Agricole was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, age 10 months, in December 1822, Neuville was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 3 months, in October 1828, Jean Rosiclair, called Rosiclair, was born in January 1831, Aurelien in August 1833, and François Fedorin, called Fedorin, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 1, in August 1837.  Their daughters married into the Clément, Royer, and Thibodeaux families.  Joseph, père's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in December 1862; he would have been in his early 70s that year.  

3a

Joseph, fils married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Julien Babineaux, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in May 1840, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1846.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Jean was born in January 1846.  Joseph, fils may have died at Carencro in June 1848; he would have been only 28 years old.  

3b

Agricole married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Babineaux, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in June 1841, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1847.  Their son Fillio died probably at Carencro at age 3 months in February 1843, Émilien was born in November 1845, Jean De Theate in January 1849, François Fedorin or Fridolin in January 1851, Pierre Philias was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 2, in October 1854, Omer was born in May 1866, and Dema near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in June 1869. 

3c

Jean Rosiclair married fellow Acadian Émilie Thibodeaux probably in St. Landry Parish in the late 1850s.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born in St. Landry Parish in July 1857.  Rosiclair's succession record was filed at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in 1866; he would have been 35 years old that year. 

3d

François Fedorin married Belzire, daughter of fellow Acadian Marcellin Thibodeaux and widow of Joseph Istre, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1857.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son Edval François was born in September 1862.  

3e

Aurelien married fellow Acadian Zelmire Broussard probably near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in the late 1850s, and remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Béloni Broussard, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in May 1866, unless Marie and Zelmire were the same person and the Church Point wedding was a sanctification of a civil union. 

4

Denis-Olivier, called Olivier, born at Opelousas in October 1793, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Richard of L'Anse, St. Martin Parish, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1816.  Their son Gustave was born at La Pointe, on the upper Teche near present-day Breaux Bridge, in March 1816 but died at L'île des Cypres, or Cypress Island, today's Lake Martin, at age 4 in October 1820, François Azolin was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1826, and Joseph near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in October 1829.  Their daughters married into the Trahan and Weekly families.  Did any of Olivier's sons create families of their own? 

5

François-Eufroi, born probably at Petite-Anse in September 1801, married fellow Acadian Aspasie Guidry probably in St. Martin Parish in the early 1820s.  They settled near Carencro.  Their son Jean was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 17 months, in August 1826, Placide at age 11 months in December 1828, Joseph was born in July 1829, Alcide was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 1, in May 1837, François Oscar, called Oscar, was born in July 1838, and Cyprien in December 1843.  Their daughter married into the Breaux family.  

5a

Placide married cousin Euphémie Guidry probably in St. Landry Parish in the early 1850s.  Their son Albert was baptized at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, age 1, in October 1856, and Zéphirin was born in July 1860.  During the War Between the States, Placide served in Company K of the 3rd (Harrison's) Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi.  

5b

During the War Between the States, Cyprien served in Company K of the Chalmette Regiment Louisiana Volunteer State Troops Militia Infantry, which fought in Louisiana during the early part of the war.  Cyprien married Azélie Blanchard, probably a fellow Acadian, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1865.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born in January 1869. 

5c

François Oscar married Marie Cléorine, called Cléorine, daughter of fellow Acadian Rosémond Richard and widow of Firmin Breaux, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1866, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in January 1867.  They settled near Church Point, where a daughter was born two years before their civil marriage.  

6

Youngest son Charles-Cyprien, sometimes called Cyprien, born probably at Petite-Anse in August 1803, married Claire or Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadian Augustin Guidry, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1830.  Their son Valsin was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 5 months, in May 1831, Laissaint at age 13 months in June 1835, and Jean Dupré was born in August 1847.  Their daughter married into the Teal family.  

Valsin married Eloise or Loise, daughter of fellow Acadian Antoine Boudreaux, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1850.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son Gerasin was born in June 1851, Cyprien le jeune in October 1852, Laissaint le jeune in December 1855, Valsin, fils in August 1860, and Aladin Joseph in November 1862 but died at age 5 1/2 in July 1868. 

Gerasin married Marie Elida, daughter of French Creole Syphorien Meche, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1870. 

~

Two orphaned sisters, daughters of Alexis Benoit and Hélène Comeau, came to Louisiana by the mid-1770s probably from St.-Domingue, today's Haiti.  The sisters likely were born in Massachusetts, where their parents were exiled in 1755, and followed other Acadians to St.-Domingue in the early 1760s, from whence they came to Louisiana:

Élisabeth Benoit, remained on the river, where she married at Ascension on the Acadian Coast.

Anne Benoit left the river and moved to the Attakapas District, where she married Amand, son of fellow Acadian Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil and widower of Hélène Landry, in May 1775.  Anne died in St. Martin Parish in September 1830, in her early 70s.  

~

Two Acadian Benoits who came to Louisiana from France in 1785 settled on upper Bayou Lafourche before crossing the Atchafalaya Basin during the 1790s.  One of them failed to establish a family line on the prairies, but the other, who had married a young widow soon after he reached the colony, settled in the Opelousas District and created a family line of his own:

Descendants of Nicolas-Jean-Sébastien BENOIT (1760-?; Martin dit Labrière, Jean, Claude)

Nicolas-Jean-Sébastien, called Sébastien, son of Augustin Benoit and Françoise Thériot, was born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in November 1760.  When he was three years old, he followed his parents to the Falkland Islands and lived in that forbidding place for five years.  His family was back in France by 1768, and Sébastien came of age there.  It is not clear which, if any, of the Seven Ships he took to Louisiana in 1785; he appears on neither the embarkation nor debarkation rolls of any of the expeditions, so he may have gone to Louisiana after 1785.  He first appears in Louisiana records in August 1789, when he married Jeanne, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean De La Forestrie and widow of Joseph Hébert, at Lafourche.  Jeanne had come to Louisiana with her husband and five young children aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, in September 1785.  Her husband died at Lafourche by January 1788, when she was listed in the census there as a widow.  She probably gave Sébastien no children.  Jeanne died on upper Bayou Lafourche by December 1795, when Sébastien was listed as a widower in the Valenzuéla census.  Soon after her death, Sébastien crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Opelousas District.  His uncle Étienne Benoit, who had come to Louisiana from Maryland in 1768, had settled at Carencro, near the southern edge of the Opelousas District, in the late 1770s, so this probably was Sébastien's motivation to go to the western prairies.  Sébastien remarried to Hippolythe, also called Pauline, daughter of French Creole Barthélémy Lebleu of Calcasieu, probably at Opelousas in August 1800.  He and his new wife settled near her family at the extreme western end of the Opelousas District, along the Calcasieu River near present-day Lake Charles.  Their daughters married into the Courvello or Courvelle, Lacase, Servant, and Soileau families.   

Augustin or Auguste, by his second wife, born probably on the Calcasieu in the first decade of the 1800s, married Marie Tarsile, called Tarsile, daughter of fellow Acadian André Préjean, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1828.  Their son André, born probably at Calcasieu, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 6 months, in April 1830, and Lucien at age 16 days in November 1831 but died 2 days later.  Auguste remarried to Marie Eusèide or Zèide, daughter of fellow Acadian François Guidry and widow of François Gerbron, at the Vermilionville church in March 1834.  Their son Auguste, fils was born near Carencro in October 1835, Sébastien le jeune was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 9 1/2 months, in January 1839, François was born in May 1842, Alfred in Vermilion Parish in June 1849, Étienne in January 1854, and Éloi in August 1861.  Their daughter married into the Cormier family.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in Vermilion Parish counted a single slave--a 45-year-old black female--on Augustin Benoit's farm in Ward 6 of the parish's Western District.  

Auguste, fils, by his second wife, married fellow Acadian Émelie or Amelia Broussard probably in Vermilion Parish in the early 1850s.  Their son Antoine was born in Vermilion Parish in August 1853, Sébastien le jeune in April 1855, and Joseph in November 1860.  

André, by first wife, married French Creole Marthe, also called Emma, Mallet probably in Vermilion Parish in the early 1850s.  Their son Alcide was born in Vermilion Parish in April 1854, Albert in March 1859, and Alcée in February 1870.  

François, by his second wife, married Adèle Mallet at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in August 1859.  Their son Antoine Cleopha was born in Vermilion Parish in May 1860, Numa in February 1862, and Jules in November 1866. 

Alfred likely married cousin Ozelia Benoit.  Their son Auguste was born near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in December 1869. 

Donatien BENOIT (c1777-1797; Martin dit Labrière, Pierre le jeune, Claude)

Donatien, eldest son of Grégoire Benoit and Marie-Rose Carret, born probably at Nantes, France, in c1777, came to Louisiana with his parents and siblings aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, and followed them to upper Bayou Lafourche.  When he came of age, he crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Attakapas District, where he died in August 1797.  He was only 20 years old and probably did not marry. 

~

Other BENOITs on the Western Prairies

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link many Benoits in the western parishes with known Acadian lines of the family there:

____ Benoit, "an Acadian or Canadian," "hired or engaged" by Mr. Despaux, died "at his home" in the Opelousas District in February 1797.  The priest who recorded the Acadian/Canadian's burial did not bother to give his first name or his parents' names.  

Hortense Benoit's son François Villeneuve, born probably in St. Martin Parish in c1832, was baptized at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, at age 8 in May 1840.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names.  Marie Louise, daughter of Hortense Amand[sic] Benoit, married Hippolyte, son of Jean Pierre Martinet, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1869.  One wonders who was Marie Louise's father. 

Octave Benoit married Adèle Racca in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1844.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couples' parents' names.  One wonders if he was the third and youngest son of François Xavier Benoit, who, according to church records, was called Francois Octave and Octave and was born in November 1820 but died at age "10 1/2," actually 5 1/2, in August 1826.  A daughter of Octave and Adèle was born near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in October 1868, two dozen years after their marriage. 

François Théodore, son of Charlotte Benoit, married Estelle, daughter of Narcisse Rochon, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in June 1846.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the groom's father's name. 

Michel Benoit married Adeline Benoit.  Their son Narcisse was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in February 1848. 

Carmelite Benoit married Thomas Stout.  Their daughter married into the Guidry family in 1850. 

Jean, son of Jean Baptiste Benoit and Hélène Royer, married Azélie, daughter of Léandre Landry, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1865.  Was Jean Baptiste Acadian? 

Victor Benoit married Adelphine or Delphine Savoie.  Their son Victor, fils was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in August 1861, Joseph in February 1863, and Félix in June 1867.  

Jules Benoit married French Creole Emma Legros and settled near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, by the early 1860s.  

A succession record for Jules Benoit, married to ____ Lege, was filed at the Abbeville courthouse, Vermilion Parish, in 1866. 

Jean Benoit married Ophelia Blanchard, perhaps a fellow Acadian, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1865.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their son Jean, fils was born in June 1866, and Hilaire in February 1869. 

A succession record for Emmanuel Benoit was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in April 1866. 

Ulysse Benoit married Acadian Élodie Jeansonne.  Their son Félix was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in March 1867. 

Joséphine, daughter of Charles Benoit and Joséphine Scott, married Joseph, son of French Creole Joseph Landreneau or Landrieau, at the Arnaudville church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1868. 

Joseph Benoit married Marie Delphine ____ and settled near Iota, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Joseph Benoit married Méranthe ____ and settled near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Sosthène Benoit married Valentine ____ and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Jean Baptiste Benoit married Amelia Marcolli.  Their son Jean Sully was born in Lafayette Parish in March 1869. 

Lick Benoit married Euzaie Scipion at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in December 1869.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names. 

Alsée, son of Ozia Benoit, was born near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, in May 1870.  Was Ozia the boy's mother or father? 

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Also with the Breau party from Maryland in 1768 was Marie Benoit, age 31, husband Jean-Charles Breau, age 34, and their four children, ages 13 to 2.  The Spanish governor forced them to live far up the river at San Luìs de Natchez, but they were allowed to leave in 1769.  Marie and Jean-Charles moved from Natchez to St.-Gabriel, where Spanish officials counted them on the "right bank ascending" in 1777, and then to St.-Jacques, a bit farther down the river, where Marie died a widow in November 1795.  The priest who recorded her burial claimed that Marie was 74 years old when she died, but she was in her late 50s. 

Élisabeth, daughter of Alexis Breau of Pigiguit, born probably in Maryland, was counted with sister Anne at Port Tobacco in the summer of 1763.  It is not clear which of the larger Maryland expeditions--1766, 1767, or 1768--took orphans Élisabeth and Anne Benoit to Louisiana.  Anne moved to the Attakapas District by the 1770s, but Élisabeth remained on the river, where she married Jean-Baptiste, son of fellow Acadian Antoine Dupuis, at Ascension in February 1775.  In 1777, Spanish officials counted Jean-Baptiste and Élisabeth at St.-Gabriel, upriver from Ascension on the Acadian Coast, along the "left bank ascending."  

None of the Benoits who came to Louisiana from Maryland via Texas in 1769 settled on the river. 

~

The largest contingent of Acadian Benoits who emigrated to Louisiana came from France aboard five of the Seven Ships of 1785.  Some of them settled on the river above New Orleans at Manchac, Baton Rouge, and St.-Jacques, and one of them settled below New Orleans:

Daniel Benoit, age 36, crossed on Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in July.  With him were his wife Henriette Legendre, age 34, and daughter Henriette-Renée, age 7.  They went to Manchac, south of Baton Rouge.  Henriette died there in the late 1790s, and Daniel remarried to a much younger woman soon after Henriette's death.  

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Anne Benoit, age 55, widow of Pierre and Jean-Baptiste Hébert, crossed on Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August.  With her was 13-year-old son Jean-Charles Hébert, who had been born at Belle-Île-en-Mer, France.  They followed the majority of the passengers from their ship to the Baton Rouge area.  Anne did not remarry.

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Anne-Marie Haché, age 36, wife of Jean-Charles Benoit, crossed on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in November.  With her were four Benoit children--Jean-Marie, age 14, Paul-Frédéric, age 9, François-René, age 7, and Sophie-Renée, age 2. Husband Jean-Charles Benoit, a sailor, age 39, crossed on La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in December.  Perhaps because of his profession, he chose to take his family to English Turn, on the river below New Orleans, near where a hand full of other Acadian families settled.  

Marie-Marthe Benoit, age 49, also crossed on La Caroline, with second husband Nicolas-Gabriel Albert, a Frenchman, age 45, and their 12-year-old son, Nicolas-Gabriel, fils.  They were among the hand full of Acadians who chose to settle at St.-Jacques on the Acadian Coast, where Acadians had first settled over two decades before.  

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Two of the Benoit family heads who crossed from France--first cousin--remained on the river, one below New Orleans, the other at Baton Rouge:  

Descendants of Jean-Charles BENOIT (c1746-; Martin dit Labrière, Pierre le jeune)

Jean-Charles, son of Charles Benoit and Marie-Madeleine Thériot, born probably at Pigiguit in c1746, married Anne-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Haché, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in January 1770.  Marie-Anne and their four children crossed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, and Jean-Charles followed on La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships.  They chose to settle with a hand full of other Acadians at English Turn, near the Isleño community of San Bernardo in present-day St. Bernard Parish below New Orleans.  Jean-Charles was a sailor by profession, so his living near the port city, away from the majority of his Acadian brethren, may have been dictated by his employment. 

1

Oldest son Jean-Marie was born at St.-Servan, France, in November 1770.  

2

Paul-Frédéric was born at Châtellerault, Poitou, France, in October 1775.

3

Youngest son François-René, born at Nantes, France, in c1778, married Luisa, daughter of Spanish Creole Francisco Cobos of Pensacola, Florida, at New Orleans in June 1803.

