BOOK TEN:  The Louisiana Acadian "Begats"

 

BOOK ONE:        French Acadia

BOOK TWO:        British Nova Scotia

BOOK THREE:     Families, Migration, and the Acadian "Begats"

BOOK FOUR:      The French Maritimes

BOOK FIVE:        The Great Upheaval

BOOK SIX:          The Acadian Immigrants of Louisiana

BOOK SEVEN:     French Louisiana

BOOK EIGHT:      A New Acadia

BOOK NINE:        The Bayou State

BOOK ELEVEN:  The Non-Acadian "Cajun" Families of South Louisiana

BOOK TWELVE:  Acadians in Gray

 

Acadian Settlement and Marriage Patterns, 1764-1870:  the Louisiana Acadian "Begats"

The antebellum period witnessed the burgeoning of established Acadian communities and the creation of new ones.  From the lower and upper Acadian coasts, Acadian families continued to move upriver into the Baton Rouge area, some even into Pointe Coupee, where few Acadians had settled during the colonial period.  Acadians from upper Bayou Lafourche tended to move in the opposite direction--down bayou to the lower Lafourche, over into Bayou Terrebonne, and on to the edges of the vast coastal marshes, where they settled on other distributaries such as bayous du Large, Grand Caillou, Petit Caillou, and Pointe-aux-Chênes.  The most dramatic movements of Acadian families were out on the prairies.  There, the direction of migration was generally westward, up to and across the Mermentau and its many tributaries, on to the Calcasieu, and even west of the Sabine into East Texas.  Others moved down into the coastal marshes at the southwest corner of the state, where they settled atop the tree-covered chênières running parallel to the coast.   

Meanwhile, Acadians continued to play a role in the creation of a regional "melting pot" by taking wives and husbands from other cultures.  Their rate of exogamy in colonial Louisiana, based on family surnames, had stood just below 20 percent when Jefferson's Purchase turned them into Americains.   Five and a half decades later, at the end of the antebellum period, their exogamy rate had doubled to nearly 40 percent.  The culture had been transformed.  No family or community, old or new, escaped this demographic phenomenon.  Even Anglo-American families became "Cajunized" when their children adopted the folkways of their Acadian mothers.  Aristocratic French Creoles, as they had done during the colonial period, did their best to dissuade their children from marrying "lowly" Acadians, but as descendants of Acadian exiles became members of Louisiana's planter elite, proud Creoles allowed their sons and daughters to marry into those families.  By the eve of war in 1861, families of various nationalities had intermarried so often with Acadians, they, too, were becoming "Cajuns."01  

The Acadian Families Who Came to Louisiana But Failed to Establish Lines in the Bayou State

From 1764 into the early 1800s, members of over 150 Acadian families emigrated to Louisiana, but not all of their names survived there.  Fifty-five of these families, many of them latecomers to Acadia, most of them refugees from France, failed to perpetuate agnatic lines in the Bayou State:69 

Arosteguy

Basque fishermen were among the first Europeans to go to North America, and some of them settled in French Acadia.  Pierre Arostey or Arosteguy, perhaps a French Basque, emigrated to British Nova Scotia probably from his native Bayonne, in the Gascogne region, by May 1737, when he married Marie, daughter of Charles Robichaud dit Cadet and his second wife Marie Bourg, at Grand-Pré.  They moved on to Chignecto, where they settled on the Beauséjour ridge.  Marie gave Pierre at least five children, including two sons, Pierre, fils and Jean.  Although they lived near the site of Fort Beauséjour, built by the French in 1751, after the fort's fall in June 1755, Pierre and his family escaped the British roundup of the Chignecto Acadians and escaped, most likely, to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By the early 1760s, however, they fell into British hands and "came home" to Beauséjour, as prisoners of war.  In August 1763, the British counted Pierre, wife Marie, and five of their children in the prison compound at Fort Cumberland, Chignecto, formerly Fort Beauséjour.  Pierre, fils evidently married Isabelle Comeau, a fellow Acadian, during exile. 

With 300 other Acadians who came to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in 1765, the Arosteguys settled at Cabahonnocer, present-day St. James Parish.  Pierre, père and Marie likely died soon after their arrival, among the dozens of Acadians there who perished during the first year of settlement.  Evidence of their early death can be found in the Spanish census at Cabahannocer of April 1766, which counts both Pierre, père and Pierre, fils, each with a "woman" and a "girl" in their respective households, followed by a Spanish report of Acadians at New Orleans in July 1767, in which daughters Marie-Théotiste and Marguerite and son Jean (whom the Spanish official called Arostéllie) are counted, but neither of their parents.  No other census record in colonial Louisiana enumerates Pierre Arosteguy, père and Marie Robichaud after April 1766. 

Two of their three daughters married soon after they came to the colony.  Anne wed Bernard Capdeville of Ste.-Foix de Morlaas, Bern, Switzerland, chief surgeon of the French vessel L'Intelligence, at New Orleans in February 1766--one of the earliest marriages in Louisiana between an Acadian and a non-Acadian.  Marie-Théotiste married Antoine-Emmanuel Morin at New Orleans in January 1768--another "mixed" marriage.  There is no record of Pierre, père's daughter Marguerite or son Jean ever marrying, so it fell to older son Pierre, fils, to carry on the family's name in Louisiana.  But it was not to be.  Pierre, fils evidently fathered no sons, so only the blood of this Acadian family survived in the Bayou State.03

Barthélemy

In April 1766, Spanish officials counted Joseph Barthélemy, age 33, as part of Judice's Company of militia at Cabahannocer, an enumeration consisting mostly of Acadians who had arrived from Halifax via French St.-Domingue the year before.  One wonders if Joseph also was Acadian.04

Bastarache

Jean or Joannis Bastarche dit Le Basque, whose family name also was spelled Basterretche, was born probably at Bayonne, in the Basque country of southern France, in c1658.  Jean came to French Acadia in the early 1680s and married Huguette, daughter of Pierre Vincent and Anne Gaudet, at Port-Royal in c1684.  According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, Jean's brother Michel dit Le Basque, a flibustier, or pirate, also came to Acadia, with a wife and two children.  Jean and Huguette settled on what Acadians called the haute-rivière, above Port-Royal, today's upper Annapolis River.  There they had five children, and there they remained, among the few early Acadian families who did not move on to other settlements.  Jean and Huguette's three sons married, into the Labauve, Richard, and Forest families, and they, too, remained in the Annapolis valley.  Jean and Huguette's daughters married into the Orillon dit Champagne and Girouard families.  In January 1752, on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement, one of Jean's granddaughters, Anne, from his second son Jean, fils, married Salvator, son of Sr. Jean Mouton, a surgeon at Chignecto, and Marie Girouard, who also had lived at Annapolis and Minas. 

The Grand Dérangement of 1755 scattered the Bastarches to the winds. One family ended up on the island of Martinique.  Another Bastarache was exiled to South Carolina in the fall of 1755 but escaped and made his way back through the North American wilderness to his family in greater Acadia.  After the war with Britain ended in 1763, they joined fellow exiles on the Baie Ste.-Marie in Nova Scotia.  One Bastarache took his family to Yamachiche, Québec.  Other Bastaraches settled at Bouctouche and Tracadie on the eastern shore of what became New Brunswick.  

At the beginning of the Great Upheaval, Anne Bastarache and husband Salvator Mouton escaped the British roundup at Chignecto and fled to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  With them went two of Anne's younger sisters, Marie-Modeste and Élisabeth.  In c1760, at Restigouche, Marie-Modeste married Salvator's younger brother Louis, and Élisabeth married Salvator's and Louis's nephew, Jean dit Neveu, son of Jacques Mouton and Marguerite Caissie, in one of the Nova Scotia prison compounds in c1763.  In 1765, the Moutons and their Bastarache wives were among the 300 Acadians from Halifax via French St.-Domingue who settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Since Anne, Marie-Modeste, and Élisabeth were the only descendants of Jean dit Le Basque to come to Louisiana, only their blood, through several lines of the Mouton family, survived in the Bayou State.  Anne Bastarche, who died probably at Cabahannocer, present-day St. James Parish, soon after she came to the colony, was, in fact, the paternal grandmother of Louisiana's first popularly-elected governor, Alexandre Mouton of Lafayette Parish.05

Bélisle

The Le Borgne de Bélisle family, called Bélisle in Louisiana, was one of the most distinguished families in Acadian history, though they were not very prolific there.  In 1642, Emmanuel Le Borgne, sieur du Coudray, a native of Calais but now a wealthy merchant of La Rochelle, became a partner, and creditor, of Charles de Menou, sieur d'Aulnay de Charnisay, Acadia's future governor.  However, not until after d'Aulnay's death in 1650 did Le Borgne himself go to the colony, and not as a settler.  In the summer of 1653, he sailed to Port-Royal to complete what his henchmen had failed to accomplish in the years since d'Aulnay's death--the conquest of all rivals in Acadia, including former governor Charles La Tour, and the collection of the huge debt d'Aulnay's widow still owed him.  But Le Borgne did not remain in Acadia long.  In the summer of 1654, a New English fleet under Robert Sedgwick attacked French Acadia.  Le Borgne was compelled to return to France, but he left his oldest son, Emmanuel du Coudray, as a hostage to the English, who were determined to maintain their hold on the colony.  After a few months, young Emmanuel was allowed to return to France.  In November 1757, while the English still held the colony, the Company of New France declared the elder Le Borgne proprietary governor of Acadia, in absentia.   The following spring, Le Borgne sent his second son, Alexandre, then only age 18, to secure the family's interests in Acadia.  The impetuous Alexandre attacked the English garrison at La Hève, on the Atlantic side of the peninsula.  The attack failed, and Alexandre fell into English hands and was held prisoner at Boston and London.  In September 1659, the English relented, and La Hève was returned to the Le Borgnes.  

Alexandre did not return to Acadia until the summer of 1670, after the English surrendered the colony to France.  By then, he was age 30 and still a bachelor.  He also had assumed his father's seigneuries in Acadia, which included Port-Royal as well as La Hève.  In c1675, at age 35, he married Marie, daughter of former governor Charles La Tour and d'Aulnay's widow Jeanne Motin de Reux, who had remarried to La Tour.  Alexandre was now styling himself Le Borgne de Bélisle, and he alone of his three brothers settled in Acadia.  Marie gave him seven children, including two sons who created families of their own.  Older son Emmanuel le jeune married Cécile, a daughter of Pierre Thibodeau, in c1698.  In December 1707, younger son Alexandre, fils married Anastasie, daughter of capitaine de sauvages Jean-Vincent d'Abbadie de Saint-Castin, third baron de Saint-Castin, and Abenaki princess Mathilde.  Emmanuel le jeune had no sons.  Alexandre, fils had two sons, Alexandre III, who married Marie, daughter of Jean LeBlanc and Jeanne Bourgeois, at Grand-Pré in January 1731; and Jacques, who married Marie-Anne Maurice probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730.  Before Alexandre III died in August 1744, only 36 years old, he fathered at least four sons:  Alexandre IV; Anselme; Jean-Pierre, called Pierre; Joseph-Marie; and Mathurin.  Jacques's son Jacques, fils married Cécile, daughter of Claude Doucet and Marie Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in January 1752.

During Le Grand Dérangement, Alexandre IV, age 19 in 1755, fled to Canada, where, at L'Islet, on the St. Lawrence River below Québec city, he created a family of his own.  His widowed mother and younger siblings, however, were deported to Maryland, where British authorities counted them at Annapolis in July 1763.  By then, Alexandre III's son Anselme, while in his early 20s, had married cousin Anne, daughter of Paul Babin and Marie LeBlanc of l'Assomption, Pigiguit, in Maryland in the late 1750s or early 1760s; Anselme's mother, also, was a LeBlanc, Marie, in fact, so he and his wife Marie were cousins.  Anselme and Anne were counted at Annapolis in 1763 with no children.  By 1767, however, Anselme had fathered a son, Paul, born probably at Annapolis in October 1766. 

It was son Anselme who brought the family name to Spanish Louisiana.  He, wife Anne, and infant son Paul were in the second contingent of Maryland Acadians who arrived at New Orleans via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, aboard the English ship Virgin in July 1767; his widowed mother and none of his siblings accompanied him to the colony.  Anselme and Anne settled with their fellow passengers at San Gabriel, a new Spanish post on the river above New Orleans.  Anne died not long after the family reached Louisiana, and Anselme remarried to another cousin, Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Dupuis and Élisabeth LeBlanc of Grand-Pre, probably at Ascension, between St.-Gabriel and Cabahannocer, in the late 1760s or early 1770s.  They appear in a Spanish census at Ascension, conducted in August 1777, living on the right, or west, bank of the river on 5 arpents of frontage with a single slave.  By then, Anselme's children included not only Paul, now age 13, but also Marie, age 6; Françoise-Hélène, age 4; and Marguerite, age 2.  Another son, Joseph-Anselme, was baptized at St.-Jacques, formerly Cabahannocer, in May 1778.  A third son, Auguste, was born at either St.-Jacques or Ascension in c1782.  During the late 1780s, Anselme took his family to upper Bayou Lafourche, where they settled among dozens of Acadian families who had recently come to Louisiana from France.  In 1788, Anselme owned 14 head of cattle but still only a single slave.  By 1797, he owned three slaves.  Whatever aristocrat pretensions he may have brought to Louisiana likely had been beaten down by exile and resettlement.  He died in Assumption Parish, on the upper Lafourche, in February 1817; he was 80 years old. 

Meanwhile, in 1793 and 1799, Anselme's daughters Françoise-Hélène and Marguerite married at Ascension and Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche into the Landry family.  The priests who recorded the marriages called Anselme's daughters Belille.  Anselme's oldest son Paul died at Ascension in August 1791, age 25 and still a bachelor.  Second son Joseph-Anselme married at least twice, the second time, in his early 70s, to Marie Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Duhon and Adélaïde Landry and widow of Augustin LeBlanc, at Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in September 1850.  She gave him no children.  Joseph-Anselme died in Assumption Parish in November 1851, age 74. Anselme's youngest son Auguste died near Paincourtville in May 1855, age 73.  Area church and civil records hint that neither of Anselme's married sons fathered children of their own, so only the blood of this prominent Acadian family seems to have survived in the Bayou State.06

Bellemère

André Célestin dit Bellemere, a blacksmith, came to Acadia with wife Pérrine Basile in c1690.  They settled at Grand-Pré, at the time a new settlement in the Minas Basin, where they raised seven children, including two sons who created families of their own.  Older son Jacques married a Landry at Grand-Pré in February 1719 and used his father's dit, Bellemère, as a surname.  Younger son Antoine married a Gautrot at Grand-Pré in November 1718 and called himself a Célestin

In the fall of 1755, members of both Jacques's and Antoine's families were rounded up by British forces and deported to three seaboard colonies.  Antoine's descendants went to Maryland, where they were counted at Annapolis in July 1763.  Amazingly, when 625 of the Acadians in Maryland set sail for New Orleans in the late 1760s, none of them were Célestins. 

Brother Jacques dit Jacob's descendants were sent to Massachusetts and Virginia.  One of Jacques's daughters, Marie-Osite, married a Breau in Massachusetts and followed him to Canada in the late 1760s.  The fate of Jacques's descendants sent to the Old Dominion was even more tragic than that of their cousins who ended up in the other colonies.  In late autumn of 1755, when five transports appeared unexpectedly at Hampton Roads, Virginia's royal governor, Robert Dinwiddie, protested their deportation to his colony without his consent.  More of the exiles died on the filthy, crowded ships anchored in Hampton Roads while the Virginia authorities pondered their fate.  Acadians from one vessel were moved up to Richmond, two of the vessels were unloaded at Hampton, and two more at Norfolk.  A hand full of young Acadians managed to slip away and trek overland through fields and forests, over the mountains, and on to French Canada, but most of the exiles remained in Virginia.  Finally, in the spring of 1756, Governor Dinwiddie and Virginia's House of Burgesses made their decision ... the Acadians must go!  On 10 May 1756, the four transports filled with Acadians left for England--299 to Bristol, 250 to Falmouth, 340 to Southampton, 336 to Liverpool--1,225 of the original 1,500 sent to the Old Dominion.  Tthe British treated the Acadians in their midst like incarcerated criminals, holding them in prison warehouses for seven long years.  Many exiles died of smallpox soon after they reached Bristol.  Jacques's descendants were held at Southampton. 

In the spring 1763, after prolonged negotiations between the British and French governments, the Acadians in England were repatriated to France.  The Bellemères sailed aboard the transport L'Ambition, which reached St.-Malo in late May.  They settled at nearby St.-Servan with hundreds of fellow exiles.  In the early 1770s, they followed dozens of fellow Acadians to the Poitou region, where members of the family perished.  A decade later, only two of Jacques's descendants were still living in France--at Chantenay near Nantes, across the Breton peninsula from St.-Malo.  Jacques's daughter Anastasie, now in her mid-40s, was married to second husband Honoré, son of Jean-Baptiste Comeau and Anne-Marie Thibodeau of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, and widower of Marguerite Poirier.  Jacques's son Bruno had died in Poitou a decade earlier, but Bruno's daughter Josèphe-Marie was still alive and living with relatives in Nantes.  When the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Anastasie and Josèphe-Marie agreed to take it. 

Josèphe-Marie was age 18 when she came to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, in August 1785 and followed her fellow passengers to St.-Jacques on the Acadian Coast.  Her aunt Anastasie and uncle Honoré Comeau, along with three of Anastasie's Boudrot sons from her first marriage, arrived aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth ship of the Seven Ships, in September and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Josèphe-Marie married twice in Louisiana, first to Pierre, fils, son of fellow Acadians Pierre Lambert and his third wife Marie Doiron of Chignecto, at St.-Jacques in October 1787; she gave him a number of children, including at least three sons.  She remarried to Jean Félix, called Félix, son of Canadians Baptiste Pallaquin and Joséphine Dejen of Québec, at St. James in January 1805 and gave him two daughters.  Josèphe Marie died in Assumption Parish, on upper Bayou Lafourche in October 1846, a widow again.  She was age 79 at the time of her passing--the last of her family in the Bayou State.  Although no male Bellemère's came to Louisiana, the blood, at least, of this Acadian family survived in a number of lines of the Boudreaux and Lambert families.07

Belliveau

The Belliveaus were among the earliest families to settle in Acadia.  Antoine Belliveau, a farm worker perhaps from La Chaussée, near Blois, in the Orleanais region of the Loire valley, came to the colony in the mid-1640s, during the civil war being fought between rival colonial leaders Charles La Tour and the sieur d'Aulnay.  In c1651, Antoine married Andrée Guyon, a widow, at Port-Royal and remained there.  Andrée gave him two children, a daughter who married Germain Bourgeois, and a son, Jean, who became a carpenter as well as a farmer.  Jean married twice, first to Jeanne, a daughter of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry, at Port-Royal in c1673, and then to Cécile, a daughter of Charles Melanson dit La Ramée and Marie Dugas, at Port-Royal 30 years later, when he was in his early 50s.  Both of Jean's wives gave him children: his first wife three sons and a daughter, his second wife another son and two more daughters.  All four of Jean's sons created families of their own by marrying into the Melanson, Thériot, and Haché dit Gallant families. 

Perhaps to escape British rule, in the early 1720s, Jean took his second wife and their children to Port-Toulouse on the French Maritime island of Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, where he likely worked as a carpenter.  Later in the decade, he moved his family to Île St.-Jean, present-day Prince Edward Island, another French Maritime possession.  Jean died at Tracadie on Île St.-Jean in the mid-1730s, in his 80s.  His descendants by his second wife remained on the island, settling at Port-Lajoie and St.-Pierre-du-Nord.

Most of Jean's children by his first wife, meanwhile, remained at Port-Royal, renamed by the British Annapolis Royal, where they became a fairly prominent family.  One of Jean's grandsons, Charles, by his oldest son Jean, fils, married a daughter of René Granger and Marguerite Thériot of Grand-Pré, in November 1717 and worked as a pilot and ship's carpenter in the colonial capital.  A few Belliveaus settled at Chignecto on land their ancestor Antoine had purchased there. 

Le Grand Dérangement scattered this family to the winds.  Some Belliveaus escaped the British roundup at Annapolis, crossed the Bay of Funday, and made their way up Rivière St.-Jean before continuing on to Canada.  The Belliveaus who fell into British hands at Annapolis were placed on ships heading to Massachusetts and North Carolina.  However, the ship destined for the southern colony, the Pembroke, did not make it there.  Soon after it left Annapolis Basin, the ship fell into the hands of the exiles led by Charles Belliveau the pilot.  He and his compatriots sailed the Pembroke first to Baie Ste.-Marie, on the western shore of Nova Scotia, where they hid for a month, and then crossed the Bay of Fundy to the mouth of Rivière St.-Jean in January 1756.  In early February, they fought off a British attack in the lower St.-Jean, burned the vessel, and retreated upriver to the Acadian settlement at Ste.-Anne-du-Pay-Bas, today's Fredericton, New Brunswick, where they spent the rest of the winter.  That summer, food having run low in the St.-Jean settlements, the Belliveaus and other Pembroke passengers made their way north to Québec, while others went to Miramichi and Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Charles Belliveau, the hero of 1755, died at Québec in early 1758.  Meanwhile, Belliveaus at Chignecto either escaped the British roundup there and joined their cousins in Canada, or the British deported them to South Carolina and Massachusetts.  When the war with Britain finally ended in 1763, the Belliveaus in Massachusetts joined their cousins in Canada.  Members of the family settled in present-day Québec Province at Trois-Rivière; at Bécancour, Maskinongé, St.-Grégoire-de-Nicolet, and Nicolet between Trois-Rivières and Montréal; at St.-Jacques-de-L'Achigan, St.-Sulpice, and L'Assomption near Montréal; and at Grande-Rivière on the southern shore of the Gaspé Peninsula.  They also settled at Memramcook in present-day New Brunswick; at Rustico on Prince Edward Island; at Pubnico, Grosse-Coques, Ste.-Anne-du-Ruisseau-de-l'Anguille, and at St.-Bernard and Pointe-de-l'Église, now Church Point, on the Baie Ste.-Marie in Nova Scotia.  One community along the eastern shore of the Baie Ste.-Marie became L'Anse-aux-Belliveau, now Belliveau Cove.  

In 1755, the Belliveaus of Île St.-Jean, living in territory controlled by France, escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia, but their respite from British oppression proved to be short-lived.  After the fall of Louisbourg on Île Royale in July 1758, Louis Belliveau and his family at Tracadie escaped the British roundup on the island.  By the 1760s, they had made their way to Île Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Louis died on Miquelon in December 1775, age 65.  Another war with Britain--the American Revolution, in which France sided with the Americans--resulted in British deportation of the Acadians on Île Michelon, including the Belliveaus, to La Rochelle, France, in 1778.  Two of Louis's children died at La Rochelle in July and August 1779.  His widow Louise Haché dit Gallant died there the following October, age 65.  Their daughters Rose married Pierre Le Clair of Île Miquelon, widower of Anne Comeau, at St.-Nicholas, La Rochelle, in January 1782.  In the early 1780s, when the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in their Mississippi-valley colony, the Belliveaus at La Rochelle had either returned to Miquelon or chose to remain in France.  No member of the family can be found on the passenger lists of the Seven Ships bound for Louisiana in 1785. 

Only one member of this prominent Acadian family seems to have gone to Louisiana.  According to the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville, he was Pierre Belliveau dit Bideau.  Judging by his dit, he likely was a descendant of Charles dit Bideau of Annapolis Royal, one of Jean, père's sons by his first wife.  The date of Pierre dit Bideau's arrival in Louisiana, where he settled, and who he married, if he married at all, remain a mystery.  He did not come to Louisiana from France.  Did he arrive in 1765 with the exiles from Halifax, or in 1766-69 with the Acadians from Maryland?  A perusal of the church records of the New Orleans, river, and prairie parishes where the Acadian exiles settled turns up no one named Belliveau.  Nor can anyone with that name be found in the surviving Spanish colonial censuses.  It is safe to say, then, that the family name brought to Acadia by Antoine Belliveau, whose descendants in Canada can be numbered in the thousands, did not survive in the Bayou State.  Antoine's blood, however, and that of his wife Andrée Guyon, can be found in many South Louisianans (including this one).08

Billeray

Claude-Joseph, called Joseph, son of Jean-Claude Billeray and Anne-Monique Godard, was born at Vermier-Fontaine, Diocese of Besancon, France, in November 1727.  Joseph married Brigitte, daughter of Michel de Forest, fils and his second wife Marie Célestin dit Bellemère, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in June 1752.   A French official counted them at Anse-au-Matelot, near Port-Lajoie, in August.  Having just married, they had no children.  They had at least two children on the island:  Jeanne, born in c1753; and Charles in c1755. 

When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, the Acadians on Île St.-Jean were safe for now because they lived in territory controlled by France.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British gathered up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France later in the year.  Joseph Billeray, his wife Brigitte, and their two children crossed aboard one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  All of them survived the crossing that took the lives of scores of their fellow Acadians, but daughter Jeanne must have been weakened by the ordeal; she died in May 1759 probably in a St.-Malo hospital.   Joseph and Brigitte joined other Acadians in the St.-Malo suburb of Pleurtuit, where more children were born to them:  Marie-Jeanne in July 1759, Joseph-Jean or Jean-Joseph in November 1761, and Anne-Brigitte in June 1764.   In 1765, Joseph took his family to Belle-Île-en-Mer, where they joined over 300 other Acadians in a venture they hoped would give provide them independence from the government handouts on which they subsisted at St.-Malo.  They lived in the village of Kervarigeon, in the parish of Bangor, where, in February 1767, Joseph and Brigitte recounted their respective family genealogies for French authorities.  They also lost two more children at Kervarigeon.  Two years later, in c1771, wife Brigitte died, leaving Joseph with two children, Charles, then 16, and Marie-Jeanne, age 12.  Joseph remarried to Marie Thomas, perhaps a fellow Acadian, and fathered at least two more daughters.  He died on the island in c1779, in his early 50s.  His daughter Marie-Jeanne by his first wife married Frenchman François Le Sommer of Grandchamp probably on Belle-Île-en-Mer. 

When the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana., Joseph Billeray's widow and most of his children chose to remain on Belle-Île-en-Mer, where they were counted by French officials in 1792.  Oldest surviving daughter Marie-Jeanne, however, now a young widow, agreed to take up the Spanish offer.  She sailed aboard the sixth of the Seven Ships from France, La Ville de Archangel, with the family of 75-year-old Jacques Forest, her maternal uncle.  Her ship reached New Orleans in December, and she followed the Forests and the majority of her fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores, north of Baton Rouge. 

 Marie-Jeanne Billeray was only 27 years old when she came to Spanish Louisiana.  One wonders if she remarried there.  Since she was the only member of her family to emigrate to Louisiana, the Billerays of Île St.-Jean, St.-Servan, and Belle-Île-en-Mer are among the Acadian families who did not set down roots in the Bayou State.11

Bonnevie

Jacques Bonnevie dit Beaumont of Paris, a corporal in the King's service, married Françoise, daughter of Philippe Mius d'Azy and his first wife, a Mi'kmaq woman whose name has been lost to history, at Port-Royal in c1701.  By 1732, Jacques, age 72, was on the list of retired disabled veterans of the French army on Île Royale in the French Maritimes, having served for 17 years and suffered a wound to his thigh, which disabled him.  Jacques and Françoise had five children, including two sons, only one of whom seems to have created a family of his own:  Jacques dit Jacquot dit Beaumont, born at Port-Royal in c1704, became a blacksmith and married three times, first to Marguerite, daughter of Alexandre Lord and Marie-Françoise Barrieau, probably at Port-Royal in c1729; then to Françoise, daughter of Jean Comeau, in c1745; and then in c1755 to Anne dite Nannette, daughter of Paul Melanson and widow of Jacques-François Thébeau.   Jacques dit Beaumont's children, with the exception of Jacques dit Jacquot, moved to Île St.-Jean, now Prince Edward Island, probably in the early 1750s. 

Since they lived in territory controlled by France, the Bonnevies of Île St.-Jean escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  In late 1758, after the fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg in July, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  Sadly, two of the old corporal's daughters--Françoise, married to Jean Helie dit Nouvelle (her second husband), and Marie, married to François Duguay--never made it to France.  In December 1758, they perished with their husbands and children and dozens of other Acadians aboard the Violet, an English transport that sank in a mid-Atlantic storm on its way to St.-Malo.  

Meanwhile, Jacques dit Jacquot and his family were deported to South Carolina aboard the British transport Edward Cornwallis, which reached Charles Town in November 1755.  They likely were among the Acadians in that colony allowed to return to Nova Scotia by sea, which they accomplished in the spring of 1756.  After finding refuge on Rivière St.-Jean, they may have been among the Acadians granted permission to move on to Île St.-Jean, where the rest of Jacquot's family could be found, or, more likely, they moved on to Miramichi on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Later, they joined other Acadian exiles at Restigouche, at the head of the Baie de Chaleurs, where Jacquot's youngest daughter was baptized in May 1760.  Three of Jacques dit Jacquot's children married during the family's stay at Restigouche:  Rose married Jean Gousman, an Andalusian sailor and widower of Marie Barrieau, in January 1760; Amand married Catherine Gaudet in July 1760; and Joseph married Marguerite Haché-Gallant in May 1761.  The British attacked Restigouche in the summer of 1760, and Jacques dit Jacquot, his wife, and five of their children were among the Acadians who fell into enemy hands when this last French stronghold in North America surrendered to the British.  Jacques dit Jacquot died by 1761, when his wife remarried.  His family was held at Fort Edward, formerly Pigiguit, in British Nova Scotia before being transferred to the larger prison on Georges Island at Halifax, where a British official counted some of them in August 1763.  When the war with Britain finally ended, the surviving Bonnevies moved from Halifax to the French-controlled island of Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland, but not all of them stayed there.  Some of them moved to Chezzetcook near Halifax, some to Menoudie at Chignecto in Nova Scotia, and others to nearby Cap-Pelé on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore. 

Jacques dit Jacquot's son Amand dit Beaumont outdid all his siblings in his wanderings.  He was at Port-Louis, France, in 1768; back on Miquelon later in the year; was deported by the British to France aboard the brigantine La Jeanette in November 1778; and died at St.-Servan near St.-Malo in c1779.  His widow Catherine Gaudet returned to Miquelon in c1785 and moved on to the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence by the late 1780s.  Son Pierre, a fisherman, married Françoise Briand on the isolated islands in c1790 but did not remain there.  They were living at Halifax later in the decade, where a daughter was born to them in c1796.  They moved on to Le Havre, where another daughter was born in August 1799, and their older daughter died in September, age 2 1/2.  Brother Amand, fils married Marie LeBorgne, probably a fellow Acadian, became a carpenter, and also settled at Le Havre.  Between 1797 and 1805, Marie gave Amand, fils at least six children, five sons and a daughter, at the Norman port.  Two of them died in infancy.  Joseph's and Amand, fils's sister Marie-Modeste married into the Doucet family at Le Havre. 

Meanwhile, Jacquot's daughter Rose and her Spanish husband Jean Gousman, fils joined other members of her family on the French island of Miquelon after they departed the prison at Halifax.  Pressured by the French government to vacate the overcrowded island, they, too, moved to France, where they were counted at Le Havre in 1772.  Unlike brother Amand's widow, however, they remained in France with the hundreds of other Acadian exiles still living there.  Despite their many relocations, Jean, fils and Rose had at least nine children, including six sons, but all of these children except two died in childhood, not an uncommon fate during the Great Upheaval.  In the early 1770s, Rose and Jean went to Poitou with dozens of their fellow Acadians to settle on land that belonged to an influential French nobleman.  The venture failed after two seasons of effort, and Rose and Jean retreated with their fellow Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where they lived as best they could on what work they could find and on welfare provided by the French government.  When the Spanish offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Rose Bonnevie and her husband agreed to take it.  

Rose Bonnevie, age 44, husband Jean Gousman, age 56, and two children--Rosalie-Charlotte, age 21, and Jean-Thomas, age 2--crossed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in early November 1785.  They did not follow the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche but settled downriver from the city.  Nueva Gálvez, also called San Bernardo, in present-day St. Bernard Parish, was an Isleño, or Canary Islander, community, where a hand full of other families from L'Amitié chose to settle.  Rose died at San Bernardo in October 1791; she was only 50 years old. 

Rose was the only Acadian Bonnevie who settled in Louisiana.  Her son by Jean Gousman probably died young, but her daughter married twice at New Orleans and had children of her own.  So, although the Acadian branch of the Bonnevie family did not take root in the Bayou State, its blood survived in at least two New Orleans families.12

Boucher

Pierre Boucher, one of a number of Acadians with the surname, married Marie, daughter of Jean Doiron and Anne LeBlanc, probably at Chignecto in the early 1750s.  They had at least one child, daughter Marie-Anne, born at Chignecto in c1754, on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  In the autumn of 1755, the British deported Pierre Boucher, his wife Marie, and their infant daughter Marie-Anne to South Carolina aboard the sloop Dolphin, which left Chignecto on October 13 and reached Charleston on November 19.  Pierre died in South Carolina, and Marie remarried to Pierre, son of fellow Acadian Philippe Lambert and widower of Marguerite Arseneau and _____, in South Carolina in c1761.  Two years later, in August 1763, South Carolina officials counted Marie Doiron, daughter Marie-Anne Boucher, Pierre Lambert, a son by a previous marriage, Pierre and Marie's infant son Jean, and three orphans still living in the colony; Marie-Anne was 9 years old at the time.  Soon after, the family seems to have followed hundreds of other Acadians exiles languishing in the British Atlantic colonies to French-controlled St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, where the French were building a new naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas on the north shore of the island. 

Marie-Anne Boucher, now age 11, came to Louisiana probably from French St.-Domingue with her mother Marie Doiron, age 28; stepfather Pierre Lambert, père, age 39; and stepbrother Pierre Lambert, fils, age 14, in 1765.  They may have sailed from St.-Domingue on their own or, more likely, joined a contingent of Acadian exiles from Halifax who stopped at Cap-Français on their way to the Mississippi valley.  The Lamberts, including Marie-Anne, settled at Cabahannocer, later called St.-Jacques, on the river above New Orleans.  Marie-Anne married Jean-Baptiste, son of Jean Goudreau and Geneviève Bélanger, at St.-Jacques in August 1775; Jean-Baptiste was either a French Creole or a French Canadian. 

Marie-Anne probably was the only Acadian Boucher who emigrated to Louisiana, so this branch of the family, except for its blood, did not take root in the Bayou State.  The Bouchers of South Louisiana are French Creoles or French Canadians, not Acadians.13

Brun

Like the Belliveaus, the Bruns were among the earliest families to settle in Acadia.  Vincent Brun was a laborer perhaps from La Chaussée, near Blois, in the Orleanais region of the Loire valley in France.  In 1636, he may have come to Acadia as a single man in his early 20s aboard the St.-Jehan, though he does not appear on the ship's passenger list.  After his labor contract with Razilly and d'Aulnay was up, Vincent may have returned to La Chaussée in the early 1640s and married a girl from his village, ____ Breau, whose given name has been lost to history.  His wife died soon after giving birth to their child, who also died.  Vincent remarried to his dead wife's sister, Renée Breau, in c1644 or 1645 and returned to Port-Royal with her in c1648.  They brought with them their two daughters, who married into the Trahan,Thériot, and Hébert families.  Two more daughters were born to Vincent and Renée in Acadia and married into the Bourg and Gautrot families.  

Vincent and Renée had only one son, Sébastien, who married Huguette, daughter of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry, at Port-Royal in c1675.  Sébastien and Huguette had seven children, including five sons, all born at Port-Royal, four of whom raised families of their own by marrying into the Dugas, Pellerin, Gautrot, and Comeau families.  Sébastien and Huguette's two daughters married into the Pitre and Moyse dit Latreille families.  Huguette died at Port-Royal sometime in the late 1680s or early 1690s.  Sébastien, who never remarried, may have lived for a time at Cobeguit in the early 1700s, but he returned to Port-Royal, where he died in August 1728; he was 73 years old.  By 1755, a few of the descendants of Vincent Brun had moved to Minas, Chignecto, Chepoudy, Petitcoudiac, and Île St.-Jean, but the great majority of them remained in the Annapolis River valley, where they had lived for generations.  

Le Grand Dérangement scattered this large family even farther.  Descendants of Vincent Brun ended up in South Carolina; New England; New York; Morlaix and St.-Martin de Chantenay, France; the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in present-day eastern New Brunswick; Halifax; and in French St.-Domingue.  After the war with Britain finally ended, most of them emigrated to Canada, where they settled on the upper St. Lawrence or along the Richelieu River at St.-Anne-de-la-Pérade, Bécancour, Nicolet, St.-Philippe-de-Laprairie, L'Acadie, Maskinongé, St.-Michel-d'Yamaska, Yamachiche, Verchères, Pointe-du-Lac, St.-Denis-sur-Richelieu, and at Québec City; on the lower St. Lawrence and Rivière Chaudière at St.-Marie-de-Beuce, Ste.-Famille and St.-Pierre on Île d'Orléans, Rivière-Ouelle, Cap-St.-Ignace, Rivière-du-Loup, and Kamouraska; and at Carleton on the southern Gaspé Peninsula.  Bruns also lived in present-day New Brunswick on Rivière St.-Jean and at Memramcook, and in Nova Scotia on Baie Ste.-Marie; and on the French island of Miquelon, off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  

Despite the substantial size of the family in Acadia, only two Acadian Bruns--one a widow, the other a wife--found refuge in Louisiana.  They both reached New Orleans in February 1765 with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue.  After a short respite in the city, they followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District, where they helped establish La Nouvelle-Acadie on the banks of Bayou Teche:  Anne Brun, age 27, came with husband Jean-Baptiste Broussard, age 34, and two sons, ages 13 and 1.  She died at Attakapas in November 1798, age 60.  Agnès Brun, age 22, widow of Paul Doucet, came with a year-old daughter.  Agnès remarried to widower Olivier Thibodeaux at Attakapas in c1770 (the marriage was sanctified at the Attakapas church in September 1786), and gave him more children.  She died at the home of her son Cyrille Thibodeaux at La Grand Point, St. Martin Parish, in October 1809, in her late 60s.  

Since no male Acadian Bruns came to Louisiana during or after Le Grand Dérangement, only the blood of this family survived in the Bayou State, in several branches of the Broussard and Thibodeaux families.  The Bruns and Lebruns of South Louisiana, then, are descendants of French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.14

Carret

Ignace dit Saint-Jacques Carret, one of two Acadians with the surname, was born in France in c1687, probably no kin to the other Carret in Acadia.  Ignace came to the colony by c1718, the year he married Cécile, daughter of Martin dit Robert Henry and Marie Hébert of Cobeguit.  They settled at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, and had at least nine children, including seven sons, all born probably at Pigiguit.  In the late 1740s or early 1750s, the family joined dozens of other Acadians who slipped away from British Nova Scotia and moved to the French Maritimes islands to get clear of British authority.  In 1752, a French official counted Ignace dit Saint-Jacques and his family at Pointe-à-la-Jeunesse on Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island.  

Living on islands controlled by France, Ignace Carret and his family escaped the wholesale deportation of their former neighbors in the Minas Basin during the fall of 1755.  But, like their namesakes on Île St.-Jean, their respite from British oppression was short-lived.  After the fall of the French fortress at nearby Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île Royale and deported them to France later in the year. 

The deportation of 1758 devastated this branch of the Carret family.  They sailed on one or more of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Ignace, père, age 84 according to the passenger list (in truth, he was "only" in his early 70s), and his wife Cécile Henry, age 65, survived the crossing despite their advanced ages.  So did unmarried sons Honoré, age 25, and Ignace, fils, age 13, who traveled with them.  Sadly, eight members of the family did not survive the crossing, including three other unmarried sons who traveled with them:  Joseph, age 31, died in the hospital at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in March 1759, soon after reaching France.  François, age 21, died in the hospital probably at St.-Malo in February 1759.  And Zenon, age 20, died probably in the St.-Malo hospital three days after his brother François died.  Married son Charles, age 37, a widower, traveled with three children--daughters Susanne, age 5, and Rosalie, age 2, and son Pierre, age 4.  Charles died in the hospital at St.-Servan in early March 1759.  All three of his children died at sea.  Married son Jean, age 35, also a widower, accompanied his two daughters--Marie-Rose, age 9, and Thérèse, age 7--aboard one of the Five Ships.  The girls survived, but Jean died in the hospital probably at St.-Malo in February 1759.  

Ignace, père and the survivors of his family fared as best they could in the mother country.  Honoré married into the Benoit family at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in March 1759.  He and his wife lived for a while at Chateauneuf in eastern Brittany, where Honoré worked as a day laborer.  They returned to St.-Servan in 1760 and were still there in 1772.  Ignace, fils, also a day laborer, married into the Clémençeau family at St.-Servan in October 1767.  Ignace, fils and his family also settled at St.-Servan.  Honoré and Ignace, fils's brother Jean's daughter Marie-Rose also married a Benoit, at St.-Servan in February 1770.  Meanwhile, Honoré and Ignace, fils's mother, Cécile Henry, died at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in August 1761; she was 65 years old.  Ignace, père died at St.-Suliac three months later; he was 74 years old.  

In the early 1770s, French officials came up with a scheme to settle Acadians on farmland owned by a powerful nobleman.  Hundreds of Acadians left the ports around St.-Malo and moved to settlements in the Poitou region near Châtellerault.  Honoré and Ignace, fils remained at St.-Servan, refusing to join the venture, but their niece Marie-Rose and her Benoit husband went to Poitou with the other Acadians.  After two years of effort, most of the Acadians in Poitou, including Marie-Rose and her family, retreated to the coastal city of Nantes and survived there as best they could.  By 1784, Honoré and Ignace, fils and their families also had left St.-Servan and settled with their relatives at Nantes.  When the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, descendants of Ignace Carret jumped at the opportunity.  

Two middle-aged Carret brothers brought three sons with them to the colony, providing a chance for this family to set down roots in Spanish Louisiana; they all sailed on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships of 1785.  Honoré Carret and his wife Françoise Benoit brought son Pierre-Marin, age 24, to the colony.  He was their only surviving child, he did not marry, and he may not even have survived the crossing from France.  Honoré and Françoise had no more children in Louisiana, so this line of the family did not survive in the Bayou State.  Honore's niece Marie-Rose, daughter of older brother Jean, came to Louisiana with her husband Grégoire Benoit and a half dozen of her Benoit children, three of whom created families of their own, so at least the blood of Jean Carret's line of the family survived in the Bayou State.  Marie-Rose's younger sister Thérèse married into the French Creole Gautier family at Lafourche. 

Honoré and Jean's younger brother Ignace, fils was the other Carret head of household who came to Louisiana from France.  Daughter Marie-Josèphe married into the Guidry family at Assumption on upper Lafourche in January 1802 and died in Lafourche Interior Parish in her early 70s.  Her brothers Eustache-Ignace and Jean were the only Carrets who could have perpetuated an Acadian line of the family in Louisiana.  Jean died young.  Eustache-Ignace married a Boudreaux at Assumption in March 1796 and died by July 1813, in his 40s, when his wife remarried at Assumption.  Eustache-Ignace fathered two daughters, who married into the Daunis and Prejean families.  His son Leufroi, however, did not marry, so, like brother Jean, only the blood of Ignace, fils's line of the family survived in the Bayou State.  The Carrets of South Louisiana, then, are French Creoles, Spanish Creoles, or Foreign French, not Acadians.15

Chaillou

Jeanne, daughter of Claude Chaillou and Marthe Bastrate, born in c1733, perhaps in Nantes, married first to Nicolas Cuomel and may have followed him to Newfoundland in the early 1760s.  She remarried to Jean-Baptiste, son of Abraham Bourg le jeune and Marie Dugas of Annapolis Royal, on Île St.-Pierre, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland, in October 1763.  Their daughter Marie-Geneviève was born on nearby Île Miquelon in c1767.  

Soon after Marie-Geneviève's birth, French authorities determined that îles St.-Pierre and Miquelon were overcrowded and that the Acadian refugees there must be transported to France.  The first of them left in early October 1767 and landed in the ports of St.-Malo, Brest, Lorient, and Rochefort.  More followed in November.  Jean-Baptiste Bourg, wife Jeanne Chaillou, and their daughter evidently were among the deportees.  They likely ended up at La Rochelle.  Three more children, all sons, were born to them in France, two at La Rochelle in c1769 and c1771, and another at Mointhoiron, Poitou, in January 1775.  The family's presence in Poitou in the mid-1770s reveals that it was part of the major Acadian settlement scheme near the city of Châtellerault which began in early 1773.  In March 1776, Jean-Baptiste, Jeanne, and their children retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Jean-Baptiste died there in August 1777, age 44. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Jeanne Chaillou and her children greed to take it.  They sailed to Louisiana aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August 1785.  With her were her four Bourg children, three sons and four daughters, ages 18, 16, 14, and 10.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jeanne died there probably in the early 1790s, in her late 50s or early 60s.  Her daughter and two of her sons created families of their own along the bayou. 

Jeanne, widow of Jean-Baptiste Bourg, was the only Chaillou to go to Louisiana.  Except for its blood, then, this putative Acadian family did not survive in the Bayou State.16

Clémençeau

The Clémençeau family came relatively early to Acadia.  Jean Clémençeau dit Beaulieu of Bordeaux, France, a sergeant in the King's service, reached Port-Royal before 1703, when he ran afoul of Acadian Governor Jacques-François de Mombeton de Brouillan during early months of Queen Anne's War.  The governor had authorized Clémençeau "to work on the distribution of the King's provisions and munitions" at the Port-Royal fort, but one of Clémenceau's superiors received word that Clémençeau "was involved in some malfeasance."  The superior complained to the governor, who ordered the sergeant's arrest when Clémençeau returned to the fort, "but shortly thereafter he was released and his clothing was returned to him ...."  Evidently the sergeant had found an ally in one demoiselle Barat, "who promised to represent him whenever and as often as would be necessary."  Two years later, the war still raging, Clémençeau married Anne, daughter of Jean Roy and Marie Aubois, a métisse, in Boston, so the English must have captured him during Colonel Bejamin Church's raid up the Bay of Fundy in the summer of 1704.  Back at Port-Royal in 1706, Jean and Anne's marriage was blessed by a priest.  They had six children, including two sons, Louis and Jean, both born at Port-Royal; only Louis created a family of his own.  Their four daughters married into the Martin, Héon, Lavigne, and Lejeune dit Briard families; most of them moved to Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, but one of them settled on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island.  In the 1710s, Jean took up with Marguerite, daughter of Jean Corporon and Françoise Savoie, with whom he had a son, Jean-Pierre, born in March 1712.  Wife Anne Roy died in c1717, soon after giving birth to her sixth child with Jean. 

Jean dit Beaulieu's sons Louis and Jean-Pierre married into the Caissie dit Roger, Martin, and Gautrot families.  By 1755, the sergeant's descendants could be found at Port-Toulouse on French-controlled Île Royale; on Île St.-Jean; at Chignecto; and Grand-Pré. 

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this family even farther.  In the fall of 1755, British forces deported the Acadians at Minas to Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and New England.  Jean-Pierre Clemençeau, his second wife Françoise, and at least two of their daughters, Marie and Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, ended up in Virginia, where they endured a fate worse than most of their fellow refugees.  The Virginia governor, Robert Dinwiddie, refused to allow the 1,500 Acadians sent to him to remain in the colony.  Many of the exiles died on the filthy, crowded ships anchored in Hampton Roads while the Virginia authorities pondered their fate.  Acadians from one vessel were moved up to Richmond, two of the vessels were unloaded at Hampton, and two more at Norfolk.  A hand full of young Acadians managed to slip away and trek overland through fields and forests and over the mountains, to French territory, but most of the exiles remained in Virginia.  Finally, in the spring of 1756, Virginia's House of Burgesses made its decision ... the Acadians must go!  In May, the first shipment of Acadians in hired vessels left for England, and in two weeks all of them had gone--299 to Bristol, 250 to Falmouth, 340 to Southampton, and 336 to Liverpool--1,225 of the original 1,500. 

One of Jean dit Beaulieu's daughters, Marguerite dit Beaulieu, wife of Jean-Baptiste Lejeune dit Briard, died at St.-Jean, Île d'Orléans, south of Québec City, in November 1756, so she and her family escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia.  

Jean dit Beaulieu's descendants on Île Royale, living in territory controlled by France, escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia.  Le Grand Dérangement caught up to them with a vengeance, however, with the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758.  Later in the year, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île Royale and transported them to France.  Jean dit Beaulieu's daughter Marie-Anne, widow of Nicolas Lavigne, and five of her children crossed to St.-Malo on the British transport Queen of Spain.  Marie-Anne died on the crossing, along with three of her younger children.  Marie Clemençeau, age 20, wife of Antoine Haché, and two of his relatives, crossed on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  They all survived the terrible crossing and settled in the St.-Malo area.  

The Acadians in England endured life in the port cities as best they could.  By 1763, more than half of them were dead, including most likely Jean-Pierre Clemençeau and his wife.  In May of that year, after prolonged negotiations between the French and British governments, the Acadians in England were repatriated to France.  Among them were Jean-Pierre's two daughters--Marie, now 12, and Marie-Madeleine, now 11--who sailed to France aboard the ship L'Ambition with relatives and settled in the St.-Malo area, where at least one of their cousins had gone.  Marie-Madeleine was the first to marry.  She wed Ignace, son of fellow Acadians Ignace Carret and Cécile Henry, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in October 1767.  Marie married Pierre, son of fellow Acadians Pierre Trahan and Madeleine Comeau, and widower of Marguerite LeBlanc, Élisabeth Darois, and Madeleine Vincent, at St.-Donatien, near Nantes, France, in February 1783; Marie was in her early 30s at the time of the wedding, and Pierre was old enough to be her father.  Meanwhile, in the early 1770s, their cousin Marie Clemençeau, her husband Antoine Haché, and their children were part of an attempt by French authorities to settle Acadians languishing in the port cities on marginal land in the Poitou region owned by an influential nobleman.  The venture failed after two years of effort, and in late 1775 Marie and her family retreated to the port city of Nantes with dozens of other Poitou Acadians.  Marie died at Chantenay, near Nantes, in November 1782; she was only 40 years old.  

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Sisters Marie and Marie-Madeleine Clemençeau and their husbands agreed to take it.  Marie, age 34, husband Pierre Trahan, age 62, and a 1-year-old daughter, crossed to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships from France that reached New Orleans in September 1785.  Younger sister Marie-Madeleine, age 33, husband Ignace Carret, age 41, and three children, ages 15, 14, and 7, also crossed from France aboard Le St.-Rémi.  Both sisters and their families followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where both sisters lost their husbands.  They remarried at St.-Jacques on the river in the early 1790s.  Marie-Madeleine remarried to Frenchman François, son of Pierre L'Autel and Anne Dansi of Bordeaux, France, in November 1791 and settled with him on the upper bayou, though she may have died in St. James Parish.  Marie remarried to Frenchman Louis, son Pierre Delanoir and Marie-Dominique Noblez of Dunkirk, Flanders, in October 1794 and may have remained on the river. 

No male members of this branch of the Clémençeau family emigrated to Louisiana, so, except for its blood, it did not take root in the Bayou State.  The Clémençeaus of South Louisiana are French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadian.17

Clossinet

Louis Closquinet dit Dumoulin, a carpenter, born at Verrier, Reims, France, in c1700, married Marguerite, daughter of Vincent Longuépée and Madeleine Rimbault, at Louisbourg on Île Royale, now Cape Breton Island, in c1722.  In c1737, they settled at Rivière-du-Nord-Est on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, where they had at least eight children, all born on Île St.-Jean:  François in c1723; Pierre in c1725; Marie-Madeleine in c1727; Louis, fils in c1730; Joseph and Jean-Baptiste in c1732; Louise-Geneviève, also called Marie-Louise, in c1735; and Amable in July 1739.  Louis and Marguerite's son Pierre married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Paul Boudrot and Madeleine-Josèphe Doiron of Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Scie, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in January 1751.  Marie married Pierre-Mathurin, son of Pierre Girard of Nantes, France, at Port-Lajoie in September 1751 and settled on Rivière-de-Peugiguit.  Louis, fils married Anne Jacquemart or Jaquemin.  Joseph married Françoise, another daughter of Paul Boudrot, on Île St.-Jean in c1756.  And Louise married Charles, son of André Savary and Marie-Marthe Doucet, on the island in c1755.  

The Closquinets of Île St.-Jean, living in territory controlled by France, escaped the British roundup of Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg in July 1758, the British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  Marie Closquinet, age 34, who was pregnant, her husband Pierre Girard, age 39, two of their young children, and a domestic servant; brother Louis, fils, age 29, and his wife Anne Jacquimin, age 26; brother Joseph, age 28, his wife Françoise Boudrot, age 20, and their sons Pierre le jeune, age 6, and Grégoire, age 2; and sister Louise, age 24, her husband Charles Savary, age 31, their sons Jean-Charles, age 2 1/2, and infant Charles--all crossed on the British transport Supply, which left the Gut of Canso in late November but did not reach St.-Malo until early March 1759.  All of them survived the crossing except for Louise's infant son Charles, who died at sea, and husband Charles, who died in a St.-Malo hospital in late April. 

In France, the Closquinets suffered along with hundreds of other Acadians the indignities of life in the mother country.  During their time in France, the family's name evolved from Closquinet to Clossinet.  Marie Clossinet and her family lived at Châteauneuf, a suburb of Nantes, in 1759-60, where a daughter was born in March 1759 but died less than two months later, and at nearby St.-Servan from 1760-64, where another daughter was born in April 1760.  In April 1764, the entire family left France for Cayenne in South America aboard the ship Le Fort.  They were counted at Sinnamary, Cayenne, in March 1765; the census taker noted that Marie and Pierre were suffering from fièvre at the time.  Louise Clossinet remarried to Charles, son of fellow Acadians Étienne Trahan and Françoise Reine, at Châteauneuf, near St.-Malo, in August 1759.  A daughter was born at Châteauneuf in October 1760, and another daughter at nearby St.-Servan in March 1764.  Meanwhile, in April 1760, Louise's husband Charles shipped out on the corsair L'Hercules to fight the British but was promptly captured and held as a prisoner of war.  He remained in England until June 1763, when he was finally repatriated to France.  In April 1764, Louise and her family also left for Cayenne aboard the ship Le Fort.  When French authorities counted the settlers at Sinnamary, Cayenne, in March 1765, Charles Trahan and his two daughters were not on the list; wife Louise was counted with her sister Marie's family, so one suspects that her husband and daughters had died by then.  Louise remarried to Antoine-Joseph-Christophe Verge, place unrecorded.  Brother Louis, fils and his wife Anne Jacquemin lived at St.-Servan from 1759-64.  Anne died at St.-Servan by November 1774, when Louis, fils remarried to Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Daigle and Anne-Marie Breau, and widow of Amand Giroir, at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo.  Brother Joseph and his family lived in the St.-Malo suburbs of St.-Enogat from 1759-65, St.-Servan in 1765-66, St.-Melior in 1767, and back in St.-Servan from 1767-72.  Daughter Jeanne-Marguerite was born at St.-Énogat in April 1760, and Marie-Marguerite in July 1762 but died at age 18 months in February 1764.  Joseph died at St.-Énogat in 1764 or 1765, and wife Françoise Boudrot remarried to Marin, son of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Dugas and Marguerite Benoit, at St.-Servan in November 1766.  She gave him four sons, born at St.-Servan between 1767 and 1773.  In the early 1770s, Marin, Françoise, and their children, including Grégoire and Jeanne-Marguerite Clossinet, became part of the attempt to settle Acadians on a French nobleman's land in the Poitou region.  When the venture failed after two years of effort, Marin and Françoise joined dozens of other Poitou Acadians in an exodus to the port city of Nantes, where they subsisted as best they could on government hand outs or on whatever work they could find.  Françoise's daughter Jeanne-Marguerite married Frenchman Étienne, son of Jean Peltier and Renée Prime of Baune, Angers, France, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, a suburb of Nantes, in August 1784; Étienne was a stonecutter.  Their son Jean was born at L'Hermitage, Chantenay, in May 1785.  

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Many of the Acadians took up the offer, including a hand full of Clossinets and their spouses.  Marie Clossinet, age unrecorded, and husband Charles Comeau, age 37, a childless couple, came to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August.  They settled at Baton Rouge.  Louis Clossinet, fils, age 54, second wife Marie-Marguerite Daigle, age 37, and stepdaughter Geneviève Giroir, age 16, sailed to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in December 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores, north of Baton Rouge.  After a series of hurricanes devastated the settlement in 1794, they moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche and settled among the hundreds of Acadians already there, including niece Jeanne Clossinet and her husband Étienne Peltier.  Louis and Marie-Marguerite brought no children with them to Louisiana and bore none there, at least none who survived childhood.  The only member of Louis, fils's brother Joseph's family to emigrate to Louisiana was daughter Jeanne-Marguerite Clossinet, age 25, her French husband Étienne Peltier, who crossed as a stowaway on L'Amitié, and their infant son Jean.  If they sailed to Louisiana aboard one of the Seven Ships, they appear on none of the passenger lists.  They settled at Baton Rouge, where Spanish officials counted them in July 1788.  Jeanne and Étienne had more children in Louisiana.  By the mid-1790s, they had moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Jeanne died in October 1800; she was only 40 years old.  

Acadian Louis Clossinet, fils and his wife Marie-Marguerite had no surviving children.  The many children of Louis, fils's niece Jeanne-Marguerite Clossinet were Peltiers, and the children of Marie Clossinet, probably a cousin, would have been Comeaus.  Except for its blood, then, the Acadian branch of the Clossinet family did not survive in the Bayou State.  The Closquinets or Clossinets of South Louisiana today are French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadian.18

Corporon

Like the Belliveaus and the Bruns, the Corporons were among the earliest families to settle in Acadia.  Jean Corporon, a farmer from France, married Françoise, oldest daughter of François Savoie, at Port-Royal in c1670.  She gave him 15 children, including three sons--Jean-Baptiste, Martin, and Jean--who married into the Pinet, Joseph dit Lejeune, Viger, and Pichot families and settled at Port-Royal, Minas, Pigiguit, and on French-controlled Île Royale and Île St.-Jean.  Seven of Jean and Françoise's daughters married into the Boudrot, Doucet, Le Clerc dit Laverdure, Hébert, Johnson dit Jeanson, Samuel, and Seigneur dit La Rivière families and settled at Port-Royal, Minas, and in the French Maritimes. 

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered the family even farther.  Two of Martin Corporon's daughters by his second wife were deported from Minas to two of the British Atlantic colonies during the fall of 1755.  Françoise, wife of Jean Roy, was deported with her family to Massachusetts.  Youngest sister Marie-Osite-Anne was deported to Maryland, where she married François Simoneau, a native of Lorraine, in c1759.  They were counted at Oxford, on Maryland's Eastern Shore, in July 1763. 

Oldest sister Marie and husband Honoré Trahan outdid her Corporon kin in bouncing from one place to another, although they, too, ended up in Maryland.  In 1749, on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement, Marie and Honoré had moved from Pigiguit to Baie-des-Espagnols on Île Royale, where son Pierre was born the following year.  Dissatisfied with conditions in the isolated fishing village, they moved to Mirliguèche, on the Atlantic side of the Nova Scotia peninsula, in late August 1754.  When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia during the summer of 1755, Honoré, Marie, and Pierre, despite his having taken an unconditional oath of allegiance to the British King, were among the first Acadians held at Georges Island in Halifax harbor.  In December 1755, the British transported them, along with other Acadians from Mirliguèche, most of them kin, aboard the sloop Providence to North Carolina, where they landed probably at Edenton on Albemarle Sound.  In c1760, North Carolina officials allowed them to leave.  Most of their relatives found their way to Philadelphia, but Honoré, Marie, and Pierre moved to Maryland instead, where colonial officials counted at Port Tobacco in July 1763.  Soon afterwards, relatives who had gone to Pennsylvania joined them at Port Tobacco. 

Living in territory controlled by France, the Corporons on Île Royale and Île St.-Jean escaped the British roundup of Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg in July 1758, the British rounded up most of the Acadians on the Maritimes islands and deported them to France.  The result was wholesale disaster for the Corporon family.  Martin's widow Marie-Josèphe Viger, age 55, with her second husband Paul Benoit and her 25-year-old son Jean-Charles Corporon, sailed to St.-Malo aboard the British tranport Duke William, which sank on 13 December 1758, taking all of its passengers with it.  Meanwhile, Martin and Marie-Josèphe's daughter Marie-Josèphe-Marguerite, called Marguerite, age 24, wife of Joseph Lejeune, perished along with her husband and two young children in a cross-ocean voyage aboard one of the so-called Five Ships heading to St.-Malo. 

Some Corporons did survive the crossing to France.  At Rochefort in July 1760, Madeleine Corporon, widow of Jean Pitard, both from Louisbourg, remarried to tinsmith Jean, son of Antoine Borde and Marguerite Faur of Louisbourg; the Notre-Dame parish priest who recorded the marriage did not give the bride's parents' names.  Martin Corporon's son Pierre, by Martin's first wife, ended up at Cherbourg, where he remarried to Marie Simon, perhaps a fellow Acadian, in November 1761.  Sadly, a year earlier, in February and April 1760, Pierre's daughters Marie-Blanche, age 11, and Anne, age 18, died in de quartre Sables at Cherbourg.  In April 1762, Anne Corporon married day laborer Jean Thubert, a widower, at Notre-Dame in Rochefort; the priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names, but it did note that the bride and groom were "anciens habitants de l'Île Royale."  In June 1784, Anne-Madeleine, daughter of Jean Corporon, described as an "officier sur les navires," and Jeanne Pichot of Louisbourg, married carpenter Jacques Dixmier, a widower, at St.-Nicolas, La Rochelle.  When, in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, none of the Corporons agreed to take it. 

At least one Corporon ended up in the French West Indies by the early 1760s.  Madeleine, daughter of Baptiste Corporon and Charlotte Roy of Louisbourg, died at Fort Royal, Martinique, in November 1764.

When the war with Britain ended in February 1763, most of the Acadians languishing in the New England colonies chose to go to Canada.  Françoise Corporon and her family settled at Repentigny, on the St. Lawrence above Québec, where she remarried to Canadian Antoine Dupuis dit Raymond in February 1785 and died in February 1799, age 79.  Her cousin, Eustache, son of Jean-Baptiste Corporon l'aîné, took his family to another part of Canada.  By 1770, he and his family were living at Pointe-de-l'Est, near Halifax, Nova Scotia.  At least one of his sons, Abraham-Gilbert, moved on to Bas de Tousquet, today's Tusket, at northwestern end of Nova Scotia, in the early 1800s. 

Meanwhile, Françoise's sisters and their families still languishing in Maryland also spurned life in a British colony, but they chose to go to a very different place after the war with Britain ended.  When word reached the Acadians in Maryland that they would be welcome in French Louisiana, they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them south to New Orleans.  

The first Acadian Corporon to find refuge in Louisiana was Marie-Osite-Anne, age 31, daughter of Martin Corporon and his second wife Marie-Josèphe Viger of Île Royale.  Marie-Osite-Anne reached New Orleans from Maryland in 1766 with husband François Simoneau, age 38, a native of Lorraine, France.  They and their four children, ages 6 to infancy, followed their fellow Maryland exiles to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans.  By the late 1770s, they had moved downriver to Ascension.  During the late 1780s and early 1790s, Spanish officials were counting Marie-Anne-Osite Corporon, husband François Simoneau, and their children on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marie-Anne-Osite died at Assumption on the upper bayou in September 1802, in her late 60s.