Descendants of Daniel BENOIT (c1748-1825; Martin dit Labrière, Pierre le jeune)

Daniel, younger son of Claude Benoit and Élisabeth Thériot, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1748, married Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadian Francois Legendre, at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in February 1768.  They crossed to Louisiana with their daughter aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, and followed the majority of the passengers of their ship to the Manchac Coast, between Baton Rouge and St.-Gabriel, on the river above New Orleans.  Daniel and Henriette had no more children in Louisiana.  Their daughter married into the Labauve family.  Henriette died at Baton Rouge in February 1798, age 46.  Daniel remarried to Madeleine-Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Doiron, probably at Baton Rouge in c1799.  Madeleine was a native of Pleslin, near St.-Malo, France, and also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa; she was 17 years younger than Daniel.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Daniel died at the home of one of his daughters in St. Martin Parish in December 1825; the priest who recorded his burial said that Daniel was 84 years old when he died, but he was closer to 77.  None of his sons seems to have created families of their own, so this line of the family, except for its blood, probably did not survive in the Bayou State.  

1

An infant, perhaps their oldest son, died at age 1 month at Baton Rouge in August 1800.  

2

Joseph, born at Baton Rouge in June 1802, may have died young.

3

Youngest son Célestin, born at Baton Rouge in April 1804, also may have died young.  

~

Other BENOITs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link at least one Benoit on the river with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Susanne Benoit gave birth to daughter Marie Martine in Ascension Parish in October 1866; the Donaldsonville priest who recorded the girl's baptism the following December did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names.  Susanne's son Prospere was born in Ascension Parish in December 1869; again, the Donaldsonville priest who recorded the baptism did not give the boy's father's name or the mother's parents' names. 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

Most of the Benoits who came to Louisiana from France in 1785 chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche: 

Grégoire Benoit, age 40, crossed on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in September.  With him were wife Marie-Rose Carret, age 31, five children--Jean-Marie, age 12, Marie-Rose, age 10, Donatien, age 8, Françoise-Félicité, age 3, and Rémond-Grégoire, age 2--and his unmarried sister-in-law Thérèse Carret, age 29.  Marie-Rose was pregnant when she made the crossing; daughter Martina, or Martine, named after Louisiana intendant Martin Navarro, who treated the Acadians with great respect, was born at Balize or New Orleans soon after the family reached the colony. 

Françoise Benoit, age 40, crossed on Le St.-Rémi with husband Honoré Carret, age 56, their grown son Pierre Carret, age 24, Francoise's 72-year-old mother Marie-Madeleine Thériot, widow of Charles Benoit, and cousin Victoire-Marie Benoit, age 14.  Victoire-Marie married Charles, son of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Bergeron and widow of Marie Foret, at Assumption in January 1794, and remarried to Pierre, son of fellow Acadian Pierre Lambert, in Assumption Parish in December 1815; Victoire died in Terrebonne Parish in May 1816; she was only 43 years old.  

Marie Benoit, age 48, Françoise's older sister, crossed on Le St.-Rémi with second husband Joseph Hébert, age 50, a stepson, a stepdaughter, and a daughter, ages 24, 22, and 15, and 8-year-old niece Sophie Benoit.  Marie died at St.-Gabriel, just upriver from Ascension, in June 1806; the priest who recorded her burial said that she was 80 years old when she died, but she was "only" 70.  Sophie married Francisco Antonio, son of Grégorio Turreyra of Havana, Cuba, at Assumption in October 1804 and died by February 1813, when her husband remarried in Assumption Parish.  

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Grégoire's sister Pélagie Benoit, age 44, widow of Yves Crochet, crossed on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in November.  With her were five of her Crochet children, ages 25 to 18.  Pélagie never remarried.  She died in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1824; the priest who recorded her burial said that she was 85 years old when she died, but she was "only" 83.  

Grégoire and Pélagie's younger sister Marguerite Benoit, age 32, widow of Joseph Precieux, crossed on L'Amitié alone.  She remarried to Claude-Bernard, son of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Dugas, at Lafourche in February 1786, not long after she reached the colony.  Marguerite died in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1837, also in her early 80s. 

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François-Jean-Baptiste Benoit, age 20 in 1785, a native of St.-Servan, France, does not appear on any of the passenger lists of the Seven Ships from France, but he probably came to the colony with his cousins.  He first appears in Louisiana records in September 1789, when he married a fellow Acadian at Lafourche.   

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Two of the Benoits from France--first cousins, one old enough to be the other's father--created a third center of family settlement that eventually stretched as far down bayou as the Terrebonne country: 

Descendants of Grégoire BENOIT (c1744-1829; Martin dit Labrière, Pierre le jeune)

Grégoire, elder son of Claude Benoit and Élisabeth Thériot, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1744, married Marie-Rose, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Carret, at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in February 1770.  They crossed to Louisiana with six children and his sister-in-law aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, and followed the majority of the passengers from their ship to upper Bayou Lafourche.  They had more children in Louisiana.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux and Tauzin families.  Grégoire died in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1829; the priest who recorded his burial said that Grégoire was 88 years old when he died, but he was "only" 85.  Just half of his six sons created families of their own, but his oldest son's line, especially, was a vigorous one.  

1

Oldest son Jean-Marie, born at St.-Servan, France, in September 1773, married Marie-Élisabeth or Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Étienne Darois, at Assumption in November 1799.  Their son Donatien-Marie or Jean-Donatien, called Donatien, le jeune, was born at Assumption in November 1801, Alexis-Célestin in October 1803, Jean Baptiste in June 1807, Célestin Séverin in February 1818, and Eugène Evariste, called Evariste, in July 1822.  They also had a son named Adrien.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Clément, and Navarre families.  Jean Marie died in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1844; he was 70 years old; his succession sale was recorded at the Thibodeaux courthouse in March 1846. 

1a

Alexis Célestin married Marie Adélaïde, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Hilaire Clément, père, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in June 1824.  Their son Dufroi Félix, called Félix, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1827, Charles Amédée Cleopha, called Amédée, in November 1829, Clairville Sylvain Alexis, called Sylvain, in December 1831, Ursin Octave, called Octave, in May 1836, Arsène Ulysse, called Ulysse, in August 1838, Pierre Paulin, called Paulin, in February 1843, and Joseph Alfred in March 1846.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron and Tabor families.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in Lafourche Parish counted 3 slaves--all female, all mulattoes, ages 21, 3 and 3 months--on Alexis Benoit's farm in the parish's Ward 1.  Alexis Célestin died in Lafourche Parish in September 1869; he was 65 years old.  

Félix married Malvina, daughter of Nicolas Sevin, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1848; Malvina's mother was an Hébert.  Their son Hexis Félix was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1849, Jean Joseph in June 1851, Joseph died at age 2 months in June 1853, Joachim Sylvain was born in June 1857, and Étienne in December 1864.  

Amédée married Evelina or Melina, daughter of fellow Acadian Evariste Louvière, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1856.  Their son Pierre Nicolas was born in Lafourche Parish in July 1857, Paulin Ernest in April 1861, Joseph in December 1862, and Joseph Volzi in June 1866.  

Octave married Odile, daughter of Onesime Pontiff, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1858.  Their son Jean Treville was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1860, Émile Andreci in March 1862, Jules Alexis was born in September 1865 but died at age 4 in August 1869, and Joseph Taylor was born in May 1868.  During the War Between the States, Octave served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment of Militia; he fought in the Battle of Labadieville, in nearby Assumption Parish, in late October 1862, fell into Federal hands, was paroled and returned home.  

Sylvain married Leontine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Basile Naquin, at the Chacahoula church, Terrebonne Parish, in May 1859.  During the War Between the States, Sylvain served in the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in South Louisiana, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Sylvain died in Terrebonne Parish in June 1868; he was only 36 years old.  

During the War Between the States, Ulysse served in Company G of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, and Louisiana.  Ulysse married Adele or Odile, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Naquin, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1867.  Their son Charly Joseph was born in Lafourche Parish in November 1867.  

During the War Between the States, Paulin also served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment of Militia, was captured at Labadieville, paroled, and returned home.  Paulin died in Lafourche Parish in February 1869; he was only 26 years old and did not marry.  

1b

Donatien le jeune married Andrese Carmelite, daughter of Spanish Creole Francois Domingue, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1825.  They may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Lafourche Interior Parish counted 5 slaves--3 males and 2 females, 3 blacks and 2 mulattoes, ranging in age from 35 to 1--on Donatien Benoit's farm along Bayou Lafourche.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in Lafourche Parish counted 10 slaves--4 males and 6 females, 4 blacks and 6 mulattoes, ranging in age from 44 to 1--on J. Donatien Benoit's farm in the parish's Ward 2.  Donatien remarried to Mélissaire, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Dantin, at the Thibodaux church in April 1863; Donatien was 61 years old at the time of the wedding!  He may have had no sons by either of his wives.  

1c

Jean Baptiste married Rosalie Marie or Marie Rosalie, called Rosalie, daughter of Spanish Creole Jean Marie Navarre, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in October 1835; Rosalie's mother was a Boudreaux.  Their son Evariste Arsène was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1837, Jean Hilaire in November 1838, Joseph Demetruis in February 1843, Jean Joseph in August 1849, and Arsène Paulin in March 1852.  They also had a son named Osémé.  Their daughters married into the Benoit and Hébert families.  

Evariste Arsène married Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Vincent Hébert, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in April 1864.  

During the War Between the States, Osémé served in Company G of the 30th Regiment/Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. John the Baptist Parish but included recruits from other parishes; Osémé was captured at Nashville, Tennessee, in December 1864 and held prisoner at Camp Chase, Ohio, in the final months of the war.  Osémé married Clara, daughter of Eugène Morvant, at the Thibodaux church in August 1866.  Their son Joseph Valcour was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1870.  

1d

Célestin Séverin married first cousin Émelie or Melite, daughter of Sébastien Benoit, his paternal uncle, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in October 1846.  Their son Joseph Dorville, called Dorville, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1849, Justin Honoré in January 1854, and Joseph Olivain in October 1861.  

Dorville married Dozilia, daughter of Léon Tauzin, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in April 1869.  Their son Anry, probably Henry, Joseph was born near Vacherie, St. James Parish, in January 1870. 

1e

Evariste married Marie Melite, called Melite, daughter of French Creole Bernard Morvant, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in April 1848; Melite's mother was a Boudreaux.  Their son Joseph Théophile was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1851, and Émile in May 1853.  Their daughter married into the Trosclair family at Vacherie, St. James Parish, though the marriage was recorded also in Lafourche Parish.  

2

Donatien, born probably at Nantes, France, in c1777, moved to the Opelousas District in 1797 and died there that August.  He was 20 years old and probably did not marry.  

3

Rémond-Grégoire, born at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, in July 1783, probably died young.  He may not even have survived the crossing from France.  

4

Pierre-Marie, born at Ascension in May 1788, married Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Marie Boudreaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1817.  Their son Pierre Grégoire, called Grégoire, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1820, Jean Pierre died 2 days after his birth in December 1823, and Joseph Émilien was born in July 1833.  Their daughters married into the Panvil and Tabor families.  Pierre Marie died in Lafourche Parish in February 1854; he was 65 years old.  

4a

Grégoire married Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadian Martin Thibodeaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1852.  Their son Joseph was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1852, and Pierre Émile, called Émile, in October 1855.  Grégoire died in 1859; he was only 39 years old. 

4b

Joseph Émilien married Marie or Mary Radivine, daughter of German Creole Gaspard Toups, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in February 1862; Mary's mother was a Thibodeaux.  Their son Pierre was born in Lafourche Parish in December 1862, Severe Gaspard in May 1864, Joseph Sylvère in December 1866, and Arthur Oleus in October 1868. 

5

Jean-Marie le jeune, born at Assumption in February 1792, may have died young.  

6

Youngest son François-Sébastien, called Bastien, born at Assumption in May 1794, married Marie Éloise or Héloise, 22-year-old daughter of French Creole Joseph Morvant, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in October 1822; Éloise's mother was a Bernard.  Their son Joseph Marcellus was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1827, Jean Baptiste, called Baptiste, in June 1838, and Evariste in July 1843.  Their daughters married into the Adam, Benoit, Caillouet, Guidry, and Morvant families.  Bastien died in Lafourche Parish in June 1868; the priest who recorded his burial said that Bastien was 71 years old when he died, but he was 74. 

6a

Joseph married Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian Vincent Hébert, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1851.  Their son Joseph Anatole was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1852, and Jean Joachim in September 1855.  

6b

Baptiste married cousin Mathilde, daughter of Jean Baptiste Benoit, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1861.  Their son Jean Émile Bonnefaith was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1862, Vilfrid in October 1863, Joseph in May 1866, and Joseph Clément in St. James Parish in October 1867.  

Descendants of François-Jean-Baptiste BENOIT (1765-1831; Martin dit Labrière, Pierre le jeune)

François-Jean-Baptiste, also called Jean-François, son of Augustin Benoit and his second wife Marie-Madeleine Gautrot, born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in October 1765, came to Louisiana probably in 1785 as a young bachelor and married Marie-Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Pinet dit Pinel and widow of Jean-Charles Achée, at Lafourche September 1789.  They settled on the upper bayou.  Their daughters married into the Augeron, Bedford, Bourque, Brosseart, Elsworth, Lamir, and Pierron families.  François died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1831; the priest who recorded his burial called him Joseph François and said that he was 86 years old when he died, but he was "only" 66.  His sons and grandsons settled in what became Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes. 

1

Older son Joseph-Marie, born at Ascension in June 1790, married Justine Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Thibodeaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1815.  Their son Carville Jacques, called Jacques, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1825, and Joseph Claiborne or Claiborne Joseph, called Claiborne J.,  in December 1829.  Their daughters married into the Kling, Marcel, and Welsh families, and perhaps into the Danion family as well.  

1a

Jacques married Marie Emelia or Emelia Marie, 15-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Ursin Aucoin, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in April 1850.  Their son Amand was born in Terrebonne Parish in April 1852, Maximilien Carville in November 1857, Amédée in February 1860, and Jean Marie Octave Laurent near Montegut in April 1865.  

1b

During the War Between the States, Claiborne J. served in Company G of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana. 

2

Younger son Charles, baptized at Assumption, age unrecorded, in November 1796, married Marie Farelia, daughter of fellow Acadian Jacques Thibodeaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1814.  Their son Augustin was born in Assumption Parish in March 1816, Eugène in December 1817, and Ursin Victorin, in February 1820.  Charles remarried to Marie Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Guidry of Bayou Terrebonne, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in April 1825.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1827 but died at age 1 1/2 in October 1829.  Charles died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1832; he was only in his mid-30s.  

2a

Eugène, by first wife, married fellow Acadian Marie Ludovine, called Ludivine, Thibodeaux probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in the late 1830s or early 1840s.  Their son Charles Elesiphore was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1844, Joseph Augustin in March 1851, and Adam in Terrebonne Parish in January 1856.  

Charles married cousin Nathalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Thibodeaux, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in June 1864.  Their son Charles Augustin was born near Montegut, Terrebonne Parish, in May 1869. 

Daughter Louisiana, only 17 years old, gave birth to son Jean Baptiste Prosper Benoit near Montegut in June 1870; the priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name.  

2b

Ursin Victorin, by first wife, married fellow Acadian Marie Cléonise Trahan probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in the early 1840s.  

Other BENOITs in the Lafourche/Terrebonne Valley

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link at least one Benoit in the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley to known Acadian lines of the family there:

Jean Filia, son of Locate Benoit, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1841.  Was "Locate" a he or a she?  

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Benoit or Benoist is a common surname in France and French Canada, so it should not be surprising that a number of non-Acadian families bearing the name settled in the colony, especially at New Orleans:  

A Benoit commanded Fort Toulouse, at the confluence of the Coosa and Tallapoosa rivers, then a part of French Louisiana, in the early 1730s, while Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, sieur de Bienville, was governor of the colony.  Benoit did not remain long at Fort Toulouse.  In late 1733, he was sacked for becoming involved with an English trader and replaced by a "Sieur Develle." 

Élisabeth Benoit, widow Rochon, died in New Orleans in May 1772.  She was only 18 years old.  The priest who recorded her burial did not list her parents' names or reveal where she had been born.  

Charles Benoit of Québec, a former notary at Pointe Coupée, died at New Orleans in December 1772.  He was 60 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial said nothing of a wife and children.  