Marie-Osite-Anne's older sister Marie also came to Spanish Louisiana.  She arrived in October 1769 with husband Honoré  Trahan, age 43, and their 18-year-old son Pierre.  They, too, had come to the colony from Maryland--in this case, Port Tobacco--but their experience was very different from that of the Simoneaus.  Marie and her family left Port Tobacco in early 1769 aboard the ill-fated British schooner Britannia.  With them were other Acadian families and eight German Catholic families who also chose to settle in Spanish Louisiana.  The English ship captain somehow missed the mouth of the Mississippi River, and the Britannia ran aground on the Texas coast near Espiritu Santo Bay.  Spanish officials, who feared that these ragged refugees were smugglers or spies, held them at La Bahía for six long months, until word reached the presidio commander that the crew and passengers of this vessel were harmless.  After a harrowing overland trek from La Bahía to Natchitoches, which they reached in October, Marie and Honoré chose to settle in the Opelousas District, north of Attakapas: They settled west of the Atchafalaya Basin in the Opelousas District, where Honoré had family.  Marie died at Opelousas in August 1810; the priest who recorded her burial said that she was "de cent ans et plus," or over 100 years old, when she died, but she was closer to 90.  

No male Corporon came to Louisiana, so this old Acadian family, except for its blood, did not take root in the Bayou State.  However, all of the many Simoneuxs of South Louisiana, and many of the Trahans, are Corporons through their maternal lines.19

Cousin

Jean, son of Guy Cousin of Dol, Brittany, France, probably no kin to the other Cousins in greater Acadia, was born at St.-Malo in c1716.  He reached Acadia by November 1737, when he married Judith, 16-year-old daughter of Paul Guédry and Anne Mius d'Azy, at Grand-Pré.  Jean and Judith settled near her family at Ministigueshe, near Cap-Sable, but they did not remain there.  In early 1752, a French official counted them at Baie-des-Espagnols, Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island.  The census taker noted that Jean was age 35, that his wife, age 30, was a "native of Boston," and that "They have settled in the Colony for two years and have rations for that time."  The census taker added that their "dwelling was granted verbally by Messrs. Desherbiers and Prevost [Des Herbiers was the King's commissioner, or commandant, for Île Royale, and Prevost, actually Prévost de La Croix,  was the colony's financial commissary]."  Living with Jean and Judith were four children:  Bénomy, probably Bénoni, age 9; Marie-Blanche, age 7; Jean-Baptiste, age 5; and Marie-Madeleine, age 4.  They may have had another son, Yves, born on the island in 1758. 

Living in territory controlled by France, Jean Cousin and his family escaped the British roundup of Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg in July 1758, the British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île Royale and deported them to France.  In c1768, at age 23, Jean's daughter Marie-Blanche married fellow Acadians Michel, fils, son of Michel Doucet and Angélique Pitre, probably at Le Havre.  In the early 1770s, the couple and three of their children were part of the settlement scheme in Poitou.  Daughter Marguerite-Bénoni was born at Cenan, near Châtellerault.  When the venture failed after two years of effort, the Doucets retreated to the port city of Nantes with dozens of other Poitou Acadians.  Meanwhile, Jean Cousin may have remarried to fellow island Acadian Thérèse Savary at St.-Malo in c1775.  If so, he would have been in his late 50s at the time of the wedding.  Two sons--Louis-Mathurin-Jean and Jean-François--were born to the couple at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo in June 1776 and June 1780. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  If he was still alive, Jean Cousin did not take up the offer.  Daughter Marie-Blanche and her husband Michel, however, jumped at the chance, but they almost did not make it to Spanish Louisiana.  They booked passage aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships that left France in 1785, but for some reason they did not cross on that vessel.  Marie-Blanche, now age 37, husband Michel Doucet, age 45, and three of their children, ages 17, 12, and 9, crossed to Louisiana aboard La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships of 1785, which did not reach New Orleans until December.  Michel made his living as a sailor, so he and Marie-Blanche chose to settle with some of their fellow passengers at Nueva Gálvez or San Bernardo in what is now St. Bernard Parish, below New Orleans.  San Bernardo had been settled by Isleños from the Canary Islands six years earlier, and the population of the settlement remained largely Isleños even after a dozen Acadian families settled there.  

Marie-Blanche Cousin was the only member of the Acadian branch of her family to emigrate Louisiana.  The Cousins of South Louisiana, then, are not Acadians but French Creoles or Foreign French.20

Darembourg

Pierre Darembourg, born probably in France in c1692 and no kin to the other Darembourgs in greater Acadia, married Marie, daughter of Louis Mazerolle dit Saint-Louis and Geneviève Forest of Annapolis Royal, at Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, in c1722.  They settled at nearby Petit-Dégrat before moving on to Havre-St.-Pierre on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, where Pierre died in May 1742.  Pierre and Marie had at least six children, all born in the French Maritimes--Marie-Josèphe in c1727, Geneviève in c1730, Anne in March 1734, Jean-Baptiste in October 1736, and Jacques in October 1739.  Daughter Marie-Josèphe married Jacques dit Jacqui, son of François Langlois and Madeleine Comeau of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, and Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, and widower of Madeleine Prétieux, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre, in April 1744.  In 1752, a French official counted Marie Mazerolle with her second husband, Parisian Étienne-Charles Philippe dit La Roque, at nearby Rivière-du-Nord-Est.  With them were two of Marie's Darembourg sons (called Du Rambour):  Jean-Baptiste, age 15; and Jacques, age 13. 

Living on an island controlled by France, the Acadians of Île St.-Jean escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia during the autumn of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up the majority of the Acadians on the two Maritime islands and deported them to France.  Pierre Darembourg's family ended up at Cherbourg in Normandy, where son Jean-Baptiste married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Henry and Claire Hébert of Grand-Pré, in May 1759.  Jean-Baptiste worked as a navigator, sailor, and day laborer.  He and Madeleine had at least four children in France--Jean-Baptiste, fils, born in c1761; Marie-Madeleine in c1762; Jean-Pierre in c1765; and Marie-Jeanne in c1768.  Jean-Pierre died at Cherbourg in August 1771; he was only six years old.  Soon after his death, Jean-Baptiste and Madeleine joined the hundreds of Acadians who ventured to the Poitou region of France to settle on a nobleman's land.  After two miserable years of failure, Jean-Baptiste and his family, with most of the other Poitou Acadians, abandoned the settlement and retreated to the port city of Nantes, where they endured as best they could the indignities of life in the mother country.  In February 1781, son Jean-Baptiste, fils died at age 20 in Chantenay, a suburb of Nantes.  At about that time, older daughter Marie-Madeleine married Jean-Pierre, son of François Lirette and Michaela Chaillou of Nantes, probably in that city.  Jean-Baptiste's older sister Marie-Josèphe died by c1772, when her husband remarried.  One wonders what was the fate of Jean-Baptiste's other siblings during Le Grand Dérangement.  Was the Jacques Duborg of Île St.-Jean, age 21, counted at Sinnamary, Cayenne, South America, in March 1765 the son of Pierre of Île St.-Jean?

In the early 1780s, when the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, some of the Île St.-Jean Darembourgs took up the offer.  In September 1785, Jean-Baptiste Darembourg, now 61, wife Madeleine Henry, age 45, and daughter Marie-Jeanne, age 18, reached New Orleans aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships from France.  After a brief respite in the city, they followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marie-Jeanne married Joseph, fils, son of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and his first wife Marguerite Richard, at Lafourche in April 1786.  Joseph also had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi.  Jean-Baptiste and Madeleine's older daughter, Marie-Madeleine Darembourg, age 23, and two of her daughters, Marie-Jeanne Lirette, age 2, and Rose-Adélaïde Lirette, still an infant, also sailed to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, but Marie-Madeleine's husband, Jean-Pierre Lirette, did not accompany them.  He came to the colony on a later ship, and they also settled on the upper bayou.  

When Jean-Baptiste Darembourg and Madeleine Henry emigrated to Louisiana in 1785, they were too old to have any more children.  Their only two sons--Jean-Baptiste, fils and Jean-Pierre--lay buried in France.  Except for its blood, then, the Acadian branch of the Darembourg family did not survive in the Bayou State.  

This humble Acadian family should not be confused with another family in Louisiana whose name was similar.  The aristocratic Darenbourg or D'Arensbourg family from Sweden lived on Louisiana's German Coast.  The progenitor of the family, Karl Frederick Darensbourg, commanded the German districts from the 1720s to the late 1760s, decades before the Acadian Darembourgs reached the colony. The Darembourgs of South Louisiana, then, are either German-Swedish Creole, French Creole, or Foreign French, not Acadia.21

Darois

Jérôme Darois, born in Paris in c1670, arrived in Acadia by 1698, the year he married Marie, daughter of Dominique Gareau and Marie Gaudet, and widow of ____ Lachapelle, at Port-Royal.  They moved to the Minas Basin.  In 1706, during Queen Anne's War, the British held Jérôme as a prisoner in Boston, Massachusetts.  After the war, he returned to his home at Minas.  The couple and their children moved to Petitcoudiac, probably to put even more distance between themselves and British authorities at Annapolis Royal.  Jérôme and Marie had 10 children, half of them sons.  Their five daughters married into the Trahan, Breau, Gaudet, Saulnier, and Pitre families.  On two, perhaps three, of their sons married.  Oldest son Jean, born at Port-Royal in c1700, married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Breau and Marguerite Babin of Pigiguit, probably at Minas in c1722.  He moved his family to Petitcoudiac with the rest of the clan.  Pierre-Jérôme, born at Port-Royal in c1701, never married.  Étienne, born at Port-Royal in c1703, married Anne Breau, sister of older brother Jean's wife Marguerite, in c1725, and settled probably at Minas.  Paul, born in Boston, Massachusetts, in February 1706 while his father was being held prisoner by the English, never married.  Youngest son Joseph, born at Grand-Pré in October 1711, also never married.  Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault insists that Jérôme and Marie also had a son named Simon, born in c1725 probably at Petitcoudiac, who married Anne Thibodeau in c1746.  According to Arsenault, Simon remarried to Jeanne, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Leduc, in c1760.  Meanwhile, Jérôme, père died at Petitcoudiac in c1750, around 80 years of age.  

Le Grand Dérangement of 1755 scattered this family to the winds.  Marie Gareau, Jérôme Darois's widow, was in her late 70s when the British deported her to Virginia in the autumn of 1755.  The colony's governor, Robert Dinwiddie, refused to allow the 1,500 Acadians sent to him to remain in the colony.  Many of the exiles died on the filthy, crowded ships anchored in Hampton Roads while the Virginia authorities pondered their fate; Marie Gareau was one of them.  In the spring of 1756, Virginia authorities deported the surviving Acadian to various ports in England, where they were treated like common criminals for seven long years.  At least two of Marie Gareau's married daughters--Ursule Darois, wife of Sylvestre Trahan; and Madeleine Darois, wife of Alexis Trahan--ended up at Liverpool, England.  Madeleine's husband Alexis died in exile, and she remarried to Claude, son of Marc Pitre and Sébastien Brun, and widower of Élisabeth Guérin, at Liverpool in May 1760.  Marie Gareau's son Étienne Darois and his wife Anne Breau also had been exiled to Virginia.  With them were son Étienne, fils, born in c1738, and daughter Élisabeth.  They, too, were deported to Liverpool.  Élisabeth married Pierre, fils, son of Pierre Trahan and Madeleine Comeau, and widower of Marguerite LeBlanc, at Liverpool in February 1758 but died, probably from the rigors of childbirth, by May 1760, when her husband remarried.  Étienne, fils married Madeleine Trahan probably at Liverpool in c1759.  Their daughter Élisabeth, or Isabelle, was born probably at Liverpool in c1761. 

Étienne Darois, fils, his wife, his daughter, and his paternal aunts, along with hundreds of other Acadians in England, were repatriated to France in the spring of 1763 after the war with Britain finally ended.  Étienne, fils's parents, Étienne, père and Anne Breau, probably had died in England.  In France, Étienne, fils became a tanner.  He and wife Madeleine lived in St.-Martin Parish, Morlaix, in Brittany.  At least five children were born to them there:  Simon-François in November 1766, Marie-Madeleine in June 1767, Susanne in October 1778, Anne-Françoise in July 1771, and Marie-Anne-Louise in August 1773.  In 1773, Étienne took his family to the Poitou region as part of a settlement scheme in which he and hundreds of other Acadians worked on land owned by a powerful French nobleman.  In Poitou, Étienne and Madeleine had another daughter, Rose, born at Pouthume, Châtellerault, in August 1775, but she died only five weeks after her birth.  When the Poitou venture collapsed that year, Étienne, his wife, and two surviving daughters retreated with the majority of the Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where they survived as best they could.  They settled at Chantenay, a suburb of Nantes, where at least three other children were born to them:  Marie-Élisabeth was baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in September 1776, Joseph-Étienne was born in September 1780 but died at age 1 in September 1781, and Jacques-Étienne was baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in March 1783 but died at age 11 months in February 1784.  In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a better life in faraway Louisiana.  By then, Étienne, fils's son Simon-François and daughter Marie-Anne-Louise also had died.  Étienne, fils and wife Madeleine, fed up with life in the mother country, prepared to join their cousins on the lower Mississippi.  

After repatriation to Morlaix, France, in 1763, Étienne, fils's aunts, Ursule and Madeleine Darois, followed their husbands and other Acadians from England to Belle-Île-en-Mer, off the southern coast of Brittany.  Madeleine's second husband, Claude Pitre, died at Sauzon on the island in March 1775.  When the Spanish government made its offer in the early 1780s, Ursule Darois did not have the opportunity to go to Louisiana.  She had died at Sauzon in December 1776, in her early 50s.  Husband Sylvestre Trahan refused to go to the Spanish colony and died at Belle-Île-en-Mer in 1786, the year after his fellow Acadians sailed to New Orleans.  His children remained on Belle-Île-en-Mer, where French officials counted some of them in 1792.  Members of Madeleine Darois's family--perhaps Madeleine herself--were counted by French officials at Sauzon in 1792, so they, too, remained in the mother country.  Her son Paul Trahan from her first marriage died on the island in 1826, in his mid-70s.

In North America, some of Jérôme Darois and Marie Gereau's children managed to escape the British in 1755 and move on to Canada.  Son Pierre-Jérôme died there in September 1757, age 56.  He did not marry.  Jérôme and Marie's oldest son Jean died there also, in December of the same year; he was 57 years old.  Jean's descendants, some of them spelling their surname Deroy, settled at L'Islet, on the St. Lawrence below Québec City.  Descendants of Simon Darois settled at Bécancour and Trois-Rivières, on the river above Québec. 

At least two Daroiss--Jérôme and Marie's oldest daughter, Isabelle, wife of Sylvain Breau; and Pierre, son of Jean Darois and Marguerite Breau of Petitcoudiac and Isabelle's nephew--also escaped the British in 1755, but they did not go to Canada.  In the late 1750s or early 1760s, perhaps as part of the Acadian resistance in present-day southeastern New Brunswick, they surrendered to British forces and were imprisoned at Halifax with hundreds of other Acadians.  Pierre "married" Marie, daughter of Paul Bourgeois, probably in the prison compound on Georges Island at Halifax in the early 1760s.  After the war with Britain finally ended, the Acadians being held in Nova Scotia had a serious dilemma on their hands.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  In the case of the Acadians, however, this meant that they could return only to French soil.  Petitcoudiac was now a part of British territory.  British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, as some of the Saulniers were about to do, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all that they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland. 

Isabelle Darois, Jérôme and Marie's oldest daughter, and her second husband, Sylvain Breau, followed the Broussard party from Halifax to the lower Mississippi Valley via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue.  They reached New Orleans in February 1765 and followed the Broussards across the Atchafalaya Basin to the Attakapas District, where they helped establish La Nouvelle-Acadie on the banks of Bayou Teche.  Isabelle was 66 when she reached New Orleans; Sylvain was 52.  They lasted only six months on the Teche.  In October 1765, Isabelle and Sylvain died two days apart, victims of an epidemic that killed dozens of their fellow Acadians that spring, summer, and fall.  Isabelle and Sylvain were buried au dernier camp d'en bas (at the camp lower down), near present-day Loreauville.  

Isabelle's nephew Pierre Darois, age 28, and wife Marie Bourgeois, age 30, also came to Louisiana from Halifax with the Broussards.  Marie was pregnant when they reached New Orleans in February.  Later that month, son Michel was born in the city and baptized there on the same day.  Before they moved on Bayou Teche in late April, Pierre and Marie sanctified their marriage in front of a New Orleans priest.  Spanish officials counted Pierre and Marie still on the Teche in April 1766.  Son Michel was not with them, however, so he, too, probably had died in the epidemic of 1765.  Pierre and wife Marie did not remain on Bayou Teche but moved to Cabahannocer, on the river above New Orleans, in c1770.  Spanish officials counted Pierre, now 40, and Marie, now 42, with other Acadians on the right, or west, bank of the river there in January 1777.  Evidently after the death of son Michel, they had no more children in Louisiana.

The last of the Acadian Daroiss to come to Louisiana arrived 20 years after their cousins had reached the colony.  Étienne Darois, fils, now age 47, wife Madeleine Trahan, age 45, and their four surviving daughters--Élisabeth, age 24, Marie-Madeleine, age 18, Susanne, age 13, and Marie-Élisabeth, age 8--sailed aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in September 1785.  After a brief recuperating period in the city, they followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche and then moved down bayou to what became Lafourche Interior Parish, where Étienne died in November 1833, a widower; the priest who recorded his burial said that Étienne was 106 years old when he died, but he was "only" 95.  Strangely, daughter Marie-Madeleine died on the very same day her father died, also in Lafourche Interior Parish; she was 65 years old.  Meanwhile, Étienne's oldest daughter Élisabeth married widower François, son of fellow Acadians Honoré Duhon and Anne-Marie Vincent, at Lafourche in April 1786, but he died soon after the marriage.  Étienne's youngest daughter Marie-Élisabeth, called Babet as well as Élisabeth, married Joseph-Marie, son of fellow Acadians Jean-Charles Boudreaux and his first wife Agnès Trahan, at Lafourche in May 1791, when she was only 14 years old.  Her husband also died not long after the marriage.  Daughter Susanne married Fabien-Isaac, son of fellow Acadians Joseph Aucoin and his first wife Marie-Josèphe Hébert of St.-Malo, at Assumption in April 1799.  The following November, Étienne, fils's daughter Marie-Madeleine married Mathurin-Jean, brother of sister Susanne's husband Fabrien Aucoin, the same day their youngest sister Marie-Élisabeth remarried to Jean-Marie, son of fellow Acadians Grégoire Benoit and Marie-Rose Carret.  Jean-Marie, like Marie-Élisabeth and his Aucoin brothers-in-law, also had been born in France.  

Pierre Darois's only son Michel died young.  Étienne Darois, fils brought no sons to Louisiana, and he fathered none after he got there.  As a result, the Acadian branch of this family, except for its blood, did not take root in the Bayou State.  The Daroiss of South Louisiana are descendants of French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.22

De Goutin de Ville

From the late 1680s to 1710, the de Goutins were a privileged family in Acadia.  Mathieu, the family's progenitor, was second only to the governor in power and influence; at one time, he held four important positions--chief judge of civil and criminal matters, counselor, colonial secretary, and paymaster--and in 1691 he was granted a seigneur on the Atlantic side of peninsula Acadia.  He complained at one point that he had "no set time for drinking and eating, (for) I am more busy on feast days and Sundays than on working days, (because) the settlers use these days to conduct their business when they come to Mass."  One of those settlers was Pierre Thibodeau.  When de Goutin married one of Thibodeau's daughters, the young official established a lasting connection with a significant number of settlers, from Port-Royal all the way around to the upper Fundy settlements.  One Acadian governor complained that it would be difficult for de Goutin to render an objective judgment in many civil and criminal cases "because a third of the settlers are related to his wife."  De Goutin may have been, in fact, the only colonial official that the Acadians trusted to look after their best interests.  His long career in Acadia ended with Britain's final seizure of Port-Royal in 1710.  Although de Goutin was given an important position on Île Royale, now Cape Breton Island, when the French established a colony there in 1714, he died within a year of his appointment.  His wife and children--they had 13 of them--remained on Île Royale.  De Goutin's oldest son, François-Marie, also became a colonial official, on Île Royale and Île St.-Jean, and was nearly as highly placed as his father had been at Port-Royal. 

It was de Goutin's youngest son, Joseph de Ville, who was the first Acadian native to emigrate to Louisiana.  In August 1732, Joseph came to Louisiana as a young lieutenant, having served five years in the King's Musketeers.  He was promoted to captain in October 1736, at age 31.  In 1747, at age 42, he married a local Creole girl, Marie, daughter of Jean Caron and Marie-Anne Monique, only in her teens, and they remained in the colony after he retired from military service.  By the early 1750s, Joseph was an officer in the colonial militia and "settled (in business)" at New Orleans.  He fathered at least eight children, including five sons, all born at New Orleans. 

Joseph de Ville's kinship with many of his fellow Acadians may have been a factor in so many of them coming to Louisiana.  Scholars note that Olivier Landry of Chignecto, whom the British had deported to Georgia, was a kinsman of the de Goutins (Olivier's paternal grandmother, Marie Thibodeau, was Joseph de Ville's mother's older sister).  As the story goes, while Olivier and his family languished at Savannah at the end of the final war with Britain, they somehow communicated with their cousin in New Orleans, who informed them that the French authorities in Louisiana would welcome Acadians there. The Landrys and three other families--the Cormiers, Poiriers, and Richards, 21 in all--left Savannah for Louisiana via Mobile in December 1763 and reached New Orleans the following February--the first recorded Acadian families in Louisiana.  Olivier and Joseph may have enjoyed a tearful reunion, and it would be no surprise if Joseph was kin to other members of the party as well (de Goutin's eldest son Jean-Baptiste De Ville, only 12 years old, served as godfather for 3-year-old Jean-Baptiste, one of Jean Poirier's sons, soon after the party reached New Orleans).  Olivier, Jean, and their fellow exiles went on to Cabahannocer, on the river above the city, and sent word out by the remarkable Acadian grapevine that the French authorities in Louisiana had indeed welcomed them to the colony.  Exactly a year later, in February 1765, the first large contingent of Acadian exiles, 200 men, women, and children led by resistance fighter Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil (another kinsman of Joseph de Goutin de Ville; Broussard's wife, now deceased, was a niece of Joseph de Ville's mother), reached New Orleans from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, and settled on Bayou Teche, not far from a land grant held by Joseph de Ville.  Hundreds more Acadians came from Halifax later that year, and more from Maryland in the next four years. 

It is possible, then, that Joseph de Goutin de Ville, the first Acadian in Louisiana, played a significant role in his kinsmen's mass migration to the lower Mississippi valley.  Joseph de Ville's contribution was so significant, in fact, that Acadian genealogist/historian Stephen A. White calls him "the Godfather of the New Acadia in Louisiana."  White adds that during the October 1768 Creole-led rebellion against the unpopular Spanish Governor Antonio de Ulloa, the Acadians who participated in the uprising rallied at Joseph de Goutin's home in New Orleans, evidence that the "first Acadian" remained close to his fellow Acadiennes, at least for political purposes. 

Of Joseph de Ville's five sons, only the fourth one, Joseph, fils, born in June 1761, created a family of his own.  The younger Joseph used the surname Bellechasse or Villechasse, served from a young age in the Spanish army and, in his mid-30s, secrued his place in the colony's French-Creole elite.  He married Marie-Josèphe-Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of Étienne Lalande d'Alcour and Adélaïde Oliver de Vézin, at New Orleans in October 1797.  His wife's maternal grandfather, Pierre-François Olivier du Closel de Vézin, a native of Maine, Lorraine, France, had lived at Trois-Rivières, Canada, before moving to New Orleans, where he served as royal councilor and chief surveyor and inspector of colonial roads during the French regime.  Her maternal uncle, Charles-Honoré-Hughes Olivier de Vézin, served as regidor of New Orleans during the Spanish period and moved his family to Bayou Teche in the 1790s.  As a lieutenant in the Fixed Spanish infantry regiment of Louisiana, Joseph, fils served as commandant of Spanish Fort San Fernando de las Barrancas at present-day Memphis, Tennessee, in 1796-97; commanded the Feliciana District as a captain in 1798; and, as a colonel, commanded the Louisiana militia from December 1803 to 1805.  After leaving military service, Joseph, fils became a successful New Orleans businessman.  In 1805, he was elected an alderman and city recorder in the municipal council at New Orleans.  In 1806, he served as president of the city council, recorder, and judge for the Orleans Territory.  He was a member of the legislative council of the territorial General Assembly in 1806-07, served as president of the legislative council in 1810, and was appointed to the administrative council of New Orleans Charity Hospital in 1811.  The following year, he became a member of Louisiana's first constitutional convention and so helped create the Pelican State.  Meanwhile, his daughter Marie Thérèse Charlotte was baptized at New Orleans in December 1806, son Jacques Émile Adolphe was born in June 1808, daughter Marie Josèphe Céleste in January 1810, and son Jean Louis in August 1814, on the eve of the family's emigration to Spanish Cuba.  In c1815, Joseph, fils moved his family to a sugar plantation in Matanzas province, Cuba, and served in the Spanish militia there.  In May 1830, when he would have been in late 60s, records show him serving as a lieutenant colonel in the Matanzas infantry, "probably indicating his last years were spent under the flag he had served for most of his active career."  By then, the family's name disappears from South Louisiana records.23

De La Forestrie

Joseph LaForest, born at Angers, France, in c1690, reached Havre-St.-Pierre, on the north shore of Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in c1722.  In c1726, he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Guyon Chiasson dit La Vallée and his second wife Marie-Madeleine Martin of Chignecto and widow of Jean Pothier, probably at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre.  Joseph and Marie had three sons, all born at Havre-St.-Pierre, but only one of them seems to have fathered sons of his own.  Oldest son Étienne, born in c1727, probably died young.  Joseph, fils, born in June 1728, married Susanne, daughter of Pierre dit Cadet Robichaud and Susanne Brassaud of Cobeguit, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in July 1753.  Susanne gave him a daughter, Anne, born at Havre-St.-Pierre in August 1754.  In  November 1756, Joseph, fils remarried to Marie-Anne, daughter of Jean-Baptiste-Abel Duvivier and Marie-Madeleine Caissie, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord.  She gave him another daughter, Marie-Madeleine, born at Havre-St.-Pierre in December 1757.  Joseph and Marie's youngest son Jean, born in c1732, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Bonnière and Madeleine-Josèphe Forest of Pigiguit and Île St.-Jean, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in November 1752.  Jean and Marie-Madeleine had five daughters but no sons.  In August 1752, a French official counted Marie Chiasson, age 60, widow of Joseph La Foresterie, and her unnmarried sons Joseph, fils, said to be age 22, and Jean, age 20, on the road from Havre-St.-Pierre to Havre-aux-Sauvages.  The official noted that Marie had lived on the island for 30 years. 

When Le Grand Dérangement erupted in the fall of 1755, the Acadians on Île St.-Jean, living in territory controlled by France, escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  Joseph, fils, his second wife, and his two daughters, Anne and Marie-Madeleine, reached St.-Malo, France, from "other ports" in 1760.  They settled at Plouër, near St.-Malo, where Marie-Anne died by 1761, when Joseph remarried again at nearby LaGouesniere in August 1761.  His third wife was Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Duboscq and Suzanne Lemerciere of Rouen.  The Duboscqs also had lived on Île St.-Jean and endured the deportation to France.  Madeleine gave Joseph at least four more children, most of them born at Plouër:  son Jean-Charles-Joseph, born in January 1763; twins Jean-Joseph and Jeanne-Charlotte, born in April 1766; and son Joseph, born in June 1777 at Rochefort.  Jean-Joseph died in August 1766, only three months old.  

Meanwhile, Joseph's younger brother Jean, age 28, whose surname was spelled La Foresterie on the passenger list, his wife Marie-Madeleine, age 25, and their daughters Jeanne, age 5, Marie-Rosalie, age 4, and Marguerite, age 6 months, also endured the crossing to France, aboard one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Jean, Marie-Madeleine, and two of their three daughters survived the crossing, but infant daughter Marguerite died at sea.  In France, two more daughters, twins Angélique-Madeleine-Marie and Renée-Laurence, were born to them in January 1760 at Plouër, where they settled near Jean's older brother Joseph and his family.  Angélique survived childhood, but her twin, Renée-Laurence, died at only 10 days old.  Jean's oldest daughter Jeanne married Joseph, son of Charles Hébert and Marguerite LeBlanc, at Plouër in July 1772.  Jean's wife Marie-Madeleine died by 1773, when he remarried to Michelle, daughter of Frenchman Julien Herve, at Plouër in February of that year.  Michelle gave him two more daughters and three sons, most of whom died young:  Paul-Michel, baptized at St.-Similien, Nantes, in January 1776, died at age 4 1/2 and was buried at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in June 1780; Marie-Madeleine, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in May 1778, died at age 14 months and was buried at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in July 1779; Jean-Michel was baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in June 1780; Jean-Marie-Michel, born in c1783 probably in Chantenay, died at age 6 1/2 and was buried at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in June 1780; and Marie-Adélaïde was baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in September 1785.  

In 1773, soon after his second marriage, Jean, his new wife, his two unmarried daughters by his first wife, Marie-Rosalie and Angélique, and daughter Jeanne and her family, went to Poitoiu.  (Jean's brother Joseph and his family remained at St.-Malo.)  After the Poitou venture failed, most of the Poitou Acadians, including Jean and his family, retreated with other Acadian families to Nantes.  Marie-Rosalie married Michel, son of fellow Acadians Pierre Aucoin and Marguerite Dupuis of Rivière-aux-Canards, at Nantes in July 1779.  Angélique married Moïse, son of Jean-Baptiste LeBlanc and Marguerite Bellemère, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in November 1780.  By then the family name had evolved from LaForest and LaForestrie to De La Forestrie

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Joseph De La Forestrie and his third wife Marie-Madeleine, as well as brother Jean and his second wife Michelle, chose to remain in France.  Not so Jean's married daughters.  The De La Forestrie sisters followed their husbands to Louisiana aboard two of the Seven Ships of 1785--Angélique and her family on the third ship, Le Beaumont, which reached New Orleans in August, and Jeanne and Marie-Rosalie and their families on the fourth ship, Le St.-Rémi, which arrived in September.  All three families chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Angélique may not even have survived the crossing to Louisiana.  Jeanne's husband, Joseph Hébert, died by January 1788, when she was listed in the Valenzuéla census as a widow.  She remarried to Sébastien, son of Augustin Benoit and Françoise Thériot, at Lafourche in August 1789.  Jeanne died by December 1795, when her husband was counted at Valenzuéla without a wife.  

No male De La Forestrie ventured to Louisiana, so the Acadian branch of the family did not take root in the Bayou State.  Its blood did survive, however, in several lines of the Aucoin, Hébert, and LeBlanc families.24

De La Mazière

Jean-Baptiste dit Ladouceur, son of François Massier and Marguerite Lemoine of Véraise, bishopric of Saintes, France, born in c1710, was a soldier in the troupes de la marine when he came to French Acadia.  He married Marie, daughter of François Poirier and Marie Haché dit Gallant of Chignecto, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in February 1737.  Jean-Baptiste and Marie had at least five children, all born on the island, including three sons:  Louis, born in c1737; Jean in c1742; and Jean-François, also called François, in c1746.  In August 1752, a French official counted François Mazierre, as he was called, then age 6, living with the family of Pierre Duval and Marie-Madeleine Haché dit Gallant on the south bank of Rivière-du-Nord-Est, Île St.-Jean.  Marie-Madeleine was young François's maternal great aunt. 

Living in territory controlled by France, the Mazières of Île St.-Jean escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France later that year.  The fate of Jean-Baptiste dit Ladouceur, his wife Marie, and most of their children has been lost to history.  But his son Jean-François--called François Maricre on the passenger roll, no age given, but he would have been only 11--made the terrible crossing to St.-Malo aboard the British transport Duke William with some of his maternal kin.  The vessel left the Maritimes in late August or early September and, after a mid-ocean accident, limped into St.-Malo the first of November.  The family François had been counted with at Rivière-du-Nord-Est on Île St.-Jean in August 1752--his maternal great aunt Marie-Madeleine Haché, her husband Pierre Duval, and five cousins--all died aboard the transport!  Only François and cousin Jacques Haché survived the terrible crossing. 

Jean-François De La Mazière, as he was called in France, settled at St.-Malo until July 1760, when French authorities granted him permission to move to Cherbourg.  He worked as a navigator, blacksmith, and carpenter to support himself.  Probably at Cherbourg, in c1768, he married Véronique, daughter of Acadian Jean Renaud dit Arnaud and Marie-Madeleine Pothier of Île St.-Jean.  Véronique also had come to France in 1758 but had gone directly to Cherbourg.  In the early 1770s, Jean-François and Véronique moved to the Poitou region as part of a new settlement scheme.  French authorities were tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on marginal land he owned near the city of Châtellerault.  The Acadians tried mightily to bring life to the rocky soil in this corner of Poitou.  Jean-François and Véronique's daughter Marguerite was baptized at La Chapelle-Roux, near Châtellerault, in July 1775.  They also had a son named Jean-François, fils, who may have been born in Cherbourg.  After two years of effort, the Acadians in Poitou gave up and demanded to be returned to the port cities.  In October 1775, Jean-François, père and his family retreated from Châtellerault to the port city of Nantes with other Acadians who had endured the Poitou venture.  They settled in the suburb of Chantenay, near Nantes, where at least four more children were born to them:  Jean-Baptiste was baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in April 1777, Louise-Cécile in November 1778, Rose-Jeanne in November 1781, and Marie in January 1783 but died the following June.  Two more of their children died at Chantenay:  Marguerite was 5 years old when she was buried at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in October 1780.  Older son Jean-François, fils seems also to have died there, though his date of death was unrecorded.  

When in the early 1780s the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Jean-François De La Mazière and his family agreed to take it.  Jean-François age 37, wife Véronique Renaud, age 37, and their three surviving children--Jean-Baptiste, age 8; Louise-Céleste, age 6; and Rose-Jeanne, age 4--sailed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which left Paimboeuf, the port for Nantes, in late August 1785 and reached New Orleans in early November.  During the crossing, another daughter was born to them in early October; they named her Martina, or Martine, after Louisiana's Spanish intendant, Martin Navarro, who treated the newly-arrived Acadians with sensitivity and respect. 

 Jean-François and his family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Martine may have died at Lafourche, or she may have died earlier, in New Orleans.  In any case, she was not counted with the family at Lafourche in January 1788.  Another daughter, Scholastique-Esther, was born to Jean-François and Véronique probably at Lafourche in c1791.  Jean-François's son and three of his daughters survived childhood and found mates of their own on the upper bayou.  First to marry was daughter Louise-Céleste, who married Louis, son of Jean Augeron and Marie-Louise Levron of Les Sables-d'Olonne, France, at Assumption in January 1800; Louis's mother may have been Acadian.  Next, son Jean-Baptiste married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Robichaux and his second wife Anne Hébert, and widow of Jean-François Rassicot, at Assumption in February 1800.  Younger daughter Rose Jeanne married Antoine, son of French Creole Antoine Ledet and Marguerite Vilic of St. John the Baptist Parish, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1811.  Rose Jeanne died in Lafourche Parish in May 1865, in her early 80s--one of the last of the Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join our ancestors.  Jean-François's youngest daughter Scholastique Esther married French Creole Pierre Lagarde and died in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1839, in her late 40s; one of her daughters married a son of former Louisiana governor Henry Schuyler Thibodaux

Jean-François's daughters had children of their own, but his son Jean Baptiste did not.  Jean Baptiste died in Lafourche Interior Parish in c1813; he was only in his mid-30s.  Jean François died in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1828; the Thibodauxville priest who recorded his burial said that Jean François died "at age 85 yrs."  His family line, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State.25

Dumont

Jean-Baptiste dit Dumont, son of carpenter René Dubois and Anne-Julienne Dumont of Montréal married Marie, daughter of André Simon dit Boucher and Marie Martin, at Port-Royal in May 1710.  Jean-Baptiste died at Grand-Pré in November 1713, but not before fathering a son, Joseph dit Dumont, born at Port-Royal in March 1712.  Joseph chose as his surname not Dubois but his father's dit and his paternal grandmother's surname, Dumont.  He followed his mother and stepfather, Dominque Viarrieu dit Duclos, to the French Maritimes and married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Vécot and Marie Chiasson, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord on Île St.-Jean in February 1739.  He and Marie-Madeleine had only daughters:  Anne, born in c1740, Marie-Madeleine in c1741, Marie in c1742, Marie-Josèphe in c1745, Hélène in c1747, and Susanne in c1751.  Wife Marie-Madeleine died in either the early or mid-1750s probably at St.-Pierre-du-Nord.  Joseph did not remarry. 

When the British deported the Acadians of Nova Scotia in the autumn of 1755, Joseph and his daughters, living in territory controlled by France, remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, British forces descended on Île St.-Jean, rounded up most of there Acadian habitants there, and deported them to France.  Joseph and three of his daughters--Anne, age 20; Marie, age 17; and Hélène, age 12--made the crossing aboard one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Joseph, age 46, died at sea, but his daughters survived the crossing.  

In France, Hélène Dumont grew up an orphan.  At age 20, she married Grégoire, son of fellow Acadians Jean Lejeune and Françoise Guédry, and widower of Charlotte Des Croutes, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in June 1767.  She gave Grégoire at least eight children, three sons and five daughters.  In the early 1770s, Hélène, Grégoire, and two of their daughters--Marie-Josèphe, born probably at St.-Servan in c1772; and Jeanne-Olive-Élisabeth, born in July 1772 at Pleurtuit, near St.-Malo--were part of an Acadian settlement in the Poitou region centered around the town of Châtellerault.  Daughter Geneviève was born at Châtellerault in May 1774, but she died the following August.  Jeanne-Olivier-Élisabeth died later that month; she was only 2 years old.  By December 1775, Grégoire and Hélène, along with many of their fellow Acadians, were done with the venture in Poitou.  They and surviving daughter Marie retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where Grégoire, a sailor, found work when he could.  Three sons were born to them at Chantenay, near Nantes, in c1778, February 1781, and February 1783, but the oldest son died at age 6 in March 1784.  Another daughter was born in October 1784 but died a month later, leaving them only two sons and a daughter.

About the time of their youngest daughter's death, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Hélène Dumont and her husband Grégoire Lejeune agreed to take it.  With three of their children--daughter Marie, age 14; son Grégoire-Alexis, called Alexis, born at Chantenay, near Nantes, in 1781; and son Julien, born in 1783--Hélène Dumont, age 38, and husband Grégoire Lejeune, age 45, sailed to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships of 1785, which reached New Orleans in July.  After a month of recuperation in the city, they followed their fellow passengers to the Acadian community at St.-Gabriel de Manchac, south of Baton Rouge.  They had no more children in Louisiana.  Hélène died in West Baton Rouge Parish in September 1815, in her late 60s.  Grégoire outlived her by 11 years, dying in July 1826, in his late 80s.  He never remarried.

Since Hélène was the only member of her family to make it to Louisiana, the Dumonts of South Louisiana are French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.  Only the blood of the Acadian Dumonts survived in the Bayou State, as did the blood of the Vecos of Île St.-Jean, through Hélène and her children by Grégoire Lejeune.26

Duplessis

Surgeon Claude-Antoine, son of Claude Duplessis and Marie Derivi of St.-Jean de St.-Quentin, Noyons, Picardy, France, was born in c1710.  He reached Acadia by September 1736, when he married Catherine, daughter of Pierre Lejeune and Marie Thibodeau, and widow of Antoine Lanoue, at Grand-Pré, in the Minas Basin.  Catherine was eight years older than her surgeon husband and a granddaughter of Pierre Thibodeau of Pré Ronde and Chepoudy.  In the 1740s, Sr. Claude-Antoine moved his family to Chignecto, and they were there in 1750 when Canadian soldiers and Abbé Le Loutre's Mi'kmaq burned the villages east of Rivière Missaguash to drive the Acadians into French-controlled territory west of that stream.  Claude-Antoine and Catherine moved on to Port-Lajoie on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in the early 1750s probably to escape the chaos at Chignecto.  In 1752, a French official counted the family at Havre St.-Pierre, on the north side of the island.  Their children were Anastasie-Adélaïde, born at Grand-Pré in June 1737; Marie-Louise in April 1839; and François-Marin, born probably at Chignecto in c1749.  With them was orphan Louis Labauve, age 12, native of Acadia's Atlantic coast.

Living on an island controlled by France, Claude-Antoine Duplessis and his family escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia during the autumn of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  Claude-Antoine, now age 49, Catherine, age 60, François-Marin, age 9, and a 16-year-old surgeon's apprentice made the crossing on one of the Five Ships that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  For some reason, Anastasie-Adélaïde, age 21, was not with them.  Claude-Antoine and Catherine survived the crossing, but their son died at sea.  The apprentice, Louis Labauve, called La Bore, son of René, on the ship's passenger list, died in a hospital probably at St.-Malo several months after they reached the port city.  Claude-Antoine and Catherine settled first at Chateauneuf, at the far eastern edge of Brittany, then moved to St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in 1762.  A year later, they moved to nearby St.-Servan, where Claude-Antoine died in September 1772; he was 62 years old.  

Meanwhile, Claude-Antoine's younger daughter, Marie-Louise, had married Pierre, fils, son of Pierre Gautrot and Marie Bugeaud of Grand-Pre, on Île St.-Jean in c1758.  They, too, fell into the hands of the British later that year and were deported to France aboard one of the Five Ships.  Pierre, age 27, and Marie-Louise, age 18, survived the crossing, she despite her pregnancy.  Their son Nicolas was born probably at St.-Malo in March 1759, two months after they reached the city, but he died a few months later.  Pierre worked as a farm hand and a carpenter in France.  He and Marie-Louise had at least 10 more children in the mother country, four sons and six daughters, born between 1761 and 1778.  Most of them died young, two of them, at ages 9 and 4, when the family was part of the settlement effort in the Poitou region.  French authorities were tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on marginal land he owned in Poitou near the city of Châtellerault.  In the early 1770s, the Acadians, including Pierre Gautrot and his family, tried mightily to bring to life the rocky soil in this corner of the region.  After two years of effort, the Acadians gave up and demanded to be returned to the port cities.  In December 1775, Pierre, Marie-Louise, four of their children, and Marie-Louise's widowed mother, Catherine Lejeune, retreated from Châtellerault to Nantes with other Poitou Acadians.  There they lived as best they could in a mother country that paid little attention to its neglected Acadian children.  

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Marie-Louise Duplessis and her husband Pierre Gautrot agreed to take it.  They made the journey to Louisiana in the spring and summer of 1785 aboard Le Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships from France.  Only daughter Marguerite-Adélaïde Gautrot, called Adélaïde, age 9, accompanied them; all of their other children had been buried in France.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche with most of the other passengers from La Bergère.  Daughter Adélaïde married a French Creole, François, fils, son of François  Friou and his Acadian wife Susanne Robichaux, at Lafourche in February 1792.  Pierre and Marie-Louise had no other children.  Marie-Louise died in Assumption Parish in January 1808, age 68. 

Frenchmen named Dupleci and Duplessiss were living in colonial Louisiana as early as the late 1740s.  They became especially numerous at New Orleans by the 1770s.  Marie-Louise Duplessis of Grand-Pré was the only member of her family to emigrate to Louisiana.  Except for its blood, then, the Acadian branch of this family did not survive in the Bayou State.  The many Duplessiss of South Louisiana are descended from French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.27

Durel

Charles Lacroix dit Durel, born in c1705, son of Pierre Lacroix and Jeanne Deville of St.-Denis-Le-Gast, Coutances, France, came to Acadia by September 1730, when he married Judith, daughter of Gabriel Chiasson of Chignecto, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island.  Judith gave him a son and five daughters, all born at St.-Pierre-du-Nord:  twins Marie-Élisabeth and Marguerite, born in September 1731; Anne-Marie in January 1734; Marie-Judith, called Judith, in August 1736; Charles, fils in February 1739; and Charlotte-Anne in November1741.  

At least three of Charles and Judith's daughters married.  Anne-Marie married Charles, son of Noël Pinet and Rose Henry of Minas, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in April 1753.  Marguerite, married Joseph, fils, son of Joseph Préjean and Marie-Louise Comeau, probably at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in c1758.  And Marie-Judith married Jean Daigle probably at St.-Pierre-du-Nord.  They tended to use as their surname their father's dit

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this family to the winds.  Living in territory controlled by France, the Lacroix dit Durels and other Acadians on Île St.-Jean remained unmolested by the British roundup in Nova Scotia during the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  In late 1758, after the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July, the victorious British swooped down on the island, rounded up most of the Acadians, and deported them to France.  Marguerite and Joseph managed to elude the British dragnet and escape north either to Miramichi on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore or to Restigouche, at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Anne-Marie and Charles, as well as Marie-Judith and Jean, ended up on a crowded ship that took them to Cherbourg, France. 

In the late 1750s or early 1760s, Marguerite Durel and her husband Joseph Préjean ended up as prisoners of war at Fort Edward, formerly Pigiguit, Nova Scotia, with dozens of other Acadians whom the British had captured in the region.  Daughter Victoire was born in Nova Scotia in c1761.  When the war with Britain finally ended, Marguerite and Joseph chose to accompany the majority of their fellow prisoners to the Mississippi Valley, where they could start a new life away from the hated British.  

Meanwhile, in France, Marguerite's younger sister Anne-Marie and her husband, Charles Pinet dit Pinel, had at least five children:  Louis, born at Cherbourg in c1763, Marie-Modeste in c1765, Marie-Madeleine in c1771, Martin-Charles at La Chapelle-Roux in January 1775, and another daughter whose name has been lost to history.  Marie-Judith and her husband Jean Daigle, who worked as a fisherman, had at least three children in Cherbourg:  Jean-Baptiste, born in December 1759, Charles-Lazare in August 1761, and Firmin in April 1763.  

La Chapelle-Roux, where Anne-Marie's son Martin-Charles was born, is in the Poitou region of France, so she and Charles evidently participated in the attempt to settle Acadians on a nobleman's land in the Poitou region.  After two years of effort, the venture failed, at least for them.  By the early 1780s, they were living in the seaport city of Nantes, subsisting on government handouts and surviving as best they could.  Daughter Marie-Modeste married Jean-Baptiste-Charles, son of fellow Acadians Charles Haché and Marie Hébert, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in November 1784.  

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Charles and Anne-Marie agreed to take it.  Jean and Marie-Judith did not go, but one of their sons, Jean-Baptiste Daigle, probably made the trip in 1785. 

Marguerite Durel, her husband Joseph Préjean, and two of their children--Victoire, age 4, and Jean-Baptiste, fils, in utero--were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  They came to the colony with other prisoners from Nova Scotia, reaching New Orleans in 1765 via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue.  They settled at the Acadian community of Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before.  Joseph died by the early 1770s, and, in June 1772, Marguerite remarried to Joseph, fils, sons of fellow Acadians Joseph Bourg and François Dugas, and widower of Anne-Marguerite Léger and Marie LeBlanc.  They remained at St.-Jacques, where Marguerite bore two more daughters.

Twenty years after Marguerite came to Louisiana, her younger sister Anne-Marie, husband Charles Pinet dit Pinel, and three of their children--Louis, age 22; Marie-Madeleine, age 14; and Marie-Modeste, age 20, who came with her husband Jean-Baptiste-Charles Haché and his family--sailed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in November 1785.  After a brief respite in the city, they followed the majority of their fellows passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, not far from St.-Jacques.  After 27 years of separation, the Lacroix dit Durel sisters of Île St.-Jean finally were reunited.  

Since only female members of this family came to Louisiana, and since they used their father's dit, not his surname Lacroix, the Durel families in the Bayou State are French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.  The blood of Charles Lacroix dit Durel has survived, however, in lines of the Achee, Bourg, Daigle, Pinet, and Prejean families.28

Flan

Jean-François Flan of Paris, France, married Marie, daughter of Michel Dupuis and Marie Gautrot, at Port-Royal in January 1706.  Jean-François served as clerk for the Port-Royal fortifications--commis des fortifications--and for a time oversaw the rebuilding of the town's defenses.  In June 1714, after the British took over the colony, Jean-François was among a number of Acadians who went to Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, to look at land there.  Evidently he did not move to Île Royale but remained at Port-Royal, which the British had renamed Annapolis Royal.  Jean-François eventually moved his family to Rivière-aux-Canards in the Minas Basin probably to put more distance between himself and the British authorities at Annapolis.  He and his wife had five children, including a son, François-Marie, born at Port-Royal in May 1709, who does not seem to have lived long enough to create a family of his own.  

Three of their daughters married, however, so the blood of the Parisian Flans survived in Acadia in two of the colony's largest families.  Oldest daughter Marie-Josèphe, at age 22, married Charles, son of André LeBlanc and Marie Dugas, at Grand-Pré in October 1730.  Third daughter Anne, at age 20, married Alexandre, son of Abraham Landry and Marie Guilbeau, at Grand-Pré in February 1732.  And youngest daughter Marguerite, at age 18, married Abraham dit Petit-Abram Landry, widower of Élisabeth LeBlanc and brother of her older sister Anne's husband, probably at Grand-Pré in c1746.

In the fall of 1755, British forces deported Jean-François Flan's second daughter, Anne, her husband Alexandre Landry, and their children to Maryland, where Alexandre died in the late 1750s or early 1760s.  Jean-François's youngest daughter, Marguerite, her husband Abraham dit Petit-Abram Landry, and their children, some from his first marriage, also ended up in Maryland.  In July 1763, colonial officials counted the widowed Anne and six of her children, four sons and two daughters, with other Acadians at Baltimore.  Marguerite and her family, including 10 children, were counted at the same time at Oxford, on Maryland's Eastern Shore.  Marguerite died in Maryland in the mid-1760s, in her late 40s, leaving her husband Petit-Abraham a widower again.  When word reached the Acadians in Maryland that they would be welcome in French Louisiana, they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them south to New Orleans.  Petit-Abram Landry and nine of his children, six of them from second wife Marguerite Flan, were among the first of the Maryland Acadians to emigrate to Louisiana, in 1766. 

In April 1767, Anne Flan, still a widow (she never remarried), left Baltimore for Louisiana with most of her children and 200 other Acadian exiles.  They reached New Orleans in July and settled at St.-Gabriel d'Iberville on the river above the city.  Anne was the only Acadian Flan to find refuge in Louisiana.  The Acadian branch of this family, then, did not take root in the Bayou State.  However, its blood did survive in two lines of the Landry family that settled on the Acadian Coast.29

Fouquet

Charles, fils, son of Charles Fouquet and Claude Duvivier of St.-Jean-de-la-Roise, Avranches, Normandy, France, born in c1702, came to Acadia in c1722.  He married Marie-Judith, daughter of Étienne Poitevin dit Parisien and Anne Daigre, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in September 1724.  They settled at St.-Pierre-du-Nord and raised nearly a dozen children:  Jean-Baptiste, born in c1727; Louis in December 1728; Charles l'aîné in August 1730; Jean-Aubin, called Aubin, in May 1732; Marie-Judith in April 1736; Jean-Martin, called Martin, in November 1738; Anne in July 1741; Élisabeth or Isabelle in c1743; Simon in November 1747; Françoise in c1748; and Charles le jeune in November 1751. 

When British forces rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the autumn of 1755, Charles Fouquet and his family, living in territory controlled by France, remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, British forces descended on Île St.-Jean, rounded up most of its Acadian habitants, and deported them to France. 

Charles Fouquet, père and four of his sons--Louis, Jean-Aubin, Martin, and Simon--ended up on one or more of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758.  Wife Marie-Judith Pointevin, age 50, and five of their other children--daughters Marie-Judith, age 23, Anne, age 17, Françoise, age 12, Élisabeth, age 14, and son Charles, fils, age 8--became separated from Charles and the older boys and sailed on another transport.  Jean-Aubin and Martin reached Cherbourg in March 1759, but of Charles, père and his other sons the record says only, "The fate of their father is unknown," which means he probably did not survive the crossing.  Marie-Judith and her children, meanwhile, survived the crossing that took the lives of hundreds of their fellow Acadians and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Daughter Élisabeth, weakened by the rigors of the crossing, died in the hospital probably at St.-Malo two months after she reached France.  Her mother also must have have been fatally weakened by the voyage.  When Élisabeth's older sister Marie-Judith Fouquet married Honoré, son of fellow Acadians Charles Thériot and Angélique Doiron and widower of Isabelle Bergeau, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in February 1760, both of the bride's parents were recorded in the marriage record as deceased.  

In France, the surviving Fouquets suffered along with hundreds of other Acadians the indignities of life in the mother country.  Marie and husband Honoré Thériot settled at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo, where they had at least seven children.  Anne married a French sailor, Georges, son of Nicolas Pollin and Jeanne Label of St.-Servan, at Rochefort in June 1764.  Jean-Aubin married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Quimine and Marie-Josèphe Chiasson of Chignecto and Île St.-Jean, probably in the late 1760s; this may have been Jean-Aubin's third marriage.  Marguerite gave him at least two daughters:  Marie-Charlotte, born at Port-Louis in c1770, and Jeanne-Madeleine in c1774. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Jean-Aubin Fouquet and his wife Marguerite agreed to take it.  The rest of his family remained in France. 

Jean-Aubin age 52, wife Marguerite Quimine, age 50, and daughters Marie-Charlotte, age 15, and Jean-Madeleine, age 11, sailed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships of 1785, which reached New Orleans in early November.  They likely followed some of their fellow passengers to the Isleño community of San Bernardo, also called Nueva Gálvez, on the river below New Orleans, or settled in the city.  Only a month after her family reached Louisiana, Marie-Charlotte, still only 15, married Silvestre, son of Silverio Gomes and Maria Gutierres of Senseca, Castille, Spain, at New Orleans.  Jean-Joseph Fouquet was born at New Orleans in November 1797.  A Spanish priest at the St.-Louis church recorded the boy's baptism the following January and called the mother Maria Magdalena Fouquet, "native of Acadia, resident of this city."  This likely was Jeanne-Madeleine, who would have been 23 years old at the time.  The priest did not give the boy's father's name. 

Jean-Aubin Fouquet brought only daughters to Louisiana and seems to have fathered no sons there.  One of his daughters married a Spaniard soon after the family reached the colony, and another daughter seems to have borne a natural son at New Orleans a dozens years later.  The Acadian branch of this family, then, except for its blood, did not take root in the Bayou State.  The Fouquets of South Louisiana, even the possible descendants of Jean-Joseph Fouquet, are French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.30

Grossin

Brothers Michel, born in c1705, and Pierre, born in c1708, sons of Jean Grossin and Pérrine Pétain of Carolles, Avranches, France, came to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, and settled at Havre-St.-Pierre, on the north shore of the island, in the late 1720s.  Michel married Marie, daughter of Jean Caissie dit Roger and his first wife Anne Bourgeois, probably at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre, in c1730.  Pierre married Cécile Caissie dit Roger and his second wife Cécile Hébert, younger half-sister of brother Michel's wife, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in July 1733.

Michel and Marie raised a large family on the island:  Jean was born in September 1732; Marie-Louise, called Louise, in c1734; Marie in c1737; Jacques-Christophe in February 1738; Baptiste-Louis, called Louis, in August 1740; Henriette in September 1742; Michel, fils in c1745; Brigitte in c1748; Françoise in c1749; Modeste in c1751; and Robert was baptized, age unrecorded, in November 1755 but died at age 8 months in July 1756.  Oldest daughter Louise married Pierre, son of Jacques Quimine and Marie-Josèphe Chiasson of Chignecto, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in February 1755. 

Pierre and Cécile also raised a large family on the island:  Michel le jeune was born in October 1734; Cécile in 1737; Madeleine in 1739; Anne in 1741; Jacques in August 1744; Marguerite in 1746; Rosalie in 1750; Pierre, fils in c1751; Marie-Louise in 1754; and Louis in August 1756.  Michel le jeune married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of François Chiasson and Anne Doucet, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in January 1758.  

Living on an island still controlled by France, the Grossins escaped the British roundup of the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, but they did not escape the terrors of Le Grand Dérangement.  After the fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and transported them to France.  The Grossins were among the families who were packed aboard one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  The family suffered terribly in the crossing.  Michel, père he died at sea.  Two of his children who reached France--Jacques-Christophe, age 20, and Françoise, age 9--died in the hospital at Paramé, near St.-Malo, in April 1759, a few months after they reached the port.  Michel, père's daughter Louise, age 25, wife of Pierre Quimine, crossed on one of the Five Ships with two of their children, Marie, age 3, and Geneviève, age 2.  Louise and Pierre survived the crossing, but both of their daughters died at sea.  Pierre Grossin, père and his family also crossed in one of the Five Ships and lost two of their children:  Pierre, fils, age 7, died at sea; and Rose, age 11, died in the same hospital as her cousins in April 1759.  Pierre, père, his wife, and their seven other children survived the crossing, but Pierre, père died at St.-Malo soon after they got there.  Pierre, père's son Michel le jeune and his wife Marie-Josèphe Chiasson crossed on one of the Five Ships also.  She was pregnant when they left Acadia in late November.  A son, whom they named Michel, fils, was born to them on 2 February 1759, soon after they reached St.-Malo, but died 18 days later, no doubt from the rigors of the voyage.  Marie-Josèphe died in the hospital at Paramé in early June 1759, leaving Michel le jeune a widower.

Pierre Grossin, père's widow Cécile Caissie settled at Paramé, where she remarried to Nicolas, fils, son of Nicolas Bouchard and Anne Silvain of St.-Thomas, Canada, and widower of Acadian Marie Chiasson, in June 1760.  Nicolas was living at Rivière-du-Nord-Est on Île St.-Jean in 1752, so one wonders if he had known the Grossins back on the island.  Cécile gave him no more children.  Her son Michel Grossin le jeune also had settled at Paramé and remarried to Frenchwoman Françoise, daughter of Augustin Renault and Marguerite Dagorne, at St.-Malo in February 1760, less than a year after his wife died.  Françoise gave him at least two children at Paramé:  Pierre-Michel, born in April 1761; and Jeanne-Françoise-Nicolle in January 1763. 

In April 1764, Cécile and second husband Nicolas Bouchard left France for the French colony of Cayenne in South America aboard the ship Le Fort.  Michel le jeune, his wife, and children followed his mother and stepfather to Cayenne aboard the same ship.   His unmarried brothers Jacques and Louis and unmarried sisters Cécile, Madeleine, and Marguerite also went to Cayenne, along with married sister Anne and her husband, François-Jean, son of Jean-Baptiste Bard and Josèphe Talon of St.-François, Québec, whom she had married at St.-Servan in April 1764 on the eve of their departure.  Cécile's husband Nicholas was an early casualty of the venture.  She remarried--again--to Frenchman Alexis, son of Jean-Isaac Hilairet and Marie David of Lansac, Sainte, France, at St.-Sauveur, Cayenne, in July 1765.  Cécile died at St.-Sauveur in August 1768, surrounded by her loved ones; she was 54 years old.  The decision to go to the jungles of South America proved to be a fatal one for son Jacques Grossin as well; he died at Sinnamary, Cayenne, in March 1765; he was only 22 years old and did not marry.  In that same month, March 1765, French officials took a census of the settlers at Cayenne.  Among them were Marie Grossin, veuve Belier, age 40, of St.-Servan, and her children Pierre, age 16, Julien, age 14, and Jacqueline, age 12, all named Cousin and all born at Louisbourg.  One wonders how they were kin to Michel le jeune and his family.  Michel le jeune and Françoise had at least one more child in the tropical colony:  Joseph, born at St.-Sauveur, Cayenne, in November 1766.  Louis survived the rigors of life in the tropics and married Madeleine Lope, widow of Jean dit Maroc Guilbert, at St.-Joseph de Sinnamary in May 1781.  One wonders what was the fate of Michel le jeune and his sisters in that distant colony.  Anne died probably at Cayenne.  Husband François-Jean Bard returned to St.-Malo via Brest in July 1769 and remarried to a widow at St.-Servan in January 1770. 

Meanwhile, Michel Grossin, père's daughter Marie married Jean-Baptiste, son of fellow Acadians Charles Dugas and Marie Benoit, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in February 1768.  Marie's older sister Louise died probably at St.-Servan by January 1770, when husband Pierre Quimine remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Charles Dugas and Marie Benoit, at nearby St.-Énogat, so Marie became her former brother-in-law's sister-in-law again.  Marie, husband Jean-Baptiste, and two of their children were part of the Acadian settlement in the Poitou region in the early 1770s and were among the Acadians who retreated to the port city of Nantes in November 1775 after the venture failed.  They survived in Nantes on government handouts and whatever work Jean-Baptiste could find as a day laborer.  Meanwhile, Marie's brother Michel, fils married Frenchwoman Cécile-Julienne, daughter of Pierre Troude and Suzanne Picart, at St.-Malo in December 1768.  Their son Michel-Pierre was born at St.-Malo in December 1769.  They were still in that city in 1772. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Marie Grossin and husband Jean-Baptiste Dugas agreed to take it.  Other members of her family--the ones who took French spouses or had not gone to Cayenne--chose to remain in France.  This included Marie's younger sister Henriette, wife of Frenchman François Galien.  Henriette and François had signed up to go to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, which left St.-Malo in mid-August 1785, but a note on the passenger list states:  "la famille Gallien n'embarque pas," that is, the Galien family did not embark, so older sister Marie Grossin was the only member of her family to emigrate to Louisiana. 

Marie Grossin, age 49, husband Jean-Baptiste Dugas, also age 49, and their single surviving child, 11-year-old daughter Marie-Josèphe Dugas, came to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in July 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac, south of Baton Rouge.  A Spanish official counted them at Baton Rouge in 1788.  Marie and Jean-Baptiste had no more children in Louisiana.  Daughter Marie-Josèphe, a native of St.-Énogat, a suburb of St.-Malo, married Pierre-Joseph, son of fellow Acadians Charles Lebert and Anne-Marie Robichaux, at Baton Rouge in 1794; Pierre-Joseph was a native Plouër, another suburb of St.-Malo, and had come to Louisiana as a teenager with his widowed mother aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships.  Marie died at Baton Rouge in July 1809, in her early 70s.

Marie Grossin was the only member of her family to emigrate to Louisiana, so the Acadian branch of the family did not take root in the Bayou State.  Daughter Marie-Josèphe Dugas and her husband Pierre-Joseph Lebert had no sons, but their only daughter, Lise Lebert, Marie Grossin's granddaughter, married Zéphirin, son of fellow Acadians Jacques Blanchard and Modeste-Aimée Bourg, probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in March 1813.  Zéphirin and Lise had many children, including at least six sons.  Zéphirin became a great planter, holding 66 slaves on his West Baton Rouge plantation in 1850.  So at least the blood of the hard-suffering Grossin family survived in the Bayou State.  The Grossins of South Louisiana today are descendants of French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.31

Guénard

In July 1712, James, son of Andrew Gainier and Margaret Benard of Dublin, Ireland, was serving as a soldier with the British army when he married Cécile, daughter of Pierre Cellier and Marie-Josèphe-Aimée Lejeune of Minas, at Beaubassin.  James later called himself Jacques Guénard dit Gaudereau, signifying his entrance into Acadian society.  Jacques and Cécile had three children, a son and two daughters.  Their older daughter Marie-Rose married into the Bastien family.  Jacques and Cécile died before 13 July 1742, the date of their daughter's wedding at Beaubassin.  Son Timothée, born in Maryland and baptized at Annapolis Royal in October 1716 and again in November 1718, married Anne-Marie, daughter of Pierre Thibodeau le jeune and Anne-Marie Aucoin, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1744. 