A Benoit, first name unrecorded, native of the Duchy of Luxembourg and a master tailor/clothier, died at New Orleans in November 1774.  He was 45 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial said nothing of a wife and children.  

Nicolas-Jean Benoit married Laine Montanary.  Their daughter Marguerite was born at New Orleans in August 1774.  

Thérèse Benoit, "native of the German Coast," widow of Louis Hardy, married Jacques, son of Jean Moquien of Montréal, at New Orleans in January 1781.  She died at New Orleans in June 1789.  She was 40 years old.  The priests who recorded her marriage and her burial did not give her parents' names.  

Martha Benoi married Manuel Toledano at New Orleans in November 1787.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the bride's or the groom's parents' names.  

A Benoit married a Frederique at New Orleans in December 1788 or January 1789.  The priest who recorded the marriage must have been in a hurry to do something else.  

Nicolas, son of Madeleine Benoit and grandson of Jean Hardy Benoit and Thérèse Benoit, was born at New Orleans in May 1791.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not reveal the father's name.  

Andrés, son of Andrés Benois and Augustina Lanschevins of New Orleans and native of the city, married Céleste, daughter of Jean-Pierre Buras, at New Orleans in October 1800.  

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One French Creole family was, as its surname implies, of aristocratic origin.  The family lived in New Orleans during the middle and late colonial period before moving to the western prairies, where they became one of the most socially prominent families in the Attakapas District:  

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste BENOIST de STE.-CLAIRE (?-?)

Jean-Baptiste Benoist de Ste.-Claire, a French-Canadian captain in the French army who became a chevalier of the prestigious Military Order of St.-Louis, was serving as commandant of the Illinois post when he married Marie-Louise or Rouise, daughter of Major Antoine Bienvenu, at Kaskaskia in January 1750.  He moved his family to New Orleans in the 1750s.  By the early 1780s, he had moved to the Attakapas District, where, because of his aristocratic background and military rank, the family enjoyed social prominence.  But the chevalier's sons produced few heirs, at least compared to their Acadian namesakes in the district.  

1

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste-Charles, born either in Illinois or at New Orleans in the early 1750s, married Marie-Louise-Hyacinthe, called Louise, daughter of Attakapas commandant Alexandre-François-Joseph Chevalier DeClouet of Picardie, France, at Opelousas in February 1792; the marriage also was recorded at Attakapas in May 1793.  Their son Jean-François, called François, was baptized at Attakapas, age unrecorded, in 1794.  Their daughter married into the Nee family.  Jean-Baptiste-Charles served as lieutenant of militia on the lower Mississippi and died of dropsy at Attakapas in November 1796; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jean-Baptiste was 50 years old when he died, but he probably was in his mid- to late 40s.  

François married first cousin Marie Françoise Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of Alexandre Joseph DeClouet, fils, his maternal uncle, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1816.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born at La Pointe on the upper Teche, near present-day Breaux Bridge, in November 1820, and François Louis was born in August 1824 but died at age 10 months in June 1825.  Their daughter married a DeClouet cousin.  François died in St. Martin Parish in May 1832; he was only 38 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse later that month.  

Jean Baptiste married Marie Henriette LeBreton probably in St. Martin Parish in the 1840s.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted dozens of slaves on the Benoit St. Clair plantation.  The following month, the same census taker counted 5 slaves--3 males and 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 30 to 1--on Céleste Benoit's farm.  The same census taker counted 2 slaves--a 20-year-old black male and a 17-year-old black female--on Charlotte Benoit's farm.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted a single slave--a 15-year-old black female--on Lalot Benoit's farm.  In October 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 34 slaves--17 males and 17 females, 27 blacks and 7 mulattoes, ranging in age from 55 years to 8 months--on the St. Clair De Benoit plantation.  

2

Benjamin, born probably at New Orleans in c1771, died at Attakapas "of some accident of lightning or thunderbolt," which also killed his mother, in June 1788.  He was only 17 years old when he died.  

3

Youngest son Clair, born at New Orleans in February 1774, married Charlotte-Caroline, called Caroline, another daughter of the Chevalier Alexandre De Clouet, at Attakapas in September 1801.  Clair died in St. Martin Parish in May 1833; the St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that Clair was 62 years old when he died, but he was "only" 59; his succession record, dated 28 January 1832, was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse two weeks after he died.  

~

During the antebellum period, non-Acadian Benoits could be found not only at New Orleans but also in the river and prairie parishes, where Acadian Benoits had settled.  Benoits, called Foreign French by native Louisianians, emigrated to New Orleans from France and the Caribbean Basin; most of them remained in the city:

Marie Louise and Meretine Benoit, ages 23 and 3, from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Salem out of Le Havre, France, in May 1835.  

Louisa Elisa, daughter of Élisée Bennoit and Aurora Fonteneau, married Joseph, son of Thomas Key, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in May 1836.  

David Benoit, a 44-year-old carpenter from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Luisiana out of Tampico, Mexico, in November 1836.  

Aloys Benoist, a 19-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Republican out of Le Havre in October 1838.  

Émile Benoit, a 30-year-old merchant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Salem out of Le Havre in November 1838.  

A Mr. Benois, a 45-year-old gardener from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Creole out of St.-Pierre, Martinique, in July 1841.  

_____ Benoit, a 25-year-old professor from France, and his wife, age 24, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Tippicanoe out of Le Havre in June 1843.  One wonders what he was a professor of at such an age.  

David Benoit, age 35, and Joseph Benoit, age 26, both farmers from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Mozart out of Le Havre in August 1840.  They probably were brothers.  

J. C. Benoit, age not given, Mme. Benoit, age 31, Servente Benoit, age 18, Ernestine Benoit, age 16, Jules Benoit, age 3, and Emelie Benoit, age 3 months, all from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship South Carolina out of an unnamed port in October 1843.  

Alfred, son of Jean-Baptiste Benoit and Anne-Véronique Chamit or Chanut of Melun, Department of Seine-et-Marne, France, married Annette Eugènie, daughter of Joshua Veazey, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1845.  

T. Benoit, a 36-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Vesta out of Le Havre in November 1846.  

Charles Benoit, an 18-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Moselle out of Le Havre in July 1848.  

Jean-Joseph Benoit, a 27-year-old farmer from France, and Augustine Benoit, age 22, probably his wife, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Oregon in April 1849.  

Charles Benoit, a 23-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Callender out of Le Havre in April 1850.  

In July 1850, the federal census taker in Orleans Parish counted 3 slaves--all female, all black, ages 25, 23, and 9--in Thos. E. Benoit's household in the First Ward of the parish's First Municipality.

Jean Benoit, a 43-year-old clerk, and Annette Benoit, a 40-year-old clerk, also from France and probably his wife, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Caroline & Mary Clark out of Liverpool, England, in November 1850.  

______ Benoit, a 46-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, Anton Bernard, age 8, Élisabeth Benoit, age 10, another Élisabeth Benoit, age 5, Jacob Benoit, age 5, and Louise Benoit, age 5, perhaps his children, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Belle Anaise out of Le Havre in May 1852.  

George Benoit, a 29-year-old native of France, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Rouennais out of Le Havre in January 1852.  

In October 1853, 18-year-old Hippolyte, son of Jean Baptise Benoist and Marie Bringole of Louisville, Kentucky, died of "cholera morbus" at the home of Mr. Louis Berlier, "a local merchant" living near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, who had adopted Hippolyte "7 or 8 years ago, when he was orphaned."  Evidently Hippolyte did not marry.  

.

A family of Foreign-French Benoits who favored Acadian brides settled on Bayou Lafourche in the 1830s:  

Descendants of Victor- or Victorin-Simon BENOIT (c1810?-1853)

Victor- or Victorin-Simon, 21-year-old son of Jean Baptiste Benoit and Jeanne or Susanne Marcourt of Bordeaux, France, married Césaire Julienne, 18-year-old daughter of Acadian Jean Charles Broussard, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in October 1829.  Victor died near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in September 1853; the priest who recorded his burial said that Victor was 34 years old when he died, but he had to be older than that; perhaps the priest, or the transcriber, meant 43; Victor's succession record was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in April 1854.  Only one of his four sons created a family of his own, but his son, too, may have died young and ended this line of the family.  

1

Oldest son Césaire Victorin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1830, probably died young.  

2

Louis Victorin, called Victorin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1833, married Hermance, daughter of Acadian Pierre Thibodeaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in June 1855.  Their son Jean Victorin was born near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in December 1860.  Victorin died in Lafourche Parish in January 1866; he was only 32 years old. 

3

Théodule died in Lafourche Interior Parish only 8 days after his birth in February 1838.

4

Youngest son Joseph Émile, called Émile, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1839, died in Lafourche Parish in June 1862.  He was only 23 years old and did not marry.  

.

Some non-Acadian Benoits on the western prairies were free persons of color or slaves who retained the names of their French-Creole or Acadian owners or whose progenitor was named Benoît, a given name:  

Pierre Benoit, described as a homme de couleur libre, or a free man of color, son of Pierre Benoit and Annette à Dubulet, died in St. Martin Parish at age 17 in March 1837.  

Marie Benoit, a "mulatto libre," was born to Célestie, slave of Céleste Benoit, in St. Martin Parish in July 1839.  

Pierre Benoit, a free man of color, died in St. Martin Parish at age 46 in March 1844.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse that month.  

Édouard Benoit, a free man of color, son of Charlotte De Clouet, married Elvina, daughter of Alexandre Lemelle or Lemesle, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1854.  Their son Édouard, fils was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1854, and Jean Baptiste in December 1865.  Édouard, père's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in July 1866. 

Charlotte Benoit, a free woman of color, daughter of Palmire Rivière, married Isidore Olivier, a free man of color, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1854. 

Baptiste Benoit, a free man of color, married Marguerite LeBlanc, a free woman of color, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1865.  

Paul Élie, son of Élie Benoit, free man of color, and Zai ____, free woman of color, died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in April 1867; he was only 20 years old.  Did he marry?

Cécile Benoit, a freed woman, married Thom Simon, a freedman, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in April 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

CONCLUSION

Benoits were among the early settlers of Acadia, but they came to Louisiana a bit later than other Acadian families.  The first of them, all from Pigiguit, arrived from Port Tobacco, Maryland, in 1768 with the large extended family led by the Breau brothers of Pigiguit.  Spanish Governor Ulloa forced them to settle far upriver at Fort San Luis de Natchez, but after Ulloa's ouster in a colonial uprising later that year, his successor allowed the Breau clan to move downriver to the Acadian Coast.  The Benoits from Natchez went to St.-Gabriel and Ascension, but one of them, Étienne, after he married, moved on to the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin, where he created a western branch of the family.  In 1769, another Benoit family came to Louisiana from Port Tobacco, Maryland, aboard the ill-fated British vessel Britannia.  After harrowing adventures in Texas and a long overland trek to Natchitoches, Pierre-Olivier Benoit took his family to St.-Gabriel on the river and then to the Opelousas District west of the Atchafalaya, where his son Jean-Charles established a large family.  More Acadian Benoits came from France in 1785.  One of them, Sébastien, settled on upper Bayou Lafourche but, like his cousins from Maryland, he moved to the prairies, in this case to the western edge of the Calcasieu country near present-day Lake Charles.  Meanwhile, his other cousins from France settled on the river below New Orleans or at Manchac south of Baton Rouge.  Most of the Benoits from France, however, settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, creating a third center of family settlement there.  

In Louisiana, then, the Benoits exhibited the same settlement pattern their ancestors had followed in old Acadia--they did not cluster in a single settlement but scattered all over the region.  The family that settled near Baton Rouge in the late 1780s disappears from local church records by the early 1800s, but by then their Benoit cousins could be found on the fringes of French Louisiana from the river below New Orleans, along the shore of Vermilion Bay, and in the Calcasieu River valley near the border of Spanish Texas.  They were especially numerous along the banks of Bayou Lafourche as far down as the Terrebonne country, on the prairie at Carencro north of present-day Lafayette, on upper Bayou Teche near present-day Breaux Bridge, and on the prairies of what became Vermilion Parish.  

Benoit is a common surname in France and French Canada, so non-Acadian members of the family also lived in South Louisiana during the colonial period, most of them at New Orleans.  The most significant non-Acadian family was that of Jean-Baptiste Benoist de Ste.-Claire, a French-Canadian captain in the King's army who became a chevalier of the prestigious Order of St.-Louis.  He served as commandant of the Illinois post in the late 1740s before moving his family to New Orleans the following decade.  By the early 1780s, he had taken his family to the Attakapas District, where they became socially prominent members of that community.  During the antebellum period, quite a few Foreign-French Benoits came to New Orleans, and most remained there.  One Foreign-Frenchman, Victor- or Victorin-Simon Benoit of Bordeaux, settled on upper Bayou Lafourche in the 1820s.  He married an Acadian, and his only married son took an Acadian bride.  A number of Benoits who were free persons of color established families on the western prairies during the antebellum period.  But these non-Acadian Benoits, including the Benoist de Ste. Claires, never came close in numbers to their Acadian namesakes who lived nearby. ...

The family's name also is spelled Bennoit, Benois, Benoist, Benua, Venua.  