In the autumn of 1755, British forces deported Timothée Guénard, wife Anne-Marie Thibodeau, daughter Anastasie, and son Joseph, to Massachusetts, where colonial officials counted them at Marlborough in 1761.  When the war against Britain ended in 1763, they went to Halifax to join hundreds of their fellow Acadians who had been held as prisoners of war there during the last years of the war.  Ann-Marie, being a Thibodeau, was kin to Acadian resistance fighters Alexandre and Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil of Petitcoudiac, who were being held with dozens of other relatives in Nova Scotia compounds.  In late 1764 or early 1765, Timothée and Anne-Marie followed their kinsmen to the lower Mississippi valley via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue.

Timothée Guénard, age 49, wife Anne-Josèphe Thibodeau, age 42, and their two children--Joseph, age 19, and Anastasie, age 14--reached New Orleans sometime in the spring of 1765.  After a brief stay in the city, they moved on to the western prairies and settled in the Opelousas District, where Timothée soon died.  Anne-Marie remarried twice at Opelousas, first to French Creole François-Marie Rivard in c1767, and then to French Canadian Joseph, son of Jean-Baptiste Loiseau dit Francoeur and Marie-Ursule Jutras of Montréal, in November 1786.  Her Guénard daughter, Anastasie, married Amable dit Beaulieu, son of Giles Bertrand and Thérèse La Jeunesse, a French Canadian, not an Acadian, at Opelousas in February 1766 and died there in March 1789, age 38.  Anastasie's succession record was filed at what became the Opelousas courthouse in February 1791.  Anne-Marie's Guénard son, Joseph, also married.  

Joseph married Joseph, son of Timothée Guénard and Anne-Marie Thibodeau, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1746, accompanied his parents into exile in Massachusetts in 1755, to Halifax in 1763, and on to Louisiana in 1764-65.  He followed his parents to the Opelousas District, where he married Véronique, daughter of French Creoles Philippe Duplechin and his first wife Renée Boff of New Orleans and Pointe Coupée, in November 1772--the first recorded exogamous marriage by an Acadian male in Louisiana.  Wife Véronique was a resident of Opelousas at the time of their marriage.  They settled in the Opelousas District.  Véronique died at Opelousas in November 1787.  Evidently Joseph did not remarry.  Their daughter Ursule married into the Bracogne and Dauzat families.  Neither of Joseph and Véronique's sons--Benoît, born at Opelousas in c1772; and Dominique in c1776--seems to have survived childhood. 

Guénards settled fairly late in Acadia, but they were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  The immigrant progenitor died soon after he came to the colony, if he made it there at all, so it was up to his only son, and his son's French-Creole wife, to carry on the line there.  They had at least two sons, but neither produced a family of his own.  Their daughter married twice, however, first to a French Canadian and then a French Creole, so the blood of the Acadian Guénards, if not the name, survived in the Bayou State.  The Guénards of South Louisiana are descendants of French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.32

Guérin

François Guérin, perhaps from Poitou, France, married Anne, a daughter of Jean Blanchard and Radegonde Lambert, at Port-Royal in c1659.  She gave him five children, including two sons:  Jérôme, born at Port-Royal c1665; and François, fils, born at Port-Royal c1669.  Their three daughters married into the Godin dit Châtillon dit Beauséjour, Arseneau, and Doucet families.  François, père died at Port-Royal before the first Acadian census was taken in 1671.  Anne remarried to Pierre l'aîné, son of Denis Gaudet and Martine Gauthier, at Port-Royal c1672.  Anne's younger son François Guérin, fils probably died young, but older son Jérôme came of age and fathered many children of his own. 

Jérôme married Isabelle, or Élisabeth, daughter of  Martin Aucoin and Marie Gaudet, at Port-Royal in c1698.  They moved to Cobeguit by 1701, one of the first families to settle there, and had 13 children.  Seven of their daughters married into the Bourg, Thériot, Pitre, Boudrot, and Dugas families, two of them to brothers.  Jérôme and Isabelle's five sons, all born at Cobeguit, married into the Bourg, Mius, LeBlanc, and Henry families.  All of them left Cobeguit and moved to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, or Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, before 1752.  By 1755, most, if not all, of François Guérin's descendants were living on the French Maritime islands.  

When the British rounded up Acadians in Nova Scotia in the autumn of 1755, the Guérins, living on an island controlled by France, were safe for now.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on the Maritimes islands and deported them to France. 

The crossing devastated the family.  Jérôme's daughter Marguerite Guérin, wife of Pierre Thériot, lost her husband and three of three of their five children aboard the British transport Duke William, which left Acadia in late summer and reached St.-Malo at the beginning of November despite an explosion aboard the ship.  The rigors of the voyage soon caught up to her:  she died at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, soon after her ship reached France.  According to the Duke William passenger list, sister Françoise, wife of François Thériot, also died on the same vessel (in truth, she survived the crossing).  Six children of Jérôme's son Pierre also sailed on the Duke William. Two of them--Josèphe and Agricole--perished, while Gertrude, Joseph, Louis, and Pierre, fils survived the crossing.  Soon after reaching the mother country, Louis and Pierre, fils moved from St.-Malo to work as sailors.  Pierre's sister Isabelle and her family also died aboard the Duke William.  Brother François, his wife Geneviève Mius, and all their children perished on a British transport that was lost at sea.  François's sister Henriette, age 45, wife of Olivier Boudrot, age 47, sailed with her family aboard one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Like brother François and so many of her nieces and nephews, Henriette also perished on the voyage, along with four of her own children; only husband Olivier and a 15-year-old daughter survived the crossing.  Brother Jean-Baptiste Guérin, age 36, his wife Marie-Madeleine Bourg, age 35, and four of their children also sailed on one of the Five Ships; Jean-Baptiste & Marie-Madeleine survived the crossing, but two of their children--daughter Marie-Madeleine, age 4; and son Xavier, age 2--perished; sons Jean-Pierre, age 9; and Jérôme, age 6, survived.  Jean-Baptiste's younger brother Dominique, age 36, his wife Anne LeBlanc, age 31, and six of their children sailed aboard one of the Five Ships.  Dominique and Anne survived the crossing, but two of their children--daughters Anastasie, age 10; and Françoise, age 3--died at sea, and two more daughters--Anne-Josèphe, age 12; and Marie, age 3 month--died in the hospital at St.-Malo soon after reaching France; only daughter Marguerite, age 8, and son Joseph, age 6, survived the crossing.  Youngest brother Charles, age 34, his wife Marguerite Henry, also age 34, and four of their children also sailed aboard one of the Five Ships.  Charles died in a St.-Malo hospital two months after reaching France; Marguerite survived the crossing, but half of their children--sons Marin, age 8; and Alexis, age 5 months--did not survive the deportation; only daughters Tarsile, age 11, and Marguerite-Josèphe, age 5, made it to France.  Marie, age 59, one of Jérome Guérin's oldest daughters and wife of Claude Thériot, ended up not at St.-Malo but at Rochefort, where she died at the Hôpital des oprhelins soon after she reached that city. 

The Guérins who survived the ordeal of 1758-59 lived in France for over a quarter century, enduring along with hundreds of other Acadians the indignities of life in the mother country.  After brothers Louis and Pierre, fils Guérin left St.-Malo for Lorient in January 1759, they disappear from history, unless Louis was the one who went to French St.-Domingue and died there in January 1776.  Dominique Guérin and wife Anne LeBlanc settled first at Ploubalay, near St.-Malo, and then at nearby Trigavou, and had more children in France:  Élisabeth, or Isabelle, was born at Trigavou in October 1760; another Françoise in May 1763; another Anastasie in February 1766 but died at age 1 1/2 in June 1767; and Brigide was born in August 1769.  During the early 1770s, Dominique and his family were part of the Acadian settlement near Châtellerault in the Poitou region and were among the Acadians who retreated to the port city of Nantes in March 1776 after the Poitou venture failed.  Dominique, Anne, and their younger children lived in the parish of St.-Jacques at Nantes and survived on government handouts and whatever work Dominique could find as a day laborer.  Son Joseph lived in the nearby parish of St.-Similien, where he married Agnès, daughter of fellow Acadians Benjamin Pitre and Jeanne Moïse, in April 1776.  Two daughters were born to them at Nantes:  Marie-Joséphine at St.-Similien in January 1777; and Françoise at St.-Jacques in April 1784.  Meanwhile, Dominique's wife Anne died at St.-Jacques in May 1782; she was 56 years old.  Daughter Françoise married Jacques, son of fellow Acadians Étienne Thériot and Hélène Landry, at St.-Jacques in November 1784.  Dominique's older sister Françoise, who actually survived the deportation, settled at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo; she was a widow when she came to France and did not remarry.  Dominique's older brother Jean-Baptiste and wife Marie-Madeleine Bourg settled at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, where they had more children:  Joseph, born in September 1760; and Ambroise in August 1762.  Jean-Baptiste died at St.-Suliac in December 1771; he was 50 years old.  His son Jérôme le jeune married fellow Acadian Marie Pitre perhaps at St.-Suliac in the late 1770s.  Dominique's niece Tarsile, daughter of younger brother Charles, married Jacques, fils, son of fellow Acadians Jacques Forest and Claire Vincent, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in August 1774.  Jacques, fils also had come to France aboard one of the five British transports.  The fate of Tarsile's younger sister Marguerite-Josèphe is lost to history. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Several of the Guérins, including Dominique and his family, a sister, and a nephew, agreed to take it.  Other members of the family chose to remain in France. 

The Acadian Guérins who emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785 sailed aboard three of the Seven Ships.  Most of them chose to settle on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Dominique Guérin, age 63, now a widower, sailed to New Orleans aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August 1785.  With him were two of his unmarried daughters--Élisabeth, or Isabelle, age 25; and Brigide, age 15.  (Dominique in fact may have died on the voyage over or in New Orleans soon after the ship arrived; he appears in no Louisiana census.)  Élisabeth married Jean-Pierre, son of fellow Acadians Prosper Landry and Isabelle Pitre, at Lafourche in February 1786 but died by 1790, when her husband remarried at Lafourche; Jean-Pierre also had come to Louisiana aboard La Bergère, so they probably had known one another in France.  Brigide married François-Jean, son of fellow Acadians Blaise Thibodeaux and Catherine Daigle, at Assumption in July 1796; François-Jean also had come to the colony from France, aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships.  Brigide died in Assumption Parish in April 1830; the Plattenville priest who recorded her burial said that she died at "age 66 yrs.," but she was "only" 60. 

Dominique's son Joseph, age 33, also crossed on La Bergère, with wife Agnès Pitre, age 38, and their year-old daughter Françoise.  One wonders if Françoise survived the crossing.  Joseph and Agnès had another daughter, Agnès, at Lafourche in September 1787, but they had no sons.  Joseph died in Assumption Parish in December 1813, in his early 60s. 

Dominique's middle daughter, Françoise, age 22, crossed on La Bergère with husband Jacques Thériot, age 25, and an infant daughter.  Françoise died a widow in Assumption Parish in October 1849; the Plattenville priest who recorded her burial said that she died at "age 47 years," but she was 86!

Dominique's nephew, Jérôme Guérin, age 35, crossed with wife Marie Pitre, age 38, and infant son Jean-Pierre on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in September.  Jean-Pierre either did not survive the crossing from France or died in Louisiana soon after they arrived.  Jérôme and Marie had a daughter in Louisiana whom they named Marie-Anne, but they had no more sons.  Jérôme's date of death is unrecorded.

Only one of the Acadian Guérins who came to Louisiana from France chose to settle on the river above New Orleans.  Dominique's older sister Françoise, age 75, widow of François Thériot, crossed on La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, with the family of Charles Henry and Marguerite Thériot, probably her daughter and son-in-law.  They reached New Orleans in December and chose to go to the Baton Rouge area. 

Guérins were early settlers in Acadia, but, compared to other Acadian families, they came "late" to Louisiana.  Three families from France reached the colony in 1785, giving promise that the family would thrive there.  Sadly, none of the Guérin family heads who came to Louisiana had sons who created families of their own, so only the blood of this long-suffering family from the Maritimes survived in the Bayou State.  The Guérins of South Louisiana, then, are descendants of French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.33

Hamon

Two Frenchmen with similar-sounding surnames came to greater Acadia during the early 1730s and settled in the French Maritimes.  One suspects that they hailed from different families and that an "Acadian" who emigrated from France to Spanish Louisiana in 1785 and who also bore the name was not a descendant of either of the island progenitors. 

Jean Hamon, also called Amont, Hémond, and Emond, son of perhaps Jean Amont and Marguerite Gastineau-Duplessis of Trois-Rivières, Canada, where he may have been born in November 1695, married Acadian Marie Blanchard and settled in the French Maritimes.  They had at least three sons there:  Pierre, born in c1732, Ignace in c1748, and Joseph in c1752.  Jean and Marie died on one of the Maritime islands probably before 1758.

Another Jean, son of Oliver Hamon and Françoise Pireau, was born at Reintembault, diocese of Dol, France, in c1714.  He emigrated to Louisbourg by January 1736, when he married Marie, daughter of Joannis Daguerre and Marie Charlant, at the French citadel.  Jean may have been a soldier stationed in the garrison.  He and Françoise had at least six children, all born at Louisbourg:  Françoise in c1737, Jean-Baptiste in c1738, Jean-François in c1739, Mathurin in c1739 or 1740, Marie-Gervaise in c1742, and Cécile in c1744.  One of their daughters married into the David and Maigne families. 

When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, the habitants on the Maritime islands, living in territory controlled by France, escaped the deportations.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île Royale and Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.

Jean Hamon at Louisbourg, his wife and children, were deported to Rochefort.  In October of 1759, Jean took his family to St.-Malo, where the majority of the Maritime Acadians had been transported.  They lived at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, from 1760-63.  Jean's son Mathurin, age 20 in 1760, served probably as a privateer in the war against Britain.  He was captured and held as a prisoner in England and was not released until the war ended in 1763.  He returned to St.-Servan to join his family.  Later that year, Mathurin and his father left France aboard Le Marie-Charlotte and settled on one of the French-controlled islands, St.-Pierre or Miquelon, off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Mathurin did not remain at St.-Pierre or Miquelon but returned to France by January 1766, when he married Marie, daughter of René Renault and Élisabeth Lelardon, at St.-Servan.  They had at least two children, both sons:  Mathurin, fils, born in c1768, and Julien in c1772.  Mathurin and Marie sailed from France to St.-Pierre or Miquelon in the 1760s or 1770s, but, again, Mathurin did not stay there long.  During the American Revolution, after France joined the war on the side of the Americans, the British seized St.-Pierre and Miquelon and deported the Acadians there to France.  Mathurin and his family made the crossing aboard the schooner La Modeste, which reached St.-Malo in November 1778.  

Meanwhile, two sons of the Jean Hamon of Île St.-Jean--Joseph, age 6; and Ignace, age 10, both orphans now--were transported to France aboard one or more of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January.  Joseph crossed with the family of Pierre Blanchard, probably a relative, Pierre's wife Madeleine Hébert, and two of their children.  Joseph did not survive the crossing to St.-Malo but died along with Pierre Blanchard and both of his children aboard the British transport; only Pierre's wife Madeleine made it to France.  Ignace sailed aboard one of the Five Ships with the family of another Pierre Blanchard, Pierre's wife Françoise Breau, and their 21-year-old son Charles.  Pierre and Françoise died at sea.  Charles made it to France but died in a St.-Malo hospital three months after he reached the port city.  Only young Ignace endured the crossing without losing his health.  He lived probably with relatives at Pleurtuit, a suburb of St.-Malo, from 1759-60 and then at nearby Pleudihen, where, in May 1770, he married Anne-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Bourg and Cécile Michel.  Ignace and Anne-Josèphe's daughter Anne-Madeleine was born at Pleudihen in July 1773.  Soon after the birth, Ignace and Anne-Josèphe participated in a settlement scheme in the Poitou region.  French authorities were tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on some marginal land he owned near the city of Châtellerault.  The Acadians tried mightily to bring life to the rocky soil around the long line of houses in the woods of Poitou.  After two years of failure, the Acadians gave up and demanded to be returned to the port cities.  Meanwhile, Ignace's wife Anne-Josèphe bore another daughter in Poitou:  Marie-Modeste was born near Châtellerault in May 1775.  In March 1776, Ignace, Anne-Josèphe, and their two daughters retreated to the port city of Nantes with the last convoy of Acadians to leave Poitou.  They survived on government hand outs and what work they could find.  Ignace worked as a quarryman.  At three more children were born to them at Chantenay, a suburb of Nantes:  Catherine-Françoise in c1777 but died at age 5 in August 1782; Jean-Étienne was baptized on 9 June 1780 but died the following June 20; and an unnamed child, gender unrecorded, was buried in November 1782--a dreadful year for the family. 

Ignace and Joseph's older brother Pierre was not deported to France.  He escaped the British roundup on Île St.-Jean and married Marie-Thérèse, daughter of French Canadian Jacques Fradet, at St.-Vallier, on the south bank of the St. Lawrence below Québec City, in November 1767.  Pierre, called Le Cadien by his family and neighbors, died at St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse, Québec, in 1831, purportedly at age 99.  He and his many descendants in Canada call themselves Emond

Guillaume, son of Joseph Hamon and his French wife Marie Dameue, born in France in c1761, married Marguerite, daughter of Acadians Charles Saulnier and Euphrosine Lalande of Rivière-aux-Canards, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in November 1780.  Guillaume worked as a carpenter in Nantes, where Spanish government agents counted him with his wife in September 1784.  His relationship to Ignace and the other Hamons is anyone's guess.  

When the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Ignace Hamon and Guillaume Hamon agreed to take it.  Guillaume, age 24, and wife Marguerite Saulnier, age 27, crossed to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in September 1785.   Guillaume and his wife remained childless.  Ignace, age 39, wife Anne-Josèphe Bourg, age 41, and daughters Anne-Madeleine, age 12, and Marie-Modeste, age 10, reached New Orleans aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, the following November.  Anne-Josèphe gave birth to another daughter, christened Martine after Spanish intendant Martin Navarro, in New Orleans soon after they arrived.  Ignace and Anne-Josèphe had no more children in Louisiana.  All three of their daughters married on the upper bayou:  Anne-Madeleine to Urbanne, son of Amable Stelly and Marianne Moniceau of Montréal, in August 1793; Marie-Modeste to Pierre-Victor, son of Pierre Chataignier and Marguerite Mainville of Le Havre, France, in January 1799; and Martine to Jean-Baptiste, son of Louis Leonard and Anne Dardaine of New Orleans, in September 1804.  A petition for a family meeting was filed in Martine's name at the Thibodauxville courthouse, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1821; she would have been in her mid-30s that year. 

Hamons settled "late" in greater Acadia, in the French Maritimes, and they came "late" to Louisiana.  Two families, likely not kin to one another, emigrated from France aboard two of the Seven Ships in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Ignace Hamon and his wife had three daughters but no sons, and Guillaume Hamon and his wife had no children, so the Acadian branch of the family, except for its blood, did not take root in the Bayou State.34

Hugon

Louis, son of Henri Hugon and Madeleine Lafond, born at Villefagnan, Angouleme, France, in c1695, married Marie, daughter of Claude Bourgeois and Anne Blanchard, at Chignecto in April 1720.  They had six children, four sons and two daughters.  Two of the sons, both born at Chignecto, created families of their own.  Older son Jacques, born in c1730, married a woman whose name has been lost to history probably at Chignecto.  Younger son Joseph, born in c1732, married Théotiste Broussard probably at Chignecto; they had at least one daughter, Marie, born probably at Chignecto in c1751.  

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this small family to the wind.  The first Acadians in Nova Scotia rounded up by the British in the fall of 1755 were the ones at Chignecto.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New-English forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto settlers, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with the French at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  Hugons were among them.  In the fall of 1755, British forces deported Louis Hugon and his family to South Carolina aboard the English sloop Endeavour.  Louis must have died in South Carolina.  Colonial officials counted his widow Marie Bourgeois, son Jacques, Jacques's daughter Marie-Madeleine, and Jacques's son Joseph, still living in the colony in August 1763.  Jacques's wife was not in the census with them, so she, too, probably had died before the census was taken.  

After the war with Britain ended in 1763, French officials encouraged Acadians exiled in New England and South Carolina to go to French St.-Dominique, today's Haiti, to work on a naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas.  Although driven from North America, the French were determined to hang on to what was left of their shrinking empire.  The new naval base on the north shore of St.-Domingue would protect the approaches to what was left of their possessions in the Caribbean basin.  French officials saw the Acadian exiles as a ready source of cheap labor.  They promised them land of their own if they came to the tropical island to help build the naval base.  And so South Carolina Acadians, including Jacques Hugon and his brother Joseph, emigrated to Môle, St.-Domingue, in February 1764.  Joseph died probably soon after the family reached the site of the naval base.  Jacques's son may have died there, too.  This, along with the dismal state of venture, would have prompted Jacques and Théotiste Broussard,  brother Joseph's widow, to quit the place as soon as they could.  Jacques's daughter Marie-Madeleine stayed in St.-Dominique.  She married three times, first to Félix Thibault, then to Francois Regnault, and then to Jean-Baptiste Chaumette, son of Nicolas, bourgeois, and Catherine Bardin of St.-Didier, Sommeil en Barrois, France, at Môle St.-Nicolas in June 1785.  

None of Jacques Hugon's children were with him when he came to Louisiana, so his family either died or, in the case of his daughter Marie-Madeleine, remained in St.-Domingue.  The place and time of Jacques's death are clues that he hooked up with the Broussard party from Halifax going to Louisiana via Cap-Français in January 1765.  If so, he would have reached New Orleans in February and followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District that April.  Fate did not give Jacques the opportunity to start another family there.  He died on the Teche on October 8, only a few months after he got there, victim of an epidemic that struck down dozens of his fellow Acadians that summer and fall.

Most likely, Théotiste Broussard, Jacques's younger brother Joseph's widow, and Joseph's daughter Marie Hugon, also came to Louisiana directly from St.-Domingue with the Broussard party.  Théotiste and Marie would have followed their kinsmen to Bayou Teche, and they probably were there when Jacques Hugon breathed his last.  Dozens of their fellow Acadians escaped the sickness by fleeing to the river, but Théotiste and Marie remained on the Teche with their Broussard kin.  Théotiste never remarried.  Marie married cousin Paul, son of Michel Trahan and Anne-Euphrosine Vincent, at Attakapas in July 1772.  Their marriage was recorded at Pointe Coupée, but the priest who recorded the ceremony noted that Marie and Paul were residents of Attakapas and that they had to secure dispensation for third degree of affinity in order to marry. 

Hugons settled "late" in Acadia, but two of them, including Jacques, son of Louis, were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  Jacques, a widower when he reached the colony, died before he could remarry and father another son.  The only other Acadian Hugon who came to Louisiana was Jacques's niece Marie, so the Acadian branch of the Hugon family did not took root in the Bayou State.  Marie married at Attakapas and bore a number of children, so her family's blood, at least, lived on in a line of the Trahan family.35

Josset

According to the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville, Louisiana, Paul Josset was Acadian.  He came to Louisiana in February 1765 with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, and followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District, but he did not live there long.  He died in late August 1765, a victim of the epidemic that took the lives of dozens of his fellow Teche valley denizens.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Paul's parents' names or his age at the time of his death.  South Louisiana church and civil records give no hint that he had married and fathered any children, so this branch of the Josset family did not take root in the Bayou State.36

Lafaye

According to the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville, Marie-Marquis Lafaye, daughter of _____ Lafaye and Catherine Comeau, was Acadian on her father's as well as her mother's side.  Marie was counted at Cabahannocer, now St. James Parish, in the Spanish census of April 1766 living with her widowed mother and the family of Abraham Roy, who may have been a relative.  Since Marie-Marquis was the only member of her family to reach Louisiana, the Lafayes in the Bayou State today are either French Creole or Foreign French, not Acadian.37

La Garenne

 Louis Chênet, Chenais, or Chesnay dit La Garenne, son of Bertrand, sieur de Lothainville and Élisabeth Aubert, born at Québec in August 1678, moved to Port-Royal and married Jeanne, daughter of Barnabé Martin and Jeanne Pelletret, in c1697.  They had two children, both born at Port-Royal:  Marie-Josèphe in c1698, and Jean in c1700.  Jeanne remarried to Gabriel, fils, son of Gabriel Samson and Françoise Durand, at Port-Royal in April 1704, so Louis dit La Garenne had died by then.  She followed her second husband to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, where she died in c1728.  Her daughter Marie-Josèphe Chênet dit La Garenne married Charles Charpentier at Port-Toulouse in c1723, and remarried to Jean-François, son of Jean Morel and François Briand, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in August 1739. 

Louis's son Jean took his father's dit, La Garenne, as his family name and married Anne, daughter of Jean Potier and Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in October 1728.  Jean and Anne raised seven or eight children on the island, all born there:  Jean-Baptiste was born in October 1732, Charles in September 1734, Claire in 1736, Lange in May 1738 but died 10 months later, Joseph was born in May 1740, Geneviève in 1744, and Élisabeth in 1750.  They also had a daughter named Cécile.  Jean's oldest son Jean-Baptiste married Anne-Hippolythe, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Doiron and Marguerite Michel, either at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in the late 1750s or in France in the early 1760s. 

When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1765, the Acadians on Île St.-Jean, including the Chenet dit La Garennes, were safe for now because they lived in territory controlled by France.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the British gathered up most of the Acadians on the Maritimes islands and deported them to France. 

Marie-Josèphe Chênet (she did not take her father's dit as her brother Jean had done), now 60 years old and twice widowed, and three of her Charpentier sons crossed to St.-Malo aboard the British transport Supply.  They survived the crossing.  Jean Chênet dit La Garenne, his wife Anne Potier, and their children also crossed to France probably on a British packet boat that carried them first to Portsmouth, England, and then to Cherbourg in Normandy.  There, Jean died, perhaps during a small pox epidemic that struck the Acadians at Cherbourg in late 1759, leaving Anne a widow.  Daughter Cécile married Germain, son of fellow Acadians François Landry and his first wife Marie-Josèphe Babin of l'Assomption, Pigiguit, at Tres-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in July 1767.  In April 1774, Anne Potier and daughter Geneviève Chênet, 30 years old and still single, were among the Acadians transported from Cherbourg to La Rochelle aboard the ship Le Thomas.  Geneviève evidently moved on to Nantes, where she married Pierre, fils, son of fellow Acadians Pierre Breau and Marguerite Guédry, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in August 1780.  Pierre Breau, fils had been living at Nantes for 10 years at the time of their wedding; he was, in fact, one of the first Acadians to reside in that port city, where hundreds of his fellow Acadians gathered in the mid-1770s. 

Meanwhile, Jean and Anne's son Jean-Baptiste dit La Garenne and his wife Anne-Hippolythe Doiron endured life in the mother country as best they could, perhaps at Cherbourg with his widowed mother and sister.  He, too, was living at Nantes in September 1784.  When in the early 1780s the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Jean-Baptiste and Anne-Hippolythe agreed to take it.  Other members of his family remained in the mother country.  Two of sister Cécile's children--Bonne-Marie-Adélaïde and Jean-Jacques-Frédéric Landry, ages 16 and 15 in 1785, followed their paternal grandfather, François Landry, to the Spanish colony, so Cécile and her husband must have died in France.  Sister Geneviève and her husband, if they were still alive, remained in France. 

Jean-Baptiste dit La Garenne, now age 55, and wife Anne-Hippolythe Doiron, age 46, crossed on Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships of 1785.  They reached New Orleans in August and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Baton Rouge.  They brought no children to Louisiana and were too old to have any after they got there.  The Chênet dit La Garenne family of Île St.-Jean, then, did not take root in the Bayou State.38

Lagrèze

According to the Acadian Memorial at St. Martinville, Pierre Lagrèze was Acadian.  He came to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, in February 1765 with the Broussard party.  Pierre died on the Teche, where the Broussards and their kinsmen had settled, only a few months after he arrived in the colony, probably a victim of the epidemic that killed dozens of Teche valley Acadians that summer and fall.  He must have been a notable member of the Broussard party because he appears on the list of Acadians who exchanged Canadian card money in New Orleans two months after they reached New Orleans.  Moreover, fellow Attakapas Acadian Jean-Baptiste Semer mentions one La Greze, probably Pierre, in an April 1766 letter to his father in France.  The young Acadian writes:  "I will tell you then my very dear father that I arrived here in the month of February 1765 with 202 Acadian persons, including Joseph Brossard, called Beauplaisir (sic), and all of his family, La Greze, and Catalan, all coming from Halifax and having passed by the Cape [Français]."  Why would young Semer mention La Greze if he was not an important member of the party?  He likely was the Sr. Lagrèze counted among the 1,003 Acadians at Restigouche in late October 1760, several months after the British attacked the outpost.  One suspects he was a French or Canadian officer who chose to follow the Broussards to Louisiana, and that if he was an Acadian, he was an honorary one. 

Evidently Pierre Lagrèze was not married when he came to Louisiana, so his branch of this family did not take root in the Bayou State.  Two brothers with a similar-sounding surname settled on upper Bayou Lafourche during the late antebellum period, but they were Foreign French, not Acadian.  They did, however, marry Acadian LeBlanc sisters, so that branch of the family has Acadian "blood."39

Lamoureaux

In c1693, at Plaisance, Newfoundland, then part of greater Acadia, Jean Lamoureux dit Rochefort, born in Rochefort, France, in c1664, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Abraham Pichot and Madeleine Aubert.  Jean was a fisherman and served as a major of the Plaisance militia before being compelled by the Treaty of Utrecht to move from British-controlled Newfoundland to French-controlled Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, in October 1714.  He and his family remained on Île Royale until the mid-1720s.  According to the many censuses taken at Louisbourg during those years, Marie-Madeleine died before 1719, and Jean, who did not remarry, became a prominent fisherman/merchant with many boats and helpers.  In 1726, he was counted at L'Indienne on Île Royale with one domestic servant, 36 sailors and fishermen in his employ, 6 chaloups, and a bateau ou goélette en pêche, which in that day was a respectable-sized fishing vessel.  By 1728, he and his children had moved again, this time to Pointe-de-l'Est on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island.  By 1734, they had moved to Havre-St.-Pierre on the north side of the island.  Jean dit Rochefort died there in September 1739, age 75.  During their life together, he and Marie-Madeleine had five children, four daughters and a son, all but one of whom survived childhood and created families of their own.  Three of Jean dit Rochefort's daughters married into the Morin dit Langevin, Dutraque, and Baudoin Le Cluzeau families either at Plaisance or on Île Royale. 

Son Jean-Baptiste dit Rochefort, born at Plaisance in c1704, married Marie-Claire, daughter of Jean Potier and Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, at Saint-Pierre-du-Nord in July 1740, soon after his father died.  Jean-Baptiste and Marie-Claire had at least five children, including four sons, all born on Île St.-Jean:  Jean-Baptiste, fils, born in May 1741, Louis in October 1742, François in c1750, and Martin in November 1753.

When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, the Acadians on Île St.-Jean, including the Lamoureauxs, were safe for now because they lived in territory controlled by France.  Their respite from British oppression was a short one, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  Jean-Baptiste Lamoureaux dit Rochefort died at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in May 1758, age 54, just before the Acadian Grand Dérangement caught up to his family.  The British deported his widow and children from Île St.-Jean aboard a British transport that sailed first to Portsmouth, England, and then on to Cherbourg in Normandy, while most of the other island Acadians sailed straight to St.-Malo.  

Jean-Baptiste dit Rochefort's older sons both married fellow Acadians in Cherbourg.  Jean-Baptiste, fils married Marie, daughter of Pierre Bertrand and Marie-Josèphe Moulaison, at Tres-Ste.-Trinité in October 1763.  Louis, who became a sailor, married Marie, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marguerite Mouton, at Tres-Ste.-Trinité in August 1763.  Louis and Marie's son Jean-Louis was born at Cherbourg in c1765.  Eight years later, in 1773, despite Louis's occupation as a sailor, he and Marie became part of an attempt to settle Acadians from the port cities on an influential nobleman's land in the Poitou region.  Daughter Marie-Adélaïde was born there in June 1774.  By late 1775, the settlement venture having failed, at least for them, Louis and his family joined other Poitou Acadians in their retreat to the port city of Nantes.  

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Louis and Marie, weary of life in the mother country, agreed to take it.  However, Jean-Baptiste, fils and his family remained in France. 

Louis dit Rochefort, age 44, his wife Marie Hébert, age 36, and their children--Jean-Louis, age 20, and Marie-Adélaïde, age 10--booked passage aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships of 1785, but for some reason they did not take that ship to Louisiana.  They sailed, instead, on La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in mid-December 1785.  After a brief respite in the city, they chose to settle at Cabahannocer, today's St. James Parish, on the river above the city--an area that had come to be known as the Acadian Coast.  Neither Jean-Louis nor Marie-Adélaïde seems to have married, and Louis dit Rochefort and Marie had no more children in Louisiana, so the Acadian branch of the Lamoureaux family did not take root in the Bayou State.  The Lamoureauxs of South Louisiana today likely are descended from a Foreign Frenchman, Louis-Ambroise, who came to Louisiana in the 1820s, settled on Bayou Lafourche, and married two Acadian women from the Boudreaux and LeBlanc families.40

Latier

According to an historian of the Acadian exiles in Maryland, Louis Latier, or Lasté, born in c1730, married Anne, daughter of Étienne Trahan and Marie-Françoise Roy, and widow of Jean-Baptiste Benoit, at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in c1751.  Louis Latier may very well have been a soldier serving in the French fortress at Louisbourg.   

Colonial officials counted Louis, Anne, and their children, including three Benoit "orphans," likely daughters from Anne's first marriage, at Port Tobacco, Maryland, on the lower Potomac River, in July 1763.  Considering that the great majority of the Acadians deported to Maryland had come from the Minas Basin, one wonders how a family from Louisbourg got to the Atlantic colony.  When word reached the Acadians in Maryland that they would be welcome in French Louisiana, they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them south to New Orleans.  The Latiers, following their Trahan and Benoit kin, were among the last to go.

Louis Latier, wife Anne Trahan, and their children, left Port Tobacco, Maryland, in early January 1769 aboard the English schooner Britannia.  With them were sons Antoine and Paul Lantier, daughter Élisabeth Latier, and Anne's three daughters--Marie-Rose, Marie-Anne, and Marguerite--by her first husband, Jean-Baptiste Benoit.  Unfortunately, either through incompetence or ill luck, the Britannia missed the entrance to the Mississippi River and ran aground on the Texas coast at Espiritu Santo Bay.  A Spanish patrol "rescued" the passengers and crew, and Spanish authorities held them at La Bahía for several months, suspecting them of being spies or smugglers.  After the Spanish released them, the Latiers and their fellow passengers traveled overland to Natchitoches Post on the Red River, arriving there in late October.  Spanish authorities allowed them to settle where they wanted.  In April 1770, the Benoit girls followed their uncle Pierre-Olivier Benoit, who also had sailed on the Britannia with his family, to the Acadian community of San Gabriel on the river above New Orleans.   Later in the decade, two of the girls moved on to the Opelousas District.  

The Latiers may also have moved to the Opelousas District after living for a time at San Gabriel.  The fate of the Acadian Latiers in Louisiana is difficult to determine.  No member of the family appears in the church records of South Louisiana, at least not under the name Latier.  This family should not be confused with the Lantier or Nantier family, whose pregenitors came to South Louisiana from France and Montréal during the late colonial period and settled at Opelousas.41

Lavergne

Pierre Lavergne, born probably in France, was the servant of the Père du Breslay of Port-Royal in the early 1690s.  Pierre married Anne Bernon at Port-Royal in c1693.  They had five children, including a son, Jacques, born at Port-Royal in April 1706, who married Françoise, daughter of Claude Pitre and Marie Comeau, at Port-Royal in November 1727.  Two of Pierre's daughters, twins Cécile and Geneviève, born at Port-Royal in March 1708, married brothers:  Cécile married Pierre, son of Michel Haché dit Gallant and Anne Cormier of Chignecto, probably at Port-Royal, in c1726; and Geneviève married Pierre's brother Charles at Port-Royal in February 1727.  Pierre's wife Anne died at Port-Royal in August 1728; she was age 60.  The date and place of Pierre's death has been lost to history.  In the 1730s, members of Pierre's family left Port-Royal and moved to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island.  Cécile and Geneviève and their families were counted at Port-Lajoie on the island in 1734.  Cécile died at Port-Lajoie in December 1743; she was only 35 years old.  Members of the family were still on the island in 1752, on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  

Meanwhile, Pierre's son Jacques and his wife Françoise Pitre had at least 10 children, including three sons:  Joseph, born in c1728, Pierre in c1730, and Jean-Baptiste in c1736.  They, too, probably moved to Île St.-Jean in the 1730s.  Of Jacques's three sons, only the second one, Pierre, seems to have created a family of his own.  Pierre's first wife was Anne, daughter of Pierre Lord and Jeanne Doucet, whom he married at Port-Royal in October 1753.  Records show that after a brief stay at a place called Ste.-Anne, which was perhaps Tintamarre in the Chignecto area, Pierre returned to Île St.-Jean.  

Still living in territory controlled by France, the Lavergnes of Île St.-Jean escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia during the fall of 1755. Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  

Jacques Lavergne survived the crossing to France that took the lives of hundreds of his fellow Acadians.  He and his family ended up at Le Havre in Normandy, where he died in December 1759, age 53, perhaps from the rigors of the crossing.  Son Pierre's wife Anne Lord also died soon after they reached France, and Pierre remarried to Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham Daigre and Anne-Marie Boudrot and widow of Eustache Bourg, at Le Havre in November 1763; Marguerite's first husband Eustache had died at Plymouth, England.  Pierre earned his living at Le Havre as a carpenter.  In the early 1770s, he, Marguerite, and five of their children--Jean-Baptiste-Alexandre; Pierre-Benjamin (the second with the name; the first had been born at Le Havre in August 1764 but died 18 months later; this Pierre-Benjamin had been born at Le Havre in March 1768); Marguerite and Victoire-Bellarmine from his first wife; and Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, born at Le Havre in March 1767--joined the hundreds of Acadians who settled on an influential French nobleman's land in the Poitou region of France.  After two years of effort, Pierre and his family, with most of the other Poitou Acadians, abandoned the settlement and retreated to the port city of Nantes.  Pierre chose to settle at Paimboeuf, downriver from Nantes.  Marguerite died at Paimboeuf in September 1782; she was 50 years old.  Pierre remarried again--his third marriage--to Frenchwoman Gillette, daughter Marc Caudan and Perrine LeBiede of Lanvaudan, diocese of Vannes, and widow of Frenchman Claude Bigot, at Paimboeuf in January 1785.  She gave him no more children.  

Meanwhile, Pierre's sister Marie married Étienne, 21-year-old son of fellow Acadians Jean Hébert and Marguerite Mouton, at Notre-Dame, Le Havre, in January 1767; Marie was six years older than her husband.  They, too, were part of the venture in Poitou, where a son was born to them.  Marie died by August 1779, when Étienne remarried at St.-Nicolas, Nantes.  Meanwhile, Pierre and Marie's sister Rose married sailor Guillaume, son of Jean-Baptiste Laborde and Marie Prieur of Île St.-Jean and widower of Marie-Rose Daigre, at Le Havre in November 1767; she was age 24, and he was 27.  In October 1778, Pierre's oldest daughter Marguerite, from his first wife, married Joseph, son of fellow Acadians Claude Trahan and Anne LeBlanc of l'Assomption, Pigiguit, at St.-Nicolas, Nantes. 

When, in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Pierre Lavergne grabbed it, but he did not take his third wife with him.  Only a few weeks after they were married, Gillette died at Paimboeuf in late March 1785, leaving Pierre a widower once again.  His two sisters and their husbands chose to remain in France. 

A few weeks after his third wife's death, Pierre Lavergne and three of his unmarried children--Victoire-Bellarmine, age 22, Marie-Madeleine, age 18, and Pierre-Benjamin, age 17--boarded Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, and sailed to Louisiana (one wonders what had happened to son Jean-Baptiste-Alexandre, who had retreated with the family from Châtellerault to Nantes in November 1775).  Aboard ship, Victoire married Michel, son of Manuel Betancourt and Maria Ignacia ____ of La Gracieuse, Morge, Switzerland, whom she probably had known in France (the marriage was blessed at New Orleans in September 1785, a few weeks after they reached the colony).  After a brief respite in New Orleans, Pierre and his family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Baton Rouge.  Daughter Victoire and her new husband Michel joined her father and younger siblings there.  Marie-Madeleine married Frenchman Jean, fils, son of Jean Prosper and Marie Rus of St.-Michel, Carcassone, at Baton Rouge in July 1787.    

Pierre's oldest daughter Marguerite, age 32, also crossed to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, with husband Joseph Trahan, age 35, and two of their children, ages 4 and 2.  Marguerite was pregnant on the voyage over and gave birth to son François-Antoine Trahan probably at Baton Rouge in early December; the boy was baptized there late that month.  Joseph died probably at Baton Rouge, and Marguerite remarried to Frenchman Jean, son of Étienne Raffray and Françoise Soneru of St.-Malo, and widower of Marie-Madeleine Landry, probably at Baton Rouge.  They moved north and settled in what became West Feliciana Parish. 

Pierre's son Pierre-Benjamin also married, but not until he was age 34.  He married Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste dit Petit Jean Hébert and Marie-Madeleine Dupuis of San Gabriel, at Ascension on the lower Acadian Coast in October 1802.  Although Pierre-Benjamin and Geneviève married on the lower coast, they settled near Baton Rouge, close to his family.  Their daughters married into the Anselme, Terrell, and Tuttle families.  Pierre Benjamin died probably at Manchac, south of Baton Rouge, in February 1819; he was 50 years old.  Since he was the only surviving son of his father Pierre, all of the Acadian Lavergnes of South Louisiana would have descended from him.  There is no evidence, however, that any of Pierre-Benjamin's sons created families of their own.  So when Pierre Benjamin died, his line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him.  The many Lavergnes of South Louisiana, then, are descendants of French Creoles, French Canadians, or Foreign French, not Acadians.  One family in New Orleans even claims to have descended from French royalty.42

L'Enfant

According to the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville, Jean L'Enfant, born in c1758 perhaps in Maryland, was Acadian.  As a 20-year-old orphan, he came to Louisiana in February 1768 with the large party of Acadian refugees from Maryland led by the Breau brothers of Pigiguit.  Jean settled in the new Mississippi River community of San Luìs de Natchez with the rest of the group.  One wonders what became of him after he reached Natchez.  One suspects that the L'Enfants of South Louisiana today are descendants of French Creoles or Foreign French, not Jean from Maryland.43

Livois

Pierre, son of Jean Livois and Louise Basile, born at Drago or Drayé, Normandy, France, in c1722, came to the French Maritimes in c1740 probably as a young fisherman.   He married Anne, daughter of Denis Boudrot and Agnès Vincent of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in May 1751.  Their daughter Marie-Anne was born at Port-Lajoie in March 1752.  (The following August, a French official insisted that Pierre was the widower of Marie Daigre, not Anne Boudrot, when he listed him as a fisherman and farmer at Étang-St.-Pierre, on the north shore of the island, with daughter Marie-Anne, age 5 months.)  Pierre remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Michel Poirier and Jeanne Bourgeois, at nearby Havre-St.-Pierre in January 1753.  Marie-Madeleine gave him three more children, all born on the island:  Marie-Madeleine in November 1753, Pierre, fils in June 1755, and Judith in July 1757.  

Living in territory controlled by France, the Livoiss of Île St.-Jean escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia during the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  In late 1758, after the fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg in July, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadian habitants on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  

For Pierre Livois and his family, the crossing to France was a disaster.  Pierre, in his 40s, and wife Marie-Madeleine, in her 30s, lost four of their five children on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Marie-Anne, age 6; Pierre, fils, age 3; and Judith, age 14 months, all died at sea.  Marie-Madeleine was pregnant during the crossing.  On 5 February 1759, soon after they reached St.-Malo, son Ambroise-Pierre was born to them, but he died four months later, in June, another victim of the deportation.  Only daughter Marie-Madeleine, age 5 in 1758, survived the ordeal.  

Pierre and Marie-Madeleine settled at Paramé, near St.-Malo, and then moved to nearby St.-Ideuc in 1771.  They had six more children in France:  Ambroise-Pierre, born at St.-Malo in February 1759 but died 4 1/2 months later; Pierre-Joseph-Jean, born at Paramé in March 1760; Pérrine-Françoise at nearby La Barbinais in January 1762; twins Françoise-Nicole and Marie-Rose at Paramé in March 1764; and Jeanne-Céleste at La Barbinais in May 1766.  Pierre died at St.-Ideuc in October 1772; the priest who recorded his burial noted that Pierre was 55 or 56 years old when he died.  Soon after Pierre's death, Marie-Madeleine Poirier took her family to Poitou as part of a settlement scheme for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on some marginal land he owned near the city of Châtellerault.  The Acadians tried mightily to bring life to the rocky soil in that corner of Poitou.  Marie-Madeleine's daughter, Marie-Madeleine Livois, married fellow Acadian Jean-Grégoire Blanchard in Poitou in c1774.  Their daughter Marie-Anne was baptized at St.-Jacques, Châtellerault, in February 1775, but died a year later and was buried at St.-Jean-Baptiste, Châtellerault.  After two years of effort, the Acadians gave up on the Poitou venture and demanded to be returned to the port cities.  Jean-Grégoire Blanchard and Marie-Madeleine Livois took the last convoy to Nantes in March 1776 a month after burying their daughter, Marie-Anne.  They settled in the parish of St.-Similien, Nantes, and had two more children there:  Marie-Madeleine, born in July 1776, and Jean-Baptiste in March 1778.  Happily, both children survived childhood.  In early 1785, another son, Pierre-Charles, was born to them at Nantes.  Marie-Madeleine Poirier and five of her Livois children--Pierre-Joseph-Jean, Périnne-Françoise, Marie-Rose, Françoise-Nicole, and Jeanne-Céleste--likely followed her older daughter Marie-Madeleine to Nantes.   

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a better life in faraway Louisiana.  Jean-Grégoire Blanchard, his wife Marie-Madeleine Livois, and her sister Marie-Rose, still unmarried, agreed to take it.  If Marie-Madeleine Poirier was still alive in 1785, she chose to remain in France, as did at least two of her other daughters:  Périnne-Françoise married a Frenchman named Melliard and was counted at Nantes in February 1791.  Marie-Rose's twin, Françoise-Nicole, married Pierre Testard, probably a Frenchman, and also was counted at Nantes in February 1791. 

Marie-Madeleine Livois, age 31, husband Jean-Grégoire Blanchard, age 37, their three small children, ages 9, 8, and 1, and Marie-Madeleine's sister Marie-Rose, age 21, sailed to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in September 1785.  After a brief respite in the city, they chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marie-Madeleine, a widow, died in Assumption Parish in December 1815; she was 62 years old.  Five months after she and her older sister had reached the colony, Marie-Rose married Charles-Casimir, son of fellow Acadians André Templet and his second wife Marguerite LeBlanc, at Lafourche in February 1786.  Charles-Casimir had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships.  He and Marie-Rose lived at Baton Rouge perhaps until Charles-Casimir died, and then Marie-Rose returned to upper Bayou Lafourche, where she remarried to Pierre-Olivier, son of fellow Acadians Pierre Bourg and Marie Naquin, at Assumption in October 1794.  Pierre-Olivier also had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi.  Marie-Rose, twice a widow, died in Assumption Parish in October 1827; she was 63 years old.  No male Acadian Livois came to Louisiana, but the blood of this family, in several lines of the Blanchard, Bourg, and Templet families, survived in the Bayou State.  The Livoiss of South Louisiana today are descendants of French Creoles or Foreign French, not Acadians.44

Marant

According to the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville, Joseph Marant, born in c1729, was Acadian.  He married Angélique Dugas in c1755 probably at Chignecto.  Soon after their marriage, the British deported them to South Carolina, where they were counted by colonial authorities at Charleston in August 1763 (for some reason the British called him Joseph Moreau).  Joseph and Angélique probably went to French St.-Domingue with other Acadians from South Carolina soon after the census was taken and may have been among the hand full of Acadians there who hooked up with the refugees from Halifax who stopped to change ships at Cap-Français in early 1765.  

Joseph, now age 36, and his wife Angélique, age 31, reached New Orleans in 1765 with several orphans in tow, including Angélique's nephew and niece, Joseph Orillion dit Champagne, fils, age 17, and Marguerite Orillion dit Champagne, age 15, whose mother was a Dugas.  They followed other Acadians to Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before.  By the 1770s, they had moved to Ascension, farther upriver, where Joseph served as a "publican," so he must have been an educated man.  Joseph and Angélique had no children, at least none who survived Le Grand Dérangement, so the Acadian branch of the Marant family did not survive in the Bayou State.45

Mius d'Entremont

The Mius d'Entremonts, descendants of French nobles from Savoy and Normandy, were among the earliest and most distinguished families in French Acadia.  Philippe Mius d'Entremont of Cherbourg, Normandy, came to Acadia in 1651 as a lieutenant of erstwhile governor Charles La Tour, a childhood friend.  Philippe was 50, a lieutenant-major, married to Madeleine Hélie, and father of a daughter when he was named La Tour's adjutant.  In 1653, during his second tenure as governor of the colony, La Tour awarded his trusty lieutenant with the seigneurie of Pobomcoup, now Pubnico, near Cap-Sable, where Philippe and Madeleine settled for most of their time in Acadia; Philippe thus became the sieur d'Entremont, baron de Pobomcoup, lieutenant-major et commandant des troupes.  His barony ran from Cap-Nèigre, northeast of Cap-Sable, around to Cap-Fourchu near present-day Yarmouth.  He built his feudal house near the entry to the harbor at Pobomcoup.  One biographer asserts:  "D'Entremont played an important part in the colony's history both because of what he did as an administrator and because he was one of the rare Acadian seigneurs to concern himself with cultivation and with clearing land; he attracted to his estate 'several indentured workers and a few families from Port-Royal ... and this seigneury eventually formed a small centre of population.'"  In 1670, upon the restoration of the colony to France, Philippe, at age 69,  became the King's attorney in Acadia.  He served in this capacity until 1688, when old age and infirmity (he was 87!) compelled him to relinquish the post.  In his final days, he lived for a time at Minas with his older daughter and died in c1700 at age 99, "with all his teeth," either at Minas or Port-Royal.  He and his wife Madeleine had four more children in Acadia.  Their older daughter Marguerite married Pierre Melanson dit LaVerdure, fils.  Their three sons also married, the two oldest--Jacques de Pobomcoup and Abraham de Pleinmarais--to daughters of Charles La Tour, and the youngest, Philippe d'Azy, to two Mi'kmaq women, the second named Marie. 

On the eve of Le Grand Dérangement, descendants of Philippe Mius d'Entremont could be found at Annapolis Royal, on Île St.-Jean, and in France, but they were especially plentiful in the family's barony at Pobomcoup.  The Great Upheaval scattered the family even farther.  While the British were gathering up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, Marguerite Mius d'Azy of Port Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, and her new husband, Jean Delâge dit Langlois, left the island for Québec, where Marguerite died in early October 1755, age 36.  

There were descendants of Philippe Mius d'Azy still at Annnapolis Royal in 1755.  One of them, granddaughter Marie-Josèphe, with her husband Jean-Baptiste Raymond, was deported to North Carolina aboard the Pembroke in December.  Soon after the ship left Goat Island in the lower Annapolis River, a storm in the lower Bay of Fundy separated the Pembroke from the other transports filled with Annapolis valley Acadians.  The exiles aboard the ship, led by Charles Belliveau, a pilot, and including Jean-Baptiste Raymond, saw their opportunity.  They overwhelmed the officers and crew of the Pembroke, who numbered only eight, seized the vessel, sailed it to Baie Ste.-Marie on the western shore of Nova Scotia, hid there for nearly a month, and then sailed across the Bay of Fundy to the lower Rivière St.-Jean in January 1756.  There, in early February, they were discovered by a boatload of British soldiers and sailors disguised as French troops.  Raymond and the others managed to drive off the British force, burn the ship, and make their way with the ship's officers and crew to the upper Rivière St.-Jean settlement of Ste.-Anne-du-Pay-Bas, today's Fredericton, New Brunswick, where they spent the rest of the winter.  When food ran short at Ste.-Anne-du-Pay-Bas in the summer of 1756, Jean-Baptiste took his family to the St. Lawrence valley.  Marie-Josèphe died in a smallpox epidemic at Québec in December 1757, two weeks before her husband died.  

Most of the Mius d'Azys at Annapolis Royal remained in British hands.  Philippe Mius d'Azy's grandson Joseph and his wife Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Préjean and Andrée Savoie, ended up at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in late 1755.  Three of Joseph's younger brothers--Charles dit Charles-Amand and his wife Marie-Marthe, daughter of Antoine Hébert and Jeanne Corporon; François and his wife Jeanne, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Duon and Agnès Hébert; and Jean-Baptiste and his wife Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Surette and Jeanne Pellerin--along with their families, were deported to Massachusetts.  In October 1761, Joseph remarried to widow Marie Vincent at Philadelphia.  In 1763, after the war with Britain finally ended, Joseph took his family to Massachusetts, where his younger brothers and some of his Mius d'Entremont cousins were still living in exile.  

Meanwhile, in the spring of 1756, the British swooped down on Cap-Sable and Pobomcoup and sent two English sloops, the Mary and the Vulture, with approximately 170 Acadians from the Cap-Sable area to New York and Massachusetts.  One of these Cap-Sable deportees was Jacques Mius d'Entremont, fils, his wife Marguerite, daughter of François Amireau and Marie Pitre, and some of their children.  They sailed aboard the Vulture to Boston.  Jacques, fils died at Walpole, Massachusetts, in July 1759, age 80, and was buried at nearby Roxbury.  Jacques, fils's daughter Anne married Abel, son of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Duon and Agnès Hébert of Annapolis Royal, at Marblehead, Massachusetts, in 1756.  Jacques, fils's son Joseph married Agnès, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Belliveau and Agnès Gaudet, in Massachusetts in 1763.  

The other Mius d'Entremonts of Pobomcoup, including children of the captured Jacques, fils, escaped the 1756 round up.  They may have made their way to one of the Maritime islands north of peninsula Acadia, either to Île St.-Jean or to Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, which in 1755 were areas still controlled by France, or, more likely, the family eluded the British attackers in the spring of 1756 and remained at Pobomcoup.  No baptismal, marriage, or burial record places any of the Mius d'Entremonts of Cap-Sable on any of the Maritime islands. For those who remained at Pobomcoup, their respite from British oppression was short-lived.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, 400 British soldiers disembarked at Cap-Sable in late September to search for Acadians still in the area.  Two sailboats manned by British troops sailed along the shore above and below the the cape "to prevent the vermin from escaping in canoes," one British officer commented.  This time luck ran out for the Mius d'Entremonts of Pobomcoup.  The British burned all of the houses and other buildings in the area to deny the habitants shelter and sustenance.  In late October, the British embarked 68 Acadians they had captured at Cap-Sable, plus their priest, on the transport Alexander II.  This probably included Mius d'Entremonts.  Several Acadian families escaped the ruthless Rangers sent out to catch them but surrendered to British authorities the following summer and were held as prisoners at Georges Island, Halifax.  Meanwhile, the Alexander II sailed from Cap-Sable to Halifax, which it reached the first week of November.  From Halifax, in December 1758, the British sent the Cap-Sable Acadians to France with the Acadians they were deporting from the Maritime islands.  The Mius d'Entremonts went to Cherbourg.   

Among the family members sent to France in late 1758 were three daughters and a son of Joseph Mius d'Azy and Marie Amireau dit Tourangeau of Pobomcoup who had resettled on Île St.-Jean and chose to remain there.  Living in territory controlled by France, the Mius d'Azys of Île St.-Jean escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia during the fall of 1755.  Like their kins at Cap-Sable, their respite from British oppression was short-lived.  After the fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadian habitants on the island and deported them to France.  Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Mius d'Azy, and her husband Jean-Baptiste Henry; sister Geneviève and her husband François Guérin; sister Rosalie and her husband Éloi Lejeune; and brother Charles-Benjamin and his wife Marie-Josèphe Guédry were deported aboard the British transport Duke William.  Sadly, all of them, along with their children, perished at sea.  Their cousin Marie-Madeleine Mius d'Entremont, widow of Jean Lafitte of Île Royale, also was deported to France in 1758.  She ended up at Rochefort, near La Rochelle, where she died in August 1760, age 70.  

That the Cap-Sable Mius d'Entremonts were at Cherbourg by late January 1759 is attested to by the baptism of Abraham, younger son of Jacques Mius d'Entremont III and Marguerite Landry of Pobomcoup, at Tres-St.-Trinité, Cherbourg, on 22 January 1759; Abraham's baptismal record states that he was born "aux quatre Sables," that is, at Cap-Sable, on 8 December 1758, so this gives an idea of when the family was transported from Acadia to France.  The following year, 1760, was especially tragic for the Cap-Sable Mius d'Entremonts at Cherbourg:  Marie-Jeanne-Charlotte, age 3 weeks, daughter of Simon Mius d'Entremont and his first wife Marie Amireau, and Simon, age 5, perhaps another child of Simon and Marie, died in February.  Claire Mius d'Entremont, wife of Charles-Paul Hébert, age 50; and Joseph, age 72, son of Jacques Mius d'Entremont, père, died in March.  Charles, age 33, a bachelor, son of Joseph Mius d'Entremont; Anne Mius d'Entremont, age 30; and Marguerite, age 45, daughter of Charles Mius d'Entremont, died in May.  Two more bachelor sons of Joseph--Jean, age 27, and Abraham, age 38--died in June.  Jacques Mius d'Entremont III also died at Cherbourg in 1760.  The rigors of deportation probably contributed to so many deaths in the family that year; also, French ports were hotbeds of ship-borne epidemics such as smallpox and plague.  Nevertheless, there were also moments for the family to celebrate, such as the baptism of young Abraham Mius d'Entremont in January 1759.  But tragedy was always near.  Cécile, daughter of Joseph Mius d'Entremont, died at Cherbourg in c1762, in her late 30s.  Still, there were marriages to celebrate.  Simon, son of Joseph Mius d'Entremont and Cécile Boudrot and widower of Marie Amireau, married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Gabriel Moulaison and Marie Aubois of Pobomcoup and widow of François Viger, in September 1763.  Joseph le jeune, son of Charles Mius d'Entremont and Marguerite Landry, married cousin Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians François Landry and Marie Belliveau, in February 1764, soon after Joseph le jeune's parents died at Cherbourg.  His son Joseph-David was born that December, and Pierre-Marin was born posthumously in August 1766; Joseph le jeune had died at Cherbourg in March.  Madeleine, daughter of Joseph Mius d'Entremont and Marie-Josèphe Moulaison, married Jean, fils, son of fellow Acadians Jean Granger and Madeleine Melanson of Annapolis Royal, in May 1764.  That same month, Madeleine, daughter of Charles and Joseph le jeune's sister, married Basile, son of fellow Acadians Pierre Boudrot and another Madeleine Melanson of Annapolis Royal, but Madeleine, the bride, died in December 1770, age 40.  Pierre, brother of Joseph le jeune and Madeleine, joined his siblings in death at Cherbourg in July 1778; he was 47 years old and never married.  

Not all of the Muis d'Entremonts remained at Cherbourg.  By the early 1780s, Jacques IV, now in his 20s, had moved down the coast to St.-Malo in northern Brittany, where he married Frenchwoman Marie Herve of St.-Brieu, near St.-Malo, widow of Louis Landromon dit Langlinais of that city.  Jacques IV signed as a witness to a marriage at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in February 1784, about the time the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Jacques IV, wife Marie, and his widowed mother, Marguerite Landry, were the only members of his extended family who agreed to take it, but Jacques IV, aware of his aristocratic roots, put a price on his emigration to the Spanish colony.  Before he and his family set sail for Louisiana in August 1785, the Spanish made him a captain in recognition of the noble status of his family in old Acadia.  

Meanwhile, the Mius d'Entremonts and Mius d'Azys who had been exiled to Massachusetts and Pennsylvania waited patiently for the war with Britain to end.  When it did, in early 1763, they were able to leave the British colonies, where they had never felt welcome.  Most of the Acadians in New England, New York, and Pennsylvania repatriated to Canada.  Jacques Muis d'Entremont, fils's children and grandchildren returned to their home at Pobomcoup.  They no longer held the seigneurie there--that ended with their exile--but at least they were home again.  One of Jacques, fils's younger sons, Bénoni, died at Pobomcoup, now Pubnico, Nova Scotia, in February 1841, in his late 90s.  

Joseph Mius d'Azy and his family left Philadelphia for Massachusetts in 1763 to join his younger brothers and his cousins there.  One of Joseph's daughters, Marie-Cécile, married Frenchman Pierre Rinard of Granville, Normandy, in Massachusetts in c1765.  By 1767, the Mius d'Azys also had returned to their home at Cap-Sable--to Ste.-Anne-du-Ruisseau-de-l'Anguille, Pointe-à-Rocco, Pointe-des-Ben, and Bas-de-Tousket, now Tusket, near Pobomcoup.  In the 1780s, one of Charles Mius d'Azy's sons, Barthélemy, and his wife Madeleine Doiron moved to Arichat on Île Madame, off the southern coast of Cape Breton Island, formerly Île Royale.  In the 1790s, they moved on to Prince Edward Island.  But most of the Mius D'Entremonts and Mius d'Azys remained in the Cap-Sable area.  

Only one descendant of Philippe Mius d'Entremont, baron de Pobomcoup, found refuge in Louisiana.  Philippe's great-grandson, Jacques IV, son of  Jacques Mius d'Entremont III and Marguerite Landry, came to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships from France, that reached New Orleans in early December 1785.  The recently appointed captain was only 29 years old when he made the crossing.  With him was his widowed mother, age unrecorded; wife Marie Herve, age 30; son Jacques-Ferdinand, age 1; newborn daughter Marie, or Martine, born probably aboard ship; and three Langlinais stepchildren, ages 11, 9, and 7.  Infant Martine was baptized at New Orleans soon after the family reached the city.  

Jacques IV took his family to upper Bayou Lafourche, where his wife soon died.  He does not seem to have remarried.  Despite the captaincy given to him by the Spanish, censuses taken on upper Bayou Lafourche in the late 1780s and early 1790s reveal a man who was not much more affluent than fellow Acadians from humbler families.  In 1788, Jacques IV, now a widow, was living on the upper bayou with daughter Martine and two Langlinais stepchildren.  Son Jacques-Ferdinand had died by then.  Jacques IV's spread along the bayou was 8 arpents wide (the typical Acadian land grand was 6 arpents wide), he owned a single slave, one horned cow, and one pig.  Three years later, still living with his daughter and two Langlinais stepchildren, he could boast 10 arpents of frontage on the river, but he still owned only a single slave and only one cow.  His swine herd, however, had increased to 10--still a much more humble "seigneurie" than that of his distinguished ancestor.