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Calcasieu, Lafayette, Lafourche Interior, St. Martin, & Vermilion parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Lafayette, Lafourche, & St. Martin parishes; Arsenault, Généalogie, 427, 1101-04, 1330-35, 1470, 2185, 2415-18; "Benoits of Bay St. George," AGE, May 2008, 42-44; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:42, 2:27, 3:23-24; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 8, 10, 11; Michel J. Foret, "War or Peace? Louisiana, the Choctaws, and the Chickasaws, 1733-1735," pp. 299, 300, in Conrad, ed., The French Experience in LA; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 25-27 ; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; NOAR, vols. 3, 4, 5, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, Family Nos. 31, 32, 42; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Supply.htm>, Family Nos. 19, 22, 30; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Tamerlan.htm>, Family Nos. 2, 9, 10; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family Nos. 70, 120; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 7-9; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 10-11; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 47-55; White, DGFA-1, 105-19; White, DGFA-1 English, 20-26; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 24-25, 150-51.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day parishes that existed during the War Between the States in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Anne BENOIT 01 176? Atk born c1759, perhaps MA; daughter of Alexis BENOIT & Hélène COMEAUX; sister of Élisabeth; went to St.-Domingue before going to LA?; married, age 16, Amand dit Beausoleil, son of Joseph BROUSSARD dit Beausoleil & Agnès THIBODEAUX, & widower of Hélène LANDRY, 24 May 1775, Atakapas, now St. Martinville; in Attakapas census, 1777, called Anne BENOIS, age 18, with husband & 1 stepson; in Attakapas census, 1781, unnamed, with husband & 4 others; in Attakapas census, 1785, unnamed, with husband & 8 others; died at her home at Fausse Pointe, St. Martin Parish, 18 Sep 1830, "about age 67[sic] years", buried next day "in the parish cemetery"
Anne BENOIT 02 Aug 1785 BR born c1730; daughter of Pierre BENOIT & Élisabeth LEJUGE; on Île St.-Jean 1752, age 22; married, age 23, Pierre, son of Jean HÉBERT & Madeleine DOIRON, c1753, probably Île St.-Jean; deported to St.-Malo, France, 1758-59, age 28; at St.-Servan, France, 1762, age 34; married, age 40, (2)Jean-Baptiste, son of Jean HÉBERT & Marguerite TRAHAN, & widower of Anne LEBLANC, 6 Feb 1770, St.-Servan, France; received permission to leave St.-Malo & reside at La Rochelle, France, 30 Aug 1770; at Locmaria, Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, Jan 1772; at Rochefort, France, 1772, age 42; on list of Acadians at Paimboeuf, France, Sep 1784, called Anne BENOIT, widow HÉBERT, with 1 unnamed son; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 48[sic], widow, head of family; on list of Acadians at Fort Bute, Manchac, 1788, called Ana BENUA (widow), with 1 other person in her family [son Jean-Charles HÉBERT], 1 1/2 barrels corn, 1/4 qt. rice
Daniel BENOIT 03 Jul 1785 StG, BR, Atk born c1748, probably L'Assomption, Pigiguit; son of Claude BENOIT & Élisabeth/Isabelle THÉRIOT; brother of Grégoire, Marguerite, & Pélagie; moved  to L'Anse-au-Matelot, Île St.-Jean, 1752, age 6; deported to France 1758, age 10; day laborer; married, age 19, (1)Henriette, daughter of François LEGENDRE & Marguerite LABAUVE, 9 Feb 1768, St.-Servan, France; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, with wife & 1 daughter; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 36, head of family; on list of Acadians at Fort Bute, Manchac, 1788, called Daniel BENUA, with 3 unnamed persons in his family, 3 barrels corn, 1/4 qt. rice; married, age 51, (2)Madeleine-Ursule, daughter of Alexandre DOIRON & Ursule HÉBERT, c1799, Baton Rouge; died "at his daughter's home," St. Martin Parish, 15 Dec 1825, "at age about 84 years[sic]," buried next day "in the parish cemetery"
Donatien BENOIT 04 Sep 1785 Asp, Op born c1777, probably Nantes, France; son of Grégoire BENOIT & Marie-Rose CARRET; brother of Francoise-Félicité, Jean-Marie, Marie-Rose, Martina, & Rémond-Grégoire; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 8; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, called Danencien, age 10, with parents & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, called Dannancien, age 12[sic], with parents & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Donaciano, age 16[sic], with siblings next to parents; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 17[sic], with siblings next to parents; moved to Opelousas District; never married; died [buried] Opelousas 24 Aug 1797, age 20
Élisabeth BENOIT 05 176? Asc, StG, BR? born Boston, MA; daughter of Alexis BENOIT & Hélène COMEAUX; sister of Anne; went to St.-Domingue before going to LA?; married Jean-Baptiste, son of Antoine DUPUIS & Marguerite BOUDREAUX, 7 Feb 1775, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, left bank ascending, unnamed, with husband, 1 son, & 1 orphan boy; died by Dec 1816, when her husband remarried at Baton Rouge
Étienne BENOIT 06 Feb 1768 Natz, StG, StJ, Atk born c1751, probably Pigiguit; son of Claude BENOIT & Anne COMEAUX; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Luìs de Natchez, 1768, called Esteban VENUA, orphan, age 18, with family of Juan Carlos BRO; moved to St.-Gabriel; married, age 21, Madeleine, daughter of Charles BREAUX & Claire TRAHAN of l'Assomption, Pigiguit, 20 Jan 1771, St.-Jacques; moved to Attakapas District; died [buried] Attakapas 8 Dec 1787, age 36
*François-Jean-Baptiste BENOIT 14 1785? Asp born 7 Oct 1765, baptized next day, St.-Servan, France; son of Augustin BENOIT & his second wife Marie-Madeleine GAUTREAUX; brother of Sophie & Victoire-Marie; at St.-Servan 1765-72; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; arrived LA probably 1785, age 20; married, age 24, Marie-Modeste of Le Havre, France, daughter of Charles PINET dit PINEL & Anne-Marie DUREL, & widow of Jean-Charles ACHÉE, 13 Sep 1789, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, called François, age 25, with wife Marie age 26, son Jean-Baptiste age 1, [step]daughter Martine [ACHÉE] age 6, 0 slaves, 4 arpents, 0 qts. rice, 60 qts. corn, 0 horned cattle, 0 horses, 8 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Francisco, age 34, with wife Maria age 30, sons Agustin age 6, Josef age 4, & [step]daughter Magdelena [probably Martine ACHÉE] age 10, also [wife's former brother-in-law] Frederico AHHE [ACHÉE] age 30, & [engagé?] Guillermo ARSEMENT age 22; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called François, age 35, with wife Marie age 31, sons Martin [probably stepdaughter Martine ACHÉE!] age 11, Joseph age 5, & daughter Barbe age 3, 0 slaves; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called François, age 31, with wife Marie age 32, sons Joseph age 6, Charles age 4, [step]daughter Martines [ACHÉE] age 11, daughters Babet age 5, & Judit age 2, 6/25 arpents, 0 slaves
François-René BENOIT 07 Nov 1785 SB born c1778, Nantes, France; son of Jean-Charles BENOIT & Anne-Marie ACHÉE; brother of Jean-Marie, Paul-Frédéric, & Sophie-Renée; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 7; settled near English Turn, below New Orleans; married, age 25, Luisa of Pensacola, daughter of Francisco COBOS & Francisca DEMOUREL, 15 Jun 1803, New Orleans
Françoise BENOIT 08 Sep 1785 Asp born c1741; daughter of Charles BENOIT & Marie-Madeleine THÉRIOT; sister of Jean-Charles & Marie; deported from either Île St.-Jean or Île Royale to St.-Malo, France, aboard Tamerlan 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 16 Jan 1759, called Francoise BENOIST, age 18; married, age 20, Honoré son of Ignace CARRET & Cécile HENRY, 6 Mar 1759, St.-Servan, France; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, with husband & 1 unnamed son; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 40[sic]; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, age 42[sic], with husband, & niece Victoire BENOIT; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, age 44[sic], with husband & no children; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Francisca, age 50[sic], with husband & no children; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 51[sic], with husband & no children; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 50[sic], with husband & no children
Françoise-Félicité BENOIT 09 Sep 1785 Asp born c1782, probably Chantenay, France; daughter of Grégoire BENOIT & Marie-Rose CARRET; sister of Donatien, Jean-Marie, Marie-Rose, Martina, & Rémond-Grégoire; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 5[sic]; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, age 5, with parents & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, age 8, with parents & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Francisca, age 14, with siblings next to parents; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 15, with siblings next to parents; in Lafourche census, 1798, age 18[sic], with parents & siblings; married, age 29, Jean-Baptiste, fils, son of Jean-Baptiste TAUZIN & Jeanne-Marie LANBEAUX of Bayonne, France, 6 May 1811, Assumption, now Plattenville
Grégoire BENOIT 10 Sep 1785 Asp, Lf born c1744, probably L'Assomption, Pigiguit; son of Claude BENOIT & Élisabeth/Isabelle THÉRIOT; brother of Daniel, Marguerite, & Pélagie; moved  to L'Anse-au-Matelot, Île St.-Jean, 1752, age 8; deported to France 1758, age 14; day laborer; married, age 25, Marie-Rose, daughter of Jean CARRET & Rose TRAHAN, 13 Feb 1770, St.-Servan, France; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, with wife, 3 unnamed sons, 2 unnamed daughters, & 1 unnamed orphan, probably sister-in-law Thérèse CARRET; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 40, head of family; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, age 42[sic], with wife Marie-Rose age 34, sons Jean-Marie age 11, Danencien age 9, daughters Marie-Rose age 10, Françoise age 5, 6 arpents, 40 qts. corn, 6 swine; in Ascension census, 1791, left bank, age 42[sic], with wife Marie-Rose age 36, sons Jean-Marie age 15, Dannancien age 12, Pierre age 2, daughters Marie-Rose age 13, Françoise age 8, 0 slaves, 9 arpents, 0 qts. rice, 100 qts. corn, 6 horned cattle, 0 horses, 20 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Isidoro[sic], age 50, with wife Maria Rosa age 38, & no children; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 51[sic], with wife Marie & no children, 0 slaves, next to son Jean-Marie & other children; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 55, with wife Marie age 45, sons Pierre age 10, Bastien age 4, daughters Marie age 20, & Françoise age 18, 6/40 arpents, 0 slaves; died Lafourche Parish 21 Jan 1829, age 88[sic]; succession record dated 18 Jan 1809, Interior Parish courthouse
Henriette-Renée BENOIT 11 Jul 1785 BR, Atk baptized 12 Jun 1778, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France; called Renée; daughter of Daniel BENOIT & his first wife Henriette LEGENDRE; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents; sailed to LA on Le Bon Papa, age 7; on list of Acadians at Fort Bute, Manchac,, 1788, unnamed, with parents & no one else; married, age 15, (1)Pierre, son of Antoine LABAUVE & Anne VINCENT, 17 Feb 1793, Baton Rouge; married (2)Antoine, fils, son of Antoine MALLET & Catherine BORDELON, early 1800s, probably Baton Rouge; moved to Attakapas District & settled at Grand Bois, Fausse Pointe, St. Martin Parish
Jean-Charles BENOIT 12 Oct 1769 Natc, StG, Op, Atk born c1759, probably MD; son of Pierre-Olivier BENOIT & his first wife Susanne BOUDREAUX; brother of Madeleine & Marie-Rose; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Jean BENOIST, with parents & sisters; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769, aboard English schooner Britannia with father, stepmother, & siblings; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at La Bahia, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 15[sic]; moved to St.-Gabriel; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, unnamed, age 18, with parents & sisters; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1785, unnamed, with father, stepmother, & others; married, age 26, Anne of St.-Jacques, called Nanette, daughter of François SAVOY & his third wife Anne THIBODEAUX, 7 Sep 1785, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; in Opelousas census, 1788, Plaquemines Brûlé, called Jn. Cho., with 1 unnamed male, 1 unnamed woman [wife Anne], 0 slaves, 15 cattle, 5 horses, 2 arpents; in Opelousas census, 1796, Grand Coteau District, called Jean, with unnamed wife [Anne/Nanette], 3 unnamed white males, 1 unnamed white female, & 0 slaves, next to future brother-in-law Augustin BOUDREAU; moved to Attakapas District, settled at La Petite-Anse, now Avery Island, Iberia Parish, & Grand Bois; died Grand Bois, St. Martin Parish, 17 Jan 1813, "at age about 50[sic] years," buried next day "in the parish cemetery"
Jean-Charles BENOIT 13 Dec 1785 SB born c1746, probably Pigiguit; called Charles; son of Charles BENOIT & Marie-Madeleine THÉRIOT; brother of Françoise & Marie; deported from Île St.-Jean to St.-Malo, France, aboard Tamerlan 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 16 Jan 1759, called Jean BENOIST, age 11[sic]; sailor; married, age 24, Anne-Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste ACHÉE & Anne OLIVIER, 9 Jan 1770, St.-Servan, France; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, called Charles BENOIST, with wife, 3 sons, & 1 daughter; sailed to LA on La Caroline, age 36[sic], listed singly (his wife & children had sailed to LA on L'Amitié); settled near English Turn, below New Orleans
Jean-Marie BENOIT 15 Sep 1785 Asp born & baptized 18 Sep 1773, St.-Servan, France; son of Grégoire BENOIT & Marie-Rose CARRET; brother of Donatien, Françoise-Félicité, Marie-Rose, Martina, & Rémond-Grégoire; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 10[sic]; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, age 11[sic], with parents & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, age 15[sic], with parents & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Juan Maria & Juan, age 22, with siblings, next to parents; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Jean-Marie & Jean, ages 22 & 23, with "his wife" Marie BENOIT age 19 [probably his sister Marie-Rose], no children, brothers Jean age 22, Donatien age 17, Pierre age 8, Valentin age 4, sisters Marie-Rose [probably a double-listing] age 19, & Francoise age 15, 0 slaves, next to their father; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called Jean-Marie, age 24, listed singly, with 3/60 arpents, 0 slaves; married, age 25, Marie-Élisabeth/Isabelle, called Élisabeth, of Nantes, France, daughter of Étienne DAROIS & Madeleine TRAHAN, & widow of Joseph-Marie BOUDREAUX, 4 Nov 1799, Assumption, now Plattenville
Jean-Marie BENOIT 16 Nov 1785 SB born & baptized 11 Nov 1770, St.-Servan, France; son of Jean-Charles BENOIT & Anne-Marie ACHÉE; brother of François-René, Paul-Frédéric, & Sophie-Renée; at St.-Servan, 1770-72; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 14; settled near English Turn, below New Orleans
Madeleine BENOIT 17 Oct 1769 Natc, StG, Op born c1763, probably MD; daughter of Olivier BENOIT & his first wife Susanne BOUDREAUX; sister of Jean-Charles & Marie-Rose; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Margueritte BENOIST, with parents & siblings; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769, aboard English schooner Britannia with father, stepmother, & siblings; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at La Bahia, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 6; moved to St.-Gabriel; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, unnamed, age 8[sic], with parents & siblings; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1785, unnamed, with father, stepmother, & others; married, age 24, (1)Amand, son of Dol MARTIN & Madeleine CYR of Canada, 6 Sep 1787, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; married, age 26, (2)André or Andrew, son of Bernard FAVRON & Pérrine MOIRLOS of St.-Malo, France, 1 Oct 1789, Opelousas; in Opelousas census, 1796, Bellevue District, unnamed, with husband Andrés FABRON, 4 others whites, & 0 slaves; married, age 52, (3)Augustin-Rémi, son of probably Pierre BOUDREAUX & Anne HÉBERT of Pigiguit, & widow of Judith MARTIN, 25 Jul 1815, Opelousas
Marguerite BENOIT 18 Oct 1769 Natc, Op born c1760, probably MD; daughter of Jean-Baptiste BENOIT & Anne TRAHAN; sister of Marie-Anne & Marie-Rose; stepdaughter of Louis LATIER; in report of Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Margueritte BENOIST, with mother, stepfather, 2 sisters, & a stepbrother; departed Port Tobacco 5 Jan 1769, aboard English schooner Britannia with mother, stepfather, & siblings; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at Goliad, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 9; moved to Opelousas District; married, age 15, Louis, son of Urbain BROUSSARD & Catherine ____ of Pigiguit, c1775, probably Opelousas; in Opelousas census, 1777, called Marguerite BENOIS, age 18, with husband & 2 sons; in Opelousas census, 1785, unnamed, with husband & 6 others; in Opelousas census, 1796, Grand Prairie District, unnamed, with husband & 10 others
Marguerite BENOIT 19 Nov 1785 Asp, Lf born c1753, probably Île St.-Jean; daughter of Claude BENOIT & Élisabeth/Isabelle THÉRIOT; sister of Daniel, Grégoire, & Pélagie; deported to France, 1758, age 5; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; married (1)Joseph, son of Joseph PRÉCIEUX & Anne HACHÉ-GALLANT [ACHÉE], 7 Feb 1775, St.-Jacques, Châtellerault; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775, with family of sister Pélagie; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, called Marguerite BENOIT, widow PRÉCIEUX, listed singly; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 32, widow, listed singly; married, age 33, (2)Claude-Bernard, son of Jean-Baptiste DUGAS & Marguerite-Josèphe DOIRON, 14 Feb 1786, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, called Margueritte, age 36, with husband & no children; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, called Margrithe, age 40[sic], with husband, no children, & probably her mother-in-law; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Margarita, age 43, with husband & no children; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Margueritte, age 44, with husband & no children; died Lafourche Interior Parish 8 Sep 1837, age 90[sic]
Marie BENOIT 20 Feb 1768 Natz, StG, StJ born c1737, probably Minas; married Jean-Charles, son of Pierre BREAUX & Marguerite GAUTREAUX, probably Minas; exiled to MD 1755, age 18; in report of Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Marie BRAUX, with husband, a son, a daughter, & an orphan; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Luìs de Natchez, 1768, called Maria, age 30, with husband, 2 sons, 2 daughters, & 2 orphans; moved to St.-Gabriel; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, unnamed, age 40, with husband, 2 daughters, & 1 son; died [buried] St.-Jacques 15 Nov 1795, age 64[sic] or 74[sic], a widow
Marie BENOIT 21 Sep 1785 Asc, StG born c1736; daughter of Charles BENOIT & Marie-Madeleine THÉRIOT; sister of Francoise & Jean-Charles; married (1)René, son of René RASSICOT & Marie HACHÉ, 1750s, probably Île St.-Jean; deported from either Île St.-Jean or Île Royale to St.-Malo, France, aboard Tamerlan 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 16 Jan 1759, called Marie BENOIST, age 22; at Châteauneuf, France, 1761; at St.-Servan, France, 1761-72; married, age 29, (2)Joseph, son of Jacques HÉBERT & Marguerite LANDRY, & widower of Marguerite RICHARD, 7 Jan 1766, St.-Servan; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, with husband, 1 unnamed stepson, & 2 unnamed daughters [one of them a stepdaughter]; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 48; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, age 50, with husband & niece Sophie BENOIT; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, age 50[sic], with husband & no children; died [buried] St. Gabriel 9 Jun 1806, age 80[sic]
Marie-Anne BENOIT 22 Oct 1769 Natc born c1754; daughter of Jean-Baptiste BENOIT & Anne TRAHAN; sister of Marguerite & Marie-Rose, stepdaughter of Louis LATIER; exiled to MD 1755, age 1; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Anne BENOIST, with mother, stepfather, 2 sisters, & a step-brother; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769 aboard English schooner Britannia with mother, stepfather, & siblings; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at Goliad, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 15
Marie-Marthe BENOIT 23 Dec 1785 StJ born c1736, Cobeguit; married (1)Jean CLÉMENT; moved to Louisbourg; deported probably from Louisbourg to Rochefort, France, 1758-59; married, age 25, (2)Nicolas-Gabriel ALBERT of Île d'Oléron, France, & Louisbourg, Île Royale, widower of Marie GARSANT, 12 Jan 1761, St.-Louis, Rochefort; in Poitou, France, 1770s; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, called Marie, with husband Nicolas ALBERT & 1 unnamed son; sailed to LA on La Caroline, age 40[sic]; on report of Acadians at St.-Jacques, 1788, unnamed, with husband Nicolas ALBERT, 1 other unnamed person [son Nicolas-Gabriel ALBERT, fils], & 4 1/2 barrels corn
Marie-Rose BENOIT 24 Oct 1769 Natc, Op born c1747; called Rose or Rosalie; daughter of Jean-Baptiste BENOIT & Anne TRAHAN; sister of Marguerite & Marie-Anne, stepdaughter of Louis LATIER; exiled to MD 1755, age 8; in report of Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Rose BENOIST, orphan, with mother, stepfather, 2 sisters, & a stepbrother; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769, aboard English schooner Britannia with mother, stepfather, & siblings; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at La Bahia, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 13[sic, probably meant 23]; married, age 22, (1)Romain, son of Pierre DELAFOSSE & Jeanne GILLEMENNE of Natchitoches Post, 26 Dec 1769, probably Natchitoches; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1777, called Rose BENOIS, age 30, with husband Romain DE LA FOSSE age 40 who was head of family number 26, son Romain [DELAFOSSE, fils] age 3, daughters Rosalie [DELAFOSSE] age 6, & Hélène ]DELAFOSSE] age 1, 0 slaves, 2 cattle, 0 horses, 6 hogs, 0 sheep; married, age 51, (2)Joseph of "Estrecho," son of Charles CAMPOS & Charlotte NANTAIR, 31 Jan 1796, Opelousas; died [buried] Opelousas 3 Apr 1801, age 54
Marie-Rose BENOIT 25 Oct 1769 Natc, StG, Atk born c1761, MD; daughter of Olivier BENOIT & his first wife Susanne BOUDREAUX; sister of Jean-Charles & Madeleine; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Marie BENOIST, with parents & siblings; departed Port Tobacco, MD, 5 Jan 1769, aboard English schooner Britannia with father, stepmother, & siblings; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at Goliad, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 8; moved to St.-Gabriel; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, unnamed, age 12[sic], with parents & siblings; moved to Attakapas District; married (1)Marin, son of Amand PRÉJEAN & his first wife Madeleine MARTIN, late 1770s, probably Attakapas; in Attakapas census, 1781, unnamed, with husband & no one else; in Attakapas census, 1785, unnamed, with husband & 2 others; married, age 39, (2)Daniel, Anglican from NC, son of Jonathan BOONE of NC & Marie CARTER of PA but residents of KY, 27 Jul or 12 Aug 1800, Attakapas
Marie-Rose BENOIT 26 Sep 1785 Asp, Lf baptized 3 May 1775, St.-Jean-L'Evangeliste, Châtellerault, France; daughter of Grégoire BENOIT & Marie-Rose CARRET; sister of Donatien, Francoise-Félicité, Jean-Marie, Martina, & Rémond-Grégoire; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 9; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, age 10, with parents & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, age 13[sic], with parents & siblings; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Maria Rosa, age 18, with siblings next to parents; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 19[sic], with siblings next to parents; in Lafourche census, 1798, called Marie, age 20[sic], with parents & siblings; married, age 27, Jean-Baptiste of St.-Servan, France, son of Victor BOUDREAUX & his first wife Catherine-Josèphe HÉBERT, & widower of Marie-Françoise LEBLANC, 25 Apr 1803, Assumption, now Plattenville; died Lafourche Interior Parish 29 Sep 1847, age 72; family meeting held 12 Dec 1855, Lafourche Interior Parish
*Martina/Martine BENOIT 27 Sep 1785 Asp? born 16 Sep 1785, La Balize or New Orleans, 6 days after her family reached LA; baptized 18 Oct 1785, New Orleans; daughter of Grégoire BENOIT & Marie-Rose CARRET; sister of Donatien, Francoise-Félicité, Jean-Marie, Marie-Rose, & Rémond-Grégoire; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, in utero; not in Valenzuéla censuses of 1788 & 1791 with the rest of her family, so she probably died young
*Mathurin BENOIT 28 17?? StG born c1757; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, called Maturin BENOIS, age 20, a bachelor, with 4 cattle, [0 horses?] 6 hogs, 14 fowl, 6 arpents, surrounded by Acadians
*Nicolas-Jean-Sébastien BENOIT 33 1785? Asp, Atk, Op born 23 Nov 1760, baptized next day, St.-Servan, France; called Sébastien; son of Augustin BENOIT & Françoise THÉRIOT; nephew of Étienne; at St.-Servan 1760-63; to Falkland Islands aboard L'Aigle 1763; in Falkland Islands 1763-68; returned to St.-Malo 23 Apr 1768; at St.-Servan 1768-72; arrived LA probably 1785, age 24; married, age 28, (1)Jeanne, daughter of Jean DE LA FORESTRIE & Marie-Madeleine BONNIÈRE, & widow of Joseph HÉBERT, 16 Aug 1789, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, called Sébastien BENOIT, age 30, with wife, stepsons Joseph [HÉBERT] age 18; Louis [HÉBERT] age 12, Charles [HÉBERT] age 17, stepdaughters Marie [HÉBERT] age 14, & Nanette [HÉBERT] age 5, 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 100 qts. corn, 2 horned cattled, 1 horse, 12 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Sébastian BENOIT, age  74[sic, probably meant 34], listed singly, so probably a widower; moved to Attakapas District & then to Opelousas District, late 1790s, settled on Calcasieu River near present-day Lake Charles; married, age 39, (2)Hippolythe, daughter of Barthélémy LEBLEU & Marie-Josèphe LAMIRANDE of Calcasieu River, 20 Aug 1800, Opelousas
Paul-Frédéric BENOIT 30 Nov 1785 SB baptized 7 Oct 1775, St.-Jean-L'Evangeliste, Châtellerault, France; son of Jean-Charles BENOIT & Anne-Marie ACHÉE; brother of François-René, Jean-Marie, & Sophie-Renée; in Third Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Dec 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 9; settled near English Turn, below New Orleans
Pélagie BENOIT 31 Nov 1785 Asp, Lf born c1741, probably L'Assomption, Pigiguit; daughter of Claude BENOIT & Élisabeth/Isabelle THÉRIOT; sister of Daniel, Grégoire, & Marguerite; moved to L'Anse-au-Matelot, Île St.-Jean, 1752, age 11; moved to Louisbourg, Île Royale; married, age 17, Yves, son of Guillaume CROCHET & Julienne DURAND of Megrit, France, 6 Feb 1758, Louisbourg; deported from Île Royale probably to Rochefort, France, 1758-59, age 17; arrived St.-Malo, France, from Rochefort 1 Oct 1759, age 18; at Megrit, France, 1759-61; at St.-Servan, France, 1762-64; at Megrit 1765-67; at St.-Servan 1767-68; at Megrit 1769-72; in Poitou, France, 1773-75, a widow; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, called Pélagie BENOIT, widow CROCHET, with 4 unnamed sons & 2 unnamed daughters; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 44, widow, head of family, received from Spanish on arrival 1 each of hatchet, 2 of axe, shovel, hoe, & knife; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, called Pélagie BENOIT widow CROCHET, age 48[sic], with sons Yves CROCHET age 19, & Julien [CROCHET] age 17, 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 25 qts. corn, 2 swine, between sons-in-law Léonore LAGARDE & Joseph ADAM; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, called Pélagie BENOIT widow CROCHET, age 48[sic], with son Julien [CROCHET] age 20, 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 0 qts. rice, 12 qts. corn, 2 horned cattle, 0 horses, 4 swine, next to widowed daughter Françoise; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Pélagia, age 60[sic], with son Julian CROCHET age 24, next to son-in-law Josef ADAN; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Pélagie BENOIT, Widow, age 61[sic], with son Julien CROCHET age 25, & 0 slaves; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 62, with son Julian CROCHET age 25, & "single" Mathurin AUCOIN age 25, 6/40 arpents listed with son Julian, 0 slaves; died Lafourche Interior Parish 7 Aug 1824, age 85[sic], buried same day; succession inventory dated 16 Apr 1825, Lafourche Interior Parish courthouse
Pierre-Olivier BENOIT 29 Oct 1769 Natc, StG, Op born c1729, probably Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit; called Olivier; son of probably Pierre BENOIT & Anne-Marie GAUDET; exiled to MD 1755, age 26; married, age 27, (1)Susanne BOUDREAUX, c1756, probably MD; in report on Acadians at Port Tobacco, MD, Jul 1763, called Olivier BENOIST, with wife Susanne, son Jean, & daughters Margueritte & Marie; married, age 36, (2)Marie-Geneviève, daughter of Mathieu BRASSEAUX dit La Citardy & Jeanne CÉLESTIN dit BELLEMÈRE, c1765, probably MD; departed MD 5 Jan 1769 aboard English schooner Britannia with wife & children; lost in the Gulf of Mexico & held by Spanish at La Bahia, TX; arrived Natchitoches Post, LA, 24 Oct 1769, overland from TX, age 40; moved to St.-Gabriel; in St.-Gabriel census, 1777, right bank ascending, called Aulivier BENOIS, age 40(?)[sic, probably 48], with unnamed wife [Marie] age 35, 1 unnamed son [Jean-Charles] age 18, 2 unnamed daughters ages 12 [Marie-Rose] & 8 [Madeleine], 22(?)[sic] cattle, [0 horses?] 10 hogs, 14 fowl, 6 arpents; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1785, called Ol, with 5 unnamed free individuals, 0 slaves; died Opelousas 12 Dec 1787, age 58, buried next day; succession recorded dated 8 Dec 1787, Opelousas courthouse; depicted in Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville
Rémond-Grégoire BENOIT 32 Sep 1785 Asp baptized 25 Jul 1783, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France; son of Grégoire BENOIT & Marie-Rose CARRET; brother of Donatien, Françoise-Félicité, Jean-Marie, Martina, & Marie-Rose; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, an infant; not in the Valenzuéla censuses of 1788 & 1791 with the rest of his family, so he probably died young
Sophie BENOIT 34 Sep 1785 Asp born c1780, Nantes, France; daughter of Augustin BENOIT & his second wife Marie-Madeleine GAUTREAUX; sister of François-Jean-Baptiste & Victoire-Marie; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 8[sic], called "niece," traveled with family of Joseph HÉBERT & Marie BENOIT; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, age 8, with family of Joseph HÉBERT & Marie BENOIT; married, age 24, Francisco Antonio of San Vicente, Havana, Cuba, son of Gregorio TURREYRA & Theresa SILVA, 29 Oct 1804, Assumption, now Plattenville; died probably Assumption Parish by Feb 1813, when her husband remarried at Assumption
Sophie-Renée BENOIT 35 Nov 1785 SB born c1783, probably Nantes, France; daughter of Jean-Charles BENOIT & Anne-Marie ACHÉE; sister of François-René, Jean-Marie, & Paul-Frédéric; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & brothers; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 2; settled near English Turn, below New Orleans
Victoire-Marie BENOIT 36 Sep 1785 Asp, Lf born 11 Nov 1772, baptized 12 Nov 1772, St.-Servan, France; daughter of Augustin BENOIT & his second wife Marie-Madeleine GAUTREAUX; sister of Francois-Jean-Baptiste & Sophie; in Poitou, France, 1773-75; in Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Nov 1775; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 14, traveled with family of Honoré CARRET & first cousin Francoise BENOIT; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, called Victoire BENOIT, his [Honoré CARET's] niece[sic], age 14[sic], with family of Honoré CARET; married, age 23, (1)Charles, son of Jean-Baptiste BERGERON & Catherine CAISSIE dit ROGER of Rivière St.-Jean, & widow of Marie FORET, 7 Jan 1794, Assumption, now Plattenville; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Victoria, age 23, with husband, 4 stepsons, 1 stepdaughter, & 1 daughter; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, age 24, with husband, 4 stepsons, 1 stepdaughter, & 1 daughter; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 25[sic], with husband, 3 stepsons, 1 son, 2 stepdaughters, & 2 daughters; married, age 44, (2)Pierre of St. James, son of Pierre LAMBERT & Marie-Josèphe CÉLESTIN dit BELLEMÈRE, 10 Dec 1815, Assumption; died Terrebonne Parish 31 May 1816, age 43; succession record filed 22 Jun 1816, Terrebonne Parish courthouse