Jacques Mius d'Entremont IV's daughter Martine survived childhood at Lafourche, but she did not remain there.  After she came of age, she crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and married Jean-Baptiste, son of fellow Acadians Jean-Athanase Trahan and Madeleine Thibodeaux, at Attakapas in July 1802. They settled at La Grosse Île du Vermilion.  Perhaps a victim of the rigors of childbirth, Martine died in St. Martin Parish in October 1807; she was only 23 years old. 

Jacques IV, great-grandson of Philippe Mius d'Entremont, seigneur of Pobomcoup, came to Louisiana in 1785 with his French wife and two children, but he fathered no more children there.  His son probably died in childhood.  His daughter survived childhood and married but died in her early 20s.  This proud, old family from Acadia, then, except through a line of the Trahan family, did not survive in the Bayou State.46

Neveu

According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, Laurent, son of Jean Neveu and Catherine Cayer of Santon, La Rochelle, France, a widower, probably not kin to Pierre, fils of Bordeaux, emigrated to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in the early 1700s.  In November 1721, Laurent married Jeanne, daughter of Pierre Robin of St.-Jean, La Rochelle, at Port-La-Joye.  Laurent and Jeanne settled at Tracadie on the north shore of the island.  One wonders why no one in this family was counted on Île St.-Jean in August 1752. 

After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on the Maritime islands and deported them to France.  Descendants of Laurent Neveu of Île St.-Jean may have been among these hapless Acadians.  Vincent, fils, son of Vincent Neveu and Marie Bernard, born probably in France in c1765 and perhaps a descendant of Laurent Neveu, was the only member of the family to emigrate to Louisiana with the Acadians from France.  He crossed on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in November 1785. 

Soon after his arrival, Vincent, fils married Cécile, daughter of Acadians Étienne Hébert and his first wife Marie Lavergne, at New Orleans; she also had crossed on L'Amitié.  Vincent and Cécile followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Spanish officials counted them in 1788 and 1791.  In both censuses, the couple had no children.  According to Ascension area church records, no Neveu children were born between 1791, when Cécile Hébert was still in her early 20s, and 1819, when she would have been in her early 50s, so Vincent and Cécile may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  The Neveus of South Louisiana today, then, are descendants of Foreign French or Afro Creoles, not Acadians.47

Noël

Pierre Noël, born "in Acadie" in c1725, lived at Grand-Pré in the Minas Basin.  One wonders who his parents may have been and when the first of his family came to the colony.  In the late summer of 1755, Pierre Noël, along with dozens of his fellow Acadians, was rounded up by British and New English forces under Colonel John Winslow and held in the church at Grand-Pré.  Colonel Winslow's list calls him Pierre Noails and says he had a daughter, so he must have been married, or perhaps he was a 30-year-old widower by then; Winslow's list does not name or even count the settlers' wives.  The list also reveals that Pierre owned no "bullocks," no "cowes," and no hogs, only five sheep. 

Pierre, perhaps with his daughter, ended up on a British transport bound for Virginia and from there was deported to England in May 1756.  He remarried to Marie-Madeleine Barbe, perhaps a fellow Acadian, soon after he reached England.  Two children were born to them in one of the coastal prison compounds where the Acadians were kept:  Marie-Madeleine in c1757, and Jean-Baptiste in May 1759. 

In May 1763, Pierre, now age 28, Marie-Madeleine, age 25, and their two children were repatriated from England to St.-Malo, France, aboard the ship L'Ambition.  They settled at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, where two more daughters were born to them:  Marie-Marguerite in February 1764, and Perrine-Rosalie posthumously in March 1766.  Pierre died at St.-Servan in late August 1765, "at age about 40 years."  Daughter Perrine-Rosalie died at St.-Servan in May 1766, only seven weeks after her birth.  In the early 1770s, Marie-Madeleine Barbe, still an unmarried widow, took her three surviving Noël children to Poitou as part of the settlement scheme there.  In late 1775, after the venture failed, they, along with dozens of their fellow Acadians, retreated to the port city of Nantes, where they lived on government hand outs and on what work they could find.  Marie-Madeleine Barbe died at St.-Martin de Chantenay, a suburb of Nantes, in February 1779; she was only 41 years old.  Her orphaned children--Marie-Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste, and Marie-Marguerite--were ages 22, 20, and 15, respectively, at the time of her death.  Interestingly, the first of the Noël daughters to marry was not the older Marie-Madeleine but the much younger Marie-Marguerite.  She married Frenchman Guillaume-Jean Roquemont of St.-Vivien, Rouen, probably at Chantenay in c1784.  Marie-Marguerite was 20 years old when she married; her husband was 56!  Guillaume-Jean died either later that year or in 1785.  They probably had no children.  

 Meanwhile, in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  The Noël sisters, one a young widow, the other still unmarried, agreed to take it.  Brother Jean-Baptiste, however, chose to remain in France.  "A mariner by profession," he married Luce, daughter perhaps of fellow Acadians Joseph Granger and Anne Poirier, probably at Nantes.  Luce had been born at Cherbourg in March 1768, so she was nine years younger than Jean-Baptiste.   Their son Pierre was born at Nantes in April 1789, and a second Pierre in October 1790.  In 1794, Jean-Baptiste, his wife, and two sons appeared on a list of Acadians and Canadians at Nantes who, according to "the law of 25 February 1791," were entitled to a subsidy from the Revolutionary government.  One hopes they survived the French Revolution with their heads intact. 

Only two members of the Acadian branch of the Noël family emigrated to Louisiana, from France in 1785.  Marie-Madeleine Noël, age 28, and younger sister Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, age 21, a young widow, crossed on La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Marguerite, still only age 22, remarried to Charles, fils, 39-year-old son of fellow Acadians Charles Aucoin and Anne-Marie Dupuis of Grand-Pré, in January 1786.  Charles also had come from France aboard La Bergère.  Spanish officials counted them on the upper bayou in January 1788.  They had no children; Marguerite's older sister Marie was the only other member counted in their household.  By January 1791, however, Marguerite had given Charles a daughter.  She gave him more children before he died at Ascension in January 1805, in his late 50s, leaving Marguerite a widow again.  She did not remarry.  She died in Assumption Parish in April 1840.  The Plattenville priest who recorded her burial said that she died "at age 70 a widow," but she was 76. 

Marie-Madeleine Noël did not remain with her younger sister and brother-in-law on upper Bayou Lafourche.  In April 1788, when she was 31 years old, she married Blaise, son of fellow Acadians Michel Rivet and his first wife Anne Landry.  Blaise had come to Louisiana from Maryland as a young bachelor in 1768.  Although he was age 41 at the time of their wedding, this also was his first marriage.  Blaise died at San Gabriel in September 1797, age 50, but not before Marie-Madeleine gave him two sons and at least two daughters.  Marie-Madeleine remarried to Frenchman Jean Baptiste, son of Antoine Lagarde and Marguerite Alrig of Languedoc, at St. Gabriel in July 1805.  Marie-Madeleine was age 48 at the time of her wedding, so she probably did not give her second husband any children.  She died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in March 1838, age 81.  One of her Rivet sons by her first husband settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, but her other son, also a Rivet, remained on the river. 

Noëls settled "late" in Acadia, and, compared to most other Acadian families, they came "late" to Louisiana.  Two sisters, one unmarried, the other a young widow, came to the colony from France in 1785.  Their only other sibling, brother Jean-Baptiste, a sailor, although married to a fellow Acadian remained in France.  Both sisters helped create families of their own in Louisiana, and both of them lived to ripe old ages.  Since the sisters were the only members of their family to emigrate to Louisiana, no Acadian Noël family lines emerged in the Bayou State.  The blood of the family survived, however, in several lines of the Rivet and Aucoin families.  The Noëls of South Louisiana today are descendants of French Creoles, Foreign French, or Afro Creoles, not Acadians.48

Olivier

Pierre Olivier, a tailor, born in c1692 in the Parish of St.-Mederic, Paris, came to Acadia by 1718, the year he married Françoise, daughter of Jacques Bonnevie and François Mius d'Azy, at Annapolis Royal.  They had eight children, including four daughters who married into the Caissie, Dubois, and Haché dit Gallant families.  Their three sons, all born at Annapolis Royal, created families of their own.  Oldest son Paul, born in c1727, settled first at Chignecto and then at Pigiguit before moving on to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, where he married Marguerite, daughter of François Poirier and Marie Haché dit Gallant, in September 1749.  Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, born in c1728, also settled at Chignecto before moving on to Île St.-Jean.  He married twice, first to Susanne Pitre in c1749 and then to Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Haché dit Gallant and Marie Gentil of Île St.-Jean, at St.-Servan, France, in January 1767 during Le Grand Dérangement.  Youngest son Joseph, born in c1730, moved to Chignecto, where he married Marguerite, daughter of Paul Martin dit Barnabé and Marguerite Cyr, in c1752.  They remained at Chignecto.  

In 1755, descendants of Pierre Olivier the tailor could be found at Chignecto and on Île St.-Jean.  And then Le Grand Dérangement scattered the family even farther.  The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives, a petit dérangement.  In 1750, Canadian soldiers, assisted by Mi'kmaq warriors led by the French priest Abbé Jean-Louis Le Loutre, burned Acadian homesteads in the British-controlled area east of Rivière Missaguash, forcing the habitants to move to the French-controlled area west of the river.  Oliviers may have been among the refugees.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto settlers, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with the French at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  

In the fall of 1755, the British deported Joseph Olivier and his wife Marguerite Martin dit Barnabé to South Carolina.  In 1756, they evidently were among the Acadians who did not take advantage of the South Carolina governor's permission to return to greater Acadia on their own hook.  In August 1763, six months after the war with Britain had ended, colonial officials placed Joseph and his family on a list of Acadians in South Carolina "who desire to withdraw from under the standard of their king ...."  Joseph was able to sign the list, indicating that he was literate.  Soon afterwards, he and his family, along with hundreds of other Acadians in the British Atlantic colonies, emigrated to French St.-Domingue, present-day Haiti, where the French were building a naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas.  Although driven from North America, the French were determined to hang on to what was left of their shrinking empire.  The new naval base on the north shore of St.-Domingue would protect the approaches to what was left of their possessions in the Caribbean basin.  French officials saw the Acadian exiles as a ready source of cheap labor.  They promised them land of their own if they came to the tropical island to help build the naval base.  And so Acadians, including Joseph Olivier and his family, emigrated to St.-Domingue in late 1763 and 1764.  But they found no farmland, only misery and death.  Evidently Joseph and Marguerite settled for a time at Cap-Français, east of Môle St.-Nicolas, where their son Jean-Baptiste was born in the mid-1760s.  Fed up with life in St.-Domingue, Joseph and Marguerite looked for an opportunity to join their fellow Acadians who had gone to Spanish Louisiana. 

Living in territory controlled by France, Joseph's older brothers Paul and Baptiste, still on Île St.-Jean, escaped the British roundup of 1755 in Nova Scotia, but their respite from British oppression was short-lived.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and transported them to France.  Among the Acadians exiled from Île St.-Jean was older sister Anne, born at Port-Royal in c1721, who had married Jean-Baptiste Haché dit Gallant, her brother Jean-Baptiste's wife Marie's brother.  Jean-Baptiste Haché died in France.  Anne did not remarry.  She remained in France for a quarter of a century, suffering along with hundreds of other Acadians the indignities of life in the mother country.  She and her family survived, like so many other Acadians, on government subsidies.  When the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a better life in faraway Louisiana, hundreds of them, including Anne Olivier, agreed to take it.  One wonders what happened to her brothers and their families in France.  If they were still there in 1785, they chose not to go to Louisiana. 

Meanwhile, younger brother Joseph, his wife Marguerite Martin dit Barnabé, and young son Jean-Baptiste le jeune, emigrated to Louisiana from French St.-Domingue by July 1767, when Spanish officials recorded them at New Orleans.  Unlike the great majority of his fellow Acadian exiles, Joseph settled at New Orleans.  Only by settling among other Acadians on the river, along Bayou Lafourche, or out on the prairies west of the Atchafalaya Basin could Joseph's descendants have held on to their Acadian identity. 

Two decades after Joseph Olivier reached the colony, his older sister Anne, now a widow; daughter Anne-Marie Haché, wife of  Jean-Charles Benoit and their four children; and grand-niece Madeleine-Appoline Haché came to the colony aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, in November 1785.  Anne Olivier followed her daughter and son-in-law, who was sailor, to the largely-Isleño community of San Bernardo, south of the city, instead of to a predominantly Acadian community west of New Orleans.  Meanwhile, brother Joseph's only surviving son, Jean-Baptiste, married a French Creole from the city in June 1785, farther distancing Joseph's descendants from their native culture.  The many Oliviers of South Louisiana, then, are descended from French Creoles and Foreign French, not Acadians who spurned their culture.49

Patry

Guillaume, son of Louis Patry and Mathurine Mahez of St.-Cloud, St.-Malo, France, born at Thiou in c1714, married Françoise, daughter of Gabriel Chiasson and Marie Savoie, and widow of Guillaume Gallet, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in October 1741.  Guillaume and Françoise had four children, all born at Havre-St.-Pierre:  Georges in July 1742, Angélique in June 1744, and twins Paul and Françoise in c1747.  Daughter Françoise probably died in childhood.  A French official counted them at Havre-St.-Pierre in August 1752. 

Living in territory controlled by France, Guillaume Patry and his family escaped the British roundup of the Acadians in Nova Scotia during the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, British forces rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  Guillaume, age 53, Françoise, age 54, Georges, age 17, Angélique, age 15, and Paul, age 12, crossed on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  All of Guillaume's family survived the crossing that took the lives of hundreds of their fellow Acadians.  They settled near St.-Malo, at LaGouesnière from 1759-61, and then at St.-Servan until 1765.  In March 1765, Guillaume took his family to Île Miquelon, a French island off the southern coast of Newfoundland, aboard Le Duc de Choiseul, but they did not remain on the crowded island.  They returned to St.-Malo via La Rochelle in March 1768.  Guillaume's wife Françoise may have died by then.  He remarried to a Frenchwoman, Jeanne, daughter of Mathurin Joucan and Charlotte Rouault of Bauger-Morvan, Dol, and widow of Pierre Beaugendre, at St.-Servan in October 1769.  They settled at St.-Malo.  She gave him no more children.  Guillaume was still alive in November 1770, when he served as godfather to son Paul's oldest daughter at St.-Servan.  Guillaume's family was reported as still residing at St.-Malo in 1772. 

Guillaume's son Paul by his first wife grew up at LaGouesnière and St.-Servan and accompanied his family to Île Miquelon and back.  He married Charlotte, daughter of fellow Acadians Christophe Potier and Anne Boudrot, at St.-Servan in January 1770.  They had at least three children at St.-Servan:  Jeanne-Charlotte-Rosalie, born in November 1770, Paul-Charles in December 1771 but died the following September, and Anne-Perrine in August 1773.  Soon after Anne-Perrine's birth, Paul and his family went to the Poitou region and, after two years of effort, retreated to the port city of Nantes with the majority of the Poitou Acadians.  Paul and his family settled at Chantenay, a suburb of Nantes.  They had another child at Chantenay:  Marie-Modeste was baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in June 1777.  Paul died in his early or mid-30s, probably at Chantenay, before November 1783, when his wife remarried to Pierre, fils, son of fellow Acadians Pierre Hébert and Marie Bernard of Chignecto, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay. 

One wonders what happened to Paul's older siblings, Georges and Angélique, after the family reached France.  Angélique served as godmother to Barthélemy, fils, twin son of Barthélemy Cosset and his third wife Françoise Gallais, at Bonnaban, near St.-Malo, in the spring of 1762, so she not only survived the crossing but also its effects.  Brother Paul served as godfather to Barthélemy, fils's twin sister, Louise-Geneviève.  The twins' mother, Françoise Gallais or Gallet, was Angélique and Paul's half-sister by their mother's first marriage.  Paul, himself, was a twin, of his sister Françoise, who died young. 

Soon after Paul Patry's death at Chantenay in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a better life in faraway Louisiana.  His widow Charlotte Potier and her second husband Pierre Hébert, fils agreed to take it.  Her Patry in-laws, if they were still alive, chose to remain in France.  Daughters Jeanne-Charlotte-Rosalie and Marie-Modeste Patry, who would have been 14 and 8 in 1785, also did not go to Louisiana, so they, like their father, probably had died at Chantenay.  However, daughter Anne-Perrine, age 12 when they crossed, did accompany her mother and stepfather, along with an infant half-brother, to the distant colony. 

Anne-Perrine Patry, called Anne Hébert on the passenger list of Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships from France, emigrated to Louisiana with her mother, stepfather, stepbrother, and a step uncle in the summer of 1785.  Their ship reached New Orleans in late August.  After a few weeks in the city recuperating from the long voyage, her mother and stepfather did not follow the majority of their fellow passengers to the Baton Rouge area but chose to settle in one of the prairie districts west of the Atchafalaya Basin. 

Anne married Pierre-Grégoire, son of fellow Acadians Mathurin Richard and Élisabeth Landry of Grand Coteau, at Opelousas in October 1794.  Pierre-Grégoire was a native of San-Gabriel on the river, his family having come to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767.  He and Anne settled at Beaubassin on upper Bayou Vermilion, near Carencro, at the northern edge of the Attakapas District.  Anne died suddenly at Beaubassin in August 1817; she was only 44 years old.  Her husband did not remarry.  Since she was the only member of her family to emigrate to Louisiana, the Acadian branch of the Patry family did not take root in the Bayou State.  Its blood, however, did survive in a line of the Richard family.50

Pellerin

François Pellerin, born in c1636, came to Acadia from Québec by 1665, the year he married Andrée, daughter of Pierre Martin and Catherine Vigneau, at Port-Royal.  François died at Port-Royal in c1678, in his early 40s.  After François's death, Andrée moved to Chignecto, where she remarried to Pierre Mercier dit Caudebec.  Before his death, François had given Andrée seven children, six daughters and a son.  Five of their daughters married into the Trahan, Thériot, Hébert, Godin, Caissie, and Moyen families.  François and Andrée's seventh child, son Pierre, born at Port-Royal in c1678, the year his father died, moved to Canada in the early 1700s with his mother and stepfather.  Pierre married Marie-Anne, daughter of Canadians Jacques Bélanger and Élisabeth Thibault, at St.-Pierre-du-Sud, below Québec City, in June 1722 and died there in c1731, in his early 50s.  At least two François and Andrée's daughters also moved to Canada.  Catherine dit Caudebec married Pierre, son of Laurent dit Châtillon dit Beauséjour Godin and Anne Guérin, probably in Canada in c1697 and died at St.-François-du-Sud, today's Montmagny, below Québec City, in May 1758.  The priest who recorded her burial said she was age 85.  Jeanne married first to Roger, son of Guillaume Caissie and Marie-Françoise Poirier, probably at Chignecto in c1703, and then to Jacques Moyen, probably a Canadian, in c1711.  Jeanne died at St.-Pierre-du-Sud in April 1744, in her late 60s.  As far as is known, no member of this branch of the Pellerin family emigrated to Louisiana. 

A third Pellerin, Étienne, born in c1647, was, according to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, François's younger brother; however, Acadian genealogist Stephen A. White asserts:  "We are ... in no position to affirm, as certain genealogists have claimed, that François and Étienne were brothers."  Étienne reached Acadia after the first census was taken in 1671 and married Jeanne, daughter of François Savoie and Catherine Lejeune, at Port-Royal in c1675.  They remained in the Port-Royal area.  At one time Étienne owned Hog Island on Rivière-au-Dauphin, now the Annapolis River, near Port-Royal.  In August 1714, soon after the British took over the colony, Étienne was among the Acadians who traveled to Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, aboard the King's vessel La Marie Joseph to look at land with the possibility of removing to the French territory.  Evidently he did not like what he saw on Île Royale and returned to Annapolis Royal, enduring British rule there.  He died at Annapolis Royal in November 1722, age 75.  He and Jeanne had 10 children, including five sons, all born at Annapolis Royal, four of whom created families of their own.  Étienne and Jeanne's five daughters married into the Calvé dit LaForge, Gaudet, Doucet, Brun, and Surette families.  Oldest son Pierre, born in c1682, survived childhood but did not marry.  Jean-Baptiste, born in c1685, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Martin and his Mi'kmaq wife Anne Ouestnorouest dit Petitous, at Port-Royal in February 1710.  They had six children, including two sons who married into the Girouard and Bourg families.  Two of their daughters married into the Doucet and Raymond families.  Charles dit Toc, born in c1690, married Madeleine, daughter of Prudent Robichaud and Henriette Petitpas, at Annapolis Royal in January 1725; he was in his mid-30s at the time of the wedding.  Bernard, born in c1691, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Gaudet le jeune and Marie Blanchard, at Annapolis Royal in November 1713.  They had 10 children, including four sons who married into the Belliveau, Boudrot, Savoie, Girouard, Préjean, and Thibodeau families.  Three of their daughters married into the Brun and Thibodeau families.  Youngest son Alexandre, born in c1694, married Jeanne, another daughter of Pierre Gaudet le jeune and Marie Blanchard, at Annaplolis Royal in January 1716 and settled on what the Acadians called the haute-rivière above Annapolis Royal.  One of their sons, Pierre, born at Annapolis Royal in c1718, moved to Canada and married Françoise Morin at Montmagny, below Québec, in April 1749.  The others remained at Annapolis Royal. 

In 1755, descendants of Étienne Pellerin could be found at Annapolis Royal, on Île St.-Jean, and in Canada.  Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this family even farther.  In December 1755, after British and New-English troops rounded up the Acadians at Annapolis Royal, they forced three sons of Bernard Pellerin--Pierre, with wife Marie-Josèphe Belliveau and their four daughters; Grégoire, with wife Cécile Préjean and their daughter; and Charles with wife Madeleine Thibodeau--aboard the transport Pembroke, destined for North Carolina.  Soon after the ship left Goat Island in the lower Annapolis River, a storm in the lower Bay of Fundy separated the Pembroke from the other transports filled with Annapolis Royal Acadians.  The exiles aboard the ship, led by Pierre's father-in-law Charles Belliveau, a pilot, and including the Pellerin brothers, saw their opportunity.  They overwhelmed the officers and crew of the Pembroke, who numbered only eight, seized the vessel, sailed it to Baie Ste.-Marie on the western shore of Nova Scotia, hid there for nearly a month, and then, in January 1756, sailed across the Bay of Fundy to the lower Rivière St.-Jean.  There, in early February, they were discovered by a boatload of British soldiers and sailors disguised as French troops.  The Pellerins and the others managed to drive off the British force, burn the ship, and make their way with the ship's officers and crew to the Rivière St.-Jean settlement of Ste.-Anne-du-Pay-Bas, today's Fredericton, New Brunswick, where they spent the rest of the winter.  When food ran short at Ste.-Anne-du-Pay-Bas the following summer, Grégoire and Charles took their families to the Gulf of St. Lawrench shore and then to Restigouche, at the head of the Baie de Chaleurs, while Pierre and his family went on to the St. Lawrence valley.  Charles remarried to Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Paul Thibodeau and Marguerite Trahan, at Restigouche in c1759.  Pierre remarried to Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Boudrot and Cécile LeBlanc, at Lotbinière, above Québec City, in 1762.  Pierre's daughters settled on the St. Lawrence.  Grégoire and Charles remained at Restigouche until the British captured the place in late 1760.  From Restigouche, they fled to Nipisiguit down the coast, where they were counted in 1761, and then they were taken to the prison camp at Halifax with other captured Acadians from the area. 

Descendants of Étienne Pellerin also were deported from Annapolis Royal to Massachusetts and New York.  Either during Le Grand Dérangment or after the war with Britain, a number of them ended up in Canada.  From the mid-1760s, they could be found at Québec City; at Bécancour,Yamachiche, Yamaska, Lotbinière, St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan, Louiseville, Nicolet, and St.-Grégoire above Québec; and on Île d'Orléans below the city.  They also could be found at Memramcook in present-day New Brunswick; and in Nova Scotia at Chezzetcook, Halifax and Pointe-de-l'Est. 

A Pellerin, perhaps a descendant of Étienne who had been deported to France, settled on Belle-Île-en-Mer, off the southern coast of Britanny.  In April 1781, Pierre Philippe, son of Marc Pellerin and Thérèse Brun, was born at Le Palais on the island. 

Descendants of Étienne Pellerin ended up on the French island of Martinique.  Agathe "of Acadie," daughter of Jean-Baptiste Pellerin and Marie Martin and a granddaughter of Étienne, died at St.-Pierre on the island in October 1764; she was 40 years old and had never married.  Agathe's older sister Marguerite, widow of Claude Doucet, died at St.-Pierre in December; she was 54. 

Meanwhile, in North America, after the war with Britain finally ended, the Acadians being held at Halifax, including Charles and Grégoire Pellerin, had a serious dilemma on their hands.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  In the case of the Acadians, however, this meant that they could return only to French soil.  Port-Royal had not been French territory for half a century!  British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all that they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland. 

Two Pellerin brothers came to Louisiana with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in late February 1765.  After a short respite at New Orleans, they followed the Broussards across the Atchafalaya Basin to the Attakapas District, where they helped establish La Nouvelle-Acadie on the banks of Bayou Teche. 

Grégoire Pellerin, age 41, came with wife Cécile Préjean, age 33, and perhaps three children, two sons and a daughter, their names and ages unrecorded.  Cécile's mother was an older sister of the Beausoleil brothers.  Grégoire and Cécile followed the Broussards to Bayou Teche and, despite their middle age, had more children there, including a son.  Their daughters married into the Auger or Oger, Frere, and Sigur families.  Judging by the numbers and the names of the witnesses on Grégoire's daughters' marriage documents, this humble Acadian's children married men of means and influence, none of them fellow Acadians.  One of his daughters settled in Iberville Parish on the river, but the others remained on the prairies.  One of his granddaughters married a French official, who took her to France.  Grégoire's only son Frédéric, born at Attakapas in December 1770 and baptized by a Pointe Coupée priest in April 1773, married cousin Marie Anne, daughter of Frenchman François Pecot and his Acadian wife Rosalie Préjean of La Mirebalais, Haiti, at Attakapas in July 1805.  Marie Anne's family had come to Louisiana from Haiti via Cuba not long before she married Frédéric.  He and Marie Anne settled on lower Bayou Teche in what became St. Mary Parish.  Their only son Charles Frédéric was born in St. Mary Parish in March 1819.  By the late 1820s, Fréderic had become one of the few sugar planters on lower Bayou Teche.  Frédéric and Marie Anne's daughters married into the Sorrel family.  Frédéric's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in July 1833; he would have been 63 years old that year.  Only his daughters married, so at least the blood of his family line survived in the Bayou State.  Older daughter Cécile Rosalie Célenie, married Antoine François Solange, called Solange, Sorrel, a medical doctor, in October 1820 and remained in St. Mary Parish.  Younger daughter Marie Angélique Désirée Coralie, wife of Martial Sorrel, avocat of Chautisse arrondissement de St. Martin, Department de Mere, France, and Solange's younger brother, accompanied her husband back to France after their 1834 marriage.  They did not return to Louisiana.  Marie died in France in May 1843, only 32 years old.  Fréderic and Marie Anne's son Charles Frédéric's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in August 1835, though he did not die until October 1841. The New Iberia priest who recorded his burial said that Chas. Frédéric died "at age 20 yrs.," but he was 22.  He was buried in "cemetery of Martial Sorrel," a brother-in-law, near New Iberia.  Charles Frédéric did not marry, so his family line probably died with him. 

Grégoire's younger brother Charles, age 35, came with wife Élisabeth, or Isabelle, Thibodeau, age 27, and no children, but Élisabeth was pregnant when they reached New Orleans.  Their daughter Marie was born at Attakapas in August or September 1765.  Charles died at Attakapas sometime between 1766 and 1768, in his late 30s.  He had no surviving sons, and daughter Marie also probably died young, unless she was the Marie Pellerin who married Joseph Sennet in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in September 1818.  No matter, this family line, except perhaps for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State. 

The Pellerins of South Louisiana, then, are descended from French Creoles and Foreign French, not Acadians.  During the late colonial and early antebellum periods, two vigorous lines established by sons of the Opelousas District's first commandant, Louis-Gérard Pellerin, settled in what became St. Martin, St. Mary, and Lafayette parishes.  Typical of affluent French Creoles throughout South Louisiana, these Pellerins married into some of the area's most prominent families, but few married Acadians.51

Précieux

Joseph Prétieux, whose name eventually became Précieux, born in Charente, France, in c1665, married Anne Gautrot probably at La Rochelle in c1688; Anne evidently was not kin to the Gautrots of Acadia.  Their son Joseph, fils was born at La Rochelle in c1689.  A daughter, Anne, born in c1691, was their only other child.  After coming to Acadia soon after the birth of their children, Joseph, père and his family settled at Minas, where they were counted in the census of 1693.  Joseph, père died perhaps soon after the census.  Daughter Anne bore an illegitimate son named Jacques in June 1708 and two years later married Pierre, fils, alias Blaise des Brousses dit Bonapetit, son of Pierre Lalande and Marie Labonne, at Port-Royal.  

In January 1719, Joseph, fils married Anne, daughter of Michel Haché dit Gallant and Anne Cormier, at Chignecto.  In c1724, Joseph, fils and Anne followed her family to Port-Lajoie on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, where they raised five children:  Marie-Anne, born in c1732; Louise-Marguerite in c1733; Pierre in c1737; Pierre-Joseph, called Joseph, in c1739; and Louis in c1741.  They were among the first Acadians to settle on the island.  Joseph, fils's oldest daughter Marie-Anne married Augustin dit Justice, son of Jean Doucet and Françoise Blanchard, and widower of Cécile Mius, at Port-Lajoie in December 1752.  Augustin and Marie-Anne were counted that year at Rivière-du-Nord-Est on the island with Augustin's sons Joachim and Joseph Doucet by his first wife.  Augustin and Marie-Anne had two children on the island:  Pierre Doucet, born in c1753; Marie Doucet in c1755; and Augustin Doucet, fils, whose birth year was not recorded.  Marie-Anne's sister Louise-Marguerite married Jean-Baptiste, son of François Chiasson and Anne Doucet, on the island in c1752. 

When British forces rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, the Précieuxs and Doucets on Île St.-Jean, living in territory controlled by France, remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  In late 1758, after the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg the previous July, British soldiers rounded up most of the Acadian habitants on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  Marie-Anne and husband Augustin Doucet made the crossing aboard separate ships.  Marie-Anne, Pierre, Marie, and Augustin, fils crossed on the British transport Tamerlan, which left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in mid-January 1759.  Marie-Anne and her older children survived the crossing, but little Augustin, fils died at sea.  Marie-Anne's father Joseph Précieux, fils, age 67, her mother Anne Haché, age 50, and brothers Joseph, age 19, and Louis, age 16, also made the crossing on the Tamerlan; they all survived.  Marie-Anne's sister Louise-Marguerite, wife of Jean-Baptiste Chiasson, was not so lucky.  The Chiassons crossed on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Two of their children--son Jean, age 6, and daughter Anne, age 4--died at sea.  Louise, age 26, survived the crossing but died in a hospital at St.-Malo in early February.  Only husband Jean-Baptiste Chiasson survived the ordeal.  Meanwhile, Augustin dit Justice Doucet, who had landed at Rochefort in early 1759, was determined to reunite with his wife and children.  He sailed from Rochefort to St.-Malo in April 1759, and he and Marie-Anne settled at nearby St.-Énogat.  

In France, Marie-Anne and Augustin had more children, including two sons, Jean-Baptiste Doucet, born at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in September 1766; and François Doucet, born at St.-Servan in September 1770.  In the early 1770s, they ventured to the Poitou region with other St.-Malo-area Acadians as part of a settlement scheme near the city of Châtellerault.  Marie-Anne's brother Joseph Précieux III married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Claude Benoit and Élisabeth Thériot, at Châtellerault in February 1775, but Joseph died soon afterwards.  After two years of effort, most of the Poitou Acadians, including Marie-Anne and her family, retreated in four convoys from Châtellerault to the port city of Nantes.  Marie-Anne was a widow by September 1784, when she was counted at Nantes with two of her sons, Jean-Baptiste and François Doucet.   

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Marie-Anne Précieux, widow of Augustin dit Justice Doucet, was the only descendant of Joseph Prétieux who agreed to take it.  Marie-Anne's former sister-in-law, Marguerite Benoit, still unmarried, also agreed to go to Louisiana, with sister Pélagie Benoit, widow of Yves Crochet.  The three widows sailed on the same vessel. 

Marie-Anne Précieux, age 52, and her two Doucet sons--Jean-Baptiste, 19, and François, 14--sailed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in November 1785.   After a brief respite in the city, they followed the majority of the passengers from their ship to upper Bayou Lafourche.  They settled in a community the Acadians would call Assumption, in the district the Spanish called Valenzuéla.   Since Marie-Anne was the only Acadian Précieux who emigrated to Louisiana, the Acadian branch of this family did not take root in the Bayou State.  Its blood, however, was perpetuated in two lines of the Doucet family.52

Quimine

Jacques, son of Daniel Kimin, Kimine, or Quimine and Marie Torel of Pennemart, Nantes, France, born in the late 1690s, came to Acadia by February 1715, when he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Gabriel Chiasson and Marie Savoie, at Chignecto.  Jacques and Marie-Josèphe settled at Chignecto before moving to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, by the early 1740s.  They were counted at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in 1752.  They had eight children, including two sons who settled on Île St.-Jean.  Jacques and Marie-Josèphe's daughters married into the Bertaud dit Montaury, Charpentier, Douville, Fouquet, and Le Buf or Le Buffe families and also settled on the island.   Older son Pierre, born in c1727, married first to Marie-Louise, called Louise, daughter of Michel Grossin and Marie Caissie, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, in February 1755.  Louise gave Pierre at least two children on the island:  Marie-Josèphe was born in January 1756, and Geneviève in June 1757.  Pierre remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Dugas and Marie Benoit, in France during Le Grand Dérangement.  Younger son Jean-Jacques, born in c1729, married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Thériot, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in November 1751.  They had at least four children on the island:  Jean-Louis was born in September 1752, Marie-Madeleine in September 1754, Anne in July 1756 but died 8 days after her birth, and Alexis was born in June 1757. 

When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, the Quimines, living in territory controlled by France, remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  The deportation devastated the family.  Jacques Quimine, age 60, wife Marie-Josèphe Chiasson, age unrecorded, and unmarried daughter Françoise, age 23, crossed on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Jacques and Marie-Josèphe died at sea, but daughter Françoise survived the crossing.  Another of Jacques's daughter, Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, and husband Jacques, son of Pierre Bertaud dit Montaury and Marie Martin, sailed with six children aboard the British transport Supply, which did not reach St.-Malo until early March 1759.  Two of their children--a 3-year-old son and a son born aboard ship--died at sea; the others survived.  Jacques's daughter Anne, age 40, and husband Louis-Aubin Le Buffe, age 43, made the crossing aboard one of the Five Ships.  One of their children--daughter Marguerite, age 2--died at sea; the other three, ages 10, 8, and 5, survived.  Jacques's daughter Marguerite, age 20, crossed with sister Anne's family and also made it to St.-Malo.  Daughter Judith, age 28, and husband Jacques, son of Île St.-Jean pioneers François Douville and Marie Roger, age 32, sailed aboard one of the Five Ships with two of their children and servant Pierre Cosset; all of them survived the crossing.  Jacques's older son Pierre Quimine, age 32, wife Louise Grossin, age 25, and daughters Marie-Josèphe, age 3, and Geneviève, age 2, also made the crossing aboard one of the Five Ships.  Pierre and Louise survived the ordeal, but their daughters died at sea. 

Jacques's youngest son Jean-Jacques Quimine, wife Madeleine Thériot, and their children do not appear on the rolls of the St.-Malo-bound ships nor in any church records in France.  One wonders, then, if they escaped the British roundup on Île St.-Jean and made their way north to Canada.  

From France, Jacques Quimine's daughters scattered to the winds.  Madeleine and husband Jacques Montaury settled at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, but they did not remain there.  In 1763, after the war with Britain finally ended, "the entire family went to reside at St. Pierre and Miquelon," French-held islands off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  They had returned to greater Acadia.  Anne Quimine and husband Louis-Aubin Le Buf also settled at St-Servan, where a son was born to them in January 1760 but died the following month.  Louis-Aubin died "at the hospital" probably at St.-Servan in June 1762.  The following year, Anne and her children, following her older sister, took Le Marie Charlotte to St.-Pierre and Miquelon.  Judith Quimine was pregnant when she crossed from Île St.-Jean to St.-Malo.  A daughter was born to her and husband Jacques Douville at St.-Servan in January 1759 less than a week after they reached the mother country.  Another daughter was born at St.-Servan in December 1761.  They followed Judith's sisters to St.-Pierre and Miquelon in 1763.  Marguerite Quimine, still unmarried, followed her sisters to St.-Pierre and Miquelon but did not remain there. 

Françoise Quimine married Louis, son of fellow Acadians Charles Charpentier and Marie-Josèphe Chenet of St.-Pierre-du-Nord, at St.-Servan in February 1760.  They did not follow her sisters to St.-Pierre and Miquelon.  In 1764, "the entire family," including infant son Louis-Jacques-Laurent, "went to Cayenne" in South America "on the ship Le Fort.  When French authorities conducted a census of the inhabitants at Sinnamary, Cayenne, in March 1765, they counted Louis but not Françoise and Louis-Jacques-Laurent.  Next to Louis's name was the word dissentaire, so one wonders if any member of the family survived the rigors of the tropics.  Also in French Guiana was Françoise's kinswoman, perhaps a niece, Marie-Jeanne Quimine, who would have been only age 9 in 1765.  She does not appear in the March 1 census at Sinnamary, so one wonders when she reached the tropical colony.  In February 1771, when she was still only 15, she married Jean-Louis, 30-year-old son of Guillaume Busson and Françoise Guillot of Sinnamary, at Sinnamary.  The recording priest noted that Marie-Jeanne was a daughter of Yves Quenine, as he spelled it, and Marie Grossin.  One wonders if this was Françoise Quimine's older brother Pierre and his wife Marie-Louise Grossin, who had remained in France.  The priest who recorded Marie-Jeanne's marriage also noted that "The said Quenine has stated she does not know how to sign."  In April 1776, at age 20, Marie-Jeanne remarried to Étienne, 27-year-old son of Pierre Saulnier and his first wife Marguerite Vincent of Minas, at Sinnamary.  Marie-Jeanne likely remained in French Guiana.

Jacques's older son Pierre was the only member of the family who remained in France after the war with Britain ended.  He made his living as a carpenter first at Paramé, near St.-Malo, and then at nearby St.-Servan, where his sisters had lived for a time.  He and wife Louise Grossin had more children in France:  Anne-Louise was born at Paramé in May 1760, and Marie-Perrine in January 1762.  Louise died at St.-Servan in September 1765, in her early 30s, and Pierre remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Dugas and Marie Benoit, at St.-Énogat, near St.-Servan, in January 1770.  Marie-Madeleine gave him at least one more daughter: Victoire-Françoise was born at St.-Servan in March 1771.  In the early 1770s, Pierre and his family became part of an attempt by the French government to settle Acadians from the coastal cities on land owned by an influential French nobleman near Châtellerault in the Poitou region.  The experiment ended badly, and in March 1776, Pierre and his family retreated with other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  They settled at Chantenay, a suburb of Nantes, and subsisted on government hand-outs and whatever work Pierre could find.  Marie-Perrine married fellow Acadian Pierre-Ignace, son of Ignace Heusé and his second wife Cécile Bourg, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in April 1785.  Her older sister Anne-Louise remained unmarried. 

Meanwhile, Pierre's youngest sister Marguerite returned from Îles St.-Pierre and Miquelon, where she had gone with her older sisters.  She married Jean-Aubin, son of fellow Acadians Charles Fouquet and Marie-Judith Poitevin of Île St.-Jean and widower, perhaps, of Marie Chevalier and Madeleine Savary, probably in France in the 1760s.  They were at Port-Louis, near Lorient in Brittany, in 1770 and moved to Nantes by September 1784. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Hundreds of them, including Pierre and Marguerite Quimine, agreed to take it.  Pierre Quimine, age 59, sailed to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships of 1785, which reached New Orleans in July.  With him were second wife Marie-Madeleine Dugas, age 53, and unmarried daughters Anne-Louise, age 24, and Victoire-Françoise, age 14.  Also aboard the vessel was daughter Marie-Perrine and her husband Pierre-Ignace Heusé.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac, south of Baton Rouge.  Pierre died at Manchac in the late 1780s; he was in his early 60s.  Anne-Louise married Simon-Magloire, son of fellow Acadians Simon Babin and his first wife Anastasie Thériot, and widower of Marie-Madeleine Lejeune, at Manchac or Baton Rouge in December 1789.  Simon-Magloire also had come to Louisiana from France, aboard L'Amitié.  On the same day and probably at the same place, Victoire-Françoise married Jacques-Olivier, son of fellow Acadians André Templet and his second wife Marguerite LeBlanc.  Jacques-Olivier, like Anne-Louise's husband Simon-Magloire, also had come to Louisiana from France, aboard La Bon Papa.  Anne-Louise and Victoire-Françoise followed their husbands, as well as their widowed, mother to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Victoire-Françoise remarried to Antoine, son of Jean-Baptiste Ledet and Marianne Rois, and widower of Marguerite Bilique, a Frenchman from Île de Ré, near La Rochelle, France, in November 1797.  Marguerite Quimine, age 50, sailed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships of 1785, which reached New Orleans in November.  With her were husband Jean-Aubin Fouquet, age 52, and two daughters, ages 15 and 11.  They may have followed some of their fellow passengers to San Bernardo, also called Nueva Gálvez, an Isleño community on the river below New Orleans. 

By the mid-1790s, Spanish officials were counting Quimines from France on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Anne-Louise died by April 1822, when her husband Simon Babin remarried in Lafourche Interior Parish.  Victoire-Françoise's husband Antoine Ledet remarried in the early 1800s, but area church records do not provide her burial date.

Pierre Quimine brought no sons to Louisiana and fathered no sons after he arrived there.  As a result, the Acadian branch of this family did not take root in the Bayou State.  Its blood, however, did survive in two lines of the Babin and Ledet families.53

Rassicot

René, son of Jean Racicot or Rassicot and Marguerite Crosnier of St.-Jean-Ursin, bishopric of Coutances, France, born in c1705, settled on Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in the late 1720s.  In October 1729, he married Marie, daughter of Michel Haché dit Gallant and Anne Cormier of Chignecto and widow of François Poirier, at Port-Lajoie on the island.  He and Marie had at least six children there:  Jean-Baptiste dit Ratier, born in c1730; Louise-Geneviève in c1731; René, fils in October 1733; Dominique in c1735; Henri in c1737; and Louis in c1739.  They also had a daughter named Marie, birth date unrecorded.  Wife Marie died on Île St.-Jean in September 1749, age 55.  In August 1752, a French official noted that René also was deceased and that his brother-in-law, Charles Haché, living on upper Rivière-du-Nord-Est, was providing for the Rassicot children, "minor and major." 

At least three of René and Marie's children created families of their own.  Jean-Baptiste dit Ratier, age 23, married Marie-Henriette, daughter of Louis Pothier and Cécile Nuirat, at Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, in January 1754.  Jean-Baptiste became a sailor.  René, fils, age 24, married Marie, daughter of Charles Benoit and and Madeleine Thériot of Pigiguit, at Port-Lajoie in October 1757.  Marie married Nicolas Laporte, date and place unknown. 

When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, René Rassicot's children, living in territory controlled by France, remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British swooped down on the island, rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean, and deported them to France.  René Rassicot, fils, age 25, wife Marie Benoit, age 22, crossed on the British transport Tamerlane, which reached St.-Malo in mid-January 1759.  Both survived the crossing.  Older brother Jean-Baptiste dit Ratier and wife Marie-Henriette Pothier also ended up in France, at Cherbourg, where at least five children were born to them:  Jean-Baptiste, fils in c1761, Louis in c1763, Jean-François in June 1765, Anne-Marguerite in c1768, and Marie-Henriette in c1770.  In late May 1771, they sailed from Cherbourg to St.-Malo, arriving there the first of June.  They settled at Plouër, near St.-Malo, where Jean-Baptiste died at La Ville de Port St.-Hubert in June 1771; he was only 40 years old.  In the early 1770s, Marie-Henriette and her children were part of a venture in Poitou that attempted to settle Acadians from the port cities on land owned by a French nobleman near the city of Châtellerault.  Marie-Henriette remarried to Pierre, son of fellow Acadians Augustin Gaudet and Agnès Chiasson of Chignecto and widower of Anne Giroir, at Châtellerault in October 1775.  The settlement failed soon afterwards, and Marie-Henriette, her new husband, and her Rassicot children joined hundreds of other disgruntled Poitou Acadians who retreated to the port city of Nantes.  By 1785, Marie-Henriette was a widow again.  Meanwhile, her son Jean-Baptiste Rassicot, fils married Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph D'Amours de Chaufours and Geneviève Leroy, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in May 1781.  René, fils and wife Marie Benoit seem to have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  They were at Châteauneuf, near St.-Malo, in 1759-60.  In 1760, René, fils volunteered for privateer service aboard the corsair L'Hercules, was captured by the British, and held as a prisoner of war probably in England.  Meanwhile, Marie moved from Châteauneuf to nearby St.-Servan in 1761 and was listed there in 1764 as a widow.  In January 1766, she remarried to Joseph, son of fellow Acadians Jacques Hébert and Marguerite Landry and widower of Marguerite Richard at St.-Servan.  Jean-Baptiste dit Ratier and René, fils's sister Marie, widow of Nicolas Laporte, did not end up in France.  She remarried to Prosper, son of architect Jean Meunier and Marguerite Simonet of Macon, France, at Môle St.-Nicolas, French Dominique, today's Haiti, in November 1780. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Hundreds of them, including Marie-Henriette Pothier and three of her Rassicot children, agreed to take it.  Her son Jean-Baptiste Rassicot, fils, however, chose to remain in the mother country. 

Marie-Henriette Pothier, age 46, widow of Jean-Baptiste dit Ratier Rassicot, and three of her children--Jean-François, age 20, Anne-Marguerite, age 17, and Marie-Henriette, age 15--sailed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in November.  They followed most of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Marie-Henriette died in January 1787.  Older daughter Anne-Marguerite married Tranquille-François, son of fellow Acadians Pierre Arcement and Marie Hébert, at St.-Jacques on the river, in July 1788.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Anne Marguerite died in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1834, in her mid-60s.  Younger daughter Marie-Henriette married twice, first to French Creole Pierre Lecompte at Lafourche in July 1791.  A few years later, she was a young widow and caught the eye of one of the most influential men in the colony.  Louis Judice, born at New Orleans in October1731, had married Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Jacques Cantrelle, founder of the Cabanocé/St.-Jacques settlement.  By 1765, Louis Judice and his family were living on a large holding at Cabanocé granted to him by the French authorities in New Orleans.  After the Spanish took over the colony in March 1766, Louis became co-commandant of the Cabanocé district with his brother-in-law, Nicolas Verret.  In 1769, Spanish General Alejandro O'Reilly appointed Louis as commandant of the Lafourche des Chitimachas District, which the Acadians called Ascension.  Louis and Marie-Jeanne Cantrelle had a number of children, including Michel, born in c1759, who became a lieutenant of militia and another shaker and mover in the colony and also commanded at Ascension.  By the 1790s, the aging Louis was a widower, but he was determined to take another wife.  In June 1795, 64-year-old Louis Judice, captain of the German Coast militia and commandant of the Ascension District, married 25-year-old Marie-Henriette Rassicot, the widow Lecompte, at Ascension.  Marie-Henriette died a widow in Ascension Parish in February 1826; she was 56 years old. 

Marie-Henriette Pothier's son Jean-François was the only Acadian male Rassicot to make it to Louisiana.  He also settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Boudreaux and Brigitte Apart, in January 1787.  A native of Trigavou, near St.-Malo, Marie-Madeleine also had crossed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, so she and François may have known one another in France or met aboard ship.  She died within days of their wedding, so she gave him no children.  Jean-François remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Robichaux and his second wife Anne Hébert, at Lafourche in June 1788.  Marie-Josèphe was a native of St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, and had crossed to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships.  She and Jean-François settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron, Bertrand, Gaubert, Guillon or Guillou, Richard, and Robichaux families and remained on Bayou Lafourche.  Jean-François died at Assumption in c1797; he was only 32 years old.  He fathered no sons.  As a result, the Acadian branch of the family did not take root in the Bayou State.  Its blood, however, did survive in a number of South Louisiana families.54

Renaud

Renaud is a common surname in France, so, as early as 1685, a number of Frenchmen with the name emigrated to greater Acadia.  Among the last of them was Jean dit Arnaud, son of Pierre Renaud and Marie-Madeleine Gainné of Rochefort, France, born there c1704.  Probably unrelated to the other Renauds in Acadia, Jean dit Arnaud came to Île St.-Jean in the early 1720s and married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Acadians Jean Pothier and his second wife Marie-Madeleine Chiasson, at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in October 1733.  They settled at Havre-au-Sauvage and, from 1734 to 1758, had at least 10 children:  Marie was born in December 1734, Rosalie in January 1737, Collette in February 1739, Jean, fils in April 1741, Anne in October 1743, Véronique in c1747, Madeleine-Josèphe in March 1752, Jean-Charles in August 1754 but died at age 3 months the following November, Jacques in December 1755, and Marie-Anne in August 1758.  Oldest daughter Marie married Raphaël La Clair at St.-Pierre-du-Nord in January 1754. 

As a result of the British conquest of Île St.-Jean in the summer of 1758, at least one of Jean Renaud dit Arnaud's sons, Jean, fils, and two of his sisters, Colette and Véronique, ended up at Cherbourg, France.  There, Colette married Frenchman René Le Tuillier of Roville, bishopric of Constances, lower Normandy, in c1762.  Jean, fils, who became a sailor, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Poirier and Madeleine Granger of Port-Royal, at Tres-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, in January 1764.  Véronique married Jean-François, called François, son of Jean-Baptiste De La Mazière dit Ladouceur and Marie Poirier of Île St.-Jean, at Cherbourg in c1768.  Jean-François was a navigator, a blacksmith, and also a carpenter.  The siblings and their spouses had a number of children in their years at Cherbourg.  Colette and husband René had at least seven children, four sons and three daughters.  Jean, fils and wife Marie had at least four children--Jean III or Jean-Baptiste, born in July 1765; Isidore-Marin; Pierre-David; and Marie-Anne, born in April 1772.  Véronique and husband Jean-François had at least two children, a son and a daughter.  

In the early 1770s, all three families moved to the Poitou region as part of a settlement scheme there.  French authorities were tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on marginal land he owned in the region.  The Acadians tried mightily to bring life to the rocky soil near Châtellerault.  In Poitou, Colette and her husband lost a son, who died at 2 years old.  Jean, fils and his wife had another son, Louis-Auguste, baptized at St.-Jean-L'Evangeliste, Châtellerault, in February 1775.  Véronique and her husband also had another child, a daughter, baptized at La Chapelle-Roux, near Châtellerault, in July 1775.  

After two years of effort, most of the Acadians in Poitou demanded to be returned to the port cities.  In October 1775, Jean, fils and his family, along with Véronique and her family, retreated from Châtellerault to the port city of Nantes with other Poitou Acadians.  Colette and her family left Poitou on a similar convoy two months later.  The three families lived as best they could on government handouts and what work they could find at Chantenay, a suburb of Nantes.  Colette and her husband buried a son, age 9, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in July 1776.  Their daughter Marie-Rose Le Tullier married Jean-Baptiste, son of fellow Acadians François Legendre and Marguerite Labauve of Meillac, south of St.-Malo, France, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in September 1783.  Jean, fils's son Joseph-Abraham was baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in April 1777.  Véronique and her husband had four more children, a son and a daughter, at Chantenay between 1777 and 1783, but the youngest daughter died at age 5 months in June 1783.  Meanwhile, in October 1780, they buried a 5-year-old daughter.  In January 1784, at age 50, Colette's husband, René Le Tullier, died, leaving her a widow with three teenage children. 

When the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in Louisiana, the majority of the Acadians there, but very few Renauds, agreed to take it.  Jean, fils, for instance, though married to a fellow Acadian, chose to remain at Nantes.  However, his sisters Colette and Véronique and their husbands, and Colette's married daughter Marie-Rose Le Tullier and her husband, agreed to go to the Spanish colony.  Marie-Rose, age 20, husband Jean-Baptiste Legendre, age 25, and their infant daughter Rose sailed to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in late July 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac, below Baton Rouge.  Colette, age 45, and three of her Le Tullier children, ages 19, 16 and 14, sailed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached left Paimboeuf, the port of Nantes, in late August and New Orleans in November 1785.  They did not follow the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche but chose to join Marie-Rose and her husband at Manchac.  Colette's sister Véronique, age 37, also sailed aboard L'Amitié, with husband Jean-François De La Mazière, age 37, and three children, ages 8, 6, and 4.  Véronique was pregnant when the ship left Paimboeuf.  During the crossing, In early October, during the crossing, she gave birth to another daughter, whom she and her husband named Martina, or Martine, in honor of Louisiana's Spanish intendant, Martin Navarro, who served as godfather to the newborn Acadians. Véronique and her family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where the De La Mazières shortened their name to Mazière.  

The Renaud sisters from Île St.-Jean were the only Acadians with the name to settle in Louisiana.  Younger sister Véronique's Mazière's son Jean-Baptiste fathered no children, but Colette's Le Tullier sons married Daigre sisters and created vigorous lines in the Baton Rouge area, so the blood, at least, of the Acadian Renauds survived in the Bayou State.  The Renauds or Reynauds of South Louisiana today are descendants of French Creoles, Foreign French, or Afro Creoles, not Acadians.55

Ritte

According to the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville, Catherine Ritte, widow of Guillaume Blanchard, was Acadian.  Evidently she settled in the Opelousas District, where she was buried in April 1790 under the name Catherine Rieter.56

Savary

François Savary, a mason and stone cutter, was indentured to Antoine Héron "for the company of Acadia" in 1686.  In c1689, free from his contract, he married Geneviève Forest at Port-Royal.  They had one child, a son named André, who was born at Port-Royal in c1690.  When the boy was only two years old, his mother remarried to Louis Mazerolle dit Saint-Louis, so François must have died soon after his son was born.  Louis Mazerolle raised André, who, in February 1712, married Marie-Marthe, daughter of Bernard Doucet dit Laverdure and Madeleine Corporon, at Annapolis Royal.  He and Marie-Marthe had 11 children, including at least three sons who created families of their own.  Three of their daughters married into the Doiron and Horne families.  In the 1730s and 1740s, André and Marie-Marthe lived at Pigiguit and Grand-Pré in the Minas Basin before moving on to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, in c1750; one wonders if Marie-Marthe had died by then.  In 1752, André, now a widower, age 60, was counted at Rivière du Moulin-à-Scie on the island with six unmarried children:  Charles, age 25; Marguerite, age 23; Marguerite-Josèphe, age 21; Jean-Baptiste, age 20; Françoise-Anastasie, age 18; and Charles-Olivier, age 13.  Oldest son Bernard, born at Annapolis Royal in October 1714, married Marie, daughter of François Michel dit La Ruine and Marguerite Meunier, probably at Pigiguit in c1734.  They followed his father to Île St.-Jean and were counted at Rivière du Moulin-à-Scie in 1752 with seven of their 13 children:  André le jeune, age 17; Jean-Baptiste le jeune, age 14; Agnès, age 10; Isaac, age 9; Rose, age 7; Charles le jeune, age 3; and Louis, age 13 months.  Joseph, born at Grand-Pré in February 1721, married Françoise, daughter of Antoine Barrieau and Angélique Thibodeau, probably at Pigiguit in c1747.  He and Françoise also followed his kinsmen to Île St.-Jean, where they were counted at Rivière du Moulin-à-Scie in 1752 with two children:  Joseph, age 4; and Marie, age 2.  Charles, born at either Pigiguit or Grand-Pré in c1727, followed his father to Île St.-Jean and married Louise-Geneviève, daughter of Louis Closquinet or Clossinet and Marguerite Longuépée, on the island in c1755. 

When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, the Savarys on Île St.-Jean, living in territory controlled by France, remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British swooped down on the island, rounded up most of the Acadians there, and deported them to France. 

Some of the Savarys on Île St.-Jean managed to elude the British roundup.  Old André, doubtlessly sensing the futility of remaining on the island during a full-blown war between Britain and France, fled north to Québec even before the fall of Louisbourg.  The old man was buried at St.-Jean, Île d'Orléans, just downriver from Québec City, in November 1757, age 65, a year before the British captured the Maritimes islands.  Son Joseph and his family must have gone to Québec with him; Joseph died at St.-Charles de Bellechasse, Québec, in January 1758, only 37 years old.  Oldest son Bernard and his family, except for young daughter Anne-Marie-Madeleine, also may have escaped the British roundup on Île St.-Jean. 

Other Savarys on Île St.-Jean did not escape the British in 1758.  André Savary's son Charles, age 31, wife Louise Clossinet, age 34, and sons Jean-Charles, age 2 1/2, and Charles, fils, age unrecorded, made the crossing to St.-Malo, France, aboard the British transport Supply.  Charles, père, Louise, and Jean-Charles survived the crossing, but Charles, fils died at sea.  Charles, père died at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in late April 1759, a month and a half after he and his family disembarked at St.-Malo, probably from the rigors of the voyage.  Widow Louise remarried to fellow Acadian Charles Trahan at Châteauneuf, near St.-Malo, in August 1759.  Another Charles Savary, age 18, crossed alone on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758; he survived the crossing.  Charles, père's niece, oldest brother Bernard's daughter Anne-Marie-Madeleine, age about 4, made the crossing on a British transport that took her to Cherbourg; one suspects she crossed with relatives who looked after her.  Two other Savarys--Madeleine, daughter of Louis Savary and the wife of Jeanne Audaire; and Marie, wife of Pierre Loumeau--also ended up in France.  One wonders how Madeleine and Marie were kin to André et al. 

The Savarys who survived the crossings to France endured life in the mother country as best they could.  Madeleine, now the widow Audaire, remarried to day laborer Jean, son of perhaps Charles Fouquet and Marie Poitevin of Île St.-Jean and widower of Marie Chevalier, at Notre-Dame, Rochefort, in September 1763; Madeleine's father Louis and brother François witnessed the marriage.  Marie Savary, also a widow now, remarried to Charles, son of François Foubert and Renée Hurtaud of Marsay, Aunis, at Rochefort in October 1763.  Charles also was a day laborer.  Thomas Savary of Louisbourg remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Frenchman Roch Fabre and widow of Julien Denion, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, in October 1782. 

Meanwhile, Andre's granddaughter, Anne-Marie-Madeleine Savary, lived probably with relatives at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo, from 1759 to 1771 and was at Plouër, also a suburb of St.-Malo, in 1772.  Still in her teens, she married fellow Acadian Pierre Pothier, widower of Marie Comeau, at Pleudihen in May 1771.  By September 1784, Anne was living at Nantes, a widow, with two young Pothier sons:  Baptiste-Olivier, born in c1773, and Jacques-Sylvain in c1778. 

When in the early 1780s the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Anne-Marie-Madeleine Savary and her sons agreed to take it.  The other Acadian Savarys, having married into French families, chose to remain in France.  Anne-Marie-Madeleine, age 31, crossed to Louisiana aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships from France, with her two sons, Baptiste-Olivier Pothier, age 12, and Jacques-Sylvain Pothier, age 7.  They reached New Orleans in August 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Anne remarried to Joseph, fils, son of fellow Acadians Joseph Granger and Marguerite Gautrot, in June 1786.  Joseph, fils, also had come to Louisiana from France, though on which vessel the records do not say.  Anne-Marie-Madeleine had no more children by him.  Her younger son Jacques-Sylvain Potier seems to have died not long after the family reached Louisiana.  Older son Baptiste-Olivier Potier married Élisabeth or Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Aucoin and Élisabeth Hébert, who also had come to Louisiana from France, aboard the third ship Le Beaumont.  Baptiste-Olivier and Isabelle set down roots on Bayou Lafourche. 

No male descendant of an Acadian Savary emigrated to Louisiana.  However, the blood of one family, that of François Savary of Port-Royal, survived through a line of the Potier family that sprang from one of his granddaughters.  The Savarys, or Savorys, of South Louisiana today are descended from French Creoles, Foreign French, or Anglo Americans, not Acadians.57

Ségoillot

Émilien dit Sans-Chagrin, son of Dominique Ségoillot and Marie Boulet (Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault says Étiennette Ducharme), born at St.-Pierre, Autun, Bourgogne, France, in c1714, served in the Louisbourg garrison as a senior sergeant in the troupes de la marine beginning in the early 1730s.  Probably after he retired from the King's service, he married Élisabeth-Blanche, 17-year-old daughter of Acadians François Lavache and Anne-Marie Vincent, at Port-Lajoie, Île St.-Jean, in September1752.  A few days earlier, a French official counted them at Grande-Anse on the south shore of the island.  Élisabeth-Blanche gave Émilien dit Sans-Chagrin a son, François-Dominique, born at St.-Pierre-du-Nord on the island in July 1753.  The old sergeant remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Naquin and Jeanne Melanson of Cobeguit, at Port-Lajoie in September 1755.  Marguerite gave him a daughter, Marie, born probably on the island in c1756.

When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, the Ségoillots on Île St.-Jean, living in territory controlled by France, remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg in July 1758, British forces swooped down on Île St.-Jean and deported most of the Acadians there to France.  Émilien dit Sans-Chagrin, age 45, wife Marguerite Naquin, age 35, son François-Dominique, age 5 1/2, and daughter Marie, age 21 months, made the crossing aboard one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and arrived at St.-Malo in late January 1759.  All of the family survived the crossing except little Marie, who died at sea.  

In France, Émilien dit Sans-Chagrin and his family settled at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo.  Marguerite gave the old soldier another daughter at St.-Suliac:  Marie-Françoise, born in January 1764.  The year after Marie-Françoise's birth, the family moved from St.-Suliac to Belle-Île-en-Mer, where they joined dozens of other Acadians from the coastal cities who were determined to bring life to the sandy soil of the big island off the southern coast of Brittany.  Daughter Marguerite-Josèphe was born at Belle-Île-en-Mer in c1766.  A French official counted the family at Borbren, in the parish of Locmoria on the island, in February 1767.  Émilien dit Sans-Chagrin and Marguerite died on the island, he in c1769, in his late 50s, she in December 1773, in her late 40s.  After their parents died, François-Dominique may have remained on the island, but his sisters did not. 

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Marie-Françoise and younger sister Marguerite-Josèphe evidently agreed to take it.  In September 1784, Spanish officials counted Marie Sigoliau, probably Marie-Françoise, and an unnamed orphan, probably Marguerite-Josèphe, at Nantes in Brittany.  They would have been ages 20 and 18 respectively at the time of the survey, and they were recorded on a list of Acadians in the city who expressed interest in going to Louisiana at the expense of the Spanish crown.  When it was time to board a ship for New Orleans, however, Marie-Françoise did not go.  Perhaps she married a Frenchman at Nantes who insisted that they remain in the mother country, or she may have died before the first of the Seven Ships set sail from Paimboeuf, the port of Nantes, in May 1785.  Sister Marguerite-Josèphe had no reason to stay; she "embarked for Louisiana in 1785." 

Marguerite-Josèphe Ségoillot, age 19, crossed to Louisiana alone aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in August 1785.  After a short respite in the city, she may have followed most of her fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, or she may have remained at New Orleans.  She was the only Ségoillot to emigrate to Louisiana, and there is no evidence that she married there.  The Acadian branch of this family, then, perhaps including its blood, did not take root in the Bayou State.  

One wonders what happened to her after she reached the colony with hundreds of her fellow Acadian exiles.  One possibility is a tragic one.  According to the most careful study of the Seven Ships expedition, that of Oscar Wenzerling, the first ship, Le Bon Papa, reached New Orleans from Paimboeuf, the port for Nantes, in late July 1785.  Winzerling continues: "The voyage was a success in its freedom from storms, and from epidemics and sickness of any kind.  Only one death," that of an infant, he adds, "marred an otherwise perfect voyage."  Such was not the fate of the second ship, La Bergère, which left Paimboeuf in May only four days after Le Bon Papa departed but did not get to New Orleans until the middle of August.  Le Bon Papa had carried 156 passengers; La Bergère, a frigate and a larger ship, was burdened with 273.  La Bergère reached New Orleans "fortunately without any mishap," Winzerling notes, but the voyage was not as "perfect" as the previous one.  Six elderly persons had died at sea, but seven babies had been born before the ship reached the city.  Sadly, nine more passengers from La Bergère died at New Orleans while they recuperated from the 93-day voyage.  The debarkation list for La Bergère, which has survived, does not include the name of "single girl" Marguerite-Josèphe Ségoillot; she appears only on the ship's embarkation list.  Was the 19-year-old daughter of the old sergeant from Île St.-Jean one of the passengers who died at New Orleans during the period of recuperation?58

Surette

Pierre, son of Noël Surette and Françoise Colarde of Mauset, diocese of La Rochelle, France, born in c1679, was a sailor when he came to Acadia.  He married Jeanne, daughter of Étienne Pellerin and Jeanne Savoie, at Port-Royal in February 1709.  They remained at Port-Royal and settled in the parish of St.-Laurent on the haute rivière, now the upper Annapolis River.  Although Pierre became a farmer along the upper river, he also continued to work as a sailor.  As late as 1724, when he was in his mid-40s, records show him as a crew member on Englishman William Winniett's sailing vessel.  Pierre died at Annapolis Royal in October 1749, age 70.  Jeanne died at Québec in January 1758 during Le Grand Dérangement, also at age 70.  Pierre and Jeanne had nine children, all born at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal.  Four of their daughters married into the Doucet, Gignac, Long, Mius d'Azy, and Petitot dit Saint-Seine families.  Their three sons created families of their own, but they did not remain on haute rivière.  Oldest son Pierre, fils, also called Pierre II, born in December 1709, married Catherine, daughter of Pierre Breau and Anne LeBlanc, at Grand-Pré in September 1732 and lived at Minas before moving to Petitcoudiac.  Middle son Joseph, born in May 1712, married Marguerite, daughter of Claude Thériot and Marguerite Cormier, at Grand-Pré in October 1730.  They remained at Minas before moving to Petitcoudiac, where Joseph drowned in the river there in c1750.  Youngest son Paul, twin of sister Madeleine, born in November 1721, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of ____ Landry and Élisabeth Thériot and widow of Jean Landry, in c1758, during Le Grand Dérangement.  In 1755, descendants of Pierre Surette, père could be found at Annapolis Royal, Minas, and Petitcoudiac. 

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this family to the winds.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in the early 1750s, the Acadians were again caught in the middle of a conflict.  When British and New-English forces attacked Fort Beauséjour at Chignecto in the late spring of 1755, Surettes were among the trois-rivières-area Acadians who were serving in the fort as militia, though they may have left the fort a few days before it surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French troupes de la marine at Beauséjour he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  Evidently the Surettes, led by Pierre II, escaped this first round of deportations.  They instead helped form an Acadian resistance that both attacked the British in their Missaguash forts and protected their homes in the trois-rivières.  The British managed to capture some of the resistance fighters, including Pierre II, who was confined in Fort Cumberland, formerly Beauséjour.  But he did not remain in British custody for long.  In late February 1756, Pierre II, who had ingratiated himself with his British captors, led a daring escape from Fort Cumberland.  Eighty Acadians squeezed through a tunnel they had dug with discarded horse bones.  They escaped to the woods and managed to elude the British, but they paid a terrible price in doing so.  At Miramichi, on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, they suffered almost as much as they had done in the woods north of Chignecto.  In November 1759, near Memramcook, Pierre II and two other Acadian resistance leaders, Jean and Michel Bourg, "surrendered" to the British, but, the following spring, Pierre II rejoined the resistance movement, at Restigouche on the Baie des Chaleurs.  After a British force captured Restigouche in the summer of 1760, Pierre II and his family were sent to a prison-of-war compound in Nova Scotia, where they were held for the rest of the war. 

After their release, Pierre II and members of his family decided to remain in Nova Scotia, at Chezzetcook near Halifax.  They stayed there until c1770, when they moved to Ste.-Anne-du-Ruisseau, present-day Pointe-à-Rocco, northeast of Cap-Sable.  Pierre II's sons Charles-Amand, Joseph, and Paul, along with some of their Surette cousins, settled on Rivière St.-Jean in the late 1760s, but some of them joined Pierre II near Halifax by 1769.  Pierre II's nephew Pierre le jeune, son of Joseph, settled at Pointe-du-Diable, near the British settlement of Dartmouth, across from Halifax.  Surettes, especially descendants of Pierre II, also settled in Nova Scotia at Météghan and other Acadian communities on Baie Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary Bay, along the western Atlantic shore.

Pierre II's widowed mother Jeanne Pellerin died at Québec in late January 1758, age 70, so members of the family managed to escape to the St. Lawrence valley.  Brother Joseph's daughter Anne, widow of Paul Doucet, remarried to fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Pitre at St.-Pierre-les-Becquets, above Québec, in March 1761.  Pierre II's youngest sister, Françoise, widow of Joseph Petitot dit Saint-Seine, remarried to Jacques, fils, son of Jacques Gignac and Marie-Anne Richard and widower of Anne-Françoise Lafond dit Mongrain, at Ste.-Foy, near Québec City, in October 1764.  Joseph's daughter Marguerite married Jacques, fils, son of Canadians Jacques Tessier and Marie-Louie Monet, at La Chine, above Montréal, in January 1766.

Meanwhile, at Halifax in 1763, another Pierre Surette, his teenage wife Marie Thibodeau, and her Broussard and Thibodeau kin, had a serious dilemma on their hands.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  In the case of the Acadians, however, this meant that they could return only to French soil.  Chignecto and the trois-rivières were no longer French territory.  British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all that they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles, like Pierre Surette II, chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland. 

Pierre Surette, age unrecorded, and his wife Marie Thibodeau, age 25, followed the Broussards from Halifax to Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, and then on to New Orleans, which they reached in late February 1765.  With them was daughter Marie-Anne, age 3.  Also in the party were Marie's widowed mother and three of Marie's younger siblings.  After a short respite in New Orleans, during which daughter Marie-Anne was baptized on March 4 at the St.-Louis church, Pierre and Marie followed the Broussards and the Thibodeaus to the Attakapas District, where they helped created La Nouvelle-Acadie on the banks of Bayou Teche.  Marie was pregnant when they reached Attakapas, and in June, two months after they settled on the Teche, she gave birth to son Augustin.  

That summer and fall, an epidemic swept through the Teche valley settlements and killed dozens of Acadians.  When French officials counted the surviving Attakapas settlers in April 1766, only Marie Thibodeaux and daughter Marie-Anne Surette were left in her household at La Manque on the lower Teche.  Pierre and the infant Augustin must have died by then, perhaps unrecorded victims of the epidemic.  Marie remained on the Teche and remarried to fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Semer at Attakapas in c1768.  

Marie-Anne Surette married Firmin dit Ephrem, son of fellow Acadians Bruno Robichaux and Félicité Broussard, at Attakapas in April 1778, and remarried to Marcel, son of fellow Acadians Paul LeBlanc and Agnès or Anne Babin, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1811, in her late 40s.  Soon after their marriage, Marie-Anne's second husband secured a decree of separation from her.  She died at her home at Grand Pointe on the upper Teche in November 1817; the priest who recorded her burial said that she died at "age about 53 years"; she was 55.  Her succession records were filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in August 1811 and December 1817. 

Though her parents produced a son in Louisiana, the boy died in childhood, and father Pierre did not live long enough to father more children.  The Acadian branch of the family, then, except for its blood, which survived in a line of the Robichaux family, did not take root in the Bayou State.59

The Foundational Acadian Families of South Louisiana

The failure of these 55 families to establish agnatic lines in the Bayou State left 101 other Acadian families to serve as the foundation of today's Cajun culture.  Forty-six of these "foundational families" produced fairly large lines in Louisiana during the colonial and antebellum periods.  Among the largest, eight of them--Babin, Boudreaux, Braud/Breaux, Hébert, Landry, LeBlanc, Richard, Thibodeaux--were some of the oldest families of Acadia.  Two others--Broussard and Guidry--had been relatively small families in the old country but proliferated dramatically in Louisiana.  Many of the other, older families--Arceneaux, Aucoin, Benoit, Bergeron, Bernard, Blanchard, Bourg/Bourque, Bourgeois, Chiasson, Comeaux, Cormier, Daigre/Daigle, Doucet, Dugas, Dupuis, Foret, Gaudet, Gaudin, Gautreaux, Girouard, Guilbeau, Leger, Lejeune, Martin, Melançon, Pitre, Prejean, Robichaux, Savoie, Sonnier, Theriot, Trahan--created substantial lines in the Bayou State.  Several families--Duhon, Guillot, Mire, and Mouton--had reached Acadia somewhat later than the others and were relatively small in size there, but in Louisiana they, too, proliferated during the antebellum period.  Most of the Acadian families in the Bayou State, however--Achee, Allain, Arbour, Arcement, Babineaux, Barrilleaux, Bertrand, Boutin, Brasseaux, Bujole, Clément, Clouatre, Crochet, Dantin, David, Delaune, Deroche, Doiron, Dubois, Gousman, Granger, Gravois, Henry, Jeansonne, Labauve, Lachaussee, Lalande, Lambert, Lanoux, Lebert, Legendre, Levron, Longuépée, Louvière, Mazerolle, Michel, Moise, Molaison, Naquin, Orillion, Ozelet, Part, Pinel, Poirier, Potier, Prince, Rivet, Roger, Roy, Semere, Talbot, Templet, Use, Villejoin, and Vincent--were, by the end of the antebellum period, comparatively smaller in numbers than their prolific cousins.02

The surviving families settled in every corner of South Louisiana, including areas in which Acadians did not go or had been numerical minorities during the colonial period.  Beginning in the 1830s, led by the Guidrys, a hand full of Acadian families from the western prairies crossed the Sabine River and resettled in East Texas, the first of them while Texas was still a province of Mexico.  One family--the Gousmans, descended from a Spanish immigrant in Nova Scotia--moved from the river below New Orleans north to St. Tammany, and there they remained.  Most of the foundational families, however, remained in the predominantly-Acadian areas of South Louisiana:  in the river parishes above New Orleans, still called the Acadian Coast; the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley; and out on the southwest prairies.  Members of many families, especially the largest ones, could be found in all three Acadian areas east and west of the Atchafalaya Basin: 

Achée

Michel Haché dit Gallant, son of Pierre Larcher or Larché of St.-Pierre parish, Montdidier, Picardie, and an unidentified Indian woman, was born at Trois-Rivières, Canada, in c1662.  He came to Acadia as a young servant of Michel Le Neuf de La Vallière, the seigneur of Chignecto, between 1678 and 1682, and married Anne, daughter of Chignecto pioneer Thomas Cormier, in c1690.  Around 1720, probably to escape British authority in Nova Scotia, Michel dit Gallant became a pioneer himself when he moved his family from Chignecto to what the French called Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island.  According to many historians, Michel Haché dit Gallant was "one of the island's first European settlers" and the first Acadian settler on the island.  He built his new home on a red sandstone cliff now called Rocky Point, overlooking a promising harbor that came to be known as Port-La-Joye, across the channel from today's Charlottetown, the capital of the province of Prince Edward Island.  Michel dit Gallant and Anne had 12 children.  He died after falling through the ice at the mouth of Rivière-du-Nord, across from Port-La-Joye, in April 1737, age 74.  His daughters married into the Poirier, Rassicot, Prétieux, Jacqueline dit Lorraine, Hango dit Choisy, Duval, and Belliveau families.  His seven sons, all born at Chignecto, married into the LeBlanc, Gaudet, Gentil, Lavergne, and Boudrot families and settled on Île St.-Jean, though one of them, the oldest, returned to Beaubassin.  

Le Grand Dérangement scattered this family far and wide.  The British deported Hachés to South Carolina in 1755, but did not remain there.  They were among the exiles the governor of that colony allowed to return to greater Acadia by boat.  They and their cousins who had escaped the British at Chignecto sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore or in Canada.  After the war with Britain ended in 1763, Hachés could be found in present-day Québec Province at Pointe-du-Lac and St.-Antoine-de-Chambly on the St. Lawrence above Québec, and at Barachois on the southeastern coast of the Gaspé Peninsula; at Caraquet, Nepisiguit, now Bathurst, Richibouctou, Grande-Digue, Shédiac, Cap-Pélé, and Memramcook in present-day eastern New Brunswick; at Amherst and Nappan in northwestern Nova Scotia; at Mont-Carmel, Egmont Bay, Cascumpec, and Rustico on today's Prince Edward Island, formerly Île St.-Jean; at Margaree on the western coast of Cape Breton Island, now in Nova Scotia; and in the îles de la Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  Others ended up on Miquelon and St.-Pierre, French-controlled islands off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  And at least one of them ended up on Martinique in the French Antille.  Meanwhile, in 1758, the British deported Hachés from the Maritimes islands to various ports in France.  Some went to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany in hopes of finding farmland for themselves.  In the early 1770s, others went to Poitou to find land for themselves and retreated to the port city of Nantes when the dream proved elusive.  In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a better life in faraway Louisiana.  At least 17 Hachés agreed to take it and crossed on two of the Seven Ships from France in 1785.  However, some of their cousins chose to remain in the mother country. 

In July 1785, the first of the Seven Ships, Le Bon Papa out of the Paimboeuf, France, reached New Orleans with two sets of unmarried Haché sisters, all born in France, and an unmarried cousin.  Three of the sisters were daughters of Joseph Haché dit Gallant and Marie Dumont.  They may have followed their fellow passengers to Manchac on the Mississippi below Baton Rouge.  If so, they did not remain there.  Oldest sister Hélène married fellow Acadian Jean-Bapiste David at St.-Jacques, downriver from Manchac, in October 1788.  Third sister Élisabeth, or Isabelle, married Frenchman Joseph Calandrot at St.-Jacques in May 1794.  Second sister Marie-Josèphe married Antonio Ramirez, a Spaniard, perhaps an Isleño or Canary Islander, probably at San Bernardo, an  Isleños community on the river below New Orleans, in the late 1780s.  The second set of sisters aboard Le Bon Papa were daughters of Jacques Haché dit Gallant and Anne Boudrot.  They, too, followed their fellow passengers to Manchac, and they, too, did not remain there.  Older sister Marie-Jeanne, called Jeanne, married French Creole François Sevin at nearby Baton Rouge in June 1787 and moved on to Bayou Lafourche, where, at age 52, she remarried to fellow Acadian Magloire-Simon Babin, a widower, in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1822 .  Younger sister Marguerite-Marie never married and died in St. James Parish on the river in October 1847, age 74.  Their first cousin Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Antoine Haché dit Gallant and Marie Clémenceau, married fellow Acadian Mathurin-Charles Heusé at San Gabriel on the river in November 1786, settled north of Bayou Manchac in the Baton Rouge District, and then moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche. 

In November 1785, the fifth of the Seven Ships, L'Amitié, also out of Paimboeuf, reached New Orleans.  Aboard were several Haché families.  Anne-Marie Haché and her husband Jean-Charles Benoit settled at San Bernardo on the river below New Orleans, as did Madeleine-Apolline Haché, sister of Hélène et al.  Unlike her sisters, Madeleine-Apolline came to the colony on L'Amitié with an aunt, Anne Olivier of Annapolis Royal, widow of her father's brother Jean-Baptiste Haché dit Gallant.  Madeleine-Apolline did not marry. 

The other Haché families that crossed on L'Amitié followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  The family of Louis Haché of Île St.-Jean was led by his second wife, Françoise Doucet, age 46.  Louis did not take L'Amitié to the colony but came later.  With Françoise were son Pierre-Charles, age 10, and three orphans:  niece Marie-Anne Haché, age 19, and nephews Pierre-Alexis Haché, age 16, and Joseph-François Haché, age 10.  Marie-Anne married Frenchman Louis-Antoine Charrié of Nior, Poitou, at New Orleans in December 1785; Louis-Antoine also had crossed on L'Amitié.  After a brief respite in New Orleans, Françoise and her charges, along with Marie-Anne and her husband, settled on the upper Lafourche.  In December 1790, Marie-Anne remarried to Pierre de St. Angel of Québec, at Lafourche.  Nine years later, in May 1799, Marie-Anne remarried again--her third marriage--to Michel Barré of Montréal.  Meanwhile, Louis Haché joined his wife Françoise Doucet at Lafourche.  They had no more children in Louisiana, so Louis's line was perpetuated by his only son, Pierre-Charles.  Louis's Haché's nephews Pierre-Alexis and Joseph-François, the youngest sons of Louis's older brother Pierre, went with their aunt and uncle to the Lafourche, where Pierre-Alexis remained, but Joseph-François left the valley after he married and settled on Bayou Teche, west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  Two of Louis's grandsons settled in Iberville Parish on the Mississippi in the early 1800s, but most of his descendants remained on Bayou Lafourche in Assumption and Lafourche Interior parishes.  Not until after the War of 1861-65 did a line of the family set down roots on the western prairies. 

Another Haché family that crossed on L'Amitié was led by Jean-Baptiste-Charles, 22-year-old son of Jean-Charles Haché and his second wife Marie Hébert.  Jean-Baptiste-Charles had been born in Chantenay, a suburb of Nantes.  His 20-year-old wife, Marie-Modeste Pinet dit Pinel, also had been born in France.  With them were Jean-Baptiste-Charles's sister Marie-Bonne, age 18, his brother Frédéric, age 15, and his infant daughter, Martina, or Martine, who had been born a week before the ship's departure from Paimboeuf, the port of Nantes, in August (Martine was one of the Acadian infants baptized at New Orleans in late 1785 who was named in honor of Louisiana intendant Martin Navarro, who the Acadians adored).  This family also went to the upper Lafourche, where Jean-Baptiste-Charles died in c1786.  He was only 24 years old and fathered no sons.  Sister Marie-Bonne did not remain at Lafourche but crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Attakapas District, where she married Joseph dit Tito St. Germain of Fort Chartres, Illinois, in August 1788.  Brother Frédéric moved from the bayou to the river and probably never married.  Jean-Baptiste-Charles's widow, Marie-Modeste, remained on the upper Lafourche, where she remarried to fellow Acadian Jean-François, called François, Benoit, in September 1789.  Jean-Baptiste-Charles's daughter Martine survived childhood and married Jean-Baptiste Thibodeaux and widower of Marie-Rose Damour, at Assumption on the upper bayou in November 1804.  Jean-Baptiste Thibodeaux and his family also had emigrated to Louisiana from France in 1785.  Martine died in Lafourche Parish in July 1861, age 75--one of the last of the Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join her ancestors. 

The Acadian Hachés of South Louisiana descend from two cousins who came to Louisiana from France:  Pierre-Alexis, who followed his uncle Louis to upper Bayou Lafourche; and Louis's only surviving son, Pierre-Charles, who also settled along the bayou.  Over the decades, on the bayou, along the river, and out on the prairies, the family's name slowly evolved from Haché to Achée.  Unlike many of their cousins in Canada and greater Acadia, few of the Hachés of South Louisiana called themselves Gallant. ...60

Louis (1741-?) Michel dit Gallant Achée

Louis, eighth son of Jean-Baptiste Haché dit Gallant and Anne-Marie Gentil and grandson of the family's progenitor in Acadia, was born at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean, in June 1741.  Louis survived the deportation to Cherbourg, France, in 1758 and also moved on to St.-Malo to be near his family.  After being held as a prisoner of war in England in 1760-63 following his capture on a French privateer, Louis married Anne, daughter of Claude Benoit and Élisabeth Thériot, at St.-Servan in February 1765.  She gave him two children, a son and a daughter, in 1766 and 1767.  Louis remarried to Françoise, daughter of François Doucet and Marie Carret and widow of Alexis Renaud, at St.-Servan in February 1770.  She gave him two more children, a son and a daughter, at St.-Servan in 1771 and 1772.  Françoise gave him another son at Châtellerault in Poitou in 1774, and four more children, three sons and a daughter, at Chantenay near Nantes between 1776 and 1781.  Louis was the only member of his father's family to emigrate to Louisiana.  With him went his second wife, one of his sons, two nephews and a niece.  He settled in the Bayou Lafourche valley and died there after 1798, in his late 50s or early 60s.  

Only surviving son Pierre-Charles, by second wife Françoise Doucet, baptized at Châtellerault, Poitou, France, in November 1774, came to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié with his mother and three orphaned cousins.  When his father reached the colony, he followed his parents to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie-Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Bourgeois and Marie-Osite Landry of St.-Jacques, in c1797.  Marie was a native of Louisiana.  They settled at Assumption, where most of their children, including many sons, were born.  Pierre Charles died in Assumption Parish in July 1831, age 58.  Four of his eight sons created their own families.

Oldest son Urbin, born at Assumption in September 1798, married Azélie, also called Madeleine,18-year-old daughter of fellows Acadian Benjamin Landry and Anne Landry, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in January 1820, and settled in Iberville Parish on the river.  Their son Louis Urbin was born in Assumption Parish in July 1821 but died at age 15 months in October 1822.  Urbin remarried to Carmelite Placencia or Plaisance, probably an Isleño or Canary Islander.  Their son Narcisse was baptized at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, age 4 months, in July 1829 and probably died young.  Urbin remarried again--his third marriage--to Marguerite Domitille, called Domitille, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Dupuy and Henrietta LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in March 1829.  Their son Pierre was born in Iberville Parish in October 1831, and Joseph in March 1836 but died a week after his birth.  Urbin died in December 1836, age 32.  A daughter by first wife Azélie may have married into the Dugas family, and his daughters by third wife married Domitille married into the Geinglins, Housiaux, and LeBlanc families.  Only one of his four sons seems to have survived childhood.  He, too, created his own family, on the river and the prairies.    

Third son Pierre, by third wife Domitille Dupuy, married Marie or Marine, daughter of fellow Acadians Narcisse Hébert and his Creole wife Mary Virginia Langlois, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in June 1854.  Their son Jean Silentiel or Silezian, born in Iberville Parish in May 1856, died "at the point across from Plaquemine" at age 6 months the following November; Pierre Rudolphe was born near Plaquemine in February 1859;  Apollinaire near Plaquemine in July 1861; Joseph Oscar in St. Martin Parish in March 1867; and Paul was born in St. Martin Parish in March 1870.  As the birth of their younger children reveal, after the War of 1861-65, Pierre and Mary Virginia crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled in St. Martin Parish.  Their daughter Marie Virginia or Virginie, called Virginie, born near Plaquemine in March 1864, married Joseph Ernest, son of Ernest Cormier and Marguerite Alzima Lasseigne, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1881; the priest who recorded the marriage noted that the bride's parents were deceased at the time of the wedding.  

Second son Pierre Rudolphe may have married Spanish Creole Mathilde Lopez.  

Pierre-Charles's second son Louis le jeune, born at Assumption in November 1799, probably died young.  

Pierre-Charles's third son François-Marie, born at Assumption in May 1801, may have died young.

Pierre-Charles's fourth son Pierre-Sylvain or Simon, called Simon, born at Ascension in December 1805, married Colette, also called Belotte, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Landry and Scholastique Templet, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1834.  Their son Désiré Simon was born in Assumption Parish in May 1837; Aurestile Forestal in December 1838; Joseph Gervile in September 1842; Simon Pierson, called Pierson, in September 1846; Constant Camille in December 1854; and Ernest Adrien in March 1860.  Their daughter married into the Barbier family.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted a single slave--a 49-year-old black male--on Simon Achée's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District.  

Fourth son Pierson married Emma, daughter of ean Baptiste Boudreaux and Emilie Wanney, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1869, remarried to Marguerite Bennett, and moved to St. Mary Parish, on lower Bayou Teche, during the late 1800s.  

Pierre-Charles's fifth son Onésime, born at Ascension in November 1806, married Marie Zéolide or Zéolite, daughter of fellow Acadians Lubin LeBlanc and Marie Mélanie Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1828.  Their son Joseph Séverin, called Séverin, was born in Assumption Parish in February 1841 but died at age 8 in July 1849; and Paul Théolin or Théophile, called Théophile, was born in January 1848.  Onésime's daughters married into the Dugas and Simoneaux families.  

Younger son Théophile married Alida, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Blanchard and Elisa Hébert, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1867. 

Pierre-Charles's sixth son Marcellin, born at St.-Jacques  in January 1811, may have died young.  

Pierre-Charles's seventh son Rosémond, born probably in Assumption Parish in the early 1810s, married Marie Claire, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Doiron and his Creole wife Catherine Paille, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in November 1834.  They settled in Iberville Parish near his older brother Urbin.  Their oldest son, name unrecorded, died an infant near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in August 1835; Sébastien, born in September 1839, died at age 1 in October 1840; Valsin was born in December 1840; Rosémond, fils in November 1842; Théodule, also called Jules, in March 1845; and Émile in December 1846.   At least two of his sons created their own families. 

During the War of 1861-65, fourth son Rosémond, fils served in Companies A and C of the 9th Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in East Baton Rouge Parish, which served in Louisiana.  He deserted his unit late in the war and was captured by the Federals.  Rosémond, fils married Louisiana Husiaux or Housiaux at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in July 1868. 

Fifth and youngest son Théodule married Evelina, daughter of Jérôme Toups and Marie Marguerite Brown, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in April 1864.  During the War of 1861-65, Jules also served in Companies A and C of the 9th Battalion Louisiana Infantry.  He, too, deserted his unit in the last days of the war.  He remarried to Marie Uranie, daughter of Omer Antoine Langlois and Virginia Langlois, at the St. Gabriel church in September 1867.  One suspects that neither Théodule nor his older brother Rosemond were welcome in any of the local camps of the United Confederate Veterans. 

Pierre-Charles's eighth and youngest son Zéphirin, born in Assumption Parish in August 1815, may have died young.

Jean-Baptiste-Charles (1762-c1786) à Jospeh dit Gallant à Michel dit Gallant Achée

Jean-Baptiste-Charles, called Jean-Charles, elder son of Jean-Charles Haché and his second wife Marie Hébert, born in Très-Ste.-Trinité Parish, Cherbourg, France, in December 1762, was a sailor in France.  He married Marie-Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Pinet dit Pinel and Anne-Marie Durel, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, near Nantes, France, in November 1784.  They, with infant daughter Martina, or Martine, followed his relatives aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where he died probably in c1786, age 24.   He fathered no sons.  Daughter Martine married into the Thibodeaux family and was one of the last of the Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join her ancestors.

Frédéric  (c1770-1839) à Jospeh dit Gallant à Michel dit Gallant Achée

Frédéric, younger son of Jean-Charles Haché and his second wife Marie Hébert, born at Nantes, France, in c1770, came to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié with his older brother Jean-Baptiste-Charles and other relatives to upper Bayou Lafourche, but he did not remain there.  During the late colonial or early antebellum period, he moved to what became Iberville Parish, where he died near St. Gabriel in March 1839; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Frédéric, "nat. of Nantes, France," died at "age 80 yrs.," but he was probably closer to 70.  Evidently he did not marry. 

Pierre-Alexis (1768-c1818) à Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant à Michel dit Gallant Achée

Pierre-Alexis, called Alexis, elder son of Pierre Haché and his third wife Madeleine Dingle, born at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in March 1768, came to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, in 1785, with his paternal aunt Françoise Doucet, wife of uncle Louis Haché, and two siblings, younger brother Joseph-François and older half-sister Marie-Anne.  After his uncle Louis reached the colony, Pierre and his brother followed his uncle and aunt to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Pierre married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Dantin and his French wife Jeanne Gesmier, at Assumption in June 1795.  Anne, a native of France, also had come to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié.  She and Pierre-Alexis settled down bayou in what became Interior and then Lafourche Interior Parish.  Pierre Alexis's succession record was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse, Lafourche Interior Parish, in July 1818.  He would have been 50 years old that year.  His daughters married into the Ledet, Malbrough, Pitre, Roger, and Usé families. Three of his five sons created their own families.  His oldest son's line was especially vigorous. 

Oldest son Jean-Pierre, baptized at Assumption in December 1796, married Rosalie Ayraud or Aymond.  They settled on the upper Lafourche in Ascension, Assumption, and Lafourche Interior parishes.  Their daughter married into the Munch family.  They had a dozen sons, many of whom created their own families.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish, counted six slaves--2 males and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 40 years to 9 months--on Jean Pierre Achée's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District.  

Oldest son Joseph Oscar, also called Oscar J., born in Ascension Parish in November 1833,  married Elina, daughter of Joseph Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Clémense Bergeron and widow of Terence LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1857.  Their son Joseph Samuel was born in Assumption Parish in October 1858.  During the War of 1861-65, Joseph Oscar served in Company H of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Assumption Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  In March 1864, at the beginning of the Red River Campaign, he was captured along with his unit at Henderson Hill; he spent some time in a U.S. army hospital at New Orleans, so he may have been wounded in action, and was exchanged the following July.  After the war, Joseph Oscar may have crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and moved to St. Martin Parish, where he remarried to Amelie Courville.  Their daughters were born near Breaux Bridge in St. Martin Parish. 

Jean-Pierre's second son Pierre Théard, born in Ascension Parish in April 1835, may have married Natalie Quarantin.  Their son Osémé was born near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in February 1853.  Pierre remarried to Rosalie Amanda, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Bernard and Clémence Roger, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in September 1855.  They lived near the boundary between Lafourche and Assumption parishes.  Their son Louis Philibert was born in November 1858, Joseph William Bélisaire in August 1866, and Pierre Samuel in December 1868.  

Jean-Pierre's third son Jean Marie Louis, born in St. James Parish in April 1837, may have died young. 

Jean-Pierre's fourth son Jean Léopold, called Léopold and Jean Marie Léon, born in Ascension Parish in February 1839, married Marie Adolphine, called Adolphine, daughter of Jean Baptiste Pitre and Matilde Adélaïde Marse, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1859.  During the War of 1861-65, Jean Léopold served as a sergeant in Company K of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Ascension Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of Robert E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Jean Léopold was seriously wounded in the Battle of Malvern Hill, Virginia, in July 1862.  He was sent to hospitals at Lynchburg and Danville to recuperate.  In November 1862, he was placed on a list of soldiers unfit for duty, demoted to private, discharged for disability, and returned home.  Daughter Mathilde Rosalie was born near Labadieville in December 1863, and son André Courade in November 1867. 

Jean-Pierre's fifth son Bélisaire Clément was born in St. James Parish in September 1840.  During the War of 1861-65, Bélisaire Clément served in Company G of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  He enlisted in the company at Camp Moore, Louisiana, on 5 October 1861, age 21, and was promoted to corporal on 1 April 1862.  Five days later, he was killed in action in the Battle of Shiloh near Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee. 

Jean-Pierre's sixth son Jérôme Kleber or Clebert, called Clebert, born in St. James Parish in June 1842, married Aimée, daughter of John Burnes and Amelia Porche, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1864. 

Jean-Pierre's seventh son Benjamin Elphége, called Elphége, born in Ascension Parish in November 1846, married Florence, daughter of François Barthet and his Acadian wife Irma Aucoin, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1870.

Jean-Pierre's eighth son Pierre Ernest, born in Ascension Parish in July 1848, died in Lafourche Interior Parish at age 2 1/2 in February 1851.

Jean-Pierre's ninth son François Silvestre was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1851. 

Jean-Pierre's tenth son William Prosper was born in Ascension Parish in June 1852.

Jean-Pierre's eleventh son Lucien Augustin was born in Ascension Parish in July 1853.

Jean-Pierre's twelfth and youngest son Antoine Anatole was born in November 1855.

Alexis's second son Jean-Baptiste, born probably at Assumption in c1798, married Marie Ursule, daughter of Antoine Boutary and his Acadian wife Marie Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1820.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in Lafourche Interior Parish counted two slaves--a 30-year-old black male, and a 27-year-old black female--on J. B. Achée's farm at Thibodaux.  Jean Baptiste died in Lafourche Parish in August 1855.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was 62 years old when he died, but he probably was closer to 57.  He seems to have fathered no sons.  

Alexis's third son Achille, born in January 1799, probably died young.  

Alexis's fourth son Célestin, born in March 1805, may have died young.  

Alexis's fifth and youngest son Joseph François le jeune, called François, born in Assumption Parish in July 1818, married Marie Clarisse, daughter of Maurice Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Geneviève Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1833.  In the 1840s, Joseph François settled in the old Attakapas District near his namesake uncle.  Joseph François le jeune died in St. Martin Parish in September 1859, age 41.  He seems to have fathered no sons.  

Joseph-François (1772-1831) à Jean-Baptiste dit Gallant à Michel dit Gallant Achée

Joseph-François, also called Joseph dit Canawche, younger son of Pierre Haché and his third wife Madeleine Dingle, born at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France, in June 1772. came to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié in 1785 with his paternal aunt, Francoise Doucet, wife of uncle Louis Haché, and two siblings, older brother Pierre and older half-sister, Anne-Marie.  After his uncle Louis reached the colony, Joseph-Francois and his brother followed his aunt and uncle to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Joseph-François married Anne-Geneviève, called Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste LeBlanc and Marguerite Célestin dit Bellemère, at Ascension in January 1803.  Geneviève had been born on Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, and had come to Louisiana also as an orphan, with four of her siblings, aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships.  Joseph-François and Geneviève did not remain at Ascension but crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled at Fausse Pointe, on Bayou Teche, in the early 1800s.  Geneviève died at Fausse Pointe in August 1812. age 30.  Joseph François remarried to Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Guilbeau and Madeleine Broussard and widow of Donat Breaux, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1819.  She seems to have given him no more children.  Joseph Francois died in Lafayette Parish in December 1831.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph, as he called him, was 55 years old when he died, but he was 59.  Joseph's daughters married into the Daigle, Hébert, and L'ascange or Lascoureiges families.  His only son did not create a family of his own, so, except for its blood, this line of the family did not endure. 

Only son Jean-Pierre, by first wife Geneviève LeBlanc, born at Assumption in September 1804, accompanied his family to the Attakapas District, but he may not have married.  

Allain

Louis Allain, a blacksmith, born in c1654, arrived at Port-Royal in c1685.  In July 1687, the seigneur of Port-Royal, Alexandre Le Borgne de Bélisle, gave Louis permission to build a sawmill near the village.  A tributary of the lower Rivière-au-Dauphin, on which Port-Royal was located, took its name from the sawmill operator--Rivière Allain.  Around 1690, Louis married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine Bourg and Antoinette Landry.  Louis died at Annapolis Royal in June 1737, in his early 80s.  His only daughter married into the Gauthier dit Bellaire family.  His son-in-law, Joseph-Nicolas, called Nicolas, Gauthier dit Bellair, became a wealthy Annapolis valley merchant whose estate on haute rivière, Bellaire, was one of the most impressive in the colony.  During King George's War of the 1740s, Nicolas joined the Acadian resistance against the British, for which Marie and their son Nicolas, fils, spent time in the Fort Anne dungeon.  In 1749, his fortune gone, Nicolas dit Bellair took Marie and their children to Île St.-Jean, where the French compensated him with two pieces of property on Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the center of the island.  Nicolas died there in April 1752, age 63.  Marie did not remarry.  Meawhile, Louis's only son Pierre married Marguerite, daughter of Antoine LeBlanc and Marie Bourgeois, probably at Annapolis Royal in c1717 and settled at Minas.  Pierre's oldest son Louis le jeune moved to Petitcoudiac, but his younger sons--Pierre, fils, Joseph-Antoine, Benjamin, and Jean-Baptiste--remained at Minas. 

By 1755, descendants of Louis Allain, the blacksmith and sawmill owner, and Marguerite Bourg could be found not only in the Annapolis River valley, where Louis had done so well, but also at Minas, Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area, and on Île St.-Jean.  When the British rounded up the Acadians at Chignecto and the trois-rivières in the fall of 1755, Pierre Allain's oldest son Louis le jeune and his wife Anne, daughter of Jacques Léger and Anne Amireau, fled north to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where they took refuge with other Acadians.  They made their way to Restigouche, at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  When the British attacked the French stronghold at Restigouche in the summer 1760, Louis le jeune and his family escaped another roundup.  After the war, his descendants could be found at Bouctouche, Miramichi, Néguac, and Caraquet on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore in what became eastern New Brunswick.  Pierre's third son Benjamin and his wife Marie-Rose, daughter of Joseph Bugeaud and Marie-Josèphe Landry, escaped the British at Minas in 1755 and also fled northward.  When the British struck Restigouche, Benjamin was serving as a captain in the Acadian militia.  He and his family also escaped the roundup that summer and settled at present-day Carleton on the Gaspé peninsula, east of Restigouche, where they remained.  Pierre's youngest son Jean-Baptiste, only age 14 in 1755, escaped the British roundup at Minas and took refuge in Canada.  He married Marguerite dite La Branche, daughter of Pierre Cormier and Marie Cyr of Chignecto, at Bécancour, across the St. Lawrence from Trois-Rivières, in January 1762.  In the decades following Le Grand Dérangement, some of Jean-Baptiste's descendants moved downriver to St.-Ours on the lower Richelieu northeast of Montréal.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

Pierre, fils and his wife Catherine Hébert were not as lucky as his brothers.  The British deported them to Maryland in 1755.  For a dozen years, Pierre and his family endured life among Englishmen who, despite their colony's Catholic roots, did not care much for the French "papists" who had been thrust upon them.  In July 1763, British authorities counted Pierre, fils, Catherine, and their children, two sons and a daughter, at Baltimore.  When word reached the Acadians in Maryland that they would be welcome in Spanish Louisiana, where many other Acadians had gone, they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them to New Orleans.  Pierre Allain had no close relatives in Louisiana, nor did his wife, but life had to be better there than in a British colony where they were treated like pariahs.  In April 1767, as part of the second contingent of Maryland Acadians to head to the Spanish colony, the Allains booked passage on the English ship Virgin with 200 other Acadians.  With Pierre and the Baltimore Acadians went a precious package, still carefully hidden, that the Minas exiles had carried with them during their 12-year exile. 

Pierre, Catherine, and their five children settled at the new Spanish settlement of San Gabriel, on the east bank of the river south of Bayou Manchac, below Baton Rouge.  Their two daughters married into the Landry and Foret families.  The Acadian Allains of South Louisiana descend from two of Pierre, fils's three sons.  With few exceptions, Pierre, fils's sons and grandsons remained in Iberville Parish, on both sides of the river.  The exceptions were a hand full of great-grandsons who settled near Baton Rouge or on Bayou Lafourche. 

On the eve of the War of 1861-65, one of his grandsons held 18 slaves.  Other grandsons owned fewer slaves on their humble Iberville farms.  Two grandsons moved upriver to the Baton Rouge area.  Two more left the river and moved to Bayou Lafourche, where one of them held seven slaves on the eve of the war.  Many members of the family, however, held no slaves at all.

At least 20 members of both the French-Creole and Acadian branches of the Allain family served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  None of them served as officers, but a number of them were corporals and sergeants.  Two great-grandsons of Pierre, fils the Acadian served as first sergeants of their companies, one while still in his teens.  Extant military records show that all of the Allains in the Confederate army survived the war.  

The war took a terrible toll on the families' economic standing.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every plantation their forces could reach.  This included the Allain holdings in West Baton Rouge and Iberville parishes.  Union gunboats shelled and burned dozens of plantation houses along the river.  Successive Federal incursions in the Bayou Lafourche valley devastated that region, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Alain, Alin, Aling.  The Acadian and French-Creole Allains should not be confused with the Anglo-American Allens who lived in their communities.63 

Pierre, fils (c1723-1807) à Louis Allain

Pierre, fils, second son of Pierre Allain and Marguerite LeBlanc, born at Minas in c1723, married Catherine, daughter of Jacques Hébert and Marguerite Landry, probably at Grand-Pré in c1750.  Catherine gave Pierre, fils two children, a son and a daughter, at Grand-Pré in 1751 and 1752.  The British deported them to Maryland in 1755.  Between 1760 and 1766, Catherine gave Pierre, fils three more children, two sons and a daughter, in the Chesapeake colony.  In 1767, Pierre, fils took his family to Louisiana, where Catherine gave him two more children, both daughters, in 1771 and 1774.  They were the only Acadian Allains to go to the Spanish colony.  They settled at San Gabriel on the Mississippi above New Orleans, where Pierre, fils died in December 1807, age 85.  His two daughters married into the Landry and Foret families in the Spanish colony.  His three sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, born at Grand-Pré in c1751, followed his parents to Maryland in 1755, to Louisiana in July 1767, and settled with them at San Gabriel.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians René Blanchard and Marguerite Thériot, in c1780.  All of their children were born at San Gabriel.  Jean-Baptiste died at San Gabriel in March 1791, age 40.  The priest who recorded his burial noted that Jean-Baptiste was "major domo" of the church.   His daughter married into the Rivas family.  Three of his four sons created their own families, but only two of the lines endured. 

Oldest son Pierre le jeune, born at St.-Gabriel in October 1782, married Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac LeBlanc and Félicité Melançon, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1807.  Their son Pierre Ursin, called Ursin, was born in Iberville Parish in April 1811.  Their son married, but his line did not endure. 

Only son Ursin married cousin Emilie, daughter of his uncle Jean Baptiste Allain, fils and Marguerite Céleste Guidry and widow of Pierre Miremont, probably in Iberville Parish.  Ursin died at the home of Célestin Roth, Iberville Parish, in December 1858.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Ursin was "a local person" and was 51 years old when he died, but he was 47.  He seems to have fathered no sons, so his line of the family died with him.   

Jean-Baptiste's second son Landry, born at San Gabriel in May 1787, died there at age 3 in August 1790.

Jean-Baptiste's third son Bernard-Sosthène or Sosthène-Bernard, born at San Gabriel in September 1789, married cousin Apollonie or Appoline, daughter of fellow Acadians Victor Blanchard and Marie Madeleine Richard, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1817; Apollonie's father was a nephew of Bernard's mother.  Their son Bernard, fils was born in Iberville Parish in August 1821; and Jean Zenon was born in April 1823 but died the following November.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux and Blanchard families. Their older son created a family of his own.  

Older son Bernard, fils married Euphémie, daughter of Louis Édouard Guitteau and Joséphine Pignoux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in November 1842, and remarried to Marie Élodie, called Élodie, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Dupuy and Sophie Daigle, at the St. Gabriel church in August 1846.  Their son Sosthène Bernard le jeune was born in Iberville Parish in July 1847, and Antoine Roger in December 1848.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted 18 slaves--10 males and 8 females, 16 blacks and 2 mulattoes, ranging in age from 55 to infancy--owned by "Blanchard Allain," which was probably Bernard Sosthène and his wife Apollonie.  At age 39, Bernard, fils remarried--his third marriage--to Henrietta Anne, daughter of Trasimond Richard and Uranie Pujol, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1861.  One of Bernard, fils's sons married by 1870. 

Older son Sosthène Bernard le jeune, by second wife Élosie Dupuy, married Ann Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Arvillien Braud and Anne Selina Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1868. 

Jean-Baptiste's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born posthumously at San Gabriel in July 1791, married Marguerite Céleste, called Céleste or Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Guidry and Marguerite Landry, at St. Gabriel in August 1806.  Their son Jean Derosin, called Derosin or Drauzin, was born in Iberville Parish in April 1807.  Jean Baptiste, fils remarried to Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Landry and Ludevine Babin, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1811.  Their son Jean Baptiste Aimé was born in Iberville Parish in September 1825.  Jean Baptiste, fils died in Iberville Parish in January 1834.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was 55 years old when he died, but he was only 43.  His daughters, by second wife Carmelite, married into the Allain, LeBlanc, and Miremont families.  His two sons by both of his wives created their own families, but only one of the lines seems to have endured. 

Older son Jean Derosin, called Derosin or Drauzin, by first wife Céleste Guidry, married Marie Dartille, called Dartille, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham Hébert and Ludevine Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1826.  Their son Jean de Valcourt was born in Iberville Parish in June 1827 but drowned in Bayou Plaquemine at age 15 in July 1842.  Their daughter married into the Picou family.  Derosin remarried to Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Landry and Clémence Richard, at the St. Gabriel church in December 1837.  Their son or daughter J.G.W. died at age 4 months in February 1838, and Jean Baptiste Sosthène was born in Iberville Parish in November 1842.  At age 45, Derosin remarried again--his third marriage--to Victorine, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier LeBlanc and Madeleine Braud, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1852.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Bruly St. Martin Ward 11, Assumption Parish, counted a single slave--a 17-year-old mulatto female--on Wm. Drauzin Allain's farm.  One wonders if Derosin's younger son married.   

Jean-Baptiste, fils's younger son Jean Baptiste Aimé, by second wife Carmelite Landry, married Odile, daughter of Alexander Étienne Reine and Marguerite Poché of St. James Parish, at the St. Gabriel church in July 1844.  Jean Baptiste Aimé died in Iberville Parish in June 1848, age 22.  His line of the family died with him.  

Pierre, fils's second Simon, born at Baltimore, Maryland, in c1760, followed his parents to Louisiana in 1767 and settled with them at San Gabriel, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Babin and Isabelle LeBlanc, in July 1785.  Simon died at St. Gabriel in October 1809, age 49.  His daughters married into the Hébert and LeBlanc families.  Three of his five sons also created their own families on the river. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste le jeune died at San Gabriel 2 days after his birth in August 1786.  

Simon's second son Janvier, born at San Gabriel in January 1790, married Elise Mary, Marie Elizabeth, or Mary Eliza, called Elizabeth, daughter of Jean Louis Bouche, Boush, or Bush and Hélène Hamilton, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1817.  Their son Joseph Clément, called Clément, was born in Iberville Parish in November 1817 but died at age 2 in October 1819; Albert was born in April 1819; another Clément in November 1821 but died at age 3 in January 1825; Louis Sylvain, called L. S., born in Iberville Parish in February 1827; Louis Sylvestre in December 1832; Simon Ernest, called Ernest, in January 1835; Victor Amédée, called Amédée, in March 1837; and Faustin Alcée, called F. Alcée and F. A., in October 1844.  Janvier died in Iberville Parish in June 1852, age 62.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge parish, counted seven slaves--four males and three females, two blacks and five mulattoes, ranging in age from 46 to 4--on Janvier Allain's farm.  His daughters married into the Comeaux, Daigre, and Gallaugher families.  At least four of his eight sons married, and one, perhaps two, of them left the river and settled on Bayou Lafourche.  

Second son Albert married Marie Elisa or Eliza, called Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadian Lazare Landry and his Creole wife Marie Céline Lambremont, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1842.  Their son Albert Numa was born in Iberville Parish in November 1842, and Louis Dustine or Dutisne in November 1845 but died at age 4 in April 1850.  Albert remarried to Arzelia, daughter of Joseph Barthélémy Ramouin and his Acadian wife his Acadian wife Amelie Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1852.  Their son Joseph Guy was born in Iberville Parish in October 1852 but died at age 7 months the following May.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted a single slave--a 38-year-old black female--on Albert Allain's farm.  

Janvier's fourth son Louis Sylvain married Clara E., daughter of Henri Knobloch and his Acadian wife Rosalie Guidry of Lafourche Interior Parish, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in November 1851.  They remained on Bayou Lafourche.  Their son Louis Hamilton was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1860.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Ward 7, Lafourche Parish, counted seven slaves--three males and four females, five blacks and two mulattoes, ranging in age from 38 years to 3 months, living in one house--on L. S. Allain's farm.  During the War of 1861-65, Louis Sylvain served as a corporal in Company E of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee.  His younger brother Simon Ernest also served in that company.  Louis Sylvain may have remarried to Amanda, daughter of Louis Bush and Hélène Hamilton, at the Thibodaux church in January 1866; Amanda would have been Louis Sylvain's maternal aunt!  Their son Ernest was born near Baton Rouge in October 1869.  Louis Sylvain died in Lafourche Parish in 1878, age 51. 

Janvier's fifth son Louis Sylvestre, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Janvier's sixth son Ernest, during the War of 1861-65, served as a sergeant in Company E of the 4th Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, so he may have followed older brother Louis Sylvain to Bayou Lafourche.  

Janvier's seventh son Amédée married Virginia Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Denis Daigre and his Anglo-American wife Geneviève Buckner, at the Baton Rouge church in November 1863. 

Janvier's eighth and youngest son Faustin Alcée, during the War of 1861-65, served as first sergeant of Company H of Ogden's Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, which fought in Louisiana and Mississippi.  After the war, he married Ernestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Gilbert Comeaux and his wife Creole wife Adeline Gallaugher, at the Baton Rouge church in November 1865, and remarried to Léontine, daughter of fellow Acadians Frédéric Arbour, fils and Adeleine Daigre, at the Baton Rouge church in June 1868.  Their son Frédéric Vincent was born near Baton Rouge in August 1870.   

Simon's third son Simeon, born at San Gabriel in September 1797, died in Iberville Parish in June 1837, age 39.  He probably did not marry.  

Simon's fourth son Jean-Julien, called Julien, born at San Gabriel in June 1802, married Marie Alphonse Hortense, called Hortense, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac LeBlanc and Félicité Melançon, at the St. Gabriel church in March 1827.  Their son Julien, fils was born in Iberville Parish in October 1832; a son, name unrecorded, died as an infant in April 1835; and Alphonse was born in August 1846 but died at age 15 months in December 1847.  Julien died in Iberville Parish in August 1849, age 47.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted three slaves--a male and two females, all black, ages 35, 20, and 5--on Hortense Allain's farm.  This was Julien, père's widow, Hortense LeBlanc.  His daughter married into the Redditt family from Tennessee.  One of his three sons also created his own family. 

Oldest son Julien, fils married Marie Dina, called Dina, daughter of Foreign Frenchman François Dupuy and his Creole wife Françoise Rose Desbains, at the St. Gabriel church in September 1858.  Their son Antoine Arthur was born near Plaquemine in May 1861, and Joseph Charles in February 1869.  During the War of 1861-65, Julien, fils served as first sergeant of Company D of the 27th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

Simon's fifth and youngest son Victor, or Victorin, born at St. Gabriel in April 1807, married Marie Françoise Aimée, called Marie Aimée and Aimée, daughter of fellow Acadians Arsène Braud and Marie Geneviève Daigre, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1830.  Their son Victorin, fils was born in Iberville Parish in April 1834; and Simon Émile in July 1839.  Victorin, père died in Iberville Parish in July 1845 and was buried in St. Raphael's cemetery, age 38.  His daughters married into the Hébert, Landry, and Rivière families.  Both of his sons married by 1870. 

Older son Victorin, fils married cousin Armina, daughter of Rosémond Lambremont and his Acadian wife Clementine Braud, at the St. Gabriel church in November 1856.  Their son Victorin Antoine was born in Iberville Parish in September 1857, Rosémond Nemours in July 1859, and twins Joseph Olivier and Pierre Marcellin in August 1861.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted a single slave--a 22-year-old black female--on "Victorian" Allain's farm.  During the War of 1861-65, Victorin, fils served as a courier in Company I of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  According to family tradition, he visited his home near Bayou Goula as often as he could and was nearly captured by Federal patrols on at least two of these visits.  

Victorin, père's younger son Simon Émile married Mary Josephine, daughter of Ulger Baugnon and Lavinia Marionneaux, at the St. Gabriel church in November 1867.  

Pierre, fils's third and youngest son Pierre III, born at Baltimore, Maryland, in c1764, followed his parents to Louisiana in 1767 and settled with them at San Gabriel.  He married Geneviève-Anne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand-Paul Gautreaux and Marie Landry, at nearby Ascension in February 1786.  Their children were born at San Gabriel.   Pierre III died by July 1792, in his late 20s, when his wife remarried at San Gabriel.  One of his two sons married, but his family line, except for its blood, may not have survived in the Bayou State. 

Older son Pierre IV, born at St.-Gabriel in February 1787, died in St. Gabriel Parish March 1818, age 31.  He probably did not marry.  

Pierre III's younger son Pierre Landry, called Landry, born at St.-Gabriel probably in the early 1790s, married fellow Acadian Rosalie Templet probably in the early 1810s.  Their son Célestin was born near Baton Rouge in September 1813.  Their daughters married into the Bourque and Lejeune families.  Landry remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Daigre and Marie Henry, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1818.  Their son Apollinaire was born in Iberville Parish in January 1822.  Their daughter married into the Thibodeaux family.  

Older son Célestin, by first wife Rosalie Templet, married Marie Constance, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Braud and his Creole wife Jeanne Le Tullier of West Baton Rouge Parish, probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in March 1836.  Célestin died in West Baton Rouge Parish in September 1837, age 24.  His daughter married into the Tuillier family.  He fathered no sons, so his line of the family likely died with him. 

Younger son Apollinaire, by second wife Marie Daigre, evidently did not marry. 

Arbour

Michel, fils, son of Michel Harbour or Arbour and Marie Constantineau, born at Petite-Rivière-St.-Charles, Québec, in c1674, married Barbe, daughter of Acadians Pierre Morin and Françoise Chiasson, in c1700, probably at Québec.  Michel, fils was age 26 and Barbe age 14 at the time of their marriage.  Michel, fils's wife's paternal grandfather, Pierre Morin dit Boucher, had come to French Acadia during the early 1660s, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Acadian pioneers Pierre Martin and Catherine Vigneau of St.-German de Bourgeuil, and settled at Chignecto in the 1670s.  During the late 1680s, Pierre dit Boucher's second son Louis fathered an illegitimate child by Marie-Josèphe, daughter of former Acadian governor Michel Le Neuf de La Vallière de Beaubassin, the seigneur of Chignecto.  As a result of the scandal, the entire Morin family was banished from the colony.  They resettled first at Gaspésie on the northwestern edge of greater Acadia and then moved on to Canada, where they remained.  Barbe gave Michel, fils nine children, eight sons and a daughter.  All of their sons created families of their own on the lower St. Lawrence. 

Michel, fils and Barbe's second son François married Marie-Jeanne-Thérèse, called Thérèse, daughter of Henri Picoron dit Descôteaux and Marguerite Martin, at Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, near Kamouraska on the lower St. Lawrence, in October 1740.  Their second son, François, fils, was born in Canada in c1743 and came to Louisiana from France in 1785. 

The great majority of the Arbours in South Louisiana are descended from François, fils's grandson, Frédéric, fils.  During the antebellum period, the grandson and his sons became successful planters.  In 1850, Frédéric, fils owned 30 slaves in East Baton Rouge Parish.  A decade later, he held 56 slaves on two plantations in East Baton Rouge and Iberville parishes. 

At least four Arbours, three of them sons of Frédéric, fils, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65, one of them as an officer.  Meanwhile, the war took a terrible toll on the Arbour family's economic standing.  After Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal forces controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every plantation their forces could reach.  This included the Arbour holdings in East Baton Rouge and Iberville parishes.  Union navy gunboats shelled and burned dozens of plantations houses along the lower river.  After the war, the Arbours of Baton Rouge had to endure as best they could a free-labor postwar Southern economy.  ...  Dozens of Arbours can be found today in the Baton Rouge area, most of them descendants of Frédéric the planter. ... 

The family's name also is spelled Arbot, Arboure, Arbourg, Arboux, Hambourg, Harbour, Harbourg, Harbourgh.64

François, fils (c1743-1780s) à Michel, fils à Michel Arbour

François, fils, son of François Arbour and Marie-Jeanne-Thérèse, called Thérèse, Picoron dit Descôteaux, was born in Canada in c1743.  During the 1740s or 1750s, François, père may have taken his family from Canada to the French Maritimes, a part of greater Acadia, from which they were deported to France in 1758.  Or François, fils, who would have been age 20 in 1763, may have gone to France on his own during the final months of the war with Britain.  He worked as a caulker in the mother country and married Marie, daughter of Acadians Joseph Henry and Christine Pitre, at Le Havre in November 1765.  The priest who recorded his marriage noted that both of François, fils's parents were deceased at the time of the wedding and that he had resided at Le Havre for a year and a half.  François, fils and Marie had at least five children in France, all sons, the first three born probably at Le Havre:  François-Henry in c1767; Jean-Louis-Firmin, called Louis, in c1770; and Frédéric-Édouard in c1772.  In the early 1770s, François, fils, Marie, and their three sons became part of the settlement scheme in the Poitou region in which French authorities attempted to settle Acadians on marginal land owned by an influential nobleman near the city of Châtellerault.  François, fils and Marie had another son, Louis-Nicolas, at Archigny, Poitou, in June 1774.  Despite the retreat of most of the Poitou Acadians to Nantes in late 1775 and early 1776, François, fils and Marie remained at Archigny, where yet another son,  Louis-Joseph, their fifth, was baptized in June 1778.  Son Louis-Nicolas died at Archigny, age 9, in December 1782.  By September 1784, however, François, fils and his family had joined the Acadians at Nantes.  Youngest son Louis-Joseph died probably at Nantes in late 1784 or early 1785.  When in the early 1780s the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, François Arbour, fils and his family agreed to take it.  François, fils, now 45, wife Marie, age 40, and their three surviving sons--François-Henry, age 18, Louis, age 15, and Frédéric-Édouard, age 13--sailed to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in August 1785.  After a brief respite in the city, they followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Baton Rouge on the river above New Orleans.  François, fils and Marie had no more children in Louisiana.  The marriage record of François, fils's, dated 27 September 1790, notes that the groom's father was deceased at the time of the wedding, so François, fils died probably at Baton Rouge during the late 1780s, in his late 40s.  All three of his sons created families of their own, but only one of them, the youngest, seems to have perpetuated the family line in the Bayou State. 

Oldest son François-Henry, born at Le Havre, France, in c1767, followed his family to Louisiana and Baton Rouge in 1785 and married Marie-Jeanne-Jacqueline, called Jeanne, daughter of fellow Acadian François Daigre and his French wife Jeanne Holley, at nearby San Gabriel in September 1790.  Jeanne also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont.  They settled at Baton Rouge, where their children were born.  Their daughters married into the Altazin, Collier, and Lerry families.  One of François-Henry's sons created his own family and moved to the western prairies. 

Oldest son François-Alexandre, born probably at Baton Rouge in c1792, died at age 2 in August 1794.   

François-Henry's second son Charles-François, called François, le jeune, born in c1800 and baptized at Baton Rouge, age 2, in October 1802, may have married Marie Aurore, called Aurore, Leroi or Roy.  Their son François Bonicase was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1842. 

François-Henry's third and youngest son Jean Pierre died at Baton Rouge, age unrecorded, in April 1806.  

François, fils's second son Jean-Louis-Firmin, called Louis and Firmin, born at Le Havre, France, in c1770, followed his family to Louisiana and Baton Rouge in 1785 and married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Poirier and Marie Cormier of Cabahanncoer, at Cabahannocer in April 1793.  Rosalie was a native of Louisiana.  They settled at Cabahannocer, now St. James Parish, where their children were born.  Their daughter married into the Legendre family.  Jean-Louis-Firmin remarried to Susanna, daughter of George Glover and P. Roberson of Virginia, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1812.  None of Jean-Louis-Firmin's four sons, all by first wife Rosalie, seem to have created families of their own, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him.  

Oldest son Jean-Pierre, born at Cabahannocer in c1794, died at age 12 in November 1806. 

Jean-Louis-Firmin's second son Louis-Evariste, born at Cabahannocer in January 1801, probably never married. 

Jean-Louis-Firmin's third son Achilles, born at Cabahannocer in February 1803, probably never married.  

Jean-Louis's fourth and youngest son, name unrecorded, died at St. Jacques in September 1806.  

François, fils's third son Frédéric-Édouard, born at Le Havre, France, in c1772, followed his family to Louisiana and Baton Rouge in 1785.  He married cousin Marie-Rose, called Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Henry and Marie Pitre of St.-Malo, France, at Baton Rouge in September 1798; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Marie-Rose had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships.  They remained at Baton Rouge, where their children were born.  Frédéric died at Baton Rouge in March 1848.  The priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Frederick, as he called him, died at "age 80 years," but he was  age76.  His daughters married into the Delahay and Guerry or Garry families.  Both of his sons created their own families.  The great majority of the Arbours of South Louisiana are descended from Frédéric Édouard's older son, who fathered at least half a dozen sons of his own.  During the antebellum period, the older son and his sons became successful planters. 

Older son Frédéric, fils, born at Baton Rouge in December 1803, married Marie Adeline or Adele, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Daigre and Julie Trahan, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in July 1825.  Their son Frédéric III was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age 6 months, in March 1827; Joseph was born at Baton Rouge in July 1828; Édouard Bienvenu, called Bienvenu, in October 1830; Eugène Ernest, called Ernest, in November 1832; Octave Roland or Roland Octave, in September 1834; Arthur born at Baton Rouge in c1841; and Oscar in October 1845.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted 30 slaves--20 males and 10 females, all black except for two mulattoes, ranging in age from 60 years to 2 months--on Frédérick Arbour's plantation near Baton Rouge city.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted 33 slaves--ranging in age from 65 years to 4 months--on Frederick Arbour's plantation near Baton Rouge city.  In July 1860, he also held 23 more slaves--19 males and four females, all blacks except for one mulatto, ranging in age from 80 to 6--in Iberville Parish.  Frédéric, fils died near Baton Rouge in December 1866.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Frédéric was 75 years old, but he was "only" 63.  His daughter married into the Allain family.  Most, if not all, of his seven sons created their own families, and most of them served in the Confederate army, one of them as an officer, another as a sergeant. 

Oldest son Frédéric III married Ludoviska or Lodoiska Josephine Marie Adelay, D'Lahay, or De Lahay, probably at Baton Rouge in the early 1850s.  Their son Joseph André Victor Frédéric was born near Baton Rouge in February 1853, Adolphe Joseph in July 1858, and George Édouard in April 1868.   During the War of 1861-65, Frédéric III served in Company D of the 27th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He enlisted as a second lieutenant in March 1862, was promoted to first lieutenant the following June, and fought with his unit at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in 1862-63.  After the Confederate surrender at Vicksburg in July 1863, Frédéric III, along with thousands of other Southerners, was sent home on a parole of honor. 

Frédéric, fils's second son Joseph married Julie, daughter of Charles Maurin or Morin and Céleste Verret, at the Baton Rouge church in December 1851.  Their son Joseph, fils was born near Baton Rouge in August 1859 but died at age 16 months in December 1860, Joseph Charles was born in December 1861, and Henri Antoine in February 1867.  

Frédéric, fils's  third son Édouard Bienvenu, called Bienvenu, married cousin Célestine, daughter of Éloi Martinez and Victoire Heude, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1854; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son George Edward was born near Baton Rouge in June 1857, and John Early in December 1867.  During the War of 1861-65, along with younger brother Octave, Bienvenu served in Company A of Miles' Legion Louisiana Infantry, raised in Orleans Parish but which contained a number of soldiers from Baton Rouge.  The unit served in Mississippi and Louisiana.  The Miles' Legion fought at the Siege of Port Hudson in the spring and summer of 1863.  Bienvenu missed the siege, however.  He was captured at the Comite River north of Baton Rouge in early May 1863 and held by the Federals at Mobile, Alabama, until they paroled him at Grant's Island near Mobile at the end of May. 