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 11, calls her Anne BENOIT; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2415, 2416, calls her Anne BENOIT, gives her parents' names, & says she was born in c1755 but gives no birthplace; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:46, 120 (SM Ct.Hse.: OA-Vol.1, #25), her marriage record, calls her Anne BENOIT, native of Acadie, parish of St. Jean [St.-Jean-Baptiste, Port-Royal?], calls her husband a "native of Acadie of the parish of St. Jean," gives her & his parents' names & his first wife's name, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Michel MAU, Jacques FOSTAIN, Jean-Baptiste LABAUVE, Olivier TRAHAN, Pierre BROUSSARD, & Joseph LANDRY; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-C:45 (SM Ch.: v.4, #2082), her death/burial record, calls her Anne BENOIT, spouse of Amand BROUSSARD, "died ... at age about 67 yrs. at her home at la fausse pointe, buried ... in the parish cemetery," but does not give her parents' names.  See also De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 12.  

Alexis BENOIT & Hélène COMEAU, married in c1749, were exiled to MA, where they were counted at Newton in 1757 & again in 1763.  See White, DGFA-1, 114.  It stands to reason, then, that their daughters were born in that colony.  MA as a possible birth place is taken from the baptismal record of one of her sister Élisabeth's children, which says that Élisabeth was born in Boston.  There is the possibility, then, that Anne & her sister were among the Acadians who went from New England to St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, in the early 1760s before moving on to LA later in the decade, but this is only a guess.  In point of fact, this scenario is similar to the experience of Élisabeth's husband Jean-Baptiste DUPUIS & his family during Le Grand Dérangement.  See appendix.  Could Élisabeth & Jean-Baptiste have known one another in St.-Domingue?  When did Anne & Élisabeth reach LA?  Did they arrive together, as the listing in Wall of Names suggests?  

The age given in her burial record provides an estimated birth year of c1763, which means she would have married Amand BROUSSARD at age 13!  So the 1777 census age is followed here.  However, it gives an estimated birth year of c1759, & she could not have been born at Port-Royal at that time, 4 years into Le Grand Dérangement.  I would argue that the reference to her being born in the Parish of St. Jean in Acadia is a copying error, that it was meant only for Amand, not Anne.  Besides, 16 is a more believable age for her marriage than 13.  

Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 152, shows an Anne BENOIST at Port Tobacco, MD, in Jul 1763 with sister Natalis.  See also Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 84.  Few, if any, Acadians at Port-Royal were sent to MD, however.  Most of the MD refugees came from Minas.  Wood speculates, however, that this may have been the Anne BENOIT who married Amand BROUSSARD.  Natalis, or Nathalie, is not the same name as Élisabeth, so the Anne BENOIT in MD is probably another Anne BENOIT, not the wife of Amand BROUSSARD. 

Why did her sister remain on the river & Anne go to the western prairies?  Because of who they married?  See below for evidence that her sister Élisabeth & her family visited Anne & her family at Fausse Pointe in the fall of 1784 & that the sisters remained close.

02.  Wall of Names, 33 (pl. 8L), calls her Anne BENOIT veuve HEBERT, & lists her with a son; White, DGFA-1, 108; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 475-76, Family No. 531;  Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 459-60, Family No. 515; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 32-33, calls her Anne BENOIT, veuve HÉBERT, age 48, on the embarkation list, Ana VENOI, viuda ÉBERT, on the debarkation list, & Anne BENOIT, widow HÉBERT, age 48, on the complete listing, says that she was in the 12th Family on the embarkation list & the 14th Family on the debarkation of Le Beaumont with a son, details her second marriage, including her husband's name & her & his parents' names, but gives no place of marriage, & says that son Jean-Charles HÉBERT was born 6 Jan 1772 but gives no birthplace.

03.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls him Daniel BENOIT, & lists him with his wife & daughter; Robichaux, Acadians in Chatellerault, 8, Family No. 14; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 11, Family No. 20; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 8-9, calls him Daniel BENOIT, journalier, age 36, on the embarkation list, Daniel BÉNOIT, on the debarkation list, & Daniel BENOIT, day laborer, age 36, on the complete listing, says that he was in the 26th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with his wife & daughter, & details his marriage, including the names of his & his wife's parents, says they were married in 1768 but gives no place of marriage; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 25; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:58 (SM Ch.: v.4, #1741), his death/burial record, calls him Daniel BENOIT, native of Acadie, married in his last wedding to Magdelaine DOIRON, says he "died at his daughter's home Rene BENOIT wife of Antoine MALLET at age about 84 years," that he was "buried ... in the parish cemetery," but does not give his parents' names.  

I have not found the record of his second marriage.  Further evidence of his second marriage is in the baptismal record of Joseph BENOIT, dated 27 May 1803, in BRDR, 2:71 (SJO-1, 204), which lists the boy's parents as Daniel [BENOIT] & Magdalena DUARON (DOIRON), the paternal grandparents as Lodio [Claude] BENOIT & Madalena TERRIO of Acadia, & the maternal grandparents as Alexandro DOIRON & Ursula EBERRE (HÉBERT) of Acadia.  Their child, name & gender unrecorded, died a month after its birth at Baton Rouge in August 1800.  This helps pinpoint the date of their marriage.  See BRDR, 2:71 (SJO-4, 19).  So Daniel's male line in LA comes thru his second wife, not thru his first one.  

He died in his late 70s, not his early 80s.  Was he a widower again?

04.  Wall of Names, 38 (pl. 10L), calls him Donnatien [BENOIT], & places him & his family on suplement a la liste des Acadiens embarques dans le navire Le St. Remy pour la Nouvelle Orleans [additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le St.-Rémi bound for New Orleans]; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 11, Family No. 21, calls him Donatien [BENOIST], & details his family's voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 60-61, calls him Donnatien, son [Grégoire BENOIT's] fils, age 8, on the embarkation list, & Donatien BENOIT, his [Grégoire BENOIT's] son, age 8, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 1st Family on Supplément à la liste des Acadiens embarqués dans le navire Le Saint-Rémi pour la nouvelle-orleans [Additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le Saint-Rémi bound for New Orleans] with his parents, siblings, & a maternal aunt; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:47 (Opel.Ch.: v.1, p.33), his death/burial record, calls him Donatien BENOIT, single, but does not give his parents' names. 

05.  Wall of Names, 11, calls her Élisabeth BENOIT & lists her over sister Anne as though she, Élisabeth, were the elder sister; BRDR, 2:71, 269 (ASC-1, 129), her marriage record, calls her Élizabeth BENOA (BENOIT), calls her husband Jean-Baptiste DUPUY, "res. at St.-Gabriel at Manchac," gives her & his parents' names, says all parents were Acadians, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Charles MELANÇON, Augustin BRUSARD, & François HÉBERT.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 152.  

Alexis BENOIT & Hélène COMEAU, married in c1749, were exiled to MA, where they were counted at Newton in 1757 and again in 1763.  See White, DGFA-1, 114.  It stands to reason, then, that their daughters were born in that colony.  The baptismal record of daughter Marie-Adeline DUPUIS, dated 4 Sep 1799, in BRDR, 2:271 (SGA-11, 96, #475), calls the mother Ysabel BENUA of Boston.  If Élisabeth was born in MA, there is the possibility that she & her sister Anne came to LA from St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, where Acadian exiles from New England had gone in the early 1760s.  Interestingly, this is almost the exact scenario for Élisabeth's husband Jean-Baptiste DUPUIS & his family during Le Grand Dérangement--exile to NY & then to CN, off to St.-Domingue in the early 1760s, & on to LA later in the decade.  See appendix.  Could Élisabeth & Jean-Baptiste have known one another in St.-Domingue?  When did she & her sister reach LA?  Did they arrive together, as the listing in Wall of Names suggests? 

Why did she remain on the river & her sister go to the western prairies?  No matter, the sisters seem to have remained close.  There is evidence that Élisabeth & her family visited Anne & her family at Fausse Pointe in the autumn of 1784.  The baptismal record of Élisabeth's son Jean-Baptiste DUPUIS, fils, dated 17 Oct 1784, in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:290 (SM Ch.: v.3, #16), provides a light on this visit.  The boy was born in Jun 1783, probably at St.-Gabriel, where his family lived, but was baptized at Atakapas a year & a half later.  All of the other children of Jean-Baptiste DUPUIS, père & Élisabeth BENOIT, both before & after Jean-Baptiste, fils, were born & baptized at St.-Gabriel.  A trip across the Atchafalaya Basin at that time was an arduous affair, especially if one had to return to the river.  Such a visit would have lasted weeks & gives an idea of how devoted these sisters may have been to one another.  

06.  Wall of Names, 11 (pl. 1R), calls him Étienne BENOIT, & lists him singly; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2415, his father's profile in the Louisiana section, calls him Étienne [BENOÎT], says he was born in c1751 but gives no birthplace, that he was his parents' only child, & calls his mother Anne CORMIER; Arsenault, p. 2416, calls him Étienne BENOIT, says he was born in 1751 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names but calls his mother Anne CORMIER, says he was married at Baton Rouge on 5 Feb 1771, gives his wife's parents' names, & says his children were Joseph, born in c1772, Étienne in 1773, Marie-Angele in 1775, Charles in 1777, Marie-Henriette in c1776, Eloi in c1778, Francois-Xavier in c1780, & Augustin in 1786, but gives no birthplaces; BRDR, 2:71, 150 (SJA-1, 13), his marriage record, calls him Étienne BENOIT, says he was married 20 Jan 1771, gives his & his wife's parents' names, calls his parents Glaude [BENOIT] & Anne COMAU, which is COMEAUX, not CORMIER, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Jean BRAU, Jean COMAU, Olivier BABAIN, & Pierre BRAU, all of whom made their marks; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:47 (BRDA: S.J.: v.1771), a copy of his marriage record, calls him Étienne BENOIT, gives his parents' names, calls his mother Anne CORMIER, & says he was married 5 Jan 1771 but gives no place of marriage, though the reference to "SJ" means it occurred in St. James; Hébert, D., 1-A:47 (SM Ch.: v.4, #5), his death/burial record, calls him Étienne BENOIT of Canada, says he was 36 years old when he died, & gives his wife's name but not his parents' names; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 24, calls him Étienne BENOIT, & says that he was the nephew of Jean-Baptiste & Olivier BENOIT.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 436.

With 3 marriage dates to choose from, I will go with the actual marriage record at St.-Jacques, dated 20 Jan 1771, cited above.  I am assuming the other marriage dates are errors in transcription.  

His widow married Michel CORMIER, one of my paternal ancestors, in Feb 1789.

07.  Wall of Names, 40, calls him François-Renné BENOIT; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 74-75; NOAR, 7:23, 66 (SLC, M5, 151), his marriage record, calls him Francisco Renée BENOIT, "native of Nantes in the French Republic, resident of this province since boyhood, presently resident of English Turn," calls his wife Luisa COBOS, "native of Pensacola," gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Rafael PERDOMO, Pedro Nolasco SOLIS, Fernando MORENO, & Humberto DEMORUEL.  See also West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 151.

08.  Wall of Names, 37 (pl. 9R), calls her Françoise BENOIT, & lists her with her husband, a son, her mother, & a cousin; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Tamerlan.htm, Family No. 9, shows that in the crossing to St.-Malo in 1758-59, all of her family survived, even her 70-year-old paternal great-grandmother, Isabelle BABIN, except for her brother Pierre, age not given, who died at sea; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 186-87, Family No. 227, calls her Françoise BENOIST, says she was born in c1741 but gives no birthplace, gives her parents' names, details her marriage, including her husband's parents' names, says he was born in c1729 but gives no birthplace, includes the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of son Pierre-Marin CARRET, born & baptized 17 Jul 1761, St.-Servan, godson of Pierre HENRY & Marie BENOIST, & son Jean-Marie CARRET, born 19 Feb 1765 & baptized 20 Feb 1765, St.-Servan, godson of Jean LAROQUE & Marie CARRET, died age 2 1/2 years on 7 Nov 1767, buried next day, St.-Servan, & says her family resided at Châteauneuf in 1759 & St.-Servan from 1760-72; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 54-55, calls her Françoise BENOIT, sa [Honnoré CARET's] feme, age 40, on the embarkation list, Francoise BENOIT, his [Honoré CARRET's] wife], age 40, on the complete listing, says she was in the 47th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with her husband, son, mother, & a cousin, details her marriage, including her & her husband's parents' names, says they were married in 1759 but gives no marriage place, that son Pierre [CARRET] was born in 1761 but gives no birthplace, that Victoire BENOIT, who accompanied the family, was daughter of Augustin BENOIT & Madeleine GAUTROT, was born 11 Nov 1772 but gives no birthplace, & that Victoire's father was brother of Charles BENOIT, husband of Madeleine THÉRIOT.    See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 46, 53, 80, 131, 178.

Her estimated birth year is from Robichaux, who uses the age given on the passenger list of Tamerlane, the earliest primary source available.  

09.  Wall of Names, 38 (pl. 10L), calls her Françoise [BENOIT], & lists her with her parents, siblings, & a maternal aunt, with the notation:  suplement a la liste des Acadiens embarques dans le navire Le St. Remy pour la Nouvelle Orleans [additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le St.-Rémi bound for New Orleans]; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 11, Family No. 21, calls her Françoise [BENOIST], & details her family's voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 60-61, calls her Francoise, sa [Grégoire BENOIT's] fille, age 5, on the embarkation list, & Francoise BENOIT, his [Grégoire BENOIT's] daughter, age 5, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 1st Family on Supplément à la liste des Acadiens embarqués dans le navire Le Saint-Rémi pour la nouvelle-orleans [Additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le Saint-Rémi bound for New Orleans] with her parents, siblings, & a maternal aunt; BRDR, 3:81, 807 (ASM-2, 173), her marriage record, calls her Francisca Félicitas BENOIT of Nantes, France, calls her husband Juan Bautista TOZEIN of Bayonne, France, gives her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Miguel PEDEAU & Carlos Maria BOUDRAUX.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 46, 53, 80, 178.  

Her estimated birth year is taken not from the passenger list of Le St.-Remi but from an average of the ages given in the Ascension censuses of 1788 & 1791 & the Lafourche valley censuses of 1795 & 1797.  

10.  Wall of Names, 38 (pl. 10L), calls him Grégoire BENOIT, & lists him with his wife, 5 children, & a sister-in-law, with the notation:  suplement a la liste des Acadiens embarques dans le navire Le St. Remy pour la Nouvelle Orleans [additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le St.-Rémi bound for New Orleans]; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 8-9, Family No. 15, calls him Grégoire BENOIST, says he was born in c1744 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, details his marriage, including his wife's parents' names, says she was born in c1750 but gives no birthplace, includes the birth/baptismal record of daughter Marie-Rose, baptized 3 May 1775, St.-Jean-L'Evangeliste, Châtellerault, goddaughter of Grégoire-Olivier TRAHAN & Pélagie BENOIST, widow of Yves CROCHET, & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement in the early 1770s; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 11, Family No. 21, calls him Grégoire BENOIST, says he was born in 1744 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, details his marriage, including his wife's parents' names, says she was born in 1748 but gives no birthplace, includes the birth/baptismal record of son Rémond-Grégoire, baptized 25 Jul 1783, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, but gives no godparents' names, & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s & its voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 60-61, calls him Grégoire BENOIT, journalier, age 40, on the embarkation list, & Grégoire BENOIT, day laborer, age 40, on the complete listing, says he was in the 1st Family on Supplément à la liste des Acadiens embarqués dans le navire Le Saint-Rémi pour la nouvelle-orleans [Additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le Saint-Rémi bound for New Orleans] with his wife, 5 children, & a sister-in-law, details his marriage, including his & his wife's parents' names, says they were married in 1770 but gives no place of marriage, that daughter Marie-Rose was baptized in 1775 but gives no place of baptism, son Rémond-Grégoire was baptized in 1783 but gives no place of baptism, & son Jean-Marie was born in 1773 but gives no birhtplace; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:49 (Thib.Ch.: v. 1, p. 44), his death/burial record, calls him Grégoire BENOIT, says he was 88 when he died, & does not give his parents' names or the name of his wife; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:49 (Thib.Ct.Hse.: Succ. #4), his succession record, calls him Grégoire BENOIT, & must have been written long before his death.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 46, 53, 79, 131, 178.  

Was his first or middle name Isidore?  If not, why did the census taker at Assumption call him this in 1795?

11.  Wall of Names, 28 (pl. 6R), calls her Henriette [BENOIT], & lists her with her parents; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 11, Family No. 20, her birth/baptismal record, calls her Henriette-Reiné BENOIST & Henriette [BENOIST]; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 8-9, calls her Henrriette, sa [Daniel BENOIT's] fille, age 7, on the embarkation list, Henriqueta, sa [Daniel BÉNOIT's] hija, on the debarkation list, & Henriette BENOIT, his [Daniel BENOIT's] daughter, age 7, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 26th Family aboard Le Bon Papa with her parents; BRDR, 2:72, 402 (SJO-3, 2), the record of her first marriage, calls her Reine BENOIT, calls her husband Pedro LA BOVE, gives her & his parents' names, says his parents were "of St. James Parish," but gives no witnesses to the marriage.

Her mother was a LABAUVE, & her first husband was a LABAUVE, so she & first husband Pierre had to be cousins.  Their marriage record says nothing about their receiving a dispensation from the Church in order to marry, however, so they must not have been close cousins.  Notice how young she was when she married.

Evidence of her second marriage can be found in a number of places.  Her father's burial record, dated 15 Dec 1825, says that he "died at his daughter's home Rene[sic] BENOIT wife of Antoine MALLET," in Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-B:58 (SM Ch.: v.4, #1741).  I have not found the marriage record, which probably took place at Baton Rouge.  The baptismal record of son Antoine  MALLET III, dated 7 May 1813, in BRDR, 3:596 (SJO-6, 164), calls the boy's grandparents Antonio [MALLET] & Catarina BORDELON, & Daniel [BENOIT] & Madalena DUARON [actually Renée's stepmother].  The baptismal record of son Célestin Ulysse MALLET, dated 11 May 1818, in ibid., 2-A:643 (SM Ch.: v.7, #336), calls the boy's grandparents Antoine MALLET & Catherine BORDELOT, & Anathaniel BENOIST & Henriette LEGENDRE.  The burial record of daughter Zelie MALLET, dated 14 Aug 1821, says that she died "at age about 15 yrs. at her parent's home.  Her parents are listed as Antoine [MALLET], "inhabitant of le grand bois at La fausse pointe, & Reine BENOIST."  See ibid., 2-B:638 (SM Ch.: v.4, #1463).  This means that Renée & Antoine married no later than c1806, Zelie's estimated birth year. 