Frédéric, fils's fourth son Eugène Ernest, called Ernest, married Emma, daughter of André D'Lahay or De Lahay and Marie Anne Vigoureux, perhaps a sister of his brother Frédéric III's wife, at the Baton Rouge church in October 1854. Their son William Ernest was born near Baton Rouge in February 1860. 

Frédéric, fils's fifth son Octave Roland or Roland Octave married Caroline or Carrie Gayle in a civil ceremony probably in East Baton Rouge Parish in December 1860, and sanctified the marriage at the Baton Rouge church in March 1868.  Their son William Roland was born near Baton Rouge in December 1861.  During the War of 1861-65, Octave served as corporal and fifth sergeant in Company A of Miles' Legion Louisiana Infantry, raised in Orleans Parish, which fought in Mississippi and Louisiana, but his service with the unit was more praiseworthy than brother Bienvenu's.  He enlisted in Company A at Baton Rouge in September 1862, was promoted to corporal a few weeks later, and then to fifth sergeant in March 1863.  After the surrender of Port Hudson in July 1863, members of Company A of the Miles' Legion served in Company I of Ogden's Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, which also fought in Louisiana and Mississippi.  Octave among them.  He remained a sergeant and surrendered with his unit at Gainesville, Alabama, in May 1865. 

Frédéric, fils's sixth son Arthur was a single, 20-year-old lawyer living in Baton Rouge when he enlisted in Company B of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in East Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1861.  His regiment fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania, so he was one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Arthur was not part of the 7th Infantry for very long, however.  In early October 1861, he was sent to a hospital in Richmond, Virginia.  His illness or injury must have been serious, because in early November, after he was examined by a medical board, he was discharged from Confederate service for disability.  He probably returned to Baton Rouge.  Arthur married Oliva, daughter of fellow Acadian Gilbert Comeaux and his Creole wife Adeline Gallagaher, at the Baton Rouge church in July 1868.  

Frédéric, fils's seventh and youngest son Oscar, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Frédéric-Édouard's younger son Albery Gustave, baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age unrecorded, in June 1829, may have married Marguerite Zenon.  Their son Alphonse was born near Baton Rouge in May 1856. 

Arcement

Pierre-Claude Arcement, Arcemont, or Hersmence, born probably in France in c1694, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Thériot and Marie Bourg, in c1722 and settled at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in the Minas Basin.  They had eight children, including four sons, one of whom was a twin to one of his sisters.  By 1750, Pierre-Claude and his family had moved to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island.  In August 1752, a French official, calling Pierre-Claude a Herrement, "native of l'Acadie," which he was not, counted him, his wife, and three of their younger children at Grande-Anse on the south shore of the island.  Pierre-Claude's daughters married into the Guillot, LePrince, and Pitre families.  Three of his four sons, all born probably at Pigiguit, created families of their own. 

When the British deported the Acadians of Nova Scotia in the autumn of 1755, Pierre-Claude Arcement, wife Marie-Josèphe Thériot, and their children, still on Île St.-Jean, were living in territory controlled by France.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and deported them to France.  Pierre-Claude Arcement's son Pierre, age 25, his wife Marie Hébert, age 23, their infant son Pierre, fils, and Marie's sister Anne Hébert, crossed on the British transport Supply, which left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in early March 1759.  They all survived the crossing.  Pierre's sister Geneviève, age 35, husband Amand Pitre, age 35, and eight of their children, ages 12 to 3, also crossed on Supply, but they were not as lucky.  Three of their children, ages 12, 4, and 3, died at sea, and a daughter, age 8, died in April 1759 probably from the rigors of the crossing.  One wonders what happened to Pierre and Geneviève's parents and their other siblings, some of whom may have remained at Pigiguit when the rest of the family moved to Île St.-Jean in 1750. 

Pierre and Marie settled at St.-Suliac near St.-Malo, where she gave him many more children.  Pierre's sister Geneviève, husband Amand Pitre, and their four surviving children also settled at St.-Suliac, where another daughter was born in February 1761.  In the early 1770s, Amand and Geneviève were part of a settlement scheme in the Poitou region that failed after two years of effort.  In March 1776, they followed dozens of their fellow Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where they subsisted on government hand outs and on what work they could find there.  Geneviève died at Nantes sometime in the late 1770s or early 1780s.  Evidently Pierre and Marie remained at St.-Suliac. 

With brother-in-law Amand Pitre and his family, Pierre, Marie, and their seven children, three sons and four daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and chose to settle on Bayou Lafourche, where their children created families of their own.  Descendants of the older son settled in what became Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  Descendants of the younger son remained in Assumption Parish or moved down bayou into Lafourche.  

During the late antebellum period, only a few Arcements owned slaves.  Pierre's younger son Guillaume Romain, now in his 80s, owned five slaves in July 1850 on the eve of his death.  Federal census takers counted no slaves on Arcement farms in 1860.  The family, then, participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  

At least four descendants of Pierre Arcement served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  One of them, a conscript from Lafourche Parish, was captured at Vicksburg in July 1863, refused parole, and was shot to death by a Yankee guard at Camp Morton, a prisoner-of-war camp in Indiana, the following January.  His three kinsmen, only one of them a volunteer, survived the conflict.  The war was just as tragic for the Arcements who stayed at home.  Successive Federal incursions devastated the Lafourche valley early in the war, and Confederate foragers plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  After the war, the Arcements of the Lafourche and Terrebonne valleys had to endure as best they could a free-labor postwar Southern economy.  One family moved to lower Bayou Teche and settled in St. Mary Parish, but the rest of them remained in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.

In Louisiana, the family's name also is spelled Arceman, Arcemant, Arcemand, Arcemont, Archemant, Arsman, Arseman, Arsemans, Arsement, Arsemon, Hersemence, and should not be confused with the more numerous Arceneauxs.65

Pierre (1733-?) Arcement

Pierre, son of Pierre-Claude Arcement and Marie-Josèphe Thériot, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1733, followed his family to Île St.-Pierre, where a French official counted them on the south shore of the island in August 1752.  Pierre married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Hébert and Madeleine Doiron, on the island in c1757.  In late 1758, the British deported Pierre, Marie, an infant son, and Marie's sister Anne on the British transport Supply, which left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in early March 1759.  They all survived the crossing.  Pierre and Marie settled at nearby St.-Suliac, where seven more children were born to them in the next dozen years. Two more daughters were born to them elsewhere in France.  When in the early 1780s the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Pierre, Marie, and their family agreed to take it.  So did Pierre's widowed brother-in-law, Amand Pitre, and four of his children.  Pierre and Marie brought two sons and five daughters to the Spanish colony aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships from France, in 1785.  After they reached New Orleans in late December, they chose not to follow the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores on the river above Baton Rouge.  They went, instead, to upper Bayou Lafourche, where the majority of their fellow exiles from France had gone.  Pierre and Marie's daughters married into the Aucoin, Dugas, Gautreaux, Naquin, Richard, and Thibodeaux families.  Like their father and brothers, they settled on the upper Lafourche.  Both of Pierre's sons created families of their own.  Descendants of the older son settled in what became Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  Descendants of the younger son remained in Assumption Parish or moved down bayou into Lafourche.

Older son Tranquille-François, born at St.-Suliac, France, in June 1766, came to Louisiana from France probably with his parents and siblings and followed them to upper Bayou Lafourche.  He married Anne-Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Rassicot dit Ratier and Marie-Henriette Pothier, at St.-Jacques on the river in July 1788.  Anne-Marguerite had come to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships.  They settled near Tranquille's father and siblings on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Tranquille died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1829.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Tranquille was 66 years old when he died, but he was 63.  His daughters married into the Bellanger, Bergeron, Brunet, Foret, and Honoré families.  Two of his four sons created families of their own and settled in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  

Oldest son François-Louis, born at Ascension in May 1791, may have died young.  

Tranquille-François's second son Louis, baptized at Assumption in June 1797, married Anne Rosalie, Rosaline or Rose, 22-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Robichaux and Anne Prejean, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in June 1820.  Their son Louis Michel was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1821; Prosper Pierre in March 1824; Joseph Nicolas, called Nicolas, in February 1826; Pierre in May 1830; and Louis Cletus, called Cletus, in December 1837..  Louis died in Terrebonne Parish in November 1843, age 46.  His daughters married into the Duplantis and Guidry families.  Four of his five sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Louis Michel, while residing in Terrebonne Parish, married cousin Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Robichaux and Marie Madeleine Breaux of Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodeaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in July 1845.  Their son Louis Dalpheres was born probably in Terrebonne Parish in December 1849, and Jean Onesi in August 1852.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in Terrebonne Parish counted a single slave--a black 15-year-old male--on Louis Arcement's farm; this was Louis Michel.  at age 46, Louis Michel remarried to Adeline, daughter of Alexis Aucoin and , at the Montegut church, Terrebonne Parish, in July 1868. 

Louis's second son Prosper Pierre married Elzelina, Eveline, or Ezelina, 19-year-old daughter of  fellow Acadian Eléonore Crochet and his Creole wife Célise Pichoff, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1851. 

Louis's third son Nicolas, if he survived childhoold may not have married.

Louis's fourth son Pierre may have married Geneviève Dauphin and settled near Franklin, St. Mary Parish, in the lower Teche valley, by the mid-1860s.  

Louis's fifth and youngest son Louis Cletus, called Cletus, married Malvina, daughter of fellow Acadian Lucien Savoie and his Creole wife Marceline Chauvin of Lafourche Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in November 1859.  Cletus died in Terrebonne Parish in October 1863, age 25.  One wonders if his death was war-related.  He and Malvina had a daughter but no sons.  

Tranquille-François's third son Nicolas, born at Assumption in March 1802, married Rosalie, 20-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Pitre and Marie Anne Bourg, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1834.  Their son Nicolas Ovile, called Ovile, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1835; Marcellin Austin in September 1836; Joseph Wilfrid in October 1840; Charles in March 1843; Louis Félix in September 1845; and Victor Olésime in October 1848.  Nicolas died in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1862; the priest who recorded the burial said that Nicolas died "at age 62 yrs.," but he was "only" 59.  His daughter married into the Robichaux family.  At least two of his older sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Nicolas Ovile, called Ovile, married Azema, daughter of fellow Acadians Augustin Blanchard and Marcelline Robichaux, at the Thibodaux church in October 1860.  They settled near Raceland.  Their son Joseph Augustin was born in July 1861, Paul Orestil in July 1864, and Joseph Oscar in January 1867.  

Nicolas's second son Marcellin Austin married Pauline, daughter of Spanish Creole Auguste Sanchez and his Acadian wife Adèle Guillot, at the Thibodaux church in February 1863.  Their son Joseph Albert was born near Raceland in October 1865. 

Nicolas's third son Joseph Wilfrid died in Lafourche Parish in February 1859, age 18.  He did not marry.  

Tranquille François's fourth and youngest son Auguste Martial, born in Assumption Parish in June 1810, probably died young.  

Pierre's younger son Guillaume-Romain, born at St.-Suliac in January 1772, came to Louisiana with his parents and siblings in 1785 and followed them to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he worked probably as an engagé with several Acadian families.  At age 31, he married Marianne, daughter of François Aysenne and Maria Thérèse Smith of St.-Charles des Allemands, at Assumption in February 1803.  Guillaume died probably in Assumption Parish in July 1850.  The Thibodeaux priest who recorded his burial said that Guillaume was age 73 when he died, but he was 78.  His daughters married into the Boudreaux and Juneau families.  He fathered at least nine sons, but only five of them created their own families.  His oldest son's line was especially robust.  Guillaume's descendants settled up and down the Lafourche valley from Assumption Parish south to Lafourche Parish.  Three days after Guillaume's death, in late July 1850, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted five slaves--two males and three females, all black except for a single mulatto, ranging in age from 30 years to 1 month--on Guillaume Arceman's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District.  

Oldest son François Guillaume, born at Ascension in September 1806, married Marie Céleste, daughter of Hyacinthe Laurent Aucoin and Marie Céleste Delond and widow of Joseph Richard, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in January 1835.  They lived near the boundary between Lafourche Interior and Assumption parishes.  Their son Théophile Hubert was born in October 1835; Pierre Aristide in February 1837; Joseph Auguste in c1838 but died at age 9 in October 1847; Louis was born in c1840 but died at age 7 in October 1847; Jules Alexandre was born in January 1843; Alfred Félicien in December 1844; Ikiler Oleus in January 1847; Augustin Wilfrid in May 1849; Auguste Osémé in December 1852; and Leonie Numa in February 1857.  At least two of their sons married by 1870 and settled on the upper Lafourche. 

Oldest son Théophile Hubert married Emilia, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Richard and Marie Thibodeaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1858.  During the War of 1861-65, Théophile was conscripted into Company C of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which was composed of many Lafourche valley conscripts, including his uncle Joachim Arcement, and fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Théophile, along with his unit, was captured at Vicksburg in July 1863, refused parole, and spent the rest of the war in Camp Morton, a prisoner-of-war camp near Indianapolis, Indiana.  Unlike his uncle, Joachim, who was shot to death by a sentinel at Camp Morton, Théophile survived the ordeal and returned to his family. 

François Guillaume's fifth son Jules Alexandre, during the War of 1861-65, served in Company C, 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Assumption Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Jules married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Marcellin Gautreaux and Pauline Aucoin, at the Labadieville church in April 1864, while he was waiting to be exchanged.  Their son Joseph Désiré was born near Labadieville in July 1868. 

François Guillaume's sixth son Alfred Félicien married Letitia, daughter of fellow Acadian Auguste LeBlanc and his Creole wife Adèle Peltier, at the Labadieville church in January 1867. 

Guillaume Romain's second son Pierre Séraphin, born in Ascension Parish in July 1808, married Rosalie Césaire, called Césaire, daughter of Augustin Lagrange and Rosalie Mayer, at the Thibodaux church in May 1838.  They lived near the boundary between Lafourche Interior and Assumption parishes.  Their only son, name unrecorded, born in c1841, died at age 14 in May or July 1853.  Pierre Séraphin died probably in August 1849, age 41.  In July 1850, not quite a year after Pierre's death, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted three slaves--a 40-year-old female, a 7-year-old female, and a 3-year-old male, all black--on Widow Pierre Arseman's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District.  His daughters married into the Boudreaux, Hébert, and Martin families.  Only the blood of this family line survived in the Bayou State. 

Guillaume Romain's third son Joseph, born in Assumption Parish in August 1816, probably died young.

Guillaume Romain's fourth son Valsin Théodule, born in Assumption Parish in January 1818, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1848, age 29.  He probably did not marry.  

Guillaume Romain's fifth son Étienne Joseph, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1820, may have died young.  

Guillaume Romain's sixth son Onésiphore Antoine Basile, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1823, died at age 2 in November 1824.  

Guillaume Romain's seventh son Jean Baptiste Ulysse, called Baptiste, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1824, married Sarah Jane or Jeanne, daughter of Olibbe Bone, Borne, Borns, Burns, Burs, or Van and Marie Romer, at the Labadieville church in October 1856.  They settled near Attakapas Canal east of Lake Verret.  Their son Auguste Lesta was born in July 1858, Henry Cleber in December 1859, Pierre Léony Jean Baptiste in September 1863, Joseph William in December 1866, and twins Jean Baptiste Vinson and Joseph Nicholls in February 1870. 

Guillaume Romain's eighth son Joachim Auguste or Augustin, born in Assumption Parish in June 1826, married, at age 37,  Elena, daughter of Ursin Oncal or Oncale and Euphemie Maillet, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1863.  A few months before his marriage, Auguste, a private in the Lafourche Parish Regiment Militia, fought in the Battle of Labadieville, Assumption Parish, not far from his home, fell into Federal hands in November 1862, and was released on a parole of honor.  His son Mertil Predeau was born near Labadieville in April 1865; Guillaume Romain in April 1867; and Joseph Nicholls Cléome in April 1869. 

Guillaume Romain's ninth and youngest son Joachim Narcisse was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1830.  During the War of 1861-65, Joachim was conscripted into Company C of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which was composed of many Lafourche valley conscripts, including his nephew Théophile Arcement.  The regiment fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Joachim, along with his unit, was captured at Vicksburg in July 1863, refused parole, and was sent, along with nephew Théophile, to Camp Morton, a prisoner-of-war camp near Indianapolis, Indiana.  In January 1864, a Yankee sentinel shot and killed Joachim.  He was 33 years old and probably still a bachelor. 

Arceneaux

Coastal pilot Pierre Arseneau, as his name came to be spelled, born perhaps in the hamlet of La Flamancherie, Saintonge, France, in September 1646, may have come to Acadia from La Rochelle aboard L'Oranger in 1671.  He and his wives Marguerite Dugas and Marie Guérin created a large family in the colony.  In 1676 and 1678, Marguerite gave Pierre two children, both sons, both of whom created families of their own.  Between 1690 and 1702, Marie gave him seven more children, six sons and a daughter.  Pierre's daughter evidently died young, but five of his sons by his second wife also created their own families.  Pierre, Marguerite, and Marie's descendants settled not only at Chignecto, but also in the French Maritimes, where they were especially numerous at Malpèque, on the northwest coast of Île St.-Jean.  As a result, not all of Pierre's descendants were "typical" Fundy Acadians. 

In the fall of 1755, the Arceneaus remaining at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  In the spring and summer of 1750, Canadian soldiers, assisted by Abbé Le Loutre and his Mi'kmaq warriors, burned Acadian homesteads in the British-controlled area east of Rivière Missaguash, forcing the habitants to move to the French-controlled area west of the river.  Arseneaus probably were among the refugees.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto Acadians served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  

Chignecto Arseneaus who escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755 hurried north to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  Some moved on to Canada.  Paul Arseneau lost two of his sons--Félix, age 6; and Jean-Baptiste, age 1--in a smallpox epidemic that struck the Acadians at Québec in late 1757.  Other members of  the family congregated at Restigouche, at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Still others escaped to French-controlled Île-St. Jean, where their cousins had lived for decades.  Their respite from British oppression there was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the British rounded up most of the habitants on the Maritime islands and deported them to France.  Most of the Arseneaus on Île St.-Jean, living at Malpèque on the island's remote northwest coast, escaped the redcoasts and joined their cousins on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore. 

A few Arseneaus on the island could not get away.  Anne-Marie, daughter of Pierre Arseneau and Marguerite Cormier and wife of François Vécot of Boucherville, Canada, was counted with her family on the south bank of Rivière-du-Nord-Est, in the middle of the island, in August 1752.  In September 1758, the British deported them to St.-Malo, France, aboard the British transport Duke William.  Four of Anne-Marie's five children died aboard ship.  The crippled vessel arrived at St.-Malo on 1 November 1758.  One record notes that Anne-Marie "died in the roadstead at St.-Malo," so she almost made it to the mother country.  She was only 32 years old.  Her husband died on November 4, just three days after the ship made port.  Only son François Vécot, fils, age 13, survived the ordeal.  Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Arseneau and Anne Boudrot of Havre-St.-Pierre, Île St.-Jean, and widow of Jean Delaunay of Lacasse, Brittany, was deported to Cherbourg in 1758 but moved on to St.-Malo in August 1759.  She lived at St.-Cast, Corseul, and again at St.-Cast, suburbs of St.-Malo, and died at St.-Cast in October 1763, in early 40s.  Jean, fils, son of Jean Arseneau and Marie Lamy, a day laborer, married Élisabeth, daughter of Frenchmen Barthélemy Sansovoine and Anne Pasquier of St.-Martin de Péré, at Notre-Dame, Rochefort, in May 1771; Jean, fils's brothers Pierre, André, and Élie witnessed the marriage. 

Some of the Arseneaus in France, eager to return to their homes in North America, chose to settle on the French-controlled islands of St.-Pierre and Miquelon, off the southern coast of Newfoundland.   This choice, however, for many Acadians, proved to be a troublesome one.  Louise, daughter of Abraham Arseneau and Jeanne Gaudet and widow of Jean Vigneau dit Maurice, remarried to Joseph Dugas, fils, widower of Marguerite LeBlanc, at Chédabouctou, Nova Scotia, in October 1762.  The marriage was "reinstated" at Notre-Dame-des-Ardiliers, on Île Miquelon, in May 1766.  Marie-Madeleine, daughter of François Arseneau, and husband Jean dit Jeannotte Bourg, were counted on the island in 1767.  Overcrowding soon led the French to send many Acadians on the small island back to the mother country.  Louise and husband Joseph crossed to France on the schooner La Creole and reached St.-Malo in November 1767, but they refused to stay.  They returned to St.-Pierre and Miquelon the following March.  Jean Arseneau, wife Madeleine Boudrot, and their family also went to France in 1767.  They settled at Belle-Île-en-Mer, off the southern coast of Brittany, with other Acadians.  Jean drowned probably off the island in September 1768.  His family chose to remain in France.  Son Basile, now a sailor, married Anne, daughter of Joseph Bourgeois and Marguerite Hébert of Notre-Dame, Île Miquelon, at St.-Jean church, La Rochelle, in April 1780.  Meanwhile, in 1778, during the American war for independence, France joined the Americans against their old enemy, Britain.  The redcoats promptly captured St.-Pierre and Miquelon and deported the Acadians there to La Rochelle.  After reaching the port, Louise Arseneau and husband Joseph Dugas, fils returned to St.-Malo aboard the brigantine La Jeannette in November 1778.  This time they stayed.  They settled at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, where Louise died in June 1779, age 63.  Pierre Arseneau and his wife Théotiste Bourgeois of Chignecto also had come to France by a circuituous route.  As a teenager, Pierre, with younger brother Jean-Baptiste, escaped the British roundup at Chignecto in 1755, sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, and married Théotiste at Restigouche in July 1760.  Soon after their marriage, the British attacked Restigouche, defeated the French and Acadians there, captured 300 Acadian refugeess, including the newlyweds, and held them as prisoners in Nova Scotia for the rest of the war.  After the war finally ended, Pierre and Théoitiste chose to join their fellow Acadians on Île Miquelon in c1764.  They may have gone to France in 1767 and returned to the island.  They were there in 1778 when the British captured the island and deported the Acadians to La Rochelle.  Pierre, Théotiste, and their family were still at La Rochelle when their daughter Marie-Anne was born in St.-Jean Parish in February 1779.  Marie-Anne died two months later.  Their daughter Judith, called Julie, was born in St.-Jean Parish in March 1781 and died at La Rochelle in March 1782.  Pierre also died there that year.  Three of his older children--Marie-Scholastique, Pierre, and Charles--refused to remain in the mother country.  They returned to North America and settled on the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  When, in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, none of the Arceneaus still in France took up the offer to go there. 

In North America, Arseneaus who escaped the British roundup of 1758 headed to Restigouche, at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs, where they joined their Chignecto cousins already there.  After the fall of Québec in September 1759, the British attacked Restigouche in the summer of 1760, defeated the French regulars and Acadian militia, captured 300 Acadian refugees, many of whom had served in the militia, and dragged them off to prisoner-of-war compounds in British Nova Scotia.  A hand full of Arseneaus were among the captured, but most of them escaped this latest roundup and moved to the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs or to Île Miscou at the entrance to the bay.  After the war, especially after 1766, Arseneaus could be found in Canada at Québec City; on the upper St. Lawrence at Lotbinière, Bécancour, St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan, L'Assomption, and Montréal; at St.-Pierre-de-Sorel, St.-Ours, and St. Antoine-de-Chambly on the lower Richelieu; on Île d'Orléans and at Rimouski on the lower St. Lawrence; on the Îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence; at Carleton and Bonaventure in Gaspésie; at Caraquet, Cocagne, and Grande-Digue along the eastern New Brunswick shore; at Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island; and at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, in Nova Scotia.  Some of them managed to return to St. John's Island, which the British renamed Prince Edward Island.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

Not all of the Chignecto Arseneaus who had taken refuge at Restigouche escaped the British roundup there.  When the war finally ended, the Arseneaus being held in the prison compounds of Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles, including one of family of Arseneaus, chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, at least 18 were Arseneaus. 

Arseneaus were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in Louisiana.  The first of them came to the colony from Halifax via Cap-Française, St.-Domingue, in February 1765.  They followed the Broussards to Bayou Teche, but they did not remain there.  When an epidemic struck the Teche valley settlements later that year, all of the Arseneaus fled to Cabanocé on the river, and most of them stayed there, creating the first center of family settlement in the Spanish colony.  Not until the late colonial period did Arceneauxs return to the prairies, creating a western branch of the family that rivaled in numbers their kinsmen on the river.  Meanwhile, an Arceneaux from the river moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, creating a third center of family settlement in the colony.  In the 1820s, two brothers from St. Martin Parish joined their cousins along Bayou Lafourche.  One of the brothers returned to Bayou Teche, but the other one remained on the Lafourche.  

Though some of them moved to Île St.-Jean soon after Acadians began settling that island in the early 1700s, the Arseneaus of Acadia had tended to concentrate at Chignecto, which the progenitor of their family helped pioneer.  The Arceneauxs of Louisiana, however, exhibited a very different settlement pattern than that of their Acadian forebears before Le Grand Dérangement.  From the late colonial into the antebellum period, beginning at their base in what became St. James Parish, they spread out to nearly every corner of today's Acadiana--up the Mississippi as far as Baton Rouge; on Bayou Lafourche from Assumption down to Thibodaux and Lockport; on Bayou Teche from Breaux Bridge down to Charenton, and out into the prairies north and west of present-day Lafayette.  During the immediate post-war period, another Arceneaux moved from St. James Parish to the Bayou Teche valley. ...70

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In February 1765, four Arseneaus, including a set of brothers, came to Louisiana from Halifax via French St.-Domingue with the Beausoleil Broussards and followed them to Bayou Teche: 

Jean (c1728-1800) à Abraham à Pierre Arceneaux

Jean, oldest son of Pierre Arseneau and Marguerite Hébert, born at Pointe Beauséjour, Chignecto, in c1728, married Judith Bergeron probably at Chignecto on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  British officials counted them with four children, all sons, at Halifax in August 1763.  Jean took his family to Louisiana with the Broussard party in 1764-65, followed the Broussards to the Bayou Teche valley in the spring of 1765.  That fall, however, he retreated to Cabahannocer on the river to escape an epidemic that devastated the Teche valley community.  He and Judith remained on what became known as the Acadian Coast, where they had more children, including a daughter and two more sons.  Jean did fairly well at Cabahannocer; in March 1779, Spanish officials counted three slaves on his farm along the river.  He died at Cabahannocer in January 1800.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean was age 75 when he died, but he was closer to 72.  Jean's only daughter Anne dite Manon, born at Cabahannocer, married into the Clouâtre and Tomlette families.  All six of his sons created their own families on what became known as the Acadian Coast. 

Oldest son Jean-Charles, born probably at Chignecto in c1752, married Marie-Josèphe, 14-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Basile Babin and Anne Saulnier and stepdaughter of Michel Cormier of Opelousas, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in January 1777.  Jean died in St. James Parish in April 1813, in his early 60s.  His daughters married into the Bernard, Melançon, Picou, and Sonnier families.  His only son married twice and created a vigorous line on the river. 

Abraham, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in January 1782, married Marie Éloise, Héloise, or Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Marguerite Landry of San Gabriel, at St.-Jacques in August 1802.  Their son Jean Abraham was born in St. James Parish in November 1806.  Abraham and Louise's daughters married into the Arceneaux, Estevan, Landry, and Menier or Munier families.  Abraham remarried to Marie Carmelise or Carmelite, daughter of Salvador Comil, Coneille, Conille, Connille, or Counille and Marianne Peleret of New Orleans and widow of François Huguet, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in March 1815.  Their son Abraham Amédée, called Amédée, was born in St. James Parish in October 1818; and Evariste Abraham in October 1819.  Abraham and Carmelite's daughters married into the Bourgeois, Cornet, and Duhon families.  Abraham, père died near Convent, St. James Parish, in September 1830.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Abraham was age 46 when he died, but he was closer to 48.  His younger sons by his second wife created their own families on the river.

Oldest son Jean Abraham, by first wife Marie Éloise LeBlanc, probably died young. 

Second son Amédée, by second wife Carmelite Connille, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in December 1850, age 32.  He probably did not marry. 

Abraham's third and youngest son Evariste, by second wife Carmelite Connille, married Marie Victorine, daughter of fellow Acadians Bernard Allain and Apollonie Blanchard, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1840.  Their son Joseph Elphége was born near St. Gabriel in August 1841, and Martial in October 1842.  During the War of 1861-65, his two sons served Louisiana in separate units.  After the war, his older son settled in Texas. 

Older son Joseph Elphége served in Company A of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Kentucky, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi.  Joseph E. was present on all of the rolls of his company from his enlistment in New Orleans in August 1861 until June 1863.  He was captured along with many of his fellow troopers at Big Hill, Kentucky, in late July 1863.  The Federals sent him to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, in early August; transferred him to Fort Delaware, Delaware, in February 1864; and sent him on to Camp Chase, Ohio, in March.  He was exchanged at City Point, Virginia, in March 1865, but he may not have returned home to Iberville Parish.  He married Amanda Susan, daughter of Anglo American John C. Darby, at Logan, Kentucky, in December 1866.  She was a year older than Joseph Elphége.  He likely met her during his Confederate service.  They did not settle in South Louisiana but remained in Kentucky before moving to Texas by the mid-1870s.  Joseph Elphége died in Texas between 1910 and 1919, in his 60s. 

Evariste's younger son Martial, called Martialis by the priest who recorded his burial, died near Gonzales, St. James Parish, in April 1864.  He was only age 21 and probably did not marry.  He probably was the M. Arceneaux who, during the War of 1861-65, served in Company A of the 3rd Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Arkansas, Missouri, and Mississippi.  M. was captured at Corinth, Mississippi, in September 1862; was released by the Federals soon afterward; and went home on sick furlough in November.  His wartime service probably contributed to his early death. 

Jean's second son Joseph, born in exile in c1756, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadiasn Michel Dupuis and Anne Gaudet and widow of Joseph Blanchard, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in September 1780.  Joseph, père died in St. James Parish in January 1811, age 56.  His daughters married into the Aucoin, Braud, and Mire families.  His only son had many sons of his own. 

Joseph, fils, born at Cabahannocer in June 1786, married Marie Constance, called Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Mathurin Bergeron and Marie Godin, at the St.-Jacques church in June 1805.  Their son Joseph Léon or Léonard Joseph, called Léon and sometimes Jacques, was born in St. James Parish in April 1806; Félix in May 1808; Vital in November 1812; and Théodule in April 1815.  Joseph, fils died in St. James Parish in June 1818.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 35 when he died, but he was age 32.  His daughter married into the Blouin family.  Three of his four sons created their own families, but one of the lines did not endure. 

Oldest son Léon married cousin Marie Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Bergeron and Marine Landry, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in November 1824.  Their son Joseph Michel Léonard was born in St. James Parish in October 1825.  Joseph Léon may have died in St. James Parish in October 1847; if so, he would have been only age 41.  His daughters married into the Chevet and Simoneaux families.  His only son also created his own family.

Joseph Michel Léonard married cousin Marie, daughter of Daniel Blouin and his Acadian wife Marguerite Constance Arceneaux, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in 1859; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Joseph, fils's second son Félix married cousin Domitille, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham Arceneaux and Marie Éloise LeBlanc, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in October 1830.  Félix died near Convent in August 1840, age 32.  His daughter married into the Barthélémy family.  He evidently fathered no sons, so his line of the family, except for its blood, may have died with him. 

Joseph, fils's third son Vital married Marie Euphrasie, called Euphrasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Poirier and Marie Landry, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in February 1834.  Their son Michel Nicolas Vtimen, called Euthymese, was born in St. James Parish in November 1834; and Vital, fils in c1837 but died at age 12 in June 1849.  They lived in New Orleans during the early 1850s.  Vital's older son created his own family on the western prairies. 

Euthymese married Élodie Picard, and remarried to Louison, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Guilbeau and Clémence Potier and widow of Jérome Étie Valéry Arthur Bulliard, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1866. 

Jean's third son Guillaume, born perhaps at Halifax in c1761, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Gaudet and Marie Hébert, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in March 1786.  Guillaume died in St. James Parish in December 1818, age 56.  His daughters married into the Cox, Pahud, and Tassin families. Only one of his six sons seems to have created a family of his own, and that line also may have died out. 

Oldest son Charles-Guillaume, born at Cabahannocer in January 1787, may have died young. 

Second son Joseph-Louis, born at Cabahannocer in March 1788, also may have died young. 

Third son Jean-Baptiste, born at Cabahannocer in c1796, married Alexandrine, daughter of Antoine Maxent and Marguerite Mollere, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in April 1817.  Jean Baptiste died in Ascension Parish in September 1820, age 24.  Their daughter married into the Engeron family.  He may have fathered no sons. 

Fourth son Joseph-Zenon, born at Cabahannocer in March 1799, may have died young. 

Fifth and sixth sons Raymond and Rosémond, twins, born at Cabahannocer in March 1801, also may not have survived childhood. 

Jean's fourth son Pierre-Paul, called Paul and also Hippolyte, born probably at Halifax in c1762, married Élisabeth or Isabelle Fontenot probably at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in the 1780s.  Pierre Paul died in St. James Parish in September 1804, age 42.  His daughters married into the Gaudin, Mire, and Poirier families.  Only one of his three sons creatd their own families. 

Oldest son René, called Zenon, born at Cabahannocer in January 1792, married Marie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Melançon and Osite Barbe LeBlanc, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in January 1813.  Their son Théogène was born in St. James Parish in January 1817 but died at age 6 in September 1823; and Zenon, fils was born in January 1819.  Zenon, père died in St. James Parish in October 1819, age 27.  His only surviving son created his own family on the river. 

Zenon, fils married cousin Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul LeBlanc and Adélaïde Melançon, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1837; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of relationship in order to marry.  Zenon, fils died near Convent in April 1852.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Zenon died at "age 34 years," but he was only age 32.  His daughters married into the Gravois, Matherne, and Melançon families.  He evidently fathered no sons, so his line of the family, except for its blood, may have died with him. 

Paul's second son Simon, born at Cabahannocer in June 1794, may have died young. 

Paul's third and youngest son, name unrecorded, died at Cabahannocer, age 1 in January 1797. 

Jean's fifth son François, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in August 1771, married Ludivine, also called Luce, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Charles Braud and Marie Benoit, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in January 1789.  Their son Charles-Simon or Simon-Charles was born at St.-Jacques in February 1792; and François-Benjamin, called Benjamin, in December 1794 but died at age 5 in November 1799.  François died in St. James Parish in April 1810, age 37.  His surviving son created his own family on the river. 

Simon Charles married Françoise or Marie Mélanie, called Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and Marguerite LeBlanc, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in May 1811.  Their son François Faustin or Forestin was born in St. James Parish in February 1815 but died at age 3 in January 1819; Simon Léon was born in September 1816; Charles Félix, called Félix, in December 1818; and Jacques Jules, called Jules, in November 1821.  Simon died in St. James Parish in October 1822, age 30.  Two of his three surviving sons created their own families on the river. 

Second son Simon Léon died near Convent, St. James Parish, in April 1845.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Simon died at "age 30 yrs.," but he was age 28.  He probably did not marry. 

Simon Charles's third son Charles Félix married Marie Virginie, called Virginie, daughter of Jacques Mainville, Mainvielle, or Mienvielle and Delphine Mayer, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in April 1837.  Their son Louis Félix, called Félix, was born near Convent in August 1842 but died at age 2 in August 1844; and François Simon was born in January 1848.  Their daughter married into the Babin family.

Simon Charles's fourth and youngest son Jacques Jules married Stephanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Gaudin and Scholastique Hébert, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in April 1847.  Their son Joseph Léon was born near Convent in January 1852, François Elphége in February 1853, and Michel Oscar in February 1857.

Jean's sixth and youngest son Laurent, born at Cabahannocer in August 1773, married Félicité, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Bourgeois and Ludivine Granger, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in January 1792.  Laurent died in St. James Parish in February 1824, age 52.  His daughters married into the Blouin, Dicharry, Michel, Mire, Richard, and Savoie families. 

Oldest son Dionis, born at Cabahanncoer in December 1796, evidently died young. 

Second son Désiré, born at St. James in November 1804, married Marie Céleste, called Céleste, Enger or Hinger probably in St. James Parish in the early 1820s.  Their daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  Désiré remarried to Anne Gracieuse or Gratieuse, daughter of Jacques Dicharry and his Acadian wife Clémence Dugas, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in June 1831.  Their son Laurent Désiré, called L. Désiré, was born near Convent in November 1838.  Their daughters married into the Mollere and Poirier families.  Désiré, père may have died near Convent in October 1841.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Désiré was age 30 when he died, but if this was him, he would have been age 36.  After serving Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65, Désiré's only son created his own family on the river.

Laurent Désiré, by second wife Anne Gracieuse Dicharry, served in the Donaldsonville Artillery, raised in Ascension Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Laurent Désiré was present with his company from his enlistment in September 1861 until early 1864, when he was reported absent without leave.  He probably did not return to his battery.  The Federals paroled him at Natchitoches in June 1865, so he may have joined another Confederate unit when he came home without leave.  Laurent Désiré married cousin Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Theriot and his Creole wife Elize Comes, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Laurent Désiré, fils was born in Ascension Parish in October 1868. 

Laurent's third and youngest son Evariste, born in St. James Parish in April 1813, married Marie Belzire, called Belzire, daughter of fellow Acadians Urbin Braud and Anne Marcellite Braud, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1834.  Their son Evariste Désiré was born near St. Gabriel in February 1848.  Evariste died near Baton Rouge in October 1853, age 40.  His daughters married into the Cannon and Keller families.  His son may have married after 1870. 

Joseph (c1740-1790s) à Abraham à Pierre Arceneaux

Joseph, second son of Pierre Arseneau and Marguerite Hébert, born at Pointe Beauséjour, Chignecto, in c1740, married Marie, daughter of Barthélémy Bergeron dit d'Ambroise and Marguerite Dugas of Rivière St.-Jean, in the early 1760s while in exile.  British officials counted them at the prison compound at Halifax in August 1763; they had no children.  Like older brother Jean and his family, Joseph and Marie came to Louisiana with the Broussard party in 1764-65.  They followed the Broussards to Bayou Teche that spring and, like his brother, retreated to Cabahannocer on the river that autumn to escape an epidemic that struck the Teche valley community.  Joseph and Marie remained on the river, where all of their children were born.  They may have lived in New Orleans from 1767-69 (two daughters were baptized at St.-Louis Church in May 1767 and April 1769).  They were back at Cabannnocer by September 1769, when Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river there.  Joseph died by February 1798, when he was listed as deceased in a daughter's marriage record; he would have been in his late 50s that year.  His daughters married into the Bourgeois, LeBlanc, and Mire families.  Two of his three sons created their own families on the river. 

Oldest son Jean-Charles, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in July 1774, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Part and Marguerite Melançon, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in February 1799.  Jean Charles died in St. James Parish in January 1816.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean was age 45 when he died, but he was 41.  His daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  Only two of his many sons, who married sisters, created their own families, but one line may not have endured.  Two others lived well into their middle age but probably did not marry. 

Oldest son Édouard, born at Cabahannocer in November 1799, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in January 1846, age 46.  He may not have married. 

His second son, name unrecorded, died at St.-Jacques eight days after his birth in August 1801.

Third son Joseph-Simon, called Simon, born at St.-Jacques in September 1802, married Jane Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Michel David and his Creole wife Marie Louise Denis, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in May 1836.  Their son Augustin was born near Convent in June 1843.   Simon died near Convent in October 1861.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Simon died at "age 48 years," but he was age 59.  He also was a widower.  His daughters married into the Cantrelle and Decarraux families.

Jean Charles's fourth son Jean Amédée, called Amédée, born at St. James in March 1806, married Carmelite, another daughter of Michel David and Marie Louise Denis, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in October 1837.  One wonders if they had any children who survived childhood. 

Jean Charles's fifth son, name and age unrecorded, died in St. James Parish in April 1808. 

Jean Charles's sixth son Joseph le jeune, born in St. James Parish in December 1810, also may have died young. 

Jean Charles's seventh and youngest son Pierre Joachim, called Joachim, born in St. James Parish in February 1815, Joachim died near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1870, age 55.  He probably did not marry.  

Joseph's second son Joseph, fils, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in August 1777, may have died young, unless he and Augustin were the same person.  

Joseph's third and youngest son Auguste or Augustin, born probably at Cabahanncoer in the late 1770s, married Marcelline or Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadians Bonaventure Gaudin and Marie Broussard, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in September 1810.  Augustin died near Convent in November 1842.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Augustin died at "age 65 yrs."  His daughter married into the Bourgeois family.  Only one of his sons created his own family, and the line may not have endured. 

Older son Auguste or Augustin, fils, born near Convent, St. James Parish, in November 1814, died near Convent in May 1838, age 23.  He did not marry. 

Younger son Lucien, born probably near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1825, married Célina, daughter of Francois Boze or Folse and Marie Aimée Trouflox, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in June 1852.  Lucien died in Ascension Parish in June 1853, age 27.  One wonders if he fathered any children.   

Pierre, fils (c1749-?) à Abraham à Pierre Arceneaux

Pierre, fils, third and youngest son of Pierre Arseneau and Marguerite Hébert of Pointe Beauséjour, Chignecto, and brother of Jean and Joseph, was, according to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, born at Chignecto in c1749.  He may have come to Louisiana from Halifax with his older brothers and a sister in February 1765 and followed them that autumn to Cabahannocer.  He married Marie, daughter of probably Jean-Baptiste Bergeron dit d'Amboise and Marguerite Bernard of Rivière St.-Jean, probably at Cabahannocer in the late 1760s.  He does not appear in the records of the Louisiana colony until January 1777, when Spanish officials counted him on the right, or west, bank of the river at Cabahannocer with his wife, two sons, and two daughters of fellow Acadian Pierre Bourgeois.  Although this and other records give him and his wife at least three sons, none of them seem to have created families of their own, so this line of the family may not have survived in the Bayou State.  

Oldest son Pierre III, born probably at Cabahanncoer in c1770, may have died young.   

Pierre, fils's second son Jean le jeune, born probably at Cabahannocer in c1772, also may have died young.  

Pierre, fils's third and youngest son Alexandre, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in April 1777, also may have died young.

Pierre le jeune (c1731-1790s) à Pierre, fils à Pierre Arceneaux

Pierre le jeune, son of Jean Arseneau and Marie-Jeanne Hébert of Pointe-Beauséjour, Chignecto, born there in c1731, married Anne, daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Amboise and Marguerite Dugas of Rivière St.-Jean, in c1757 while in exile.  British officials counted Pierre and his family at Halifax in August 1763.  They came to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Dominique, with the Broussard dit Beausoleil party in 1764-65.  With Pierre was not only his wife and infant daughter Marie-Catherine, called Rosalie, but also an older, widowed sister.  Pierre was one of the signers of the Dauterive agreement.  That spring, he and his family followed the Broussards to Bayou Teche but retreated to Cabahannocer on the river that autumn to escape an epidemic that struck the Teche community.  Pierre and Anne had more children in Louisiana, including five sons, all born at Cabahannocer.  Pierre did better than most Acadians in the settlement; in March 1779, Spanish officials counted a dozen slaves on his farm along the river.  Nevertheless, during the late 1780s, likely in violation of Spanish policy, he and his family returned to the western prairies.  In April 1786, Pierre "obtained title, through an order of survey, to a tract of land measuring 40 x 40 arpents between present-day Carencro and Beaubassin," on upper Bayou Vermilion.  Pierre became a successful rancher in the area; he owned 400 head of cattle at the time of his death.  His succession record was filed at what would become the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in 1793.  He would have been in his early 60s that year.  His daughters married into the Breaux, Carmouche, and Guilbeau families.  All five of his sons created their own families on the prairies.  His many descendants settled in a number of places there--on the prairies southwest of Opelousas, on lower Bayou Teche as far down as Charenton, and especially in the Carencro-Grand Coteau area of Lafayette and St. Landry parishes. 

Oldest son Louis, born at Cabahannocer in c1768, married Marie Anne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Athanase Breaux and Marie LeBlanc, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in May 1788; Anne's brother was a husband of one of Louis's sisters.  They followed his parents to the western prairies, though Louis retained ownership of land at Cabahannocer.  Louis inherited from his father a 6 x 80-arpent holding on upper Bayou Vermilion in the early 1790s.  He named his home after the settlement in Acadia where his father was born.  Louis died at "Beau Bassin," his home near Carencro, in March 1812, age 44.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in 1814.  His daughters married into the Mouton and Sonnier families.  Only one of this two sons seems to have married, and that son may have fathered no children.  This line of the family, then, except for its blood, may not have survived in the Bayou State. 

Older son Louis Joachim, called Joachim, born near Opelousas in March 1791, married Marie Aspasie, called Aspasie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Bernard and Madeleine Broussard of La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1811.  Joachim died in Lafayette Parish in August 1834; the priest who recorded the burial said that Joachim died "at age 37 yrs.," but he was 43; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December 1844.  He and his wife may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children, at least none who appear in local church records, so his family line may have died with him.

Louis's younger son Alexandre Toussaint, called Laissin and Toussaint, born at Attakapas in December 1798, died in Lafayette Parish in January 1834, age 35.  He probably did not marry.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December 1834.   

Pierre's second son Pierre, fils, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in January 1773, married Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Cormier and his second wife Anne Michel, at Opelousas in April 1792.  Pierre, fils remarried to Marie-Josèphe, called Josèphe and Josette, daughter of Pierre Nezat of Layrac, France, and Madeleine Provost of Fort de Chartres, Illinois, at Attakapas in February 1802.  Pierre, fils died at his home near Carencro in August 1814, age 41.  His daughters, all by his second wife, married into the Bernard, Theriot, and Vavasseur families.  One of them settled on the river.  All six of Pierre, fils's sons married, two to first cousins, but not all of the lines endured. 

Oldest son Pierre Cyprien, le jeune, called Cyprien, by first wife Clémence Cormier, born near Opelousas in November 1793, married cousin Marie Brigitte Aglae, called Brigitte and Aglae, daughter of François Carmouche and Françoise Arceneaux, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1816.  They also settled near Carencro.  Their son Pierre le jeune, called Saintdoux, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 2, in May 1832 but died at age 10 in October 1840; and François Ovignac, called Ovignac, was baptized at age 11 months in February 1835.  Cyprien's daughters married into the Delhomme and Prejean families.  His surving son created his own family. 

Second son Ovignac married cousin Eméranthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Rosémond Breaux and Calixte Arceneaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1857.  They settled at Carencro.  Their son François Ambroise was born in July 1860; Pierre Ovide, called Ovide, in January 1862; Sosthène Alexandre in September 1863; and Joseph Ganidos in March 1870.  During the War of 1861-65, Ovignac served in Company C of the Consolidated Crescent Regiment Louisiana Infantry, which fought in Louisiana.  Ovignac died at Carencro in February 1894, age 60. 

Pierre, fils's second son Pierre Émile, called Émile, by second wife Josette Nezat, born at Attakapas in November 1802, married Marie Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Breaux and Mathide Broussard, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1821.  Their son Pierre Émile, fils, called Émile, was born near Carencro in July 1824; and Louis Joseph was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, 6 days after his birth in November 1829.  Émile died in Lafayette Parish in July 1847, age 44.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January 1848.  His daughter married into the Valière family.  His two sons created their own families.

Older son Pierre Émile, fils married Marie Alzina or Alzire, also called Alzina and Alezinore, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Fabien Richard and Eugènie Savoie, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1849.  Their son Louis Sosthène le jeune was born in St. Landry Parish in September 1851; and Pierre Émile III, called Émile, in March 1857 but died at age 9 in September 1866.  Their daughter married into the Joubert family. 

Émile's younger son Louis Joseph married double cousin Marie Amelie, called Amelie and Amelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Émilien Arceneaux and Céleste Breaux, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1852.  Their son François Alexandre was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1855, Louis Adalbert in April 1858, Bibian Émilien was born in December 1860, Pierre Joseph le jeune in June 1864, Pierre Clément in November 1866, and Louis Barthélemy in August 1868.

Pierre, fils's third son Louis Sosthène, called Sosthène, by second wife Josette Nezat, born at Attakapas in March 1804, married cousin Marie Euphanie, called Fannie, daughter of French Canadian Solastie Roy and his Creole Marie Nezat, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1830.  Louis Sosthène died in Lafayette Parish in September 1839.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Louis was age 33 when he died, but he was 35.  Hs succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in February 1840.  One wonders if he fathered any sons. 

Pierre, fils's fourth son Pierre Joseph, by second wife Josette Nezat, born in February 1810, married Marie Josephine, called Josephine, daughter of James Blaire or Blaise and his Acadian wife Marie Céleste Breaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1837.  Pierre Joseph's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in March 1852; he would have been age 42 that year.  His daughter married into the Latiolais family.  He may have fathered no sons.   

Pierre, fils's fifth son Pierre Bienvenu, by second wife Josette Nezat, born in December 1811, married first cousin Marie Adéle or Azélie, also called Azelia, daughter of his uncle François Arceneaux and Marie Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1838.  Marie Azélie died in January 1841 probably from complications of childbirth.  Her succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following June and again in July 1870.  Pierre Bienvenu evidently did not remarry.  He died in Lafayette Parish in July 1855, age 43.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse later that month.  One wonders if he and Azélie had any children who survived childhood. 

Pierre, fils's sixth and youngest son Pierre Sosthène, by second wife Josette Nezat, born in April 1813, married first cousin Geneviève Désirée, daughter of his uncle Alexandre Arceneaux and his Creole wife Hélène Carmouche, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1838.  Did Pierre Sosthène father any children?

Pierre, père's third son Alexandre, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in June 1774, married Hélène, daughter of Pierre Carmouche of Pensacola and Pointe Coupée and Geneviève Rousseau, at Ascension in March 1802.  They settled at Beaubassin on upper Bayou Vermilion, east of Carencro.  Alexandre l'aîné died probably at Carencro in September 1833, age 59.  His succession records were filed at the Opelousas and Vermilionville courthouses the following March.  His daughters married into the Arceneaux, Breaux, Carmouche, and Eastin families.  Alexandre adopted Mary Arceneaux, whose son Alexandre le jeune was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, age 2 1/2, in July 1839.  His three surviving sons created their own family. 

Oldest son Alexandre, fils, born probably at Beaubassin in June 1803, may have married Mary Balqué in St. Landry Parish in the late 1830s.  Their daughter married into the Fuselier family.

A  newborn second son, name unrecorded, died probably at Beaubassin in November 1806.

Alexandre's third son Paulin, a twin, born at home in October 1807, married Céleste Armillionne or Erminionne, daughter of French Creole André Martin and his Acadian wife Gertrude Sonnier, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1828.  Their son André Destival was baptized at the Vermilionville church at age 8 months in June 1830; Alexandre Sevigne, called Sevigne, was baptized at age 13 months in May 1832; Demas at age 6 months in October 1835; Luma at age 15 months in August 1839; and Estras was born in 1840 and baptized at the Vermilionville church in December 1841.  Paulin's daughter married into the Dominguez family.  At least three of his five sons created their own families. 

Second son Alexandre Sevigne married Marie Azéoline, called Zéoline, Azadine, Claline, and perhaps also Azélina, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Brasseaux and Valiene Dugas, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1852.  Their son Joseph Ebeard was born in Lafayette Parish in March 1856, Paul Duplessis in May 1859, Adam in June 1861, Joseph Israel in May 1863, and Jean Jacques in November 1865.  Their daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  Alexandre Sevigne may have remarried to Marguerite Valérie, called Valérie, daughter of fellow Acadian André Prejean and widow of Joachim Richard, at the Vermilionville church in July 1870. 

Paulin's third son Demas married Azélie, also called Celia, Isilia, and Zelia, another daughter of Joseph Brasseaux and Valiene Dugas, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1855.  Their son Albert was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1858; Edgard near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in September 1868; and Amédé in Lafayette Parish in March 1870. 

Paulin's fourth son Luma, called Numa by the parish clerk, may have married fellow Acadian Valentine Richard in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1870. 

Alexandre's fourth and youngest son Lazare Terssy, Belcy, or Bercy, born probably at Beaubassin in September 1812, married Hortense, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Bourgeois and his Creole wife Marcellite Judice, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in March 1837.  Their son Alexandre le jeune was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1840, and Simon Bercy in May 1841.  Lazare, called Lazard by the recording priest, died in Lafayette Parish in September 1847.  The Vermilionville priest said that Lazard was age 30 when he died, but he was 35.  His daughter married into the Broussard and Dufay or Duffay families. 

Pierre, père's fourth son François, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in April 1779.  Age age 34, he married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Frédéric Mouton and Anastasie Cormier of the lower Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1813.  Their son François Émilien or Émilien François, called Émilien and Milien, was born near Carencro in October 1815; and François, fils in September 1824.  François, père filed a succession record at the Vermilionville courthouse in October 1832 and remarried to Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Breaux and and widow of Cyrille Breaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in March 1834.  François, père died in Lafayette Parish in May 1838.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that François was age 58 when he died.  His post-mortem succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in June 1838 and another one in April 1842.  One of his daughters married an Arceneaux cousin, and another may have married into the Comeaux family.  Both of his sons created their own families, but neither of the lines seems to have survived. 

Older son Émilien married Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Breaux and his Creole wife Marcellite Carmouche, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1833.  They settled near Carencro.  Émilien died "at Carencro" in May 1842, age 26.  His daughters married into the Arceneaux and Dupuis families.  He and his wife may have had no sons who survived childhood, so this line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him. 

François's younger son François, fils married Marie Amelia, called Amelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Thibodeaux and Marie Cléonise Savoie, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1850.  Francois, fils died in Lafayette Parish in January 1860.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Francois died "at age 40 yrs.," but he was age 35.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following September.  One wonders if he and his wife had any sons.

Pierre, père's fifth and youngest son Pierre Cyprien, called Cyprien, born at Cabahannocer in c1787, married Adélaïde, another daughter of Jean Frédéric Mouton and Anastasie Cormier, at Attakapas in May 1805.  They also settled at Beaubassin near Carencro.  Cyprien died in Lafayette Parish in May 1832, age 45.  His succession records were filed at the Opelousas courthouse in June 1832 and the Vermilionville courthouse in April 1833, so he must have owned propery in both Lafayette and St. Landry parishes.  His daughters married into the Bin and Ynogass or Inogoso families.  At least four of his seven sons created their own families.  Two of them settled on the lower Teche. 

Oldest son Cyprien, fils, born at his uncle Louis's home near Carencro in July 1806, married Marie Bonne or Labonne, daughter of Joseph Breaux and Marcellite Carmouche, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1829.  Their son Joseph Romaire was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 7 months, in September 1831; Cyprien Maismain was born in December 1832; Hippolyte Nicolas was baptized at age 4 months in April 1835; Pierre Edmond at age 1 month in December 1836; Eusèbe was born in August 1849; and Tercie was born in c1850 but died at age 7 in November 1857.  Cyprien, fils died in Lafayette Parish in January 1852.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Cyprien died "at age over 40 yrs.," but he was 45.  His estate record had been filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in May 1847.  His daughters married into the Baquet, Canaudelat, Johnson, Stemmam, and Tatman families, one of them at Ville Platte in what became Evangeline Parish.  At least three of his sons created their own families. 

Second son Cyprien Maismain married Marie Azénaïde, called Azénaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Cyprien Mouton and Eliza Dugas, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1854.  Their son Lucien was born in Lafayette Parish in March 1856; Stanislaus Albert near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in May 1858; Eustache Romain in Lafayette Parish in September 1860; and Dominique in November 1862.  Azénaïde died a little over two weeks after Dominique was born, probably of complications from giving him birth.  Cyprien remarried to fellow Acadian Marie Aphanelie, called Fanelie, Dugas, widow of Aurelien Chiasson, at the Vermilionville church in September 1864.  Their son Cyprien Adam was born in Lafayette Parish in May 1870. 

Cyprien, fils's third son Hippolyte Nicolas married Azelima, also called Adelina, daughter of fellow Acadian Augustins Benoit and Anastasie Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1854.  They settled near Carencro.  Their son Joseph was born in January 1856, Louis Pancrase in May 1860, and Edmond in December 1867.  During the War of 1861-65, Hippolyte served as an officer's cook in Company K of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana. 

Cyprien, fils's fourth son Pierre Edmond married Justine, daughter of Juste Bertinot or Bertinos and Brigitte Stelly, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1867.  Their son Juste Cyprien was born near Grand Coteau in September 1868. 

Cyprien, père's second son François Aurelien, called Aurelien, born near Carencro in February 1808, married Anglo Creole Mary Andrews or Andrus in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1835.  Their son François Connas was born near Grand Coteau in December 1846; Louis Bellanger in June 1848; John Sidney near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in January 1851; Charles Hiram in October 1853; Omer in December 1855; and Moïse in March 1858.  Their daughters married into the Andrus, Broussard, and Lyons families.

Second son Louis Bellanger, called Louis B. by the recording clerk, married Anglo American Mary Wingate in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1869. 

Cyprien, père's third son Simon Ursin, called Ursin, born probably near Carencro in July 1811, died at age 8 in January 1819.

Cyprien, père's fourth son Joseph Joachim, called Joachim, born probably near Carencro in March 1813, died at age 2 in September 1815.

Cyprien, père's fifth son Agerin, born probably near Carencro in December 1816, married fellow Acadian Rose Labauve probably at New Iberia in the early 1840s.  Their son Alderie Félix was born near Charenton, St. Mary Parish, in May 1847.  Their daughter married into the Lyons family. 

Cyprien, père's sixth son Jean Pierre, born probably near Carencro in May 1822, married Félicia Félicité, daughter of Honoré Buquois and his wife Eugènie, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in September 1842.  Their son Ambroise was born near New Iberia in February 1848; Jean Pierre, fils in Lafayette Parish in June 1855; and Zitus near New Iberia in October 1857.

Cyprien, père's seventh and youngest son Louis Lucien, born probably near Carencro, in March 1826, may have died young.

.

Later in 1765, more Arseneaus came to Louisiana from Halifax via French St.-Domingue and settled on the river above New Orleans:    

Pierre (c1735-1760) à Abraham à Pierre Arceneaux

Pierre, son of perhaps Jean-Baptiste Arseneau and Anne Cyr, born at Chignecto in c1735, escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  He married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Godin dit Lincour and Anastasie Bourg of Rivière St.-Jean, in c1760 perhaps at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  The British may have captured them soon after their marriage, or they surrendered to British forces later.  British officials counted Pierre, Marie-Josèphe and an unnamed child, probably son Euèbe, at the prisoner-of-war compound at Halifax in August 1763.  They followed their kinsmen to Louisiana in 1764-65.  Another son was born to them in 1765 either aboard ship or at New Orleans soon after they reached the Spanish colony.  Pierre settled his family at Cabahannocer on the river.  Marie-Josèphe gave him no more children there.  Pierre died at Cabahannocer by September 1769, when Marie-Josèphe was listed in a census with her second husband, Basile Préjean.  Pierre was only in his 30s when he died.  Both of his sons created their own families.  His older son settled on upper Bayou Lafourche in the 1790s.  His younger son married twice on the river and joined his cousins on the western prairies about the time his older brother moved to the Lafourche. 

Older son Eusèbe, born probably at Halifax in c1762, followed his family to Louisiana in 1764-65 and settled with them at Cabahannocer.  Still a teenager, Eusèbe was living with his stepfather, mother, and siblings on the right, or west, bank of the river at nearby Ascension in 1777.  Eusèbe married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Bergeron dit d'Amboise and Marguerite Bernard, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in August 1788 and settled near the boundary between Cabahannocer and Ascension before moving to Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in the early 1790s.  Eusèbe died in Assumption Parish in October 1825, age 62.  His daughters married into the Blanchard, Daigle, Gautreaux, and Theriot families.  Five of his eight sons created their own families.  Most of them remained on the upper Lafourche, but some of them settled as far down bayou as Lockport.  A grandson moved to the Gonzales area of Ascension Parish after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Eusèbe-Alexandre, called Alexandre, born at Cabahannocer in July 1789, married Marie Aimée, daughter of fellow Acadians Suliac Blanchard and Marie Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1810.  Their son Angel died at age 4 months in July 1811; Eusèbe Théodule, called Théodule, was born in April 1812; Siméon Suliac in February 1814; twins Jean Baptiste and Hubert in May 1818; and a newborn son, name unrecorded, died in March 1825.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin, Hébert, and Landry families.  Two of their sons created their own families on the bayou. 

Second son Théodule married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire Aucoin and Marguerite Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in December 1833.  Their son Cyprien Justinien was born in Assumption Parish in July 1835, and Joseph Pierre in March 1837.  Théodule remarried to Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Isidore Aucoin and Marguerite Daigle, at the Plattenville church in January 1843; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of affinity in order to marry.  Their son Maximilien or Marcellin Justilien was born in Assumption Parish in October 1846; Joseph died at infant in November 1848; Clairville was born in February 1849; Valsin Aristide in May 1852; and Émile Alcide Gustave, called Alcide, near Labadieville in August 1856 but died at age 5 months the following January.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin and Blanchard families.  At least two of Théodule's seven sons created their own families by 1870.

Second son Joseph, by first wife Marie Aucoin, married cousin Élisabeth, called Elisa, daughter of fellow Acadians Florentin Blanchard and Émilie Arceneaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1861.  Their son Joseph Alcide was born near Labadieville in March 1866. 

Théodule's third son Marcellin, by second wife Azélie Aucoin, married Élizabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Delaune and Azélie Boudreaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1870. 

Alexandre's third son Siméon died in Assumption Parish in July 1831.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Siméon was age 10 when he died, but he was 17. 

Alexandre's fourth or fifth son Hubert married Hirma or Irma, daughter of Zenon Rodrigue and Céleste Laguaman of St. John the Baptist Parish, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1840.  Their son Numa was born in Assumption Parish in c1845 but died at age 7 in December 1852; Philippe was born in April 1846; Joseph Arsema, called Arsema, in July 1848 but died at age 1 1/2 in March 1852; Jean Baptiste Aima was born in November 1851; Rosémond was born in c1852 or 1853 but died at age 5 in January 1858; and Louis Leoma, called Leomas, was born near Labadieville in August 1864.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin, Blanchard, and Landry families.

Eusèbe's second son Louis-Narcisse, called Narcisse, born at Cabahannocer in November 1790, died in Assumption Parish in April 1816, age 25.  He probably did not marry. 

Eusèbe's third son Michel, born at Ascension in June 1792, probably died young.  

Eusèbe's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, born at Assumption in April 1798, married Marie Mélanie, called Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Marie Gautreaux and Félicité Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1818.  Their son Jean Baptiste Pantaléon, called Léon, was born in Assumption Parish in July 1819; Jean Baptiste Apollinaire in February 1829 but died at age 8 1/2 in August 1837; and Marcellin or Marcellus was born in December 1831 but died at age 5 1/2 in September 1837.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard and Delaune families.  Baptiste's surviving son created his own family.

Oldest son Léon married Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Dubois and Marie Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1844.  Their son Guillmar Joseph Auzémé was born in Assumption Parish in August 1854; a son, name and age unrecorded, after a private baptism, died in November 1857; and Joseph Alcée was born in January 1859.  Their daughters married into the Fonseca, Richard, and Roger families. 