12.  Wall of Names, 11, calls him Charles BENOIT; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2416, says that his mother was Olivier's first wife, Suzanne BOUDREAUX, & that he was born in 1756 but gives no birthplace; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:55 (SM Ch.: v.4, #805), his death/burial record, calls him Jean Charles BENOIT, "inhabitant at Grand Bois," says he died "at his residence at age about 50 years," but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  See also De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 5.  

The St.-Gabriel census of 1777 says he was 18, which would give him an estimated birth year of c1759, closer to the age found in his burial record than in the Spanish report of 1769. 

13.  Wall of Names, 40, 47, calls him Jean-Charles BENOIT & Jean-Charles BENOIST, & places him with his family on L'Amitié as well as alone on La Caroline; Robichaux, Acadians in Chatellerault, 9, says he was born in c1746; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 74-75.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 503; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 151.  

Robichaux, cited above, also provides the names of his parents as well as his wedding date.

14.  Not in Wall of Names.  Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 47-49, Family No. 60, his birth/baptismal record, calls him François-Jean-Baptiste BENOIST, gives his parents' names, says his godparents were Françoise LEGENDRE & Anne SAPIN, & says his family resided at St.-Servan from 1763-72; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 7-8, Family No. 13, calls him François [BENOIT], gives his parents' names, & details his family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 10-11, Family No. 19, calls him François [BENOIT], gives his parents' names, & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; BRDR, 2:71 (ASC-2, 23), his marriage record, calls him Francisco BENOIT, gives his but not his wife's parents' names, gives his wife's first husband's name, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Juan Baptiste TRAHAN & Grégoire LEBLANC; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 25, says "Although not recorded in the 1785 passenger lists, another Acadian refugee from France, Jean-Francois BENOIT of St.-Malo, was in Louisiana at least by 1789, when he married Marie-Modeste PINELLE of LeHavre; two years later the two had settled along the Lafourche, where they contributed to the growth of the BENOIT families in that area."  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1779-98, 52, 78, 129, 163.

Why is an Acadian immigrant who is so well documented not on the Acadian Memorial's Wall of Names?

15.  Wall of Names, 38 (pl. 10L), calls him Jean-Marie [BENOIT], & lists him with his parents, siblings, & a maternal aunt, with the notation:  suplement a la liste des Acadiens embarques dans le navire Le St. Remy pour la Nouvelle Orleans [additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le St.-Rémi bound for New Orleans]; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 52-53, Family No. 65, his birth/baptismal record, calls him Jean-Marie BENOIST, gives his parents' names, & says his godparents were Jean-Baptiste LEJEUNE & Francoise BENOIST; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 9, Family No. 15, calls him Jean-Marie [BENOIST], & details his family's participation in the Poitou in the early 1770s; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 11, Family No. 21, calls him Jean-Marie [BENOIST], & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s as well as its voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 60-61, calls him Jean-Marie, son [Grégoire BENOIT's] fils, age 10, on the embarkation list, & Jean-Marie BENOIT, his [Grégoire BENOIT's] son, age 10, on the complete listing, says he was in the 1st Family on Supplément à la liste des Acadiens embarqués dans le navire Le Saint-Rémi pour la nouvelle-orleans [Additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le Saint-Rémi bound for New Orleans] with his parents, siblings, & a maternal aunt, & that he was born in 1773 but gives no birthplace; BRDDR, 2:72, 223 (ASM-2, 45), the record of his second marriage, calls him Juan Maria BENOIT of St.-Malo, France, calls his wife Ysabel DAROIS of Nantes in Britany, France, gives his & his her parents' names, says his parents were "of Acadia," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Pierre HÉBERT & Francois AUCOIN.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 46, 53, 80, 120, 178.

Who was "his wife," Marie BENOIT, found only in the Lafourche valley census of 1797?  Why is there no marriage record for this union?  Why is she not mentioned in the record of his marriage to Marie-Élisabeth DAROIS?  I suspect that the "Marie BENOIT, his wife," in the 1797 census is a double-listing for his sister Marie-Rose, that Jean-Marie was married only once, to Marie-Élisabeth DAROIS.

Who was the Juan BENOIT, age 22, listed by a Spanish official as belonging to Jean-Marie's family in 1795?  Or was this a double-listing for Jean-Marie himself, whom the Spanish official said was 19 that year?  In the Lafourche valley census of 1797, the Spanish official includes in his family, again, "Jean, his brother," age 22.  Who was this brother?  Or was this another double listing for Jean-Marie?  

16.  Wall of Names, 40, calls him Jean-Marie BENOIT; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 54, Family No. 67, his birth/baptismal record, calls him Jean-Marie BENOIST, gives his parents' names, says his godparents were Pierre-Paul HACHÉ & Marie BENOIST, & that his family resided at St.-Servan from 1760-72; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 9, Family No. 16; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 74-75.

17.  Wall of Names, 11, calls her Madeleine BENOIT; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2416, says that she & her sisters, along with their brother Jean-Charles, were from Olivier's first wife, Susanne BOUDREAUX; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:48, the record of her first marriage; Hébert, D., 1-A:49, the record of her second marriage.  See also De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 5.  

Arsenault says that Madeleine was born in 1758 & that she was older than sister Marie-Rose, who was born in 1760, but the Spanish record of 1769 says that Marie-Rose was the older sister, which is followed here.  The St.-Gabriel census of 1777 places their respective ages at 12 & 8 & gives no names, so this record does not reveal who was the older sister.  Marie-Rose's marriage records, which unfortunately do not give the date of her first marriage, are in Hebert, D., 1-A:49-50.  Arsenault, p. 2571, says that Marie-Rose married her first husband, Marin, c1775, but the censuses of 1777 say otherwise.

Notice that the mother of Madeleine's first husband, Amand MARTIN, was a CYR, which is an old Acadian family.  Is this a clue that was a descendant of Acadian MARTINs who took refuge on the St. Lawrence during Le Grand Dérangement?  I need a MARTIN family historian to help me here. 

18.  Wall of Names, 21, calls her Marguerite BENOIT belle fille [stepdaughter] with family of Louis LATIER.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 152; De Ville, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 27. 

The baptismal record of son Joseph BROUSSARD, dated 27 Oct 1796, in Hébert, Southwest LA Records, 1-A:136 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A, p.166), calls the boy's maternal grandparents Jean BENOIT & Marianne TRAHAN. 

19.  Wall of Names, 40 (pl. 10L), calls her Marguerite BENOIT veuve PRECIEUX, & lists her singly; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 86, Family No. 169, calls her Marguerite BENOIST, says she was born in c1752 but gives no birthplace, gives her parents' names, calls her first husband Joseph PRECIEUX, says he was born in c1739 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, details her marriage to Joseph, says that she was in the Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes in Nov 1775 not with her husband but with her sister Pélagie's family but calls her the wife, not the widow, of Joseph PRECIEUX; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 70-71, calls her Marguerite BENOIT, veuve PRECIEUSE, age 32, on the embarkation list, does not include her on the debarkation list, calls her Marguerite BENOIT, widow PRÉCIEUX, age 32, on the complete listing, says she was in the 26th "Family" aboard L'Amitié with no one else, &, calling her Marguerite BENOIST, details her first marriage, including her & her first husband's parents' names, & says she married Joseph in 1775 but gives no exact date or place of marriage; BRDR, 2:72, 83 (ASC-1, 165), the record of her second marriage, calls her Marguarita BENOIT, widow of Claude DUGAST[sic], calls her husband Claude BERNARD[sic], "an Acadian," does not give her or his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were ____ LAGARDE & Jean-Baptiste LEBLANC; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:50 (Thib.Ch.: v. 1, #789), her death/burial record, calls her Marguerite BENOIT m. Claude Bernard DUGAS, says she was 90 years old when she died, but does not give her parents' names.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 509; Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1777-98, 46, 179.  

Her second marriage record, cited above, is confusing.  The Ascension priest obviously confused the groom's middle name with his surname & seems to have had no idea who her first husband had been, though he got it right when he called her a widow.  She is the only Marguerite BENOIT in Wall of Names to fit this marriage, so this should be her.  According to Wall of Names & my own research, there was no Claude BERNARD in that place at that time, & the editors of the BRDR did not catch the priest's mistake.  Her husband, then, was Claude-Bernard DUGAS, who, incidentally, was 6 years younger than she was & a native of Boulogne-sur-Mer, France.  Note that they crossed singly on the same ship. 

It was unusual for an Acadian couple to have no children, but her age at the time of the marriage--33--and the fact that she had no children by her first husband could help explain it. 

20.  Wall of Names, 13, calls her Marie BENOIT; BRDR, 2:72 (SJA-4, 4a), her first death/burial record, calls her Maria BENOIT, "(first name obtained from other records), age 74 years, widow of the late Juan Carlos BRAUX," but does not give her parents' names; BRDR, 6:54 (SJA-4, 4a), her second death/burial record, calls her Madama BENOIT, "widow of decd. Juan Carlos BRAUX, 64 yrs. old," but does not give her parents' names.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 152; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 436; De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 6.

The estimated birth year used here is based on the Spanish report of 1768 & the St.-Gabriel census of 1777, which are consistent, certainly not her burial records.  

21.  Wall of Names, 37 (pl. 9R), calls her Marie BENOIT, & lists her with her second husband, 1 daughter, 2 stepchildren, & a niece; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Tamerlan.htm>, Family No. 2, shows that in the crossing to St.-Malo in 1758-59, she & her first husband survived the crossing & took no children with them; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 688-89, Family No. 802, calls her Marie BENOIST, says she was born in c1736 but gives no birthplace, gives her parents' names, details her first marriage, including her first husband's parents' names, says he was born & baptized 14 Oct 1733, St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, godson of René DAGUET & Suzanne BERLOUIN, details their deportation to St.-Malo in 1758-59, says they resided at Chateauneuf from 1759-60, that "on April 20, 1760, René RASSICOT embarked on the Corsair, L'Hercules and was taken prisoner by the English," that he never returned to St.-Malo from England, that in 1764 "his wife is listed as being a widow," that "after her husband's departure in 1760 and before her [re-]marriage, she resided at Chateauneuf in 1761 & at St.-Servan from 1761-66, & gives her second husband's name; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 4463-64, Family No. 519, calls her Marie BENOIST, says she was born in c1736 but gives no birthplace, gives her parents' names & her first husband's name, details her second marriage, including her second husband's parents' names, includes  the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of daughter Sophie-Marie [HÉBERT], born & baptized 20 Apr 1769, St.-Servan, goddaughter of Jacques TRAMZELLE-DUBAIL & Francoise BENOIST, daughter Marie [HÉBERT], born 6 Nov 1771, no birthplace given, died age 1 11 Dec 1772 & buried 13 Dec 1772, St.-Servan, & unnamed daughter [HÉBERT], born 2 Nov 1773, St.-Servan, died next day & buried St.-Servan, & says her second family resided at St.-Servan from 1763-72; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 52-53, calls her Marie BENOIT, sa [Joseph HÉBERT's] feme, age 48, on the embarkation list, & Marie BENOIT, his [Joseph HÉBERT's] wife, age 48, on the complete listing, says she was in the 45th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with her second husband, 1 daughter, 2 stepchildren, & a niece, details her second marriage, including her & her husband's parents' names, & says daughter Sophie [HÉBERT] was born in 1769 but gives no birthplace; BRDR, 3:81 (SGA-8, 40), her death/burial record, calls her Marie BENOIT, age 80 yrs., wid. HEBERT, but does not give her parents' names.    

22.  Wall of Names, 21, calls her Marie-Anne BENOIT belle fille [stepdaughter] with family of Louis LATIER.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 152.

What happened to her in LA?

23.  Wall of Names, 47, calls her Marie-Marthe BENOIT; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 27, 153, the record of her second marriage, at St.-Louis, Rochefort, calls her Marie-Marthe BENOIST "de Louisbourg et de la paroisse de Cobequite en Acadie, veuve de Jean CLEMENT," calls her husband Nicolas GERBERT "d'issle Roialle, Louisbourg, ici pour deux ans [here (Rochefort) for 10 years], veuf de Marie GARSANT, but does not give their parents' names or any witnesses to her marriage; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 1-2, Family No. 1, calls her Marie-Marthe BENOIST, says that husband Nicolas-Gabriel ALBERT, père was born in c1726, & that Nicolas-Gabriel, fils was baptized at St. Jean L'Evangeliste, Châtellerault, 23 Jun 1774.  

Who were her parents?  Did she marry her first husband on Île St.-Jean, where the VINCENT dit CLÉMENTs lived before Le Grand Dérangement

I will follow LA records & call her second husband an ALBERT, not a GERBERT; the Rochefort priest may have used his middle name, Gabriel, as his surname.  Île d'Oléron is an island off the coast of France near Rochefort.  The marriage record seems to be saying that Nicolas-Gabriel lived for a time at Louisbourg in greater Acadia & then returned to his hometown of Rochefort in the early 1750s.  Robichaux, cited above, documents the birth, baptism, marriage, & burials of 6 other children of Nicolas-Gabriel, père & Marie-Marthe, 4 girls, & 2 boys, all born in France.  Only Nicolas-Gabriel, fils came with them to LA.  The ones who survived childhood remained in France. 

Does Nicolas-Gabriel ALBERT, père's living at Louisbourg, part of greater Acadia, make him an Acadian, too?  It may sound like splitting hairs, but, although the criterion here for "Acadian-ness" is living in greater Acadia before or during Le Grand Dérangement and being exiled from the colony, he left Louisbourg in c1751, years before Le Grand Dérangement began in 1755, & returned to his native Rochefort.  In other words, he was not an Acadian exile.  I will call him a Frenchman here, not an Acadian, & his descendants in LA, thru his son Nicolas-Gabriel, fils, will be called French Creoles.

24.  Wall of Names, 21, calls her Marie-Rose BENOIT belle fille [stepdaughter] with family of Louis LATIER; Hébert, Southwest LA Records, 1-A:50 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A, p.62), the record of her second marriage, calls her Roselia BENOIT, "widow of Roman DE LA FOSSE," calls her husband Joseph CAMPOS "of Estrecho," gives her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Deni LIBERGE, Francisco LARRAMENDI, & Michel AUDIBERT; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-B:43 (Opel. Ch.: v.1, p.51), her death/burial record, calls her Marie-Rose BENOIT, but does not give her parents' names, mention a husband, or give her age at the time of her death.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 152; DeVille, Southwest LA Families, 1777, 19.

One source says she married, at age 14, Romain DELAFOSSE at Natchitoches on December 26, 1769, & that Romain's parents were Pierre DELAFOSSE and Jeanne GILLEMENNE.  The Opelousas census of 1777 says she was 30 that year, which gives her an estimated birth year of c1747 & her age when she married Romain a more believable 22/23.

Where is "Estrecho," mentioned in the record of her second marriage, cited above?  Is it Gibraltar in Spain?  Is it a neighborhood in Madrid?  Any geographers out there knowledgeable about Spain? 

25.  Wall of Names, 11, calls her Marie-Rose BENOIT.  Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 9:429, 430 (NI Ch.: OA Folio #5), a copy of the record of her second marriage, calls her Marie-Rose BENOIT, "wid. of Marin PREJEAN," calls her husband Daniel BOON, "born in N.C. an Anglican," gives her & his parents' names, calls his father Johnston, says her father was deceased at the time of the wedding, but gives no witnesses to the marriage. 

See also note 17 above.

I know, the question much be asked:  Was her second husband kin to the Daniel BOONE of NC? 

26.  Wall of Names, 38 (pl. 10L), calls her Marie-Rose [BENOIT], & lists her with her parents, siblings, & a maternal aunt, with the notation:  suplement a la liste des Acadiens embarques dans le navire Le St. Remy pour la Nouvelle Orleans [additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le St.-Rémi bound for New Orleans]; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 8-9, Family No. 15, her baptismal record, calls her Marie-Rose BENOIST, gives her parents' names, says she was the goddaughter of Grégoire-Olivier TRAHAN & Pélagie BENOIST, widow of Yves CROCHET, & details her family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 11, Family No. 21, calls her Marie-Rose [BENOIST], & details her family's participation in the Leigne-les-bois settlement in Poitou in the early 1770s as well as its voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 60-61, calls her Marie-Rose, sa [Grégoire BENOIT's] fille, age 9, on the embarkation list, & Marie-Rose BENOIT, his [Grégoire BENOIT's] daughter, age 9, on the complete listing, says she was in the 1st Family on Supplément à la liste des Acadiens embarqués dans le navire Le Saint-Rémi pour la nouvelle-orleans [Additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le Saint-Rémi bound for New Orleans] with her parents, siblings, & a maternal aunt, & that she was baptized in 1775 but gives no place of baptism; BRDR, 2:72, 114 (ASM-2, 84), her marriage record, calls her Marie Rosa BENOIT of Chatelrau, says her husband was native of St.-Servan, France, gives her parents' names but not his parents' names, calls his first wife Francoise LEBLANC, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Francoise LELOREC & Ambroise HÉBERT; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 2:36 (Thib.Ch.: v.1, #416), her death/burial record, calls her Marie Rose BENOIT m. Jean B. BOUDRAUX, & says she was age 72 when she died, but does not give her parents' names; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 2:36 (Thib.Ct.Hse.: Succ. #68), record of her "family meeting," calls her Marie Rose BENOIT m. Jean Baptiste BOUDREAUX, lists her children as Amédé & Eliza, but does not give her parents' names. 

27.  Not in Wall of Names because of the circumstance of her birth.  NOAR, 4:24 (SLC, F2, 20), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Martina BENOIT, gives her parents' names, calls her mother Maria Rosa CA[*], which means the surname is obscured, & says she was the goddaughter of Gilberto LEONARD & Maria [*]UTIN.  

She was one of the newborn Acadians whose honorary godfather was Martin NAVARRO, Spanish intendant of LA whom the Acadians adored, hence her name.  See notation in Appendix.  She died either at New Orleans soon after her baptism or soon after her parents went to upper Bayou Lafourche. 

28.  Not in Wall of Names.  See De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 5.  

Was he a French Creole BENOIT?  I will consider him an Acadian until the records tell me otherwise.

29.  Wall of Names, 11, calls him Olivier BENOIT; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2415-16, the LA section, calls him Pierre-Olivier BENOÎT, says he was born in c1735, that he was probablement son of Pierre [BENOÎT] & Anne-Marie GAUDET of Pigiguit, that he married Suzanne BOUDREAUX in c1756 but gives no place of marriage, that he probably remarried to Marie, daughter of Mathieu [BRASSEAU] & Anne BELLEMÈRE but gives no date or place of marriage, lists his children by his first marriage as Jean-Charles, born in c1756, Madeleine in c1758, & Marie-Rose in c1760, says he died at Opelousas on 13 Sep 1787, & that his widow remarried to Claude AUCOIN on 20 Nov 1788 but gives no place of marriage; White, DGFA-1, 269, listing for his second wife's family, calls him Pierre-Olivier BENOIT vf Susanne BOUDROT, does not give his parents' names, & says he married Marie-Geneviève BRASSEUR in c1765 but gives no place of marriage; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 24, calls him Charles-Olivier BENOIT; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:50 (Opel. Ch.: v.1, p.4), his death/burial record, calls him Olivier BENOIT, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:50 (LSAR: Opel.: 1787), his succession record, calls him Olivier BENOIT widr. of Marie BRASSEUX, but does not give his parents' names.  See also De Ville, St. Gabriel Census, 1777, 5.  

Arsenault says he was born in 1735, but the St.-Gabriel census of 1777 says otherwise.  Arsenault, p. 2416, says he died at Opelousas 13 Sep 1787, but his burial record, cited above, says 12 Dec 1787. 

The brochure that accompanies the Robert Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville, calls him Olivier BENOIT & says that he arrived in LA in 1770.  It also says:  "After the [English] captain refused to steer toward New Orleans, he [BENOIT] and other passengers aboard The Britain landed in Texas and became the first 'Texas Cajuns.'"  For another, much more complete, version of the Britannia story, see Appendix.

30.  Wall of Names, 40, calls him Paul-Frédéric BENOIT; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 9, his birth/baptismal record; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 74-75.

31.  Wall of Names, 39 (pl. 10L), calls her Pélagie BENOIT veuve Yves CROCHET, & lists her with 5 children; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1829, the Louisbourg section, calls her Pélagie BENOIST, says her parents were Claude [BENOIST] & Élizabeth TERRIOT, says she married on 6 Feb 1758, calls her husband Yves CROCHET, says he was born in c1735, that he was son of Guillaume [CROCHET] & Julienne DURAND "de la paroisse de Megrit, diocése de Saint-Malo," but gives no children; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 222-23, Family No. 276, calls her Pélagie BENOIST, says she was born in c1741 but gives no birthplace, says her parents were Claude BENOIST & Élizabeth TÉRRIOT [but a notation in my copy of this work made by Stanley LeBlanc says that her parents were Abraham (BENOIST) & Angélique VINCENT per 1752 census], details her marriage, gives her husband's parents' names, says he was born 1 Sep 1732 & baptized next day at Megrit, godson of Jean LEBRETON & Catherine DECOUR, that he died 23 Nov 1773, Quesny & was buried next day at Megrit, says she died & was buried 7 Aug 1824, Thibodaux, includes the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of son Jean-Guillaume CROCHET, born 9 Sep 1760, Quesny, baptized same day, Megrit, godson of Jean-Noël VERGURET & Jeanne, daughter of François CROCHET, son François-Louis CROCHET, born 14 Dec 1761, Quesny, baptized 15 Dec 1761, Megrit, godson of Francois DESCHAMPS & Anne BENOIST, son Jean-Joseph or Yves-Joseph CROCHET, born & baptized 25 Mar 1763, St.-Servan, godson of Daniel BENOIST & Julienne RAUX, died age 11 days old 4 Apr 1763, buried next day St.-Servan, daughter Françoise-Pélagie CROCHET, born & baptized 20 May 1764, St.-Servan, goddaughter of Grégoire BENOIST & Françoise MICHEL, daughter Marguerite-Périnne CROCHET, born 23 May 1766, Quesny, baptized same day, Megrit, goddaughter of Pierre CERTAIN & Marguerite BENOIST, son Yves-Jean CROCHET, born 3 Dec 1767, Quesny, baptized same day, Megrit, godson of Jean CROCHET & Jeanne DAULY, son Julien CROCHET, born 4 Mar 1770, Quesny, baptized next day, Megrit, godson of Julien CROCHET & Marguerite RAUX, & daughter Pélagie CROCHET, born 7 Feb 1772, Quesny, baptized next day, Megrit, goddaughter of François CROCHET & Jeanne CROCHET, says she & her husband "arrived at St.-Malo from Rochefort on October 1, 1759, & that the family resided at Megrit from 1759-61, St.-Servan from 1762-64, Megrit from 1765-67, St.-Servan from 1767-68, & Megrit from 1769-72; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 27-28, Family No. 57, calls her Pélagie BENOIST, says she was born in c1741 but gives no birthplace, says her parents were Claude BENOIST & Élizabeth TÉRRIOT, details her marriage, gives her husband's parents' names, says he  was born 1 Sep 1732 & baptized next day, Megrit, godson of Jean LEBRETON & Catherine DECOUR, that he died 23 Nov 1773, Quesny, & was buried next day, Megrit, says she died & was buried 7 Aug 1824, Thibodaux, includes the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of daughter Pélagie CROCHET, born 7 Feb 1772, Quesny, baptized next day, Megrit, goddaughter of François CROCHET & Jeanne CROCHET, died age 2 & buried 30 May 1774, St.-Jacques, Châtellerault, & son Jean-Marin CROCHET, born & baptized 2 May 1774, St.-Jacques, Châtellerault, godson of Jean CROCHET, student (probably his older brother) & Marie-Rose CARRET, wife of Grégoire BENOIST (his maternal aunt & uncle), & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 70-71, calls her Pélagie BENOIT, veuve d'Yves CROCHET, age 44, on the embarkation list, Pélagia BENOIT, on the debarkation list, & Pélagie BENOIT, widow of Yves CROCHET, age 44, on the complete listing, says she was in the 19th Family aboard L'Amitié with 5 children, &, calling her Pélagie BENOIST, details her marriage, including her & her husband's parents' names, says they were married in 1758 but gives no place of marriage, & lists the implements that Spanish gave her after she reached LA; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:51 (Thib.Ch.: v. 1, p. 16), her death/burial record, calls her Pélagie BENOIT, says she died 7 Aug 1824 & was age 85 when she died, but does not give her parents' names or mention a husband; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:51 (Thib.Ct.Hse.: Succ.: 1825), her succession record, calls her Pélagie BENOIT m. Ives CROCHET, says she died 7 May 1824, & dates her inventory 16 Apr 1825.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 507.

Arsenault does not say when her husband came to greater Acadia and what he did for a living at Louisbourg.  My guess is that he was a soldier or sailor.  Pélagie is the matriarch of the Acadian CROCHETs of LA. 

Evidently son Jean-Marin CROCHET, born in Poitou in May 1774, died before she & her other children left for LA in Aug 1785.  He probably was one of her 4 unnamed sons counted at Nantes in Sep 1784, but he does not appear on the passenger list of L'Amitié or any of the other 7 ships.  He would have been only 11 years old in 1785, too young to choose for himself to remain in France.

32.  Wall of Names, 38 (pl. 10L), calls him Raymond [BENOIT], & lists him with his parents, siblings, & a maternal aunt, with the notation:  suplement a la liste des Acadiens embarques dans le navire Le St. Remy pour la Nouvelle Orleans [additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le St.-Rémi bound for New Orleans]; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 11, Family No. 21, his birth/baptismal record, calls him Rémond-Grégoire BENOIST, gives his parents' but not his godparents' names, & details the family's voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 60-61, calls him Raymond, à la mamelle, on the embarkation list, & Raymond BENOIT, a nursling, on the complete listing, says he was in the 1st Family on Supplément à la liste des Acadiens embarqués dans le navire Le Saint-Rémi pour la nouvelle-orleans [Additional list of Acadians embarked on the ship Le Saint-Rémi bound for New Orleans] with his parents, siblings, & a maternal aunt, &, calling him Rémond-Grégoire, that he was baptized in 1783 but gives no place of baptism.  

Did he even survive the crossing to LA?  Unfortunately, the debarkation list for Le St.-Rémi did not survive.  I will retain him on this list until I find evidence that he did not reach the colony. 

33.  Not in Wall of Names.  Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 49-50, Family No. 61, his birth/baptismal record, calls him Nicolas-Jean-Sebastien BENOIST, gives his parents' names, says his godparents were Nicolas-Sébastien GILLOT & Jeanne-Françoise BEAUVAIS, this his family resided at St.-Servan in 1763, the same year "the entire family embarked on L'Aigle for the Falkland Islands," goes on to say that "They returned to St. Malo on April 23, 1768," & that they resided at St.-Servan between 1768-72; BRDR, 2:72, 293 (ASC-2, 21), the record of his first marriage, calls him Sébastian BENOIST, calls his wife Juana DE LA FORET, gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Pierre LANDRY, François LANDRY, & Théodore BOURQUE; Hébert, Southwest LA Records, 1-A:50, 506 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A, p.90), the record of his second marriage, calls him Sébastien BENOIT, widower of Carcachou [Calcasieu] River, calls his wife Hipolite LEBLEU, gives hers but not his parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Charles ÉBERE, Joseph CANPOS, & ____ PHAVRON; West, Atlas of LA Surnames, 25.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 53, 161.

He is, as far as I know, the only Acadian immigrant in Louisiana who had lived in the Falkland Islands.  

Again, why is an Acadian immigrant who is so well documented not on the Acadian Memorial's Wall of Names?

34.  Wall of Names, 37 (pl. 9R), calls her Sophie BENOIT niece [of Joseph HÉBERT & his wife Marie BENOIT], & lists her with her aunt & uncle & 3 cousins; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 52-53, calls her Sophie BENOIT, nièce au dit [Joseph HÉBERT & Marie BENOIT], age 8, on the embarkation list, & Sophie BENOIT, niece to the above [Joseph HÉBERT & Marie BENOIT], age 8, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 46th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with her aunt & uncle & 3 cousins; BRDR, 3:82, 844 (ASM-2, 98), her marriage record, calls her Sophia BENOIT of Nantes, France, says her husband was from San Vicente de Labana in Santiago, Galicia, Spain, includes her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Cayetano CAZES & Ambroise HÉBERT.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 47.

Her estimated birth year is taken from the Valenzuéla census of 1788, not from the passenger list of Le St.-Rémi.  

Sophie's father died at Nantes, age 55, in Sep 1783.  See Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 10-11, Family No. 19, which does not reveal the fate of her mother.  Notice that Sophie's older sister Victoire-Marie traveled with another aunt & uncle also aboard Le St.-Rémi, in fact the next family down on the passenger list of that vessel.  Interestingly, Marie BENOIT's parents were not the same as Augustin BENOIT's.  See Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 47-49, Family No. 60, which also does not reveal the fate of Marie-Madeleine GAUTREAUX.  Did she die at Nantes between 1777, when son Jean-Marie-Augustin BENOIT was born, & 1785, or did she remarry after Augustin's death in 1783 & refused to go LA?  If she had remarried, she probably would not have allowed her minor children to go to LA without her.  Jean-Marie-Augustin lived for only a week.  Did he take his mother with him?  If so, Sophie's estimated birth year of c1780 would be off a few years.  See Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 10, Family No. 19.  

The baptismal record of Sophie's son Francisco Eusebio Cayetano TURREYRA, dated 14 Aug 1805, Assumption, in BRDR, 3:844-45 (ASM-6, 85), says that her husband was from San Vicente, Havana, Cuba, diocese of Santiago, Galacia, Spain, so he was a Cuban.

According to the Baton Rouge diocesan church records, she had only the 1 son by her husband, so she probably died giving birth to another child.  

35.  Wall of Names, 40, calls her Sophie-Rennée BENOIT; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 74-75.

36.  Wall of Names, 37 (pl. 9R), calls her Victoire BENOIT niece [of Madeleine THÉRIOT], & lists her with her aunt & 3 cousins; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 54-55, calls her Victorie BENOIT, nièce au dit [Madeleine THÉRIOT, veuve BENOIT], age 14, on the embarkation list, & Victoire BENOIT, niece to the above [Madelaine THÉRIOT, widow BENOIT], age 14, on the complete listings, says she was in the 47th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with her aunt & 3 cousins, gives her parents' names, says she was born 11 Nov 1772 but gives no birthplace, & that her father was brother to Charles BENOIST, spouse of Madeleine THÉRIOT; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 10-11, Family No. 19, says that her father was born in c1727 but gives no birthplace, gives her father's parents' names, says that he died at age 55 years & was buried 8 Sep 1783 at St.-Similien, Nantes, says her mother was her father's second wife, that she was born in c1741 but gives no birthplace, gives her mother's parents' names, &, calling her Victoire-Marie [BENOIST], details her family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; BRDR, 2:72, 73 (ASM-2, 5), the record of her first marriage, calls her Victoria BENOIT, gives her & her husband's parents' names & the name of her husband's first wife, says her parents were from St.-Malo & his parents were from "the river St. John," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Ambroise HÉBERT & Joseph CASSAGNIOL; BRDR, 3:82, 475 (ASM-2, 244), the record of her second marriage, calls her Victoria BENOIT, wid. of Charles BERGERON, gives her & her husband's parents' names, says he was from St. James Parish, that his father was deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Francisco TUREYRA [her sister's husband] & Pascal LAMBERT; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:51 (Houma Ct.Hse.: Succ. #6), her succession record, calls her Victoire BENOIT d. 31 May 1816, m.(1)Charles BERGERON, m.(2)Pierre LAMBERT, but does not give her parents' names.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 46.  

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