Eusèbe's fifth son Valéry-Joseph, born at Cabahannocer in February 1800, married Basilise, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Aucoin and Marguerite Bourg, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1826.  Their son Joseph Drosin died 15 days after his birth in November 1826; Marcellus Eusèbe was born in June 1828; Alexandre le jeune in April 1834 but died at age 3 1/2 in October 1837; Octave Joseph, called Joseph, was born in February 1836 but died at age 9 1/2 in August 1845; Jules Lucien was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1844; and Olésiphore died in Assumption Parish at age 15 months in January 1848.  Their daughters married into the Barrilleaux, Prudhomme, Thibodeaux, and Trahan families.  His two surviving sons created their own families.

Second son Marcellus married Angèle, daughter of Joseph Friou and his Acadian wife Azélie Trahan, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1854.  Their son Joseph Jules was born near Pierre Part, Assumption Parish, in October 1861; and Cyprien Joseph in September 1866.

During the War of 1861-65, Valéry Joseph's fifth son Jules served in Company F of the Lafourche Parish Regiment Militia.  The Federals captured him in Lafourche Parish in early December 1862 and released him soon afterwards.  He married cousin Julie, daughter of Rosémond Lagrange and his Acadian wife Léocade Aucoin, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1866. 

Eusèbe's sixth son Alexandre le jeune, also called Merville, born at Assumption in May 1803, married Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Templet and Marie Crochet, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1832.  Their son Charles Honoré, called Honoré, was born in Assumption Parish in March 1833.  Alexandre le jeune died in Assumption Parish in May 1833, age 30.  His only son resettled near Gonzales in Ascension Parish. 

Honoré married cousin Angèle, daughter of fellow Acadians François Crochet and Eulalie Landry, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1854.  Their son Joseph Eugène was born in Assumption Parish in June 1855.  Honoré remarried to Helena, daughter of fellow Acadian Zenon Bourgeois and his Creole wife Eurasie Lessard, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in January 1867.  Their son Zenon Audressy was born near Gonzales in February 1870. 

Eusèbe's seventh son Michel, the second son with the name, a twin, born at Assumption in February 1805, died at age 2 in September 1807.  

Eusèbe's eighth and youngest son Pierre Lucien, called Lucien, born in Assumption Parish in October 1809, married Élise, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Theriot and Anne Hébert, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1847.  Their son Jean Lucien was born in Assumption Parish in August 1849.

Pierre's younger son Pierre, fils, born aboard ship or at New Orleans in 1765, married Pélagie, daughter of Jacques Bebe and his Acadian wife Marguerite Landry of Lafourche, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in April 1786, and remarried to Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Bourgeois and Anne-Osite Landry, at St.-Jacques, in April 1787.  Angélique's parents had come to Louisiana in February 1765 with the Broussard party but had retreated to Cabahannocer that fall to escape an epidemic.  In the early 1790s, Pierre, fils and Angélique followed his brother Eusèbe to upper Bayou Lafourche.  In 1798, they moved again, this time to the Attakapas District, where they settled near the Attakapas Post, now St. Martinville.  Pierre, fils died at Attakapas in January 1799, age 34.  His daughter married into the Robichaux family and remained on Bayou Lafourche.  Four of his five sons, all by his second wife, created their own families.  One of them also remained on Bayou Lafourche, but the others settled on Bayou Teche at Breaux Bridge, New Iberia, and Charenton.  At least one of Pierre, fils's grandsons moved west into Calcasieu Parish. 

Oldest son Pierre III, born at Cabahannocer in June 1788, followed his family to Bayou Lafourche and then to the old Attakapas District, where he married Marie Aspasie, called Aspasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Josaphat Broussard and Marie Françoise Trahan of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1817.  They settled at Fausse Pointe on lower Bayou Teche before moving to the Bayou Lafourche valley in the late 1820s  Their son Pierre IV was born probably at Fausse Pointe in March 1822; a son, name unrecorded, died at age 2 months in July 1824; Joseph Rosémond was born in September 1825; and Nicolas Adrien in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1828.  They returned to the Teche valley by the early 1830s.  Their daughters married into the Boulet, Leleux, Robichaux, and Sellers families on Bayou Teche.  Two of Pierre III"s sons married sisters on the lower Teche. 

Oldest son Pierre IV married Oliva or Olivia, daughter of Louis Sellers and his Acadian wife Aspasie Boudreaux, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in May 1843.  Their son Pierre V was born near New Iberia in August 1847, and Valérien in c1852 but died at age 4 in October 1856.

Pierre III's third son Joseph Rosémond married Marie Célesie, another daughter of Louis Sellers and Aspasie Boudreaux, at the New Iberia church in October 1848, and remarried to Émilie or Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Labauve and Élise Hébert, at the New Iberia church in September 1851.  Their son Joseph was born near New Iberia in July 1852 but died at age 6 months the following February, and Eugène was born in November 1855.

Pierre, fils's second son Valentin dit Durville or Surville, born at Ascension on the river in November 1792, followed his family to Bayou Lafourche and to the Bayou Teche valley, where he married Anne dite Annette, another daughter of Josaphat Broussard and Marie Françoise Trahan of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1817.  They also settled at Fausse Pointe.  Their son Valentin Valière, called Valière, was born at Fausse Pointe in November 1821.  Valentin died at his father-in-law's home at Fausse Pointe, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in September 1825, age 32.  His daughters married into the Amy, Blanchard, Brown, and Dartes families.  His only son also created his own family on the Teche. 

Valentin Valière married Eugènie, daughter of Joseph Patin and his Acadian wife Julienne Robichaux, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1852.  Their son Nicolas Valière was born near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in December 1856.  Valentin Valière may have remarried to cousin Zéolide Arceneaux and settled near New Iberia by the late 1860s. 

Pierre, fils's third son Alexandre, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age 1, in April 1795, followed his family to Bayou Lafourche and to the Bayou Teche valley, where he married Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, yet another daughter of Josaphat Broussard and Marie Françoise Trahan of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1820.  They also settled at Fausse Pointe.  Their son, name unrecorded, died 8 days after his birth in May 1827; Étienne was born in St. Martin Parish in March 1828; Rosémond in September 1830; Alexandre, fils in December 1831; and Alexis Perin in July 1834.  Alexandre died in St. Mary Parish in January 1838.  The Franklin priest who recorded his burial noted in French that "trouvé mort dans le grand marais du dft. Claud." (that is, he was found dead in the marshes near a place owned by a fellow names Claude.  The priest also said that Alexandre was age 40 when he died, but he was closer to 44.  His succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse the following July.  His daughters married into the Hardy and Verret families.  Three of his four surviving sons created their own families.  Two of them remained in St. Mary Parish, but one of them and a grandson moved out to the Calcasieu prairies by the early 1860s.

Second son Étienne married Célestine or Ernestine, daughter of Jean Jacques Dartes and Julienne Loignon, at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in February 1852.  Their son Louis was born near Charenton in January 1861. 

Alexandre's third son Rosémond married Domitille Justine, daughter of fellow Acadians Simonet Robichaux and Domitille Louvière, at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in February 1852.  Their son François Alexandre was born near Charenton in February 1853.  They moved to Calcasieu Parish later in the decade. 

Alexandre's fourth son Alexandre, fils married cousin Onesima Broussard.  Their son Alexandre III, born in February 1862, was baptized by a priest from Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, but the family probably was living in Calcasieu Parish at the time.  During the War of 1861-65, Alexandre, fils served in Company F of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, created in November 1863, which fought in Louisiana and Arkansas.  In April 1864, he transferred to the second Company A of Daly's Battalion Texas Volunteer Cavalry, which recruited heavily in southwestern Louisiana.  According to his enrollment papers, Alexandre, fils was 35 years old (he actually was 32), stood five feet seven inches, and was a farmer living in Calcasieu Parish when he joined the Texans in Calcasieu in April 1864.  He evidently did not care much for the Texas cavalry.  In late September, five months after his enlistment, Alexandre, fils was arrested as a deserter sent to the provost marshal's office in Houston (probably a jail) before being returned to his old unit, the Consolidated 18th Louisiana Infantry, then serving in southern Arkansas.  The next month, however, company rolls show him back on duty with Daly's Battalion at Sabine Pass, Texas, where he died of disease in November 1864.  Again, the Confederate rolls got his age wrong.  The military clerk noted that he died at age 35, but he was only 32. 

Pierre, fils's fourth son Jean-Baptiste-Valéry, born at Cabahannocer in January 1797, may have died young.  

Pierre, fils's fifth and youngest son Nicolas, also called Paul, baptized at Attakapas, age 5 months, in March 1799, two months after his father died, did not remain on the Teche.  He married cousin Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Breaux and Marie Anne Bourgeois of St. Michel, St. James Parish, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1818.  Oldest brother Pierre and his family joined Nicolas and Carmelite on the Lafourche in the 1820s but returned to Bayou Teche.  Nicolas and Carmelite may have followed.  If so, they did not remain there long.  By the middle 1820s, they had resettled in Lafourche Interior Parish.  Their son Jean Honoré was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1826; Nicolas, fils, in January 1831; Leufroi died 15 days after his birth in December 1833; Louis Désiré was born in April 1842; and Onésippe or Onésime probably in the early 1840s. Their daughters married into the Barrios and Roger families.  Nicolas's four surviving sons created their own families on the Lafourche. 

Oldest son Jean Honoré married Marie Césaire, called Césaire, daughter of Jacques Matherne and Marie Sevin, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in April 1852.  Their son Zéphirin was born near Lockport in August 1866, and Joseph in March 1870.

Nicholas's second son Nicholas, fils married Eugènie, daughter of Jean Adam Lasseigne and Marie Poché, at the Raceland church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1855. 

Nicholas, père's fourth son Louis Désiré married Zéolide, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Victor Melançon and Farelie Savoie, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in January 1860.  Their son Louis, fils was born near Raceland in January 1863. 

Nicholas, père's fifth and youngest son Onésippe married Edesie, called Desie, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Giroir and Anne dite Nanette Moïse, at the Lockport church, Lafourche Parish, in September 1863.  Their son Joachim Elphége was born near Lockport in August 1864.  They were living up bayou in Assumption Parish later in the decade. 

Firmin (c1753-1776) à ? à Pierre Arceneaux

Firmin Arseneau, born probably at Chignecto in c1753, came to Louisiana from Halifax as a young orphan probably with the family of his kinsman Pierre Arseneau.  In April 1766, Spanish officials counted Firmin on the left, or east, bank of the Mississippi at Cabahannocer with the family of his kinsman.  Although he was only age 13 in 1766, the Spanish census taker said that Firmin possessed four arpents of land on the river.  The Spanish counted him again at Cabahannocer in 1769, this time on the right, or west, bank of the river, and still living with Pierre Arceneaux and his family.  Firmin died at Cabahannocer in October 1776, age 23.  He probably did not marry. 

Aucoin

Martin Aucoin, born in France in c1651, married Marie, daughter of Denis Gaudet and Martine Gauthier, at Port-Royal in c1673 and created a large family in the colony.  Between 1674 and 1707, Marie gave Martin 19 children, 10 sons and nine daughters, including a set of twins.  Five of their daughters married into the Guérin, Gautrot, Thériot, Thibodeau, and Bourg families.  Nine of Martin's sons married, three of them to sisters, but "only" eight of them created lasting family lines.  Martin and Marie's descendants settled at Minas, Chignecto, Pigiguit, Cobeguit, Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area, and in the French Maritimes, where they were especially numerous on Île St.-Jean by 1752. 

The Acadians at Chignecto and in the trois-rivières were the first to fall into the hands of the British, who exiled them to several of their Atlantic seaboard colonies.  Minas Aucoins who did not escape the round up in the fall of 1755 ended up in Pennsylvania.  The Aucoins who were shipped to Virginia that fall endured a fate worse than most of the their fellow Acadians deported from Minas.  In mid-November, when five transports appeared unexpectedly at Hampton Roads, the Virginia governor, Robert Dinwiddie, protested their deportation to his colony without his consent.  Many of the exiles died on the filthy, crowded ships anchored in Hampton Roads while the Virginia authorities pondered their fate.  Acadians from one vessel were moved up to Richmond, two of the vessels were unloaded at Hampton, and two more at Norfolk.  A hand full of young Acadians managed to slip away and trek overland through fields and forests and over the mountains, to French Canada, but most of the exiles remained in Virginia.  Finally, in the spring of 1756, Virginia's House of Burgesses made its decision ... the Acadians must go!  In May, the first shipment of Acadians in hired vessels left for England, and in two weeks all of them had gone--299 to Bristol, 250 to Falmouth, 340 to Southampton, and 336 to Liverpool--1,225 of the original 1,500.  Their ordeal only worsened in the English ports, where they were treated like common criminals and where many died of smallpox.  Aucoins were held at Liverpool, Bristol, and Gloucester. 

In 1763, after the war with Britain had finally ended, Acadians being held in the British seaboard colonies were allowed to leave, but not before colonial officials counted them and discerned their intentions.  In June, colonial officials in Pennsylvania counted several Aucoins still in the colony.  Instead of moving to Canada, they moved down to Maryland and joined their fellow Acadians there.  When over 600 of Maryland Acadians emigrated to Louisiana in the late 1760s, only one Aucoin --Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Paul and Marie LeBlanc from Île St.-Jean--was among them.  In Maryland, surrounded by fellow exiles and French expatriates, the Aucoins who remained settled at Frenchtown in Baltimore, where their transition from Acadien to Americain went faster for them than for their cousins who had gone on to Spanish Louisiana.  In a generation or so, the family's name in Baltimore no longer was Aucoin but Wedge

Meanwhile, in August 1763, colonial officials in South Carolina counted Aucoins among the Acadians "who desire to withdraw under the standard of their king his very Christian Majesty."  An Aucoin in South Carolina chose to take his family to Canada, where they joined some of his Aucoin kinsmen.  He and his family settled on Île d'Orleans and Rivière-du-Loup on the St. Lawrence below Québec, at St.-Joseph-de-Beauce on Rivière Chaudière south of Québec, and at Yamachiche on the north shore of Lac St.-Pierre above Trois-Rivères.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

Aucoins from Atlantic seaboard colonies went also to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, where, beginning in the early 1760s, they provided cheap labor in the construction of a new French naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas on the north shore of the island.  When the opportunity came in the mid- and late 1760s to follow hundreds of their fellow Acadians to Spanish Louisiana, most of the Aucoins chose to remain in the sugar colony.  One Aucoin was an exception.  As an infant, he was taken to one of the British Atlantic colonies in 1755 and then to St.-Domingue probably in the early 1760s.  In 1769, now 14 years old, he took the ship Le Americain from Cap-Français to St.-Malo, France, which he reached the first of October.  He lived with an Aucoin couisin at nearby St.-Servan for the next several years, where he took up the woodworking trade as a joiner.  Later in the decade he moved south to Nantes, on the other side of Brittany, where he married a fellow Acadian.

The Aucoins who had moved to Île St.-Jean before Le Grand Dérangement or who had fled there from Chigecto and Cobeguit during the British roundup in Nova Scotia were living in territory controlled by France, so they remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the British swooped down on the Maritime islands and rounded up the Acadian habitants there.  Some of the Acadians escaped from Île St.-Jean and made their way north to Canada, but the great majority of them, including the Aucoins, were rounded up and deported to France.  They crossed to St.-Malo on the British transports Duke William which sank in a storm off the coast of England on its way to St.-Malo, taking all passengers with it; Tamerlane, which reached St.-Malo in mid-January 1759; and on one or more of the so-called Five Ships, which left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in late January.  The Aucoins who endured the terrible crossing did their best to create a life for themselves in the teeming suburbs of St.-Malo. 

In the spring of 1763, after prolonged negotiations between the French and British governments, the Acadians in England were repatriated to France aboard the transports Dorothée and Ambition.  Most of the repatriated Aucoins settled in the St.-Malo area, where they added substantially to the number of their kinsmen already there.  An Aucoin repatriated from England ended up Boulogne-sur-Mer but did not remain there.  In May 1766, he took his family aboard the brigantine Le Hazard to St.-Malo, and they settled near their kinsmen at St.-Servan.  Another Aucoin repatriated from England did not remain long in the coastal city to which he had been shipped.  He and his family arrived at Ploujean, Morlaix, in Brittany during the spring of 1763.  The following November, they joined other Minas Acadians from England on Belle-Île-en-Mer, off the southern coast of Brittany, where French authorities hoped the exiles would bring life to the island's sandy soil.  In the late 1770s, they left Belle-Île-en-Mer for the port city of Nantes. 

Meanwhile, in the early 1770s, several Aucoin families from the St.-Malo suburbs participated in a settlement scheme in Poitou.  French authorities were tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on land he owned near the city of Châtellerault.  After two years of effort, in late 1775 and early 1776 Poitou Acadians, including Aucoins, retreated to the port city of Nantes, where they subsisted as best they could on government subsidies and what work they could find. 

Two brothers who had been deported to Virginia and England and ended up in France also settled in the St.-Malo suburbs.  In 1773, while their cousins headed to the fields of Poitou, the brothers, along with other Acadian exiles, took their families to the Isle of Jersey, one of the British-owned Channel islands off the western coast of Normandy.  Returning to North America, they settled in the newly-established fishery at Chéticamp on the western shore of Cape Breton Island, and also fished in the Baie des Chaleurs with other Acadian exiles.  In the 1790s, members of the family settled in the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence northwest of Chéticamp. 

Back in France, despite their trials and tribulations, Aucoins proliferated in the mother country.  In the early 1780s, however, when the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, at least 93 Aucoins agreed to take it, while some Aucoins chose to remain.  Only two other families, in fact, the Héberts and the Trahans, outnumbered the Aucoins in the Seven Ships expeditions of 1785. 

After a period of recuperation in New Orleans, Aucoins from five of the Seven Ships settled at Manchac below Baton Rouge, on upper Bayou Lafourche, below New Orleans at San Bernardo, and on the western prairies at Attakapas and Opelousas.  Most of them, however, crossed on La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, and followed their fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores, now Thompson's Creek, in the Spanish district of Feliciana north of Baton Rouge.  After most of the Acadians abandoned Bayou des Écores in the early 1790s, a few Aucoins remained on the river in what became Iberville, East Baton Rouge, and West Baton Rouge parishes, but most of them moved down to Bayou Lafourche, adding significantly to that center of family settlement.  Assumption Parish on the upper Lafourche retained the largest concentration of Aucoins during the antebellum period, though some moved down bayou into Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes.  After the War of 1861-65, Aucoins from the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley moved west to the Morgan City area of St. Mary Parish and to New Iberia on lower Bayou Teche.  Meanwhile, Aucoins west of the Atchafalaya Basin, whose ancestors from France had gone there in the late 1780s, settled in St. Landry, St. Mary, Calcasieu, and Evangeline parishes, most of them remaining on the Opelousas prairies. ...71 

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Six Aucoins from France--a single family--crossed aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in late July 1785: 

Joseph (c1748-?) à Michel à Martin Aucoin

Joseph, son of Paul Aucoin and Marie LeBlanc, the second of his father's sons named Joseph, was born at Grand-Pré in c1748.  The family moved to Île St.-Jean in c1751.  A French official counted them at Rivière-du-Nord-Est in the interior of the island the following year.  In 1758, after the fall of Louisbourg, British forces deported them to Boulogne, France, where they remained until 1766.  In May of that year, they sailed from Boulogne to St.-Malo.  Joseph, now a sailor, married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians François Henry and Marie Dugas, at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in May 1770.  In the early 1770s, they were part of the failed settlement in Poitou and in early 1776 retreated to the port city of Nantes with other Poitou Acadians.  They came to Louisiana with five children aboard Le Bon Papa and settled at Manchac south of Baton Rouge before moving on to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Spanish officials first counted them in January 1791.  They had more children in Louisiana, including a son.  Their daughters married into the Barbier, Blanchard, Boudreaux, Guillot, and Richard families.  At age 51, Joseph remarried to Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Barrilleaux and Véronique Giroir and widow of François Boudreaux and Charles Broussard, at Assumption in October 1797.  Euphrosine also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, with her second husband.  Joseph's three sons, all by his first wife, created their own families in Louisiana. 

Oldest son Joseph-Jean, by first wife Isabelle Henry, born at St.-Similien, Nantes, France, in September 1776, married Anne-Victoire or Victorine, called Victoire or Victorine, daughter of fellow Acadians Vincent Landry and Susanne Gaudin, at Assumption in September 1802.  Victoire was a native of Louisiana.  Joseph Jean died in Assumption Parish in February 1832, age 55.  His daughters married into the Dupuis and Guillot families.  All three of his sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph Paul, called Paul, born in Assumption Parish in September 1815, married cousin Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadian Fabien Thomas Guillot and Pauline Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1838.  Their son Ursin Jean Baptiste was born in Assumption Parish in February 1839, Augustin Joseph in August 1840, Désiré Amédée in August 1842, Charles in September 1846, Paul Israël in July 1849, Octave near Paincourtville in January 1852, and Arthur in April 1858.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted three slaves--a male and two females, all black, ages 30, 9, and 2--on Paul Aucoin's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District; this probably was Joseph Paul.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted three slaves--a male and two females, all black, ages 40, 20, and 18, living in one house--on Paul Aucoin's farm in the parish's Third Ward; one wonders if these were the same three slaves that Paul owned a decade earlier. 

Oldest son Ursin married Léonelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Émile LeBlanc and Arthémise Gravois, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1861.

Joseph Jean's second son Caliste Jean, born in Assumption Parish in October 1818, Caliste married Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Bourg and Angélique Dupuis, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January or February 1849.  Their son Joseph Elphége was born in Assumption Parish in November 1855 but died at age 2 in February 1858.  Caliste died in Assumption Parish in June 1856, age 37.  His daughters married into the Dupuis and Guillot families.  He only the one son, who died young, so his line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him. 

Joseph Jean's third and youngest son Louis Trasimond, called Trasimond, born in Assumption Parish in August 1820, married Aurelie or Arcelie Veturi, daughter of fellow Acadian Isaac Hébert, probably in Assumption Parish.  Their son Théodule Eusilien was born in Assumption Parish in September 1851.  Their daughter married into the Melançon family.  Trasimond remarried to cousin Edesie, called Daisie, Desie, Desi, Desima, or Desy, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Mazerolle and Élisabeth Gautreaux, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1853; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Narcisse Lacroix was born in Assumption Parish in September 1854, and Louis Paul near Paincourtville in April 1857.

Joseph's second son François-Toussaint, by first wife Isabelle Henry, born at St.-Similien, Nantes, in October 1778, married Rosalie Brigitte, daughter of fellow Acadians François-Sébastien Landry and Marguerite LeBlanc of Iberville, at Assumption in November 1799.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin, Boudreaux, Friou, and Potier families.  François-Toussaint remarried to Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac Hébert and Marie Daigle, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1810.  François Toussaint died in Assumption Parish in November 1846, age 68.  His daughter married into the Crochet family.  Two of his four sons, both from his second wife, created their own families by marryings sisters who were also their first cousins. 

Oldest son François-Eugène, by first wife Rosalie Landry, born at Assumption in November 1801, may have died young. 

Second son Angèl, by second wife Scholastique Hébert, died in Assumption Parish a day after his birth in December 1810.

 François Toussaint's third son Jean Baptiste, called Baptiste, by second wife Scholastique Hébert, born in Assumption Parish in April 1826, married first cousin Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Dupuis and Basilise Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1849; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph le jeune died in Assumption Parish a week after his birth in April 1855, Docilice Félix was born near Paincourtville or Pierre Part in January 1859, Joseph Sainclair near Pierre Part in November 1864, and Étienne Philias near New Iberia on lower Bayou Teche in August 1870.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted five slaves--three males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 21--on Jn. Bte. Aucoin's farm in the parish's Fourth Ward; this could have been Jean Baptiste.  Or he may have been the J. B. Aucoin who held only a single slave--a 37-year-old black male--in the same ward.  His daughter married into the Molbert family on lower Bayou Teche.  His surviving sons evidently did not create their own families until after 1870. 

François Toussaint's fourth and youngest son Joseph Grégoire, by second wife Scholastique Hébert, born in Assumption Parish in May 1827, married first cousin Azélie Apolline, called Pauline, another daughter of Firmin Dupuis, and Basilise Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1849; they, too, had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Léo was born in Assumption Parish in December 1851 but died at age 9 in February 1861, Elphége Saint Clair was born in December 1854 but died at age 6 in January 1861, and Narcisse Ludovic was born in April 1857.    

Joseph's third and youngest son Paul-Marie, a twin, by first wife Isabelle Henry, born at Manchac in February 1788, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Dupuis and Marie Osite Dugas, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1809.  Paul died in Assumption Parish in November 1865, age 77.  One wonders if he and his wife had any children.  If not, his line of the family died with him. 

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Eighteen more Aucoins--four families, a brother and sister, a bachelor, and several wives-- arrived from France aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in mid-August 1785: 

Jean-Baptiste (c1714-1780s) à Martin Aucoin

Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, son of René Aucoin and Madeleine Bourg, born probably at Minas in c1714, married Jeanne-Anne, daughter of Jean Thériot and Marie Daigre, in c1746 probably at Minas.  In 1754, they moved on to Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area and then to Port-La-Joye, Île St.-Jean, in 1755.  The British deported them to Boulogne-sur-mer, France, in 1758.  Another daughter was born to them at Boulogne-sur-Mer in May 1765.  Their older daughters married into the Pitre and Thériot famlies in France, and one of them remarried into the Blanchard family in Louisiana.  Jean, Jeanne, and their youngest daughter Anne-Félicité emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 aboard La Bergère.  From New Orleans, they followed the majority of their fellow passengers--including older daughters Élisabeth and Marie-Anastasie and their families--to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Youngest daughter Anne-Félicité married into the Montet family and remained on the upper Lafourche.  Jeanne-Anne gave Jean-Baptiste no sons, so only the blood of his family line survived in the Bayou State. 

Olivier (c1727-1813) à Martin Aucoin

Olivier, oldest son of Charles Aucoin and Anne-Marie Dupuis, born at Grand-Pré in c1727, married Marguerite Vincent probably at Minas in c1750.  Marguerite gave Olivier two children, a daughter and a son, at Rivière-aux-Canards on the eve of Le Grand Dérangment.  The British deported them to Virginia in 1755 and sent them on to England in 1756.  After being repatriated to France in May 1763, they settled at St.-Malo.  Olivier remarried to Cécile, daughter of Pierre Richard and Cécile Granger, at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in November 1765.  Cécile gave Olivier two more sons and four more daughters at St.-Servan, in Poitou, and at Nantes.  Their son died at age 2.  Meanwhile, Olivier's daughter Marie by his first wife married Acadian shaker and mover Olivier Térriot at Nantes in 1777, and son Firmin by his first wife married at Nantes in May 1778.  Olivier, Cécile, and their three surviving daughters emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majoirty of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  The couple had no more children in Louisiana.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, Blanchard, and Templet families on the upper Lafourche.  Olivier died in Assumption Parish in August 1813, age 86.  Though his son by his first wife died in France (he was the last of Olivier's sons to die there), Olivier's only grandson emigrated to Louisiana and created  his own famliy on the upper Lafourche. 

Oldest son Firmin, by first wife Marguerite Vincent, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1755, followed his family to Virginia, England, and France, where he became a sailor.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Alexandre Bourg and Marguerite-Josèphe Hébert, in St.-Jacques Parish, Nantes, in May 1778.  Firmin died before 1785, and his widow, along with her widowed mother and her only child, a son, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 on the same vessel which took Firmin's father and stepmother to the Spanish colony.  Firmin and Marguerite's son created his own family in Louisiana. 

Only son Firmin-Louis, born in St.-Jacques Parish, Nantes, in February 1779, followed his widowed mother to Louisiana and upper Bayou Lafourche.  He married Pélagie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Arceneaux and Marie Dupuy at St. James on the river in February 1806 but settled at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their son Apollinaire Firmin or Firmin Apollinaire was born in Assumption Parish in August 1810, Théodule in November 1811, Evariste in January 1813 but died at age 10 in October 1823, and Onésiphore was born in March 1822.  Firmin-Louis died in Assumption Parish in January 1825. The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Firmin was age 42 when he died, but he was 46.  His daughters married into the Bertaud and Guillot families. Three of his four sons created their own families.

Oldest son Apollinaire Firmin married Marguerite Irma, called Irma, daughter of fellow Acadians Timothée Hébert and Rosalie Comeaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1836.  Their son Firmin Aristide was born in Assumption Parish in October 1836 but died at age 1 in July 1837; Ernest Firmin was born in January 1838; Evariste Clairville in February 1840 but died the following May; Joseph Octave was born in March 1841; Gustave Evariste, called Evariste, in March 1843; Félix in February 1845; and Camille in January 1850.  Apollinaire Firmin died in Assumption Parish in June 1852, age 41.  Two of his surviving sons married before 1870.

Second son Ernest married cousin Marie Philomène, called Philomène, daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte Breaux and Hélène Duhon, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1859; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Firmin Aristide was born in Assumption Paris in October 1860, André Eleste in March 1864, another André died at age 6 months in July 1868, and Philippe Elphége was born in December 1868.

Apollinaire Firmin's fifth son Evariste married Estelle, daughter of Jean Baptiste Edwins and his Acadian wife Marcellite Landry and widow of Cleopha Smith, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in March 1867. 

Firmin Louis's second son Théodule, at age 44, married Maria, daughter of Santiago Truxillo and Rosalie Rodriguez and widow of Francisco Hidalgo, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1856.  Their son Joseph Iréné was born in Assumption Parish in June 1859.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted a single slave--a 38-year-old black male, living in one house--on Théodule Aucoin's farm next to Joseph Truxillo in the parish's Third Ward. 

Firmin Louis's fourth and youngest son Onésiphore married Marine, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Guillot and Cléonise Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1845.  Their son Achille Onésiphore was born in Assumption Parish in January 1852 but died at age 8 in February 1860, François Camille was born in January 1856, Jacques Guillemore Juste in July 1860, Onésiphore Lazare in September 1862, and Charles Fernand Alcide in November 1867.  Onésiphore and Marine's daughters married into the Guillot, Landry, and Templet families.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted three slaves--a male and two females, all black, ages 28, 25, and 15, living in one house--on Oneziphor Aucoin's farm in the parish's Third Ward. 

Antoine, fils (c1729-?) à Martin Aucoin

Antoine, fils, third and youngest son of Antoine Aucoin and Anne Breau, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1729, followed his family to the French Maritimes after 1752 and was deported to France in 1758-59.  He married Françoise, daughter of Pierre Hébert and Marguerite Bourg and widow of Élie LeBlanc, at St.-Suliac, near St.-Malo, in January 1760.  Françoise gave Antoine, fils four children there, three sons and a daughter.  Françoise died at St.-Suliac in January 1771; Antoine did not remarry.  He and two of his sons emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Both of Antoine's sons married in the Spanish colony, but only one of the lines survived. 

Older son Pierre-Joseph-Antoine, born at St.-Suliac, France, near St.-Malo, in January 1765, followed his widowed father and a younger brother to Louisiana and Bayou Lafourche in 1785.  He married cousin Félicité, 36-year-old daughter of Charles Aucoin and Anne-Marie Dupuis, at Lafourche in July 1786.  Félicité also had come to Louisiana aboard La Bergère.  Félicité died in Assumption Parish in November 1820.  The Plattenville priest who recorded her burial said that she was age 75 when she died, but she was "only" 70.  Pierre did not remarry.  He died in Assumption Parish in August 1829, age 66.  He and his wife were that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  

Antoine, fils's younger son Louis-Jean, born at St.-Suliac, France, near St.-Malo, in January 1770, followed his widowed father and an older brother to Louisiana and Bayou Lafourche in 1785.  Three years later, he was working six arpents of land as a 17-year-old bachelor.  He married Victoire-Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Arcement and Marie Hébert, at Lafourche in August 1789.  Victoire had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships.  They settled at Assumption and may have lived for a time in New Orleans.  Louis died in Assumption Parish in March 1841, age 71.  His daughters married into the Almindingue, Bourg, Doiron, and Lejeune families.  Four of his six sons created their own families on Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Pierre-Louis, born at Lafourche in November 1790, died at Assumption at age 9 in November 1799.  

Second son Louis-Ambroise, called Ambroise, born at Assumption in July 1792, married Françoise Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Daigle and Marie Dugas, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1811.  They settled on Bayou Boeuf.  Their son Fiacro died in Assumption Parish at age 6 months in September 1813; Marcel or Marcellin Louis or Louis Marcellin was born in October 1814; Valsin Isidore in April 1817; Valentin in December 1818; Alexandre Eusilien or Eusilien Alexandre, also called Azelin, in September 1820; Eugène Zéphirin, called Zéphirin, in April 1823 but died at age 5 in September 1828; Marcellus Félicien, called Félicien, was born in February 1827; and Eugène Arturien in March 1837.  Their daughter married into the Landry family.  At age 61, Ambroise remarried to Joséphine Desbains, daughter of Joseph Chauvin and Marie Webre and widow of Pierre Charpentier, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1857.  At least five of his eight sons, all by his first wife, created their own families.  Most of them remained on Bayou Lafourche, but three of them moved on to lower Bayou Teche. 

Second son Marcellin Louis, by first wife Françoise Daigle, married cousin Azélie or Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Doiron and Anne Daigle, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in July 1834, and sanctified the marriage at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1835.  Their son Alexandre Armelin was born in Assumption Parish in March 1842.

Ambroise's third son Valsin Isidore, by first wife Françoise Daigle, married Euphrosine Adelina, daughter of Pierre Hippolyte Brez and his Acadian wife Marie Lucie Boudreaux and widow of Jean Baptiste Valéry Aucoin, probably in Assumption Parish in the late 1830s.  Their son Valsin Théodule was born in Assumption Parish in May 1850.  Valsin may have remarried to Armantine Bourgeois and settled near Brashear, now Morgan, City, St. Mary Parish, that year.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in St. Mary Parish counted a single slave--a 20-year-old black female--on Valsin Aucoin's farm.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Mary Parish counted three slaves--all females, all black, ages 30, 10, and 2--on Valsin Aucoin's farm in the parish's western district.  His and Armantine's son Joseph was born near Brashear, now Morgan, City, St. Mary Parish, in February 1865.

Ambroise's fourth son Valentin, by first wife Françoise Daigle, married Marie Mathilde, called Mathilde, daughter of Augustin Verret and his Acadian wife Marie Rose Bourg, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish on lower Bayou Teche in May 1844, and sanctified the marriage at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1844.  Their son Marcellin Augustin was born in Assumption Parish in April 1845, Louis Odreus in September 1852, and Victor Lésime in Lafourche Parish in December 1856.  Valentin's daughter married into the Newton family. 

Ambroise's fifth son Alexandre Eusilien, by first wife Françoise Daigle, married cousin Marie Clementine, called Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Pierre Daigle and Marie Modeste Arceneaux of Assumption Parish, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in December 1845.  They lived in Assumption Parish until the late 1850s or early 1860s and then settled near Brashear, now Morgan, City, St. Mary Parish.  Their son Victor Zéphirin, called Zéphirin, was born near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in April 1849; Armelin Théophile in February 1851; Basile Justilien in June 1853; and Alexandre Ovide near Brashear City, St. Mary Parish, in October 1864.  One of their sons married before 1870. 

Oldest son Zéphirin married Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadian Athanase Broussard and his Creole wife Célestine Vaughn of Assumption Parish, at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in October 1869.  Their son Louis Gaston was born near New Iberia in September 1870. 

Ambroise's seventh son Félicien, by first wife Françoise Daigle, may have married fellow Acadian Telanie Doiron and settled near Brashear, now Morgan, City, St. Mary Parish, where two of his older brothers lived.  Their son Louis Ernest was baptized at the Brashear City church, St. Mary Parish, age unrecorded, in May 1862; and Augustin Numa was born in January 1866.  

Louis Jean's third son Antoine-Joseph, born at Assumption in July 1795, married Eléonore, called Léonore, 24-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Marie Boudreaux and Isabelle Pitre, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1828.  Their son Louis Ernest was born in Assumption Parish in July 1829; Noël Andresci, Andressi, or Odresse, called Andressi and sometimes Adrien, in March 1832; and Jean Aurestile Schuyler, called Aurestile, in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1838 but died at age 8 in June 1846.  They also had a son named Lovincy L., unless he was Louis Ernest.  Antoine died in Lafourche Parish in February 1853.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial said that Antoine died "at age 54 yrs.," but he was 57.  His daughter married into the Barthet family.  Two of his sons created their own families on Bayou Lafourche.

Lovincy married cousin Émelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Ambroise Naquin and Carmelite Boudreaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in November 1851.  Their son Edgar was born near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in May 1852; and Joseph Émile in December 1861.

Andressi married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Charles Blanchard and Rosalie Blanchard, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1854, and sanctified the marriage at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in May 1855.  Their son Antoine Aurestile was born in Lafourche Parish in December 1854, Auguste Désiré in May 1860, and Victor Myrtile in October 1861.

Louis Jean's fourth son Valentin, born at Assumption in September 1797, died at age 18 in October 1815.  He did not marry.  

Louis Jean's fifth son Noël, born in September 1799 and baptized at New Orleans in January 1800, married Marie Théotiste, called Théotiste, another daughter of Auguste Doiron and Anne Daigle, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1834.  Their son Marcellin Noël was born in Assumption Parish in March 1835; Zéphirin Armand, called Armand, was baptized at Bayou Boeuf, age unrecorded, in May 1837; Louis Victor or Noël was born in January 1839 but died at age 9 in November 1848; Hernes or Ernest Lovency was born in October 1840 but died at age 11 1/2 in February 1852; Alphonse Léonard was born in August 1844; Amédée Emelius in October 1846 but died at age 2 1/2 in April 1849; and Numa, a twin, was born in November 1854.  Noël's daughter married into the Legendre family.  One of his sons married before 1870.

Second son Armand married Félicité, daughter of Foreign Frenchman Louis Lamoureaux and his Acadian wife Adélaïde LeBlanc, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in October 1866; Félicité's mother was her father's second wife and the widow of Joseph Eugène Aucoin.  Armand and Félicité's son Henry Adolphe was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1868, and Noël Félix in July 1869.

Louis Jean's sixth and youngest son Eugène, born at Assumption in June 1800, married Clementine or Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Gautreaux and Geneviève Giroir, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1837.  Their son Louis Ernest was born in Assumption Parish in October 1837, and Eugène Anatole in July 1847.  Eugène's daughters married into the Kerne and Martin families. 

Fabien (c1746-1799) à Alexis dit Lexy à Martin Aucoin

Fabien, second son of Alexis Aucoin, fils and Hélène Blanchard, born at Cobeguit in c1746, escaped to Île St.-Jean with his family in the fall of 1755, followed them to France in 1758, and settled with them in the St.-Malo suburbs.  He worked as a carpenter in France, participated in the Poitou venture of the early 1770s, and retreated with hundreds of other Poitou Acadians to Nantes.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Charles Dupuis and Marie Trahan of Rivière-aux-Canards at St.-Similien, Nantes, France, in May 1776.  They came to Louisiana in 1785 aboard La Bergère and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Fabien died at Assumption in August 1799, age 53.  He and Marguerite evidently were that rare Acadian couple who had no children.   

Charles, fils (c1747-1805) à Martin Aucoin

Charles ,fils, also called Pierre-Charles, third and youngest son of Charles Aucoin and Anne-Marie Dupuis, born probably at Grand-Pré in c1747, followed his family to Virginia in 1755, to England in 1756, and to France in 1763, where he worked as a sailor.  He was a middle-aged bachelor when he came to Louisiana in 1785 aboard La Bergère with unmarried sister Félicité.  On the eve of the crossing, his fellow passengers chose him as one of the five onboard leaders of their "expedition."  The passenger list also noted that Charles was "well fixed financially," so his work as a mariner must have lucrative.  At age 39, he married Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, 22-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Noël and Marie-Madeleine Barbe of Minas and England and widow of Frenchman Guillaume-Jean Roquemont, at Lafourche in January 1786, soon after they reached the colony aboard the same ship.  Marguerite was a native of St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, France; her family also had been repatriated to France from England in 1763.  Charles died at Lafourche in January 1805, age 58.  His daughters married into the Daigle, Hébert, Landry, and LeBlanc families.  None of his three sons married, so this line of the family, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Oldest son Marcellin-Firmin, born at Lafourche in May 1791, died at Assumption in December 1802.  He was only 11 years old. 

Second son Augustin-Babilas, born at Assumption in January 1795, died at age 20 in August 1815.  He probably did not marry.  

Third and youngest son Evariste-Claude, born at Assumption in September 1801, died in February 1817.  He was only 15 years old. 

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Another Aucoin family--three with the name--arrived from France aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans during the second week of September 1785:

Michel (c1755-?) à René à Martin Aucoin

Michel, only son of Pierre Aucoin le jeune and Marguerite Dupuis, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1755, somehow became separated from his family as an infant, perhaps in the care of his older sister Anne, and with her was deported to one of the British seaboard colonies.  In the early 1760s, Michel, perhaps with his sister, ventured with other Acadians to French St.-Dominique, today's Haiti, where French authorities employed Acadians to work on a new French naval base on the north shore of the island.  At age 14, Michel, perhaps with his sister, sailed from Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, to St.-Malo, France, which he reached in October 1769.  He lived with the family of his uncle Jean Aucoin at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, from 1769 to 1772 and became a woodworker.  Michel married Marie-Rosalie, called Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean De La Forestrie and his first wife Marie-Madeleine Bonnière of Île St.-Jean, at Ste.-Croix, Nantes, France, in July 1779.  (Sister Anne married a Frenchman, Joseph Cheramie, at St.-Vincent, Nantes, in April 1784, a year before they emigrated to Louisiana.)  With two young daughters, Michel and Rosalie also emigrated to Louisiana and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where they had more children, including two sons.  Michel died in Assumption Parish in June 1833, in his late 70s.  One of his older daughters married into the Dumon family in New Orleans.  Neither of Michel's sons seems to have married, so this line of the family, except for its blood, evidently did not survive in the Bayou State.  

Older son Michel, fils, baptized at Ascension on the river, no age given, in December 1786, may have died young. 

Younger son Célestin, born at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in December 1793, also may have died young.

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More Aucoins--a dozen of them, including three families, one led by a widow--arrived from France aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early November 1785.  Like their cousin Michel of Le St.-Rémi, none of the male newcomers created lasting family lines in the colony: 

Alexandre (1725-1780) à Martin Aucoin

Alexandre, eighth son of Alexis dit Alexy Aucoin and Anne-Marie Bourg, born at Cobeguit in August 1725, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Trahan and Jeanne Daigre, at Minas in c1750 and settled at Rivière-aux-Canards.  The British deported the family to Virginia in 1755 and sent on to England in 1756.  Alexandre remarried to Élisabeth, or Isabelle, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Duon and Madeleine Vincent of Minas, at Liverpool in October 1759.  She gave him seven more daughters at Liverpool and in France.  After repartratiation to the mother country, the family landed at Pleujean, Morlaix, Brittany, in the spring 1763.  In the fall of 1765, they joined other Acadians from England on Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany.  They remained on the island for a dozen years and then moved on to Nantes in southern Brittany.  Alexandre died at St.-Similien, Nantes, in October 1780, age 55.  His widow and their seven daughters emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 aboard L'Amitité.  Five of Alexandre and Élisabeth's daughters married into the Simon, Faulk, Guidry, Benoit, Trahan, Granger, and Sellers families in the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin, so the blood of his family survived in the Bayou State. 

Joseph, fils (c1725-?) à Martin Aucoin

Joseph, fils, older son of Joseph Aucoin and Anne Trahan, born probably at Minas in c1725, married Françoise Breau in c1747.  She gave him two daughters.  The British exiled the family to Virginia in 1755, sent them on to England in 1756, and they were repatriated to France in the spring of 1763.  Joseph, fils remarried to Madeleine, daughter of François Gautrot and Marie Vincent of Minas and widow of Pierre Boudrot, at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo, in February 1764.  She evidently gave him no more children.  One, perhaps both, of Joseph, fils's daughters by his first wife died in France.  He and second wife Madeleine emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 aboard L'Amitité and settled in the Attakapas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  They brought no children to the Spanish colony and had none there, so this family line did not endure in the Bayou State. 

Joseph (c1752-?) à ? à Martin Aucoin

Joseph Aucoin, born perhaps in British Nova Scotia in c1752, was a 33-year-old sailor living at Nantes when he emigrated to Louisiana alone in 1785 aboard L'Amitié.  He seems to have followed some of his fellow passengers to the Isleño community of Nueva Gálvez, also called San Bernardo, south of New Orleans.  He evidently did not create a family of his own in the colony. 

Mathurin-Jean (c1755-?) à Alexis dit Lexy à Martin Aucoin

Mathurin-Jean, third and youngest son of Alexis Aucoin, fils and Hélène Blanchard of Cobeguit and brother of Fabien who crossed on La Bergère, was born at Cobeguit in c1755, followed his family to Île St.-Jean as an infant, was deported with them to France in 1758, and came to Louisiana alone and unmarried in 1785.  In 1788, he was living at Lafourche with older brother Fabien and his wife.  In the 1790s, while in his early 40s, Mathurin-Jean served as an engagé, or hired worker, on the upper Lafourche farm of fellow Acadian Élie Blanchard, probably a kinsman.  Unlike his older brothers Joseph le jeune and Fabien, Mathurin-Jean did not marry.  

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The majority of the Aucoins who immigrated from France to Louisiana--53 of them, one of the largest single Acadian family groups to come to the colony--crossed aboard the La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early December 1785.  Some of them created successful family lines in the three major regions of South Louisiana.  One line on upper Bayou Lafourche was especially vigorous: 

Jean-Baptiste (c1719-?) à ? à Martin Aucoin

Jean-Baptiste, called Jean, Aucoin, born probably at Minas in c1719, was deported to Virginia in 1755.  One wonders if he was still single at age 36 or if he was married when he was sent into exile.  Virginia officials deported him and hundreds of other Acadians to England in the spring of 1756.  At age 38, Jean married Marguerite Thériot in England in c1757.  Along with a daughter, they were repatriated to France in the spring of 1763 aboard the transport Dorothée and settled at Plouër, near St.-Malo, where Marguerite gave Jean at least four more children.  Jean and Marguerite, with two sons and five daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  From New Orleans, they followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian settlement of Bayou des Écores in the Spanish district of Feliciana north of Baton Rouge.  Two of their daughters married into the Aucoin and Guidry families there.  Both of Jean's younger sons created their own families in the Spanish colony. 

Oldest son Simon, born in England in May1761, followed his family to St.-Malo, France, in May 1763.  He would have been age 24 in 1785 when his family chose to emigrate to Louisiana.  Was he still alive?  Had he married in France and chose to remain? 

Jean's second son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born at Plouër, France, near St.-Malo, in May 1764, followed his family and siblings to Louisiana in 1785 and settled with them on Bayou des Écores, where he married Rose-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Marin Bourg and Osite Daigle.  Rose-Madeleine also was a native of Plouër and had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  After the Acadians abandoned Bayou des Écores in the early 1790s, Jean-Baptiste, fils and Rose moved to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jean Baptiste, fils died in Assumption Parish in June 1812, age 48.  His daughters married into the Bourg, Landry, LeBlanc, Picou, and Porche families.  His son may have died young. 

Only son Jean-Baptiste III, born at Baton Rouge in March 1801, may not have survived childhood, so his father's line of the family, except for its blood, may not have survived in the Bayou State.  

Jean's third and youngest son Pierre-Firmin, born at Plouër in May 1774, followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana and Bayou des Écores.  When the Acadians abandoned the settlement in the early 1790s, Pierre-Firmin's older brother Jean-Baptiste, fils followed the majority of their cousins to upper Bayou Lafourche, but Pierre-Firmin moved, instead, to nearby Baton Rouge, where he married Doncella-Pélagie, called Pélagie, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Daigre and Marie LeBlanc of Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, in August 1796.  They lived for a time at Cabahannocer on the river below Baton Rouge.  Their daughters married Tullier brothers whose mother was a Daigre.  Pierre Firmin may have remarried to Marguerite Venoy, widow of A. Vignon of Arkansas, at Baton Rouge in July 1812.  Both of Pierre Firmin's sons created their own families on the river.

Older son Florestin, by first wife Pélagie Daigle, born at St.-Jacques in January 1798, married Élisabeth, daughter of André Verdau, Verdiou, Verdon, or Verdou and Marie Venaille, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in September 1820.  Their son Florentin, fils was born near Baton Rouge in December 1821; Pierre Apollinaire, called Apollinaire, in July 1824; Florestin Albert or Albert Florestin, called Florestin, in June 1826; Simon Adolphe or Adolphe Simon, in October 1828; and Célestin Jules or Jules Célestin in April 1833.  Florestin, père died near Baton Rouge in December 1847, age 49.  In November 1850, the federal census in East Baton Rouge Parish counted a single slave--a 30-year-old black female--in Elizabeth Aucoin's household in the parish's Tenth Ward; this was Florestin's widow, Élisabeth Verdon.  Her and Florestin's daughters married into the Comeaux, Edmonston, Martinez, and Picou families.  Four of Florestin's sons created their own families.  One of them did not survive Confederate service. 

Second son Apollinaire married Melissa Catherine, daughter of Joseph Bouillion and his Acadian wife Marcelline Babin, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1856.  Their son John W. Octave was born near Baton Rouge in September 1862; Albert Florestin near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in July 1864; John Gardner in December 1867; and James Maples near Baton Rouge in December 1867.

Florestin's third son Florestin Albert married Julie Zéolide, daughter of fellow Acadians Rémi Doiron and Julie Richard, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in March 1851.  Their son Telesphore was born near Baton Rouge in December 1851, Abner Sotter in April 1853, and Alphonse Odey in November 1858.  During the War of 1861-65, Florestin Albert served in Company A of the 9th Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in East Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Louisiana and Mississippi.  Perhaps because of his age and maturity, Florestin Albert enlisted as a second corporal in the spring of 1862 and was elected a junior second lieutenant in August.  He was promoted to second lieutenant in September, and this was the rank he held during the Siege of Port Hudson in the spring and summer of 1863.  According to his burial record, Florestin Albert was "killed in siege of Port Hudson," but his Confederate service record does not reveal the exact date of his death; he would have been age 37 at the time.  He probably was buried on the battlefield, and, after the war, his family disinterred his remains and buried them in Highland Cemetery, Baton Rouge, in November 1865. 

Florestin's fourth son Adolphe Simon married Mary Margaret, daughter of Michael Adam or Adams and Marguerite Trager, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1853.  Their son Julius Adolphe was born near Baton Rouge in November 1859, William Madison in October 1865, Michel Buffington in April 1867, and Joseph Lawrence in January 1869.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted a single slave-a 14-year-old black female--in Adolphe Aucoin's household.  During the War of 1861-65, A. S., as the Confederate records call him, served in Company A of the 9th Battalion Louisiana Infantry with his brothers Florestin Albert and Jules Célestin.  Like Jules Célestin, he, too, was conscripted into Confederate service and survived the war.

Florestin's fifth and youngest son Jules Célestin married Elizabeth Gordon, daughter of John Cunningham and Ellen Humphreys, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1858.  Their son Alphonse Godrey was born near Baton Rouge in April 1860, Jules Adolphe in July 1862, and Forest Albert in June 1865.  During the War of 1861-65, Jules Célestin served in Company A of the 9th Battalion Louisiana Infantry with his older brothers Florestin Albert and Adolphe Simon.  Like Adolphe Simon, he, too, was conscripted into Confederate service and probably survived the war.  

Pierre Firmin's younger son Pierre, fils, by first wife Pélagie Daigle, born near Baton Rouge in June 1802, married Élisabeth, daughter of Michel Gareuil, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1825.  Their son Derosin, a twin, was born near St. Gabriel in February 1826 but died at age 2 1/2 in November 1828; and Jean Baptiste was born in October 1828.  Pierre, fils died in Iberville Parish in June 1831, age 29.  His daughter married into the Hébert family.  One wonders if his younger son married before 1870. 

Joseph l'aîné (c1721-?) à Martin Aucoin

Joseph, sixth son of Alexis dit Lexy Aucoin and Anne-Marie Bourg and uncle of the seven Aucoin sisters who crossed on L'Amitié, was born at Cobeguit in c1721.  He married Anne, daughter of Pierre Blanchard and Françoise Breau, in c1743 probably at Cobeguit and moved on to the French Maritimes.  Anne gave Joseph three children, a son and two daughters.  The family was deported to France in 1758.  Anne and all three of their children died at sea.  Joseph remarried to Anne, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Claire Dugas and widow of Jean Blanchard, at Ploubalay, near St.-Malo, in October 1759.  This Anne gave Joseph 11 more children in the St.-Malo area.  Joseph, Anne, and six of their children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores.  Three of their daughters married into the Hébert, Bourg, and Gautreaux families in the Spanish colony.  Three of Joseph's surviving sons, all by his second wife, created their own families in Louisiana, but only one of the lines survived. 

Fifth son François-Malo, by second wife Anne Hébert, born at Tremeureuc, France, near St.-Malo, in November 1769, followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana in 1785 and settled with them at Bayou des Écores.  After the Acadians abandoned Bayou des Écores in the early 1790s, François-Malo followed his widowed mother to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Amand Boudreaux and his second wife Marie-Perrine Nogues, a Frenchwoman, at Assumption in February 1800.  Marie also had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  She and François-Malo settled at Assumption.  Their daughter married into the Gautreaux family.  Although François-Malo fathered at least four sons, only one of them married, and his line of the family probably did not endure. 

Oldest son Joseph-François, born at Assumption in December 1801, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1845.  He was 43 years old and may not have married.    

François-Malo's second son Jean Baptiste Valéry, born at Assumption in October 1805, married Euphrosine Adelina, daughter of Pierre Hippolyte Bree, Bret, or Brez and his Acadian wife Marie Lucie Boudreaux, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1835.  Jean Baptiste Valéry died in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1835, age 30.  His line of the family probably died with him.  Euphrosine remarried to another Aucoin

François Malo's third son Amand Constance was born in Assumption Parish in March 1811 and probably did not marry. 

François Malo's fourth and youngest son Zenon Nicolas was born in Assumption Parish in December 1816 and also may not have married. 

Joseph l'aîné's sixth son Gabriel-Guillaume, by second wife Anne Hébert, born at Tremeureuc, France, near St.-Malo, in March 1772, followed his family to Louisiana in 1785 and settled with them at Bayou des Écores.  After the Acadians abandoned the settlement in the early 1790s, Gabriel followed his widowed mother to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marguerite-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Boudreaux and Marie-Modeste Trahan, at Assumption in April 1800.  Marguerite-Marie had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships.  One wonders if Gabriel Guillaume and Marguerite-Marie had any children.  She remarried in May 1810, so Gabriel Guillaume was dead by then.  Interestingly, her third husband, whom she married at Thibodaux in February 1848, was her first husband's younger brother!  Moreover, she was age 65 at the time of the marriage. 

Joseph l'aîné's seventh and youngest son Hyacinthe-Laurent, sometimes called Pierre-Hyacinthe, by second wife Anne Hébert, born at La Haute Marchandais, France, near St.-Malo, in April 1785, followed his family to Louisiana soon after his birth and settled with them at Bayou des Écores.  After the Acadians abandoned the settlement in the early 1790s, Hyacinthe followed his widowed mother to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie-Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Delaune and Marie Anne Part, at Assumption in July 1804.  Marie-Céleste had come to Louisiana aboard La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships.  They settled on Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Arcement, Boudreaux, Lagrange, and Richard families.  At age 62, Hyacinthe remarried to Marguerite Marie, 65-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Boudreaux and Marie Modeste Trahan and widow of Gabriel Guillaume Aucoin, his older brother, and Joseph Marcellin Dubois, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1848.  Marguerite had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships.  In June 1860, federal census takers in Assumption Parish counted two slaves--a 50-year-old black female and an 11-year-old black male--in Hyacinthe Aucoin's household in the Eighth Ward of Napoleonville.  Hyacinthe died probably at Napoleonville in October 1861.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Hyacinthe died at "age 72 years," but he was 75.  A petition for a family meeting was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in March 1862, so he may have owned property in Lafourche Parish as well.  Hyacinthe was one of the last of the Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join his ancestors.  Two of his three sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Hubert Valéry, by first wife Marie-Céleste Delaune, born at Ascension in August 1806, married Marie Delphine, called Delphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Mire and Henriette Bernard, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1838.  Their son Augustin or Auguste Pierre was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1840, and Charles died 3 weeks after his birth in April 1843.  A petition for tutorship of Hubert's three surviving children was filed in his name at the Thibodaux courthouse in October 1854, so he probably had died by then, perhaps in his late 40s.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafourche Parish counted a single slave--a 25-year-old black male--in Mrs. H. Aucoin's household in the Seventh Ward of Thibodaux "city"; this may have been Delphine Mire's slave.  Hubert and Delphine's daughters married into the Gautreaux, Hargis, and Lagarde families.  Hubert's surviving son also created his own family on the bayou.   

Older son Auguste Pierre married Rebecca, daughter of fellow Acadian Eugène Chiasson and his Creole wife Hortense Lagarde, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in January 1866.  Their son Pierre Charles was born in Lafourche Parish in December 1867. 

Hyacinthe's second son Valsin Rosémond, by first wife Marie-Céleste Delaune, born in Assumption Parish in January 1817, died at age 8 in September 1825.  

Hyacinthe's third and youngest son Auguste or Augustin Zéphirin, by first wife Marie-Céleste Delaune, born in Assumption Parish in April 1819, married Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Marie Boudreaux and his Creole wife Rosaile Aisene, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in November 1838.  Their son Jules Léonie was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1841; Auguste Delphi or Delphi Auguste in January 1845; Gustave near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in February 1849; Octave in December 1850; and Joseph Matheus in October 1852 but died "during yellow fever epidemic," age 1, in September 1853.  In September 1850, federal census takers in Assumption Parish counted four slaves--all male, all black, ages 44 to 22--on Auguste Aucoin's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District; this may have been Auguste Zéphirin.  Auguste died near Labadieville in November 1860, age 41.  His daughters married into the Creszioni and Richard families.  One of his sons married before 1870.

Second son Delphi Auguste married cousin Marie Elfrida, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Boudreaux and Marie Gautreaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1863.

Claude (c1728-1794) à Martin Aucoin

Claude, younger son of Joseph Aucoin and Anne Trahan and brother of Joseph, fils of L'Amitié, was born probably at Minas in c1728.  Still a bachelor, Claude followed his family to Virginia in 1755 and to England in 1756.  He married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Saulnier and Madeleine Comeau of Petitcoudiac, in England in c1757.  They, too, were repatriated to France in May 1763.  With them was their 5-year-old son Jean-Baptiste.  Marie-Josèphe gave Claude eight more children, five sons and three daughters, in the St.-Malo suburb of Plouër.  Claude, Marie-Josèphe, and five of their children emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  If they followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores, they did not remain there.  They chose to settle, instead, in the Opelousas District west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  At age 60, Claude remarried to Marie-Geneviève, daughter of Matthew Brasseaux dit La Citardy and Jeanne Célestin dit Bellemère and widow of Pierre-Olivier Benoit, at Opelousas in November 1788.  Claude died at Opelousas in August 1794, age 66.  Two of his daughters by his first wife married into the Normand and Bertrand dit Beaulieu families at Opelousas.  Three of his sons, also by his first wife, created their own families in France and Louisiana, but not all of the lines endured. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Marie-Josèphe Saulnier, born at Bristol, England, in c1758, followed his family to France in May 1763 and lived with them at Plouër, near St.-Malo.  He followed them to the Poitou region, where they participated in a failed settlement scheme during the early 1770s before returning to St.-Malo.  Jean-Baptiste married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Forest and Marguerite or Marie Comeau, St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, in April 1784.  They came to Louisiana in 1785 with their infant daughter Marie-Jeanne and lived for a while at Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge, where they had more daughters.  After the Acadians abandoned the settlement in the early 1790s, Jean-Baptiste took his family to the Opelousas District, where his parents and younger siblings had gone.  Jean-Baptiste died by November 1802, when he was listed as deceased in a daughter's marriage record at Opelousas.  His daughters married into the Bellard, Desmarais, Fontenot, and Vigé families at Opelousas.  Jean-Baptiste and Marie evidently had no sons, so this line of the family, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State.  

Claude's second son Charles-Joseph was born at Plouër in September 1765.  If he survived childhood, he remained in France.

Claude's third son Pierre-Jean, born at Plouër in May 1769, died at La Metrie Pommerais, near Plouër, in October 1773, age 4.

Claude's fourth son Mathurin-Casimir, by first wife Marie-Josèphe Saulnier, born at Plouër, France, near St.-Malo, in March 1771, followed his family to Louisiana and to Opelousas, where he married Susanne, called Susette, daughter of Philippe Langlois and his Acadian wife Marie Jeansonne, in October 1796.  Their daughters married into the Bergeau and Trahan families.  Only one of Mathurin's three sons created his own family. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, baptized at the Opelousas church, age unrecorded, in February 1797, married Marguerite Saucier probably in St. Landry Parish in the 1820s.  Their son Jean Baptiste, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in August 1825.  Jean Baptiste, père died in St. Landry Parish in July 1828, age 31.  His daughter married into the St. Germain family.  His son also created a family of his own.

Only son Jean Baptiste, fils married Susan Smith, widow of ___ Hall, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1853.  Their son Jean Baptiste III was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in August 1853.

Mathurin's second son Mathurin, fils, baptized at the Opelousas church, age unrecorded, in February 1800, may have died young, unless he was the Treville Aucoin who married Marie Ellender in St. Landry Parish in the early 1820s.  (Area church records consistently call Marie Ellender's husband Treville.)  By the late 1840s, Treville and his family were living on the Calcasieu prairies.  Their son Joseph born in Lafayette Parish in March 1823; Michel, born in c1826, was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, age 13, in July 1839; Pierre, born in c1831, was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, age 8, in July 1839; Paul, born in c1834, was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, age 5, in July 1839; and Martin, born in c1836, was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, age 3, in July 1839.  Treville's daughter Marie Sylvanie gave birth to son Jean Pierre in St. Landry Parish in February 1857, when she was in her late 20s; the Opelousas priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name.  The previous year, Marie Sylvanie had given birth to a daughter whose father's name also was not recorded.  Two of Treville's sons evidently married cousins.

Oldest son Joseph may have married cousin Sylvanie Aucoin and settled in Calcasieu Parish. 

Treville's third son Pierre may have married cousin Ceranie or Cirene Ellender in the early 1850s.  Their son Levi Georges was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in January 1853; and Jean Pierre in June 1856. 

Mathurin's third and youngest son Pierre le jeune, born probably in St. Landry Parish in c1823, died at age 6 in September 1829.  

Claude's fifth son Pierre, by first wife Marie-Josèphe Saulnier, born in France in c1776, followed his family to Louisiana and Opelousas, where he married Françoise, daughter of Joseph Silvestre and Catherine Hayes, in January 1800.  At age 42, Pierre remarried to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of Philippe Fontenot and Marie Brignac and widow of Joseph Saucier, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1818.  Most of the Aucoins in the western parishes descend from Pierre and his four sons.  Not unusual for Acadians in St. Landry Parish, few of them married fellow Acadians. 

Oldest son Jean Pierre, also called Pierre, fils, by first wife Françoise Silvestre, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in May 1801, married Hyacinthe Françoise, daughter of François Fontaine and Constance Bertrand Beaulieu, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1826.  Their son Pierre III was born in St. Landry Parish in November 1829, Joseph in August 1832, Jean Pierre in September 1836, Cyprien Pierre in July 1839, Arcadins in September 1846, and Marius in April 1852.  Pierre, fils's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in March 1856; he would have been in his mid-50s that year.  His daughters married into the Brunet, Bushnell, Fontenot, McCauley, and Vizina families. 

Pierre's second son Lasty, by second wife Marie-Jeanne Fontenot, born in St. Landry Parish in May 1819, married cousin Céleste or Célestine, 19-year-old daughter of Henry McCauley and Louise Belvue Fontenot, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1838.  Their son Pierre le jeune was baptized at the Opelousas church, age 22 days, in March 1843; Henri was born in March 1845; and Zilien in March 1849.  Their daughters married into the Fontenot and Fuselier families.  Two of his sons married before 1870. 

Oldest son Pierre le jeune married cousin Célestine, daughter of Pierre Jacques Fontenot and Adrienne Fontenot, at the Ville Platte church, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in August 1865.  They settled near Eunice.  Their son Pierre, fils was born in March 1867; and Arthelus in November 1869. 

Lasty's second son Henri likely married Elmire Ardoin in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1868. 

Pierre's third son Onésime, by second wife Marie-Jeanne Fontenot, born in St. Landry Parish in April 1822, married Félicité, daughter of Zenon Deshotel and Marie Manuel, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1842.  Their son Joseph was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1848; Onésime, fils in May 1851; Dorsin near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in March 1855; Zenon in July 1860; and Pierre le jeune October 1862.  Two of Onésime's sons married before 1870.

Oldest son Joseph married Azéline, daughter of Simon Baptiste Manuel and Azélie _____, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1868.  They settled near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish. 

Fourth son Zenon married Adeline Bertrand at the Ville Platte Baptist Church, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in January 1878. 

Pierre's fourth and youngest son Célestin, by second wife Marie-Jeanne Fontenot, born in St. Landry Parish in November 1825, married Denise Desmaret, widow of Pierre Vizina, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1849.  Their son Denis was born in St. Landry Parish in December 1849. 

Claude's sixth and youngest son François-Augustin, born at Plouër in October 1779, died six days after his birth. 

Michel le jeune (c1732-1790s) à Michel à Martin Aucoin

Michel le jeune, son of Antoine Aucoin le jeune and Élisabeth Amireau, born probably at Cobeguit in c1732, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in the late summer of 1755 and married Élisabeth, or Isabelle, Hébert on the island in c1758.  The British deported the newlyweds to St.-Malo, France, later that year.  Élisabeth gave Michel 14 children at St.-Énogat, a suburb of St.-Malo.  Michel, Élisabeth, and 10 of their children, six sons and four daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian settlement of Bayou des Écores above Baton Rouge.  In the early 1790s, they were part of the Acadian exodus from Bayou des Écores to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Michel died by December 1795, when wife Élisabeth was listed in a Lafourche census without a husband.  He would have been in his early 50s at the time.  Two of his daughters married into the Potier, Pedeau, and Barrilleaux families on the Lafourche.  Five of his six surviving sons also created their own families there. 

Second son Jean-Charles, born at St.-Lunaire, France, near St.-Malo, in July 1761, followed his family to Louisiana and Bayou des Écores, where he married Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Thibodeaux and Madeleine Henry, in November 1787.  Hélène also had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  After the Acadians abandoned Bayou des Écores in the early 1790s, Jean-Charles and Hélène moved first to nearby Baton Rouge before joining his family on Bayou Lafourche.  In October 1813, a Lafourche Interior Parish court named Joseph Hébert as tutor for Jean Charles's minor children, so Jean Charles probably had died by then.  He would have been in his early 50s that year.  His daughters married into the Boudreaux, Breaux, and Lecompte families.  Three of his five sons created their own families and settled in Lafourche Interior Parish, and two of his grandsons moved down into Terrebonne Parish. 

Oldest son Casimir, born at Bayou des Écores in November 1788, died young.  

Jean-Charles's second son Francois-Élie, called Élie, born at Baton Rouge in April 1794, married Cécile Marie, called Marie, Marine, probably in Assumption Parish in the early 1810s.  Their son Jean Baptiste Élie, called Baptiste, was born in Assumption Parish in June 1815; Urbin Ursin in May 1818; and Evariste Paul in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1821.  Their daughters married into the Adam and Boudreaux families.  Élie remarried to double cousin Marie Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Joseph Aucoin and Françoise Henry and widow of Jean Baptiste Fremin, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in June 1836.  Élie died by October 1867, when his wife's burial record called her his widow.  All three of his sons created their own families.

Oldest son Jean Baptiste Élie, by first wife Cécile Marine, married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Levron and his Creole wife Marie Adam, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1833.  Their son Jean Baptiste Valsin, called Valsin, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1834; and Marcilia Franklin, called Franklin, in March 1843.  They also had a son named Alphonse.  Jean Baptiste died in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1847, age 31.  A bond for the tutorship of his seven surviving children was filed in his name at the Thibodaux courthouse in March, and a petition for sale of his effects in April.  His daughters married into the Bourg, Naquin, and Robichaux families.  Both of his sons created their own families after the War of 1861-65. 

During the war, son Franklin served in Company G of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Franklin was living in New Orleans when he enlisted in Company G in early October 1861 at age 18.  According to war records, he had a florid complexion, auburn hair, blue eyes, and stood five feet eleven inches.  He was wounded at the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862 and sent home on a 60-day furlough.  That summer, his company's orderly sergeant reported that he had "heard of him, unwell."  Franklin was still at home recuperating from his wound and perhaps serving with the local Lafourche Parish militia when he fought in the Battle of Labadieville in October.  The Federals captured him in late November, and he was exchanged aboard the steamer Frolic near Baton Rouge in late February 1863.  Franklin returned to the 18th Louisiana later in the year and was reported on the rolls of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion in late 1863.  He fell into the hands of the Federals again at Lafourche in September 1864.  He was not exchanged this time.  The Federals sent him to Ship Island, Mississippi, and then to Fort Columbus, New York harbor, from where he was transferred to the prisoner-of-war camp at Elmira, New York, in late November.  Though he was still recuperating from his wound, he survived the terrible winter at Elmira, was paroled there in early February 1865, and sent to James River, Virginia, to be exchanged.  He was not exchanged, however.  Being "not able to travel," he was returned to Elmira, where he took the oath of allegiance to the United States government in late June 1865.  He returned home and married Léontine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bourg and Euphrosine Boudreaux of Lafourche Parish, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1866; the marriage also was recorded in Lafourche Parish.  Their son Jean Baptiste Joseph was born in Lafourche Parish in October 1868 but died at age 1 in September 1869.  They likely had more children after 1870.  Franklin died in Lafourche Parish in August 1920, age 77, and is buried in St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery, Thibodaux. 

During the war, Jean Baptiste Élie's son Alphonse served in Company I of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Alphonse married Élise Charpentier at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in November 1866.  Their son Joseph Louis was born in Lafourche Parish in September 1869.  They likely had more children after 1870. 

Élie's second son Urbin, by first wife Cécile Marine, married Céleste Adèle or Adèle Céleste, daughter of Marcellin Adam and his Acadian wife Marcellite Hébert, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in December 1843.  Their son Joseph was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1849, and Ernest Marcellin in Terrebonne Parish in November 1854.  Their daughters married into the Bouvier and Chiasson families. 

Élie's third and youngest son Evariste, by first wife Cécile Marine, married Marie Émilie, called Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadian Florentin Boudreaux and his Creole wife Marianne Durocher, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in February 1842, and sanctified the marriage at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1845.  Evariste died in April 1846, age 24.  A petition for a succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse, Terrebonne Parish, in August 1847, so he probably had moved to that parish.  His daughters married into the Chiasson and Landry families.  He evidently fathered no sons, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him. 

Jean-Charles's third son Leufroi-Désiré, born at Assumption in January 1798, probably died young.  

Jean-Charles's fourth son Paul-Eléander or -Léandre, also called Léandre-Paul or just Léandre, born at Assumption in February 1801, married Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadians Mathurin Joseph Ozelet and Marie Élisabeth Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1822.  Their son Paul Joseph was born in Assumption Parish in August 1823 but died at age 8 months in May 1824; Maximilien Zéphirin, called Similien, was born in October 1825; Alexandre Élie in November 1827; and Jean Baptiste Marcellin in November 1829.  They also had a son named Firmin.  Léandre remarried to Marine, another daughter of Mathurin Joseph Ozelet and Marie Élisabeth Landry, at the Plattenville church in October 1836.  Léandre died in Assumption Parish in July 1837, age 36.  His four surviving sons, all by his first wife, created their own families.

Léandre's son Similien, by first wife Cécile Ozelet, may have married fellow Acadian Aglae Landry in Assumption Parish in the early 1850s.  Their son Evelien Oscar, called Oscar, was born in Assumption Parish in November 1854 but died at age 9 months the following August.  Similien remarried to cousin Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Dupuis and Apolline Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1857; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Edgar Firmin was born near Plattenville in October 1870.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted four slaves--two males and two females, all black, ages 30 to 1--on Maximilien Aucoin's farm in the parish's Fourth Ward. 

Léandre's son Alexandre Élie, by first wife Cécile Ozelet, may have married fellow Acadian Josephine Aureline Dantin.  Their son Joseph Aurelien was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1852; Nilson Séverin near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in January 1860; and Léo Émile in February 1866.

Léandre's son Jean Baptiste Marcellin, by first wife Cécile Ozelet, married Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadian Léandre Boudreaux and his Creole wife Baselisse Rousseau, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1857.  Their son Amédée Elphége was born near Labadieville in June 1861, and Albert Léo Jean in April 1869.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted five slaves--three males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 21--on Jn. Bte. Aucoin's farm in the parish's Fourth Ward; this could have been Jean Baptiste.  Or he may have been the J. B. Aucoin who held only a single slave--a 37-year-old black male--in the same ward. 

Léandre's son Firmin, by first wife Cécile Ozelet, married cousin Rosema, daughter of fellow Acadians Rosémond Aucoin and Clarisse Gautreaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1861.

Jean-Charles's fifth and youngest son Jean Charles, fils, was born in Assumption Parish in April 1808.  In April 1820, when Jean Charles, fils was 16 years old, a Lafourche Interior Parish court named Baptiste Aucoin as his tutor.  Jean Charles, fils married Marie Hélène, daughter of François Le Lorre or Leloret and his Acadian wife Marie Augustine Richard, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in October 1830.  Their son Ulysse Drosin was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1834; Joseph Onésime, called Onésime, in June 1837; and Joseph Franklin in November 1844.  Jean Charles, fils died in Lafourche Parish in November 1855, age 47.  His daughters married into the Guillot and Mire families.  Two of his three sons created their own families before 1870. 

Oldest son Ulysse married Marie Odilia, called Odilia, daughter of fellow Acadian Evariste Mire and his Creole wife Azeline Morvant, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in May 1861.  During the War of 1861-65, Ulysse served with younger brother Onésime in Company F of the Lafourche Regiment Militia.  Ulysse was captured at the Battle of Labadieville in October 1862, paroled by the Federals, and sent home.  His Confederate service record says nothing of his taking the oath of allegiance to the United States government.  Ulysse remarried to Estelina, daughter of fellow Acadians Isidore Hortere Guillot and Euphrosine Guillot and widow, perhaps, of Edward Jenkins, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1870; the marriage was recorded also in Lafourche Parish. 

During the war, Jean Charles, fils's second son Onésime served with older brother Ulysse in Company F of the Lafourche Regiment Militia.  He was captured in Lafourche Parish in November1862, took the oath of allegiance to the United States government, and went home.  Onésime married Adèle, another daughter of Isidore Hortere Guillot and Euphrosine Guillot, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1864.

Michel le jeune's fourth son Grégoire-Alexis, born at St.-Énogat, France, near St.-Malo, in October 1767, followed his family to Louisiana and Bayou des Écores, where he married cousin Marguerite-Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Aucoin and Geneviève Thériot, in February 1789.  Marguerite-Geneviève also had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  After the Acadians abandoned Bayou des Écores in the early 1790s, Grégoire and Marguerite moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche, where they had more sons.  Grégoire died in Assumption Parish in April 1844, age 76.  Marguerite, who did not remarry, died in Assumption Parish in October 1846, age 78.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Blanchard, Gautreaux, and Landry families.  Six of Grégoire's seven sons created their own families on the bayou. 

Oldest son Augustin, born at Bayou des Écores in December 1789, returned to the area of his birth when he came of age and lived along Bayou Sarah, near St. Francisville, north of Baton Rouge, but he did not remain there.  He married Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians François Marie Gautreaux and Félicité Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in March 1810; the priest who recorded the marriage called him "Augustin of the Felicianas."  Their son Angel died in Assumption Parish a day after his birth in April 1814; Augustin, fils was born in April 1815; Marcellin Jean Pierre in May 1817 but died at 11 months in May 1818; Eusilien François was born in July 1826; and Joseph François, also called Joseph A., in January 1829.  Augustin, père died in Assumption Parish in June 1829, age 39.  Two of his descendants, Adolph and Kleber Aucoin, became prominent citizens of Donaldsonville, Ascension Parish, in the early twentieth century.  His three surviving sons created their own families. 

Second son Augustin, fils married Estelle Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Landry and Rosalie Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1838.  Their son Onésiphore Auguste was born in Assumption Parish in April 1839; a son, name unrecorded, died at age 8 months (the priest recorded 8 years) in July 1841; Étienne Augustin was born in February 1844; Alexis Siméon Félix in February 1846; and Clete Hubert Maximin in December 1855.  In September 1850, federal census takers in Assumption Parish counted four slaves--all male, all black, ages 44 to 22--on Auguste Aucoin's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District; this probably was Augustin, fils.  Two of his sons married before 1870. 

Oldest son Onésiphore Auguste married Celima, daughter of fellow Acadian Hubert Arceneaux and his Creole wife Irma Rodrique, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1859.  Their son Arma Demofort was born near Labadieville in January 1861.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted three slaves--a male and two females, all black, ages 28, 25, and 15, living in one house--on Oneziphor Aucoin's farm in the parish's Third Ward; this could have been Onésiphore Auguste. 

Augustin, fils's third son Étienne Augustin married cousin Victorine, daughter of fellow Acadians Théodule Arceneaux and Azélie Aucoin, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1865; they had to secure a dispensation for consanguinity in order to marry, but the marriage record does not reveal the degree of consanguinity between them.  Their son Jean Albert was born near Labadieville in December 1867.  Étienne died near Labadieville in September 1870, age 26. 

Augustin, père's fourth son Eusilien François married Louisa, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Guillot and Cléonise Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1852.  Their son Augustin Eusilien was born in Assumption Parish in February 1854, Evariste Vincent Arthur in July 1855, Saturnin Guilmore Colon in November 1859, Clet Ulger Sabba in December 1866 but died the following March, and Arthur Aubin Evariste was born in March 1868.

Augustin, père's fifth and youngest son Joseph A. married Pamela, daughter of fellow Acadians Laurent Giroir and Anne Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1849.  Their son Numa was born in Assumption Parish in April 1852, Pierre Willibrodus Ozémé in June 1855, Clebert Joseph in November 1857, Aurelien Albert in February 1860, Adolphe Laurent Arthur in September 1862, and Pierre Anatole in January 1867.  In August 1860, the census taker in Assumption Parish counted six slaves--two males and four females, all black, ranging in age from 38 to 1--on Jos. A. Aucoin's farm in the parish's Ninth Ward along Bayou Lafourche. 

Grégoire-Alexis's second son Simon-Michel, born at Bayou des Écores and baptized by a Pointe Coupée priest, age unrecorded, in May 1792, followed his family to upper Bayou Lafourche, and married Marie Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Mathurin Trahan and Marie Blanchard, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1812.  Their son Simon, fils was born probably in Assumption Parish in c1813 but died at age 4 in February 1817; Joseph Dominique was born in August 1814; Augustin Gédéon in April 1816 but died at age 19 months in December 1817; Jean Baptiste Adrien, called Adrien, was born in July 1820; Marcel Grégoire in November 1822; and Gédéon Germain in July 1829.  Simon, père died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in August 1847, age 56.  His daughters married into the Crochet and Savoie families.  Three of his four surviving sons created their own families. 

Second son Joseph Dominique died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in September 1858, age 44.  He may not have married. 

Simon Michel's fourth son Adrien married cousin Rosalie or Rosaline, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Aucoin and Rosalie Thériot, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1841.  Their son Octave Joseph was born in Assumption Parish in December 1842; and Alexis Maximin, called Maximin, near Paincourtville in May 1846.  One of their sons married before 1870. 

Maximin married Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadians Sylvanie Templet and Melisa Thériot, at the Pierre Part church, Assumption Parish, in August 1869. 

Simon Michel's fifth son Marcel Grégoire married fellow Acadian Mathilde Crochet probably in Assumption Parish in the early 1840s.  Their son Sylvestre Marcellin was born near Paincourtville in December 1844, and Claiborne Désiré or Joseph Claiborne in January 1849 but died the following September.  Marcel remarried to fellow Acadian Aurelie or Aureline Templet in Assumption Parish in the early 1850s.  Their son Joseph was born near Paincourtville in January 1855, Douradon Clément in September 1857, Maximin Xavier near Pierre Part in July 1859, Joseph Victorin in March 1861, and Pierre Amédée in September 1862 but died at age 4 1/2 in June 1867.  At age 41, Marcel remarried again--his third marriage--to Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Daigle and Élise Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1864.  Their son Camille Lusignan was born in Assumption Parish in July 1865; Joseph Émile, perhaps called Émile, near Paincourtville in January 1867 but may have died at age 1 1/2 in September 1868; and Jean Baptiste Dorilien was born in January 1869.  One of Marcel's sons married before 1870.  One suspects more of them married after that date. 

Oldest son Sylvestre Marcellin, by first wife Mathilde Crochet, married Camille or Camilla, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Guillot and Joséphine Daigle, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1869. 

During the War of 1861-65, Michel's sixth and youngest son Gédéon Germain served as a corporal in Company B of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Mary Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  In his late 30s, Gédéon, called "Gédéon G. of St. Mary Parish" by the recording priest, married Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Basile Naquin and his Creole wife Adelle Ayo, at the Chacahoula church, Terrebonne Parish, in February 1868.  Their son Simon Folcar was born near Chacahoula in March 1869, and Adrien Henri in July 1870. 

Grégoire-Alexis's third son Louis-Grégoire, born at Bayou des Écores in January 1793, died at Assumption at age 7 in November 1800.  

Grégoire-Alexis's fourth son Isidore-Joseph, born at Assumption in August 1795, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Daigle and Marie Dupuy, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1817.  Their son Joseph Jean Baptiste was born in Assumption Parish in November 1818; Honoré Eusilien, called Eusilien, in February 1827; Félicien Théodule, called Théodule, in December 1829; François in February 1832 but died a month later; François Arsène was born in March 1833; Augustin Menery in November 1835; Grégoire Théodule Isidore in April 1840; and Adrien in June 1842.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux and Blanchard families.  Four of Isidore-Joseph's seven surviving son married before 1870.

Oldest son Joseph Jean Baptiste married Eléonore, called Léonore, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Barrilleaux and Marcellite Foret, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1844.  Their son Sylvanie Numa was born in Assumption Parish in April 1846; Lirode Désiré, called Désiré, in December 1851 but died at age 2 1/2 in May 1854; Onil Pierre Gedot near Labadieville in January 1856; and Adrien Philippe in July 1865.  Joseph Jean Baptiste's daughter married into the Landry family. 

Isidore Joseph's second son Eusilien married cousin Marie Clarisse, called Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Blanchard and Marguerite Aucoin, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1860.  Their son Joseph Damien was born near Labadieville in May 1861, and François Justilien Louis Amédée in March 1863. 

Isidore Joseph's third son Théodule married cousin Aimée, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Aucoin and Baselisse Arceneaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1858.  Their son Alcide Lucas was born near Labadieville in April 1862. 

Isidore Joseph's fifth son François Arsène married Uranie, daughter of Valière Barras and Adèle Rousseau, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1865.  Their son Alexandre Justilien was born near Labadieville in October 1866. 

Grégoire-Alexis's fifth son Leufroi, born at Assumption in March 1798, married Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Blanchard and Jeanne Giroir, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1819.  Their son Leufroi Heli was born in Assumption Parish in November 1821.  Leufroi remarried to Phelonise, another daughter of François Marie Gautreaux and Félicité Hébert, at the Plattenville church in July 1823.  Their son Firmin or Simon Jérôme was born in Assumption Parish in September 1824 but died at age 2 months the following December, François Rosémond died at age 7 weeks in April 1826, Édouard Pierre was born in December 1827, Adolphe in August 1829, Adrien Augustin in March 1834, Honoré Eusilien le jeune in March 1836, and Octave François in August 1843.  Leufroi's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, on lower Bayou Teche, in June 1848, so he may have owned property there.  One of his sons married before 1870. 

Sixth son Adrien Augustin, by second wife Phelonise Gautreaux, married Marie Domitille, daughter of Jean Romain and Marie LeBoeuf, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in April 1859.  They settled near Brashear City, later Morgan City, St. Mary Parish.  During the War of 1861-65, Adrien served in Company F of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Mary Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He survived the war and returned to his family.  His son Adam Onésiphore was born near Brashear City in April 1863 while Adrien was serving in the trenches at Vicksburg; and Joseph Sylvanie was born in November 1865 after his father returned from the war. 

Grégoire-Alexis's sixth son Grégoire, fils, dit Grig, born at Assumption in February 1802, married cousin Henriette Clarisse, called Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Hébert and Anatalie Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1823.  Their son Pierre Grégoire, called Grégoire III, was born in Ascension Parish in December 1829; Joseph Vileor, called Vileor or Vilcord, in Assumption Parish in February 1836; and Aurelien Ursin in June 1846.  Grégoire, fils died in Assumption Parish in May 1849.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Grégoire died at "age 44 years," but he was 47.  His daughters married into the Barras, Baudoin, Cancienne, Hébert, and Landry families.  His two olders sons married before 1870.  One of them moved to the southwestern prairies after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Grégoire III married Delphine, daughter of Auguste Cancienne, and his Acadian wife Élise Rosalie Blanchard, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1851.  Their son Léon Numa was born in Assumption Parish in November 1852; Grégoire Clebert near Labadieville in October 1856; and Joseph Demas near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in November 1870.

Grig's second son Vileor married Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Urbain Daigle and Doralise Boudreaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1859.  Their son Joseph Vileor, fils was born near Labadieville in October 1860.  During the War of 1861-65, Vileor, called Vilcord in Confederate records, was one of the dozens of Assumption Parish men conscripted into the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery and sent to Vicksburg, Mississippi, in October 1862.  He served in Company B and died probably of disease in the city hospital at Vicksburg the following January or February, age 27. 

Grégoire-Alexis's seventh and youngest son Rosémond, born at Assumption in December 1803, married Clara or Clarisse, yet another daughter of Francois Marie Gautreaux and Félicité Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1827.  Their son Jules Adelaine was born in Assumption Parish in December 1828, and Terence Zephyr in February 1836.  Rosémond died in Assumption Parish in March 1844, age 40.  His daughters married into the Aucoin and Blanchard families.  One of his sons married before 1870. 

Older son Jules married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Simonet Comeaux and Eulalie Gaudet, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in March 1853.  Their son Jules Arthur, called Arthur, was born in Assumption Parish in January 1854 but died at age 6 in November 1860; and Alcée Arthur Thibaut was born in July 1855.  Jules, père died in Assumption Parish in November 1855, age 26. 

Michel le jeune's fifth son Michel-Pierre, born at St.-Énogat, France, near St.-Malo, in February 1769, followed his family to Louisiana, Bayou des Écores, and upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marguerite-Perrine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Bourg and Anne Daigle, at Assumption in May 1800.  Marguerite-Perrine also had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Delaune, and Dubois families.  Their two sons settled in Assumption Parish. 

Older son Hubert-Onésime, born at Assumption in August 1801, married cousin Élisabeth or Élise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Daigle and Rosalie Blanchard, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1831.  Their son Guillaume Onésime, called Onésime, was born in Assumption Parish in January 1832 but died at age 13 months in May 1833.  Hubert died in Assumption Parish in January 1850, age 48.  His daughters married into the Bourg and LeBlanc families.  His line of the family, except for its blood, may have died with him. 

Michel Pierre's younger son Michel Suliac, born at Assumption in September 1809, married Basilisse, Rosalie, or Arselie, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Arceneaux and Marie Aimée Blanchard, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1835.  Their son Michel Honoré Théodule, called Honoré, was born in Assumption Parish in February 1836 but died at age 12 in October 1848; Joseph was born in December 1837; Arsène Vincent in April 1843; Louis Éloi, called Éloi, in March 1845; André Ulysse in June 1852; and Émile Augustin in July 1854.  Michel died in Assumption Parish in May 1855, age 45.  His daughter married an Aucoin cousin.  One of his sons married before 1870. 

  Fourth son Éloi married first cousin Azéma, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Hébert and Alexandrine Arceneaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1869; Azéma's mother was Éloi's maternal aunt, so they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Michel le jeune's sixth son Pierre-Paul born at St.-Énogat, France, near St.-Malo, in July 1770, followed his family to Louisiana, Bayou des Écores, and upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Rosalie-Charlotte, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Gautreaux and Madeleine Melançon, at Assumption in October 1799.  Rosalie was a native of Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, and had come to Louisiana aboard La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships.  They settled at Assumption, where most of their children were born.  Pierre Paul died in Assumption Parish in April 1818, age 47.  His daughters married into the Blanchard, Bourg, and Delaune families.  Four of his six sons created their own families in Assumption Parish. 

Oldest son Joseph-Marie, born at Assumption in September 1800, married cousin Rosalie Carmelite or Carmelite Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Francois Aucoin and Rosalie Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1822.  Their son Julien Joseph was born in Assumption Parish in January 1824.  Joseph Marie died in Assumption Parish in March 1825, age 25.

Pierre-Paul's second son Eugène, born at Assumption in January 1802, died in Assumption Parish in June 1833, age 31.  He probably did not marry.  

Pierre Paul's third son Pierre Michel, born in Assumption Parish in July 1808, died at age 4 in October 1812.  

Pierre Paul's fourth son François, born in Assumption Parish in November 1810, married Marie Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Boudreaux and Marie Melanie Gautreaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1838.  They settled at Bayou L'ours.  Their son Eugène Désiré Théodule was born in Assumption Parish in February 1845.  Their daughter married a Gautreaux cousin.

Pierre Paul's fifth son Lubin Jean Pierre, born in Assumption Parish in September 1813, married Anne Marie, called Marie and Annette, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Doiron and Marguerite Dugas, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1833.  Their son Arsène Pierre was born in Assumption Parish in June 1834.  Lubin died in Assumption Parish in August 1860.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Lubin died at "age 48 years," but he was only 46.  His daughters married into the Barras, Bergeron, Bolot, and Hébert families. 

Pierre Paul's sixth and youngest son Isidore Théodule, called Théodule, born in Assumption Parish in January 1817, married Madeleine Louise Melanie or Melanie Louise, daughter of Élie Friou and his Acadian wife Marguerite Bourg, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1841.  Their son Jean Théodore was born in Assumption Parish in February 1844, and Joseph Sylvanie in August 1845. 

Michel le jeune's seventh son François-Étienne, born at St.-Énogat, France, near St.-Malo, in December 1773, followed his family to Louisiana, Bayou des Écores, and upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married cousin Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Comeaux and Marguerite Aucoin and widow of François Bourg, at Assumption in June 1800.  Madeleine also had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  Francois Étienne, called Étienne Francois by the priest who recorded his burial, died in Assumption Parish in October 1837, age 64.  His son created his own family on the bayou.

Only son Euchariste- or Cariste-Antoine, born at Assumption in December 1800, married Louise Ludivine, also called Éloise or Louise Divine, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Thomas Hébert and Marie Pélagie Thibodeaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1825.  Their son Joseph Euchariste was born in Assumption Parish in September 1828; Léandre Alexis in September 1831; Pierre Vileor in December 1832; Simon Justinien in February 1835; Adrien Valmond in June 1840; François Félicien, called Félicien, in January 1845; and Henry Émile near Paincourtville in July 1851.  Euchariste died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in May 1868, age 67.  His daughters married into the Dupuy and Simoneaux families.  Three of his sons married before 1870.

Oldest son Joseph Euchariste married Marie, daughter of Jean St. Germain and his Acadian wife Azélie Savoie, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1857.

Euchariste's third son Pierre Vileor married cousin Rosalie, daughter of Rosémond Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Odile Hébert, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1857.  Their son Pierre Paul Denis was born near Paincourtville in June 1858, Léonard Avalse in March 1861 but died at age 1 1/2 in December 1862, Séverin Vileor was born in November 1862, Joseph Aristide in August 1866, and Oscar in October 1868. 

Euchariste's sixth son Félicien married Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Landry and his Creole wife Euphrosine Malbrough and widow of Joseph Blanchard, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1867, and remarried to Agathe or Agatha, daughter of fellow Acadian Dorville Robichaux and his Creole wife Honorine Simoneaux, at the Paincourtville church in October 1869.

Michel le jeune's eighth and youngest son Constance- or Constant-Jean-Baptiste, born at St.-Énogat in October 1782, crossed with his family to Louisiana.  If he survived the rigors of the crossing (15 passengers aboard La Ville d'Archangel died in the hospital at Algiers soon after reaching New Orleans), Constant would have followed his family to Bayou des Écores and to upper Bayou Lafourche.  He fails to appear in the Valenzuéla District census of December 1795 with the rest of his family.  He would have been age 13 at the time, and there is no record of his having married, so he likely died young, either on the crossing, at Algiers, or at Bayou des Écores. 

Simon (c1732-?) à ? à Martin Aucoin

Simon Aucoin, born probably at Minas in c1732, was exiled to Virginia in 1755 and sent on to England in 1756.  He married Marie-Geneviève, daughter of Charles Thériot and Françoise Landry, in England in c1768.  In the spring of 1763, the family, which now included a daughter, was repatriated to France.  Simon settled with his family at Plouër, a suburb of St.-Malo, and Marie-Geneviève gave him three more daughters there.  They emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge.  Simon and Marie-Geneviève had no more children in the Spanish colony.  Three of their daughters married into the Richard, Aucoin, and Landry families on the river and on upper Bayou Lafourche, so the blood of this family line survived in the Bayou State. 

Charles (c1735-?) à Martin Aucoin

Charles, younger son of Pierre Aucoin by his second wife Catherine Comeau, born at Minas in c1723, married Madeleine, daughter of Pierre Trahan and Jeanne Daigre of Pigiguit, at Rivière-aux-Canards in November 1753.  The family, which now included infant son Pierre le jeune, was deported to Virginia later that year, sent on to England in 1756, repatriated to France in the spring of 1763, and settled at Plouër, a suburb of St.-Malo.  Evidently Pierre le jeune remained their only child.  Charles, Madeleine, Pierre le jeune, and two kinswomen emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écore.  One wonders if Charles died at Bayou des Écores, and, if so, when. 

Only son Pierre le jeune, born at Minas in c1755, followed his family to Virginia, England, France, and Louisiana.  At age 30, he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Pierre Hébert and his second wife Susanne Pitre, at New Orleans in January 1786, soon after they reached the Spanish colony on La Ville d'Archangel.  They may have followed their families to Bayou des Écores, where Marie-Josèphe may have died from the rigors of childbirth.  If Pierre le jeune went to Bayou des Écores, he did not remain there.  He remarried to Marie-Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadians Claude Guidry and his second wife Anne Moïse, at San Gabriel below Baton Rouge in October 1788.  Pierre le jeune died there in August 1792, age 37.  Both of his sons created their own families on the Acadian Coast. 

Older son François, by second wife Marie-Cécile Guidry, born at San Gabriel in October 1789, married Marie Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Cécile Dupuis and widow of Bernard Comeaux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in January 1818.  Their son Trasimond François was born near St. Gabriel in March 1821; Sylvanie in c1822; François Philosin in October 1823; Valsentin or Valentin in March 1825 but died at age 9 in June 1834; Pierre Telesphore, called Telesphore, was born in March 1829; an infant son, name unrecorded, died at birth in November 1831; and Valmond was born in August 1835.  François, père died near St. Gabriel in January 1844.  The priest who recorded his burial said that François was age 50 he died, but he was 54.  Four of his surviving sons settled in West Baton Rouge and Iberville parishes and married before 1870.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted a single slave--a 52-year-old black female--on Widow F. Aucoin's farm; this may have been Francois's widow, Marie Rose Richard

Oldest son Trasimond married Solidaine or Solidenne, daughter of fellow Acadians Maximilien LeBlanc and Hélène Allain, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in October 1844.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Philippe Alcide, called Alcide, was born in August 1845 but died at age 10 months in June 1846; Joseph Alcée was born in December 1847; and Déozan near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1851.  Trasimond remarried to Marie Bardy, daughter of Pierre Beronne or Peyronne and Marie Ambloy of Savoie, France, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1856.  Their son Arthur was born near St. Gabriel in July 1857.

François's second son Sylvanie married Émilie, daughter of Félix Bernard du Montier, fils and Joséphine Seguin, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1852.  Their son François Pierre or Franklin Pierce was born near Brusly in July 1853 but died at age 1 1/2 in February 1855, and Jean Baptiste Rodolphe was born in April 1856 but died at age 3 in June 1859.  During the War of 1861-65, Sylvanie served in Company A of the 3rd Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Missouri, Arkansas, and Mississippi.  Sylvanie died in Iberville Parish in January 1868, age 46.  His family line may have died with him. 

François's fifth son Telesphore married cousin Élodie, daughter of fellow Acadians Valentin Hébert and Euphrosine Labauve, at the Brusly, church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1853; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They settled near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish.  Their son Joseph Ulysses was born in October 1854.  During the War of 1861-65, Telesphore served in Company A of the 3rd Regiment Louisiana Infantry with his brother Sylvanie.

François's seventh and youngest son Valmond married Libbie Stockwell.  Their son James Lee was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in July 1865, and William Randolph in January 1867.

Pierre le jeune's younger son Pierre-Élie, called Élie, born at San Gabriel in February 1791, married Martine, daughter of fellow Acadians Honoré Braud and Élisabeth LeBlanc and widow of Jean Charles Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in October 1819.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Jean Baptiste Rosémond was born in September 1820.  Élie died probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in December 1835.  The St. Gabriel priest who recorded his burial said that Élie was age 42 when he died, but he was 44.  His daughter married into the Betancourt family.  His son settled in West Baton Rouge Parish and also died young. 

Only son Jean Baptiste Rosémond married Ernestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Robichaux and his Creole wife Modeste Prospere of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1843.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Pierre Balthazar was born near Brusly in February 1848; Jean Baptiste Rosémond, fils, a twin, died 8 days after his birth in November 1853; and Élie Benjamin was born in September 1857.  Jean Baptiste Rosémond died near Brusly in October 1858.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Rosémond, as he called him, died at "age 32 years," but he was 38. 

Alexandre (c1740-1780s) à Martin Aucoin

Alexandre, second son of Charles Aucoin and Anne-Marie Dupuis and brother of Olivier and Charles who crossed on La Bergère, was born at Grand-Pré in c1740 and followed his family to Virginia and England.  Alexandre married Rosalie, daughter of Charles Thériot and Françoise Landry, in England in c1761.  They were repatriated to France in May 1763, settled in the St.-Malo suburbs, where Rosalie gave him at least 11 children, eight daughters and three sons.  Alexandre, Rosalie, and three of their children, two daughters and a son, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  (Two of their older children,  son Jean-Baptiste-Fabrien and daughter Perrine-Marie, may have survived childhood and elected to remain in the mother country.)  From New Orleans, Alexandre, Rosalie, and their three remaining children followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores.  Alexandre died by January 1788, when his wife remarried at Baton Rouge.  His daughters married into the Raoul and Bourg families on the river, and one of them moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche.  His son Mathurin, who was age 4 when he came to the Spanish colony, evidently did not marry, so only the blood of this family line survived in the Bayou State. 

Joseph le jeune (c1744-?) à Alexis à Martin Aucoin

Joseph le jeune, oldest son of Alexis Aucoin, fils and Hélène Blanchard, brother of Fabien and Mathurin-Jean who crossed on La Bergère and L'Amitié and nephew of Joseph l'aîné of La Ville d'Archangel , was born at Cobeguit in c1744.  He escaped with is family to Île St.-Jean in the fall of 1755, followed them to France in 1758, and settled with his widowed mother in the St.-Malo suburbs.  Joseph le jeune married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Jean Hébert and Marie-Claire Dugas, at Ploubalay near St.-Malo in March 1764.  Marie-Josèphe gave him 10 children there, eight sons and two daughters.  Marie-Josèphe died at Villou, near Tremeureuc, St.-Malo, died in June 1781, age about 37.  Both of her and Joseph le jeune's daughters died young, as did three of their sons.  Joseph le jeune and four of his sons emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  (His second son Pierre-Jean, who would have been age 19 in 1785, may have elected to remain in the mother country.)  Joseph le jeune and his four remaining sons followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Bayou des Écores.  At age 44, Joseph le jeune remarried to cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Aucoin and Marguerite Thériot, probably at Bayou des Écores in May 1788.  Marie gave him more children there, including two more sons.  Joseph le jeune may have died there.  Four of his six surviving sons created their own families on upper Bayou Lafourche, but only three of the lines, all from his first wife, endured. 

Oldest son Alexis Joseph, by first wife Marie-Josèphe Hébert, born at Tremeureuc, France, near St.-Malo, in April 1765, married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Henry and his second wife Anne Thibodeau, at New Orleans in January 1786 soon after they reached Louisiana on the same vessel.  One wonders if they followed his family to Bayou des Écores.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin, Fremin, and LeBoeuf families on Bayou Lafourche.  Alexis remarried to Anne-Marguerite, called Marguerite and Annette, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and Anastasie Barrilleaux, at Assumption on the upper Lafourche in January 1799.  Marguerite had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships.  Their daughters married into the Arcement and Dupré families.  Alexis died in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1826, age 61.  His succession inventory was filed at the Lafourche Interior courthouse the following month.  Two of his six sons married, but only one of the lines survived, in Terrebonne Parish. 

Oldest son Alexis-Célestin, called Célestin, by second wife Anne-Marguerite Dugas, was born at Assumption in May 1801, married Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Francois Thibodeaux and Brigitte Guénard and widow of Jean Boudeloche, at the Thibodeaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1841.  One wonders if he and his wife had any children. 

Alexis Joseph's second Jean Baptiste le jeune, by second wife Anne-Marguerite Dugas, born at Assumption in July 1805, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1857, age 52.  He may not have married.   

Alexis Joseph's third son Léon, by second wife Anne-Marguerite Dugas, born in Assumption Parish in May 1811, was still alive in September 1839, when he receipted land to brother-in-law Jérôme Dupré in Terrebonne Parish.  Léon may not have married.  

Alexis Joseph's fourth son Basile Joseph or Joseph Basile, by second wife Anne-Marguerite Dugas, born in Assumption Parish in December 1812, died in Assumption Parish in 1836, age 24.  He probably did not marry.  

Alexis Joseph's fifth son Ursin, by second wife Anne-Marguerite Dugas, born in Assumption Parish in c1814, married Rosalie Marianne, called Marianne, Comstock of New Orleans and Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodeaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in January 1840; Marianne was baptized the same day she married, so she probably was a Protestant when she met Ursin.  They settled in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Ursin Evariste, called Evariste, had been born in April 1839.  Their daughters married into the Benoit and Trosclair families.  Ursin's son created his own family. 

Only son Evariste married Marie Aimée, called Aimée and Emelina, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Deroche and his Creole wife Pélagie Baye of Terrebonne Parish, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in April 1859, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, the following June.  They settled near Montegut. 

Alexis Joseph's sixth and youngest son Joseph Hermogène, also called Mathurin, by second wife Anne-Marguerite Dugas, born in Assumption Parish in April 1817, may have died young. 

Joseph le jeune's fourth son Fabien-Isaac, by first wife Marie-Josèphe Hébert, born at Tremeureuc, France, in May 1769, followed his family to Louisiana, Bayou des Écores, and upper Bayou Lafourche.  He married Susanne, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Darois and Madeleine Trahan, at Assumption in April 1799.  Susanne was Fabien's brother Mathurin's wife's sister and had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships.  Fabien Isaac died in Assumption Parish in May 1835, age 67.  His daughters married into the Dupuis, Giroir, and Theriot families.  His two sons also created their own families on Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Fabien-Alexis, called Alexis, born at Assumption in March 1801, married cousin Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Marie Theriot and Anne Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1822; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Constant was born in Assumption Parish in November 1824; Joseph Drosin, called Drosin, in March 1828; Zéphirin in April 1831 but died at age 9 in November 1840; Napoléon Auguste or Augustin, called Augustin, was born in February 1833; and Fabien Jean Baptiste in December 1834.  Alexis died in Assumption Parish in June 1835, age 34.  His daughters married into the Aucoin, Blanchard, and Crochet families.  Two of his sons married before 1870.

Second son Drosin, at age 42, married Celina, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Trahan and his Creole wife Éleonore Oufnac and widow of Émile Braud, at the Pierre Part church, Assumption Parish, in March 1870. 

Alexis's fourth son Augustin married Séraphine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Landry and his Creole wife Roseline Simoneaux, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1856.  They settled near Pierre Part.  Augustin remarried to Desi Rosalie or Edesie, daughter of Anaclet Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Constance Landry and widow of Arsène Frioux, at the Paincourtville church in February 1867.  Their son Augustin Albert was born near Paincourtville in October 1870. 

Fabien Isaacs's second son Joseph Eugène, born in Assumption Parish in July 1809, married Marie Madeleine Zépheline or Zéphirine, called Zéphirine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Dupuis and Rose Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1834.  Their son Apollinaire Augustin was born in Assumption Parish in April 1840; Jean Baptiste Adrien in February 1844; and J. Baptiste Eugène, called Eugène, in September 1846.  Their daughters married into the Gorret and Theriot families.  One of Joseph Eugène's sons settled on the lower Atchafalaya. 

Joseph Eugène's third and youngest son Eugène married Laura, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Arsène Gautreaux and his Creole wife Marie Arthemise Frederick of St. James Parish, at the Brashear, now Morgan, City church, St. Mary Parish, in October 1869. 

Joseph le jeune's fifth son Mathurin-Jean le jeune, by first wife Marie-Josèphe Hébert, born at Tremeureuc, France, near St.-Malo, in April 1772, followed his family to Louisiana and Bayou des Écores.  He may have married cousin Madeleine Aucoin "of Lafourche" in the early 1790s.  Mathurin-Jean remarried to Marie-Madeleine, another daughter of Étienne Darois and Madeleine Trahan, at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in November 1799.  Marie-Madeleine was Mathurin's brother Fabien's wife's sister and had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships.  Mathurin Jean le jeune died in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1835, age 63.  One of his four sons married and settled in Lafourche Interior Parish. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, by first wife Madeleine Aucoin, born at Bayou des Écores in May 1792, may have died young.

Mathurin-Jean le jeune's second son Joseph-Firmin, by first wife Madeleine Aucoin, baptized at Baton Rouge, age unrecorded, in April 1794, died at age 20 months the following September. 

Mathurin-Jean le jeune's third son Désiré-Mathurin or -Jean, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Darois, born at Assumption on the upper Lafourche in March 1801, died in Assumption Parish in June 1828, age 27.  He probably did not marry.   

Mathurin-Jean le jeune's fourth and youngest son Joseph Eugène, also called Mathurin Joseph, from second wife Marie-Madeleine Darois, born at Assumption in June 1805, married Azélie Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte LeBlanc and Marie Marguerite Gaudet, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1826.  Their son Mathurin Eugène was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1830; and Joseph Louis, called Louis, in November 1836.  Joseph Eugène died in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1839, age 33.  An appraisement of his estate was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in February 1847.   His daughters married into the Hoffmann and Meyer families.  His two sons created their own families on the bayou.

Older son Mathurin Eugène married Catherine, daughter of André Skinner and Hortense Maronge, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1849.  Their son Julies Apollinaire was born in Lafourche Parish in July 1853 but died at age 1 1/2 in November 1854; and twins Joseph Louis Mathurin, called Louis, and Octave Adrien were born in November 1859 but died the following April.  Mathurin remarried to Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Barrilleaux and Cléonise Potier, at the Thibodaux church in January 1861.

Joseph Eugène's younger son Joseph Louis married Cecilia Marie Anne, daughter of Jean Baptiste Lagarde and Marie Anne Legendre, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in November 1865. 

Joseph le jeune's sixth son Joseph-Marie, by first wife Marie-Josèphe Hébert, born at Tremeureuc, France, in April 1775, followed his family to Louisiana, Bayou des Écores, and upper Bayou Lafourche.  In 1795 and 1797, in his early 20s, Joseph-Marie was living with his brothers at Assumption.  He probably did not marry.  One wonders if he was the Joseph Aucoin who died in Assumption Parish in February 1832, or the Joseph dit Joson Aucoin who died in Assumption Parish in December 1833  The Plattenville priest or priests who recorded the burials, and who did not give the parents' names or mention any wives, said that both Josephs died at age 50, which places their birth years in the early 1780s. 

Joseph le jeune's ninth son Germain-Jacques, by second wife Marie Aucoin, born at Bayou des Écores in December 1788, may not have survived childhood.  

Joseph le jeune's tenth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Marie Aucoin, born probably at Bayou des Écores and baptized by a Pointe Coupée priest, age unrecorded, in May 1792, married Marie Ludivine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Richard and Marie Josèphe Trahan, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1811.  Jean Baptiste died in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1844, age 54.  His daughter married into the Guédry family.  Except for its blood, this branch of the family may not have survived in the Bayou State. 

Only son Jean Baptiste Alexis, born in Assumption Parish in December 1811, died in Assumption Parish in September 1834, age 23.  He probably did not marry.   

Babin

Antoine Babin, a farmer perhaps from La Chaussée, near Blois, in the Orleanais region of the Loire valley in France, born in c1631, came to Acadia by c1662, when he married Marie, daughter of  ____ Mercier and Françoise Gaudet.  (After Marie's father died, her mother Françoise remarried to Daniel LeBlanc and became the matriarch of an even larger Acadian clan.)   Antoine died at Port-Royal in c1687, in his mid-50s, and Marie Mercier became a widow like her mother.  But before his death, Antoine gave her 11 children.  Their seven daughters married into the Rimbault, Landry, Richard dit Sansoucy, Doucet, Breau, Comeau, Doiron, Benoit, Martin, Sauneuf, and Pitre families.  Three of their four sons, all born at Port-Royal, married into the Richard, Thériot, and Boudrot families.  Antoine and Marie's descendants settled not only at Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal, but also at Cap-Sable, Grand-Pré and Rivière-aux-Canards in the Minas Basin, Ste.-Famille and L'Assomption at Pigiguit, Chignecto, and in the French Maritimes.  They were especially numerous at Minas. 

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this large family even farther.  A number of Babin families rounded up at Grand-Pré and Pigiguit were deported to Maryland, Virginia, and Massachusetts.  The few Minas Babins who escaped the British found refuge at Miramichi and other refugee camps on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, or at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  One of them at Restigouche either was captured by, or surrendered, to the British in the early 1760s and held in the prisoner-of-war compound at Halifax, where he married.  Some of the Babins at Restigouche escaped the British in the summer of 1760 and settled at Bonaventure in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie de Chaleurs, present-day Québec Province.  Meanwhile, a Babin from Chignecto slipped away from the British, made his way to Canada, and settled at Cap-St.-Ignace on the St. Lawrence River below Québec City.  His brother however, was caught in the Chignecto roundup in 1755 and deported to South Carolina.  After the war with Britain ended, especially after 1766, Minas Babins, probably those who had endured exile in Massachusetts, could also be found at Deschambault on the St. Lawrence above Québec City; at Trois-Rivières, St.-Jean-Port-Joli, and St.-Roch-des-Aulnaies on the St. Lawrence below Québec City; on Rivière St.-Jean in present-day New Brunswick; and on the French island of Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the mid-twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

The Babins who were shipped to Virginia endured a fate worse than most of the other refugees deported from Minas.  In mid-November 1755, when five transports appeared unexpectedly at Hampton Roads, Virginia governor Robert Dinwiddie protested their deportation to his colony without his consent.  Many of the exiles died on the filthy, crowded ships anchored in Hampton Roads while the Virginia authorities pondered their fate.  Acadians from one vessel were moved up to Richmond, two of the vessels were unloaded at Hampton, and two more at Norfolk.  A hand full of young Acadians managed to slip away and trek overland through fields and forests and over the mountains, to French territory, but most of the exiles remained in Virginia.  Finally, in the spring of 1756, Virginia's House of Burgesses made its decision ... the Acadians must go!  In May, the first shipment of Acadians in hired vessels left for England, and in two weeks all of them had gone--299 to Bristol, 250 to Falmouth, 340 to Southampton, and 336 to Liverpool--1,225 of the original 1,500.  Their ordeal only worsened in the English ports, where they were grossly neglected and treated like common criminals and where hundreds died of smallpox.  By 1763, more than half of them were dead.  In May of that year, after prolonged negotiations between the French and British governments, the Acadians in England, including Babins, were repatriated to France.

At least two members of the Babin family who ended up in France did not get there via Virginia and England.  When the British rounded up the Nova Scotia Acadians in the autumn of 1755, the Acadians on the Maritime islands remained untouched because they were living in territory controlled by France.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British swooped down on Île Royale and Île St.-Jean and deported most of the island Acadians to France.  A family of Babins crossed on the British transport Tamerlane, which left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in mid-January 1759.  Another island Babin ended up on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November 1758 and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  He settled at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo.  In 1761, he joined the crew of the corsair Le Tigre but was captured and held in England until 1763.  He returned to Pleudihen that year and then left for the Falkland Islands aboard L'Aigle in November 1765. 

Several Babin families from Minas who had endured seven long years of captivity in the fetid ports of England were repatriated to France in the spring of 1763.  They arrived at St.-Malo in late May aboard La Dorothée and settled in parishes around the city.  In the fall of 1765, most of them joined other flellow exiles from Minas and Virginia on Belle-Île-en-Mer, off the southwestern coast of Brittany.  Not all of them remained there. Later in the decade, a family of Babins, along with other Acadians in France, re-settled on the French-controlled islands of St.-Pierre and Miquelon, off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  At least one Babin followed other Acadian exiles to the Isle of Jersey in the England Channel before returning to North America.  At least two Babin families remained at St.-Servan near St.-Malo.  Another Babin reached St.-Malo "from other ports" in 1763.  He lived at neaby Pleudihen but moved on to Morlaix in 1764.  Another Babin ended up in France by a different route.  At age 12, he escaped the British roundup at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in 1755 but ended up a prisoner of war at Halifax in the early 1760s.  At age 23, he married a fellow exile at Notre-Dame-des-Ardiliers, Île Miquelon, in May 1766.  In 1778, during the American Revolution, the British, again at war with France, captured îles St.-Pierre and Miquelon and deported the Acadians there to France.  The Babin family left Miquelon aboard La Jeannette, reached St.-Malo that November, and settled at nearby St.-Servan among their Babin cousins.  Meanwhile, French authorities grew tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  In the early 1770s, a French nobleman offered to settle them on land he owned near the city of Châtellerault in the Poitou region.  A Babin family who had come from Virginia and settled at St.-Servan agreed to go.  When the Poitou venture failed after two years of effort, the family retreated to the port city of Nantes with hundreds of other Poitou Acadians and settled at nearby St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, where they endured as best they could.

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a better life in faraway Louisiana.  Four of the Babins still in the mother country agreed to take it.  At least one Babin, who had married a local French girl, remained on Belle-Île-en-Mer, where, in 1792, during the early stages of the French Revolution, his fellow citizens elected him a municipal officer at Le Palais.  He remarried at Le Palais, and two of his daughters married in France.

In North America, meanwhile, Acadians being held in the prison compounds of Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, two were very young Babin sisters who came with their widowed mother. 

The many Babins in Maryland endured life among English colonists who did not care much for the French "papists" who had been thrust upon them.  In July 1763, after the war with Britain had finally ended, colonial officials counted nearly a dozen Babin families at Georgetown, Fredericktown, Princess Anne, Port Tobacco, Upper Marlborough, and Oxford.  These were the Babins from the Minas settlements--Grand-Pré, Rivière-aux-Canards, and Pigiguit--whom the British had deported to the colony eight years earlier.  When word reached the Acadians in Maryland that they would be welcome in Louisiana, where many of their relatives had gone, they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them to New Orleans.  At least 61 of them were Babins.  They left for the Spanish colony in 1766, 1767, and 1768 and settled in a number of communities there.  Other Babins chose to remain in Maryland.  Surrounded by fellow exiles and French expatriates, some of these stay-behinds settled at Frenchtown in Baltimore, where their transition from Acadien to Americain went faster for them than for their cousins who had gone on to the Spanish colony. 

The last group of Babins to come to Louisiana did so in a unique way.  In 1788, five Babins--three brothers and two sisters, all unmarried, ages 25 to 15--were living with their widowed mother on Île St.-Pierre, off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Joseph Gravois of Chignecto, probably a kinsman, was captain of the schooner La Brigite.  The widow and her five children agreed to accompany Gravois and his family to Louisiana aboard La Brigite, which reached New Orleans in December 1788--the only group of Acadians to travel directly from greater Acadia to Louisiana and some of the last Acadians to reach the bayou country.  One of the daughters married at Cabahannocer on the Acadian Coast.  One wonders what became of her siblings. 

Another Acadian Babin came to Louisiana decades after the Babin siblings arrived from Île St.-Pierre.  Early in the antebellum period, in 1809, while Louisiana was still a territory of the United States, thousands of refugees from Haiti via Cuba and Jamaica arrived at New Orleans.  With them were Acadians who had left the British colonies in the 1760s and settled in the French colony of St.-Domingue, today's Haiti.  Among these refugees may have been a young Babin woman who married an Anglo American from Boston, Massachusetts in St. James Parish in September 1816.  The priest who recorded the marriage called the Babin bride a "nat. of St. Nicolas, Santo Domingo." 

Babins were among the early settlers of Acadia and some of the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  Nearly all of the Babins from Maryland settled in large numbers along the river above New Orleans from Cabahannocer on the Lower Acadian Coast all the way up to Natchez.  In the late 1760s or early 1770s, one family from the river moved to upper Bayou Teche and created a small western branch of the family.  The hand full of Acadian Babins who came to Louisiana from France in 1785 established vigorous lines among their cousins near Baton Rouge and a smaller line on upper Bayou Lafourche.  During the late colonial and early antebellum periods, Babins moved from the river to Bayou Lafourche and added substantially to that center of family settlement.  By the late antebellum period, some of them had settled as far down bayou as Lockport and Montegut in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  Soon after the war of 1861-65, a  few Babins from the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley moved to lower Bayou Teche and the St. Landry prairies.  Most Babins, however, remained on the river in West Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge, Iberville, Ascension, and St. James parishes.  They were especially plentiful around Gonzales, Ascension Parish, during and after the war. 

Some of the Babins who remained on their original river holdings created sugar plantations that rivaled in size those of their wealthier non-Acadian neighbors.  Paul P. Babin owned 800 acres in West Baton Rouge Parish in 1860; a hundred slaves worked his plantation and its steam-powered sugar mill.  The great majority of the Babins who owned slaves, however, held much fewer than their cousin Paul P.  Most members of the family held no slaves at all, at least none who appeared in the federal slaves schedules of 1850 and 1860, so they participated only peripherally in the antebellum South's plantation economy. ...

The family's name also is spelled Babain, Babein, Baden, Baven, Boben, Vaven.74

.

The first Acadian Babins in Louisiana were two sisters, ages 5 and 3, born at Halifax, Nova Scotia.  They followed their widowed mother to New Orleans in 1765, settled with her at Cabahannocer on the river above the city, followed her to Opelousas, returned to the river after they came of age, and married there.  The younger sister remained at Cabahannocer, while the older one followed her husband to Bayou Lafourche. 

Twenty-one more Babins came to the colony from Maryland in September 1766.  They included the first male Babins--three sets of brothers from the Pigiguit area.  Each of them settled at Cabahanncer and Ascension on the river, but some of their descendants moved down to Bayou Lafourche and even farther down into the Terrebonne country.  Most of the Babins of South Louisiana descend from these 1766 arrivals:

 Charles (c1742-?) à Jean à Antoine Babin

Charles, eldest son of Paul Babin and Marie Landry, born probably at l'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1742, followed his family to Maryland in 1755. Colonial officials counted him with his widowed mother and many of his siblings at Oxford on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  Still a bachelor in his mid 20s, he came to Louisiana with two of his younger unmarried siblings.  Charles married cousin Élisabeth, also called Madeleine, daughter of perhaps Germain Babin and Marguerite Landry, at Cabahannocer in March 1767 soon after reaching the colony.  In 1770, Charles and Madeleine were living on the left, or east, bank of the river at Ascension, just above Cabahannocer.  Their daughters married into the Braud and Landry families.  Charles died by November 1781, when Madeleine remarried to Joseph dit Dios, son of fellow Acadian René Landry and widower of Madeleine LeBlanc, at Ascension.  Charles's older son moved to Lafourche Interior Parish.  His younger son's line of the family seems to have died out early.  

Older son Joseph, born at either Cabahannocer or Ascension in c1769, married cousin Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Godin dit Lincour and Marie-Josèphe Babin, at Ascension in June 1801.  In the 1820s, they moved to Lafourche Interior Parish.  Joseph and Marguerite's daughters married into the Babin, Gaudin, Hébert, and LeBoeuf families.  Some of Joseph's children remained on Bayou Lafourche, while others settled in Terrebonne Parish.  

Oldest son Joseph Thomas, born at Ascension in December 1804, married Céleste Phelonise, called Phelonise, daughter of Jean Jacques LeBoeuf and Marie Jeanne Lirette of Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1830.  They settled at Bayou Cannes or Cane in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Joseph Blaise, called Blaise, was born in February 1836; Étienne Eusilien, called Eusilien, in December 1838; and Théodule Éloi in December 1841.  Joseph Thomas's daughters married into the Barrios, Bourgeois, Choistre or Choueste, Hébert, and Rhodes families.  Joseph T., as he was called, died in Terrebonne Parish in July 1863, age 58.  A petition for administration of his estate was filed at the Houma courthouse in January 1870. 

Oldest son Blaise married Milie Gurvillia, Sevelienne, Survilia, or Suvilia, daughter of Narcisse Marcel and Céleste Rhodes or Rose of Terrebonne Parish, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in December 1858, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1860.  Their son Joseph Narcisse, called Narcisse, was born in Terrebonne Parish in October 1859; and Cez Adorestille in August 1861 but died "at age 5 or 6 mths." the following January.  Blaise died in Terrebonne Parish in October 1866.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Blaise died "at age 40 yrs.," but he was only 30.  A petition for tutorship of his three children was filed at the Houma courthouse in January 1870. 

Joseph Thomas's second son Eusilien married Odille, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Broussard and his Creole wife Marie Louise Buquet of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in October 1859.  Their son Jean Celas Elphége was born in Terrebonne Parish in September 1863, and Michel Aristide in September 1866. 

Joseph's second son Jean Evariste, called Evariste, born at Ascension in October 1806, married Marie Rosalie or Rosalie Marie, also called Marguerite and Marie Josephine, another daughter of Jean Jacques LeBoeuf and Marie Jeanne Lirette, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1833.  They settled at Bayou Cannes or Cane in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Privat Trasimond was born on Bayou Black in August 1848, and Faustin or Fostin Marcellin in February 1857.  Evariste's daughters married into the Buquet, Hébert, and LeBoeuf families.  Evariste died in Terrebonne Parish in October 1857, age 51.  A petition for tutorship of his children was filed at the Houma courthouse in August 1860. 

Joseph's third son Marcellin, born in Ascension Parish in January 1817, married Théotiste, another daughter of Narcisse Marcel and Céleste Rhodes of Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Célestin Théophile was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1843; Marcellin, fils in June 1845; Eusilien in Terrebonne Parish in November 1854; and Narcisse in October 1858.  Marcellin's daughter married into the Darce family. 

During the War of 1861-65, Marcellin's second son Marcellin, fils served in Company D of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He married cousin Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Achille Babin and Angelina Pitre, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in July 1870.

Joseph fourth and youngest son Charles Dominique, called Charles D., Damis, Dom, Domi, Donis, Dumien, and Rami, born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in September 1820, married Marie Estelle, daughter of Antoine Domingue and Jeanne Sylvie, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in October 1842.  Their son Louis was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1843.  Charles Dominique remarried to Spanish Creole Marie Esteve at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in June 1849.  They settled at Petit Caillou and Montegut.  Their twin sons Charles Émile and Joseph Spoda had been born in October 1845, Antoine Florida was born in March 1850, Adam Ernest in November 1856, and Célestin Théophile in December 1866. 

Charles's younger son Alain, born probably at Ascension in c1772, married Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Anselme Landry and Osite Landry, at Ascension in May 1794.  Alain, père died at Ascension in October 1796, age 24.  His daughter Marie-Mathilde was born posthumously the following January.  His children may have died young. 

Alain-Séverin, perhaps Alain and Céleste's only son, was born at Ascension in February 1795 and seems to have died young.  If so, this branch of the family did not survive.   

Amand (c1743-1808) à Jean à Antoine Babin

Amand, second son of Paul Babin and Marie Landry and brother of Charles, was born probably at l'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1743.  Amand, still in his early teens, followed his familu to Maryland in 1755.  He came to Louisiana in September 1766 with his wife Marie-Anastasie, called Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Abraham dit Petit Abram Landry and his second wife Marguerite Flan, who Amand had married in Maryland earlier that year.  With Amand and Anastasie came two of his unmarried sisters.  He and Anastasie settled on the left, or east, bank of the river at Ascension just above Cabahannocer, where they had many children, especially sons.  Amand's daughters married into the Dugas and LeBlanc families.  Amand died in Ascension Parish in April 1808, a widower.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Amand was 76 years old when he died, but he was closer to 66.  Half of Amand's 10 sons died young, but the surviving sons created large families of their own.  Two of them settled on Bayou Lafourche.  The others remained in Ascension Parish.  Some of Amand's grandsons settled in nearby Iberville Parish.  Many of his descendants married cousins and helped create the largest Babin family line in South Louisiana. 

Oldest son Paul, born probably at Ascension in c1768, died at age 4 in August 1772.  

Amand's second son Grégoire, born probably at Ascension in c1769, died at age 3 in September 1772. 

Amand's third son Alexandre-Eusèbe or Eusèbe Alexandre, called Alex, born probably at Ascension in c1772, married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Duhon and Anne LeBlanc, at Cabahannocer in December 1793.  Their daughters married into the Landry and LeBlanc families.  Alex remarried to cousin Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Sylvain LeBlanc and Marie Josèphe Babin and widow of Pierre Landry, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in January 1809.  Their daughter married a Landry cousin.  Alex remarried again--his third marriage--to cousin Marie Madeleine Braud, widow of Raphael Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1825; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Alex, called Eusèbe by the Donaldsonville priest who recorded his burial, died in Ascension Parish in November 1831.  The priest said that Eusèbe was 65 years old when he died, but he was closer to 60.  

Oldest son Alexandre-Valéry, called Valéry, a twin, by first wife Anne Duhon, born at Ascension in October 1795, married double cousin Adélaïre, daughter of Joseph Babin and Osite LeBlanc, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in August 1816.  Their son Antoine Valéry was born in Ascension Parish in April 1817, Alexandre Maximilien or Maximilien Alexandre in August 1820, and Thomas or Damas Albert in March 1823 but died at age 5 months the following September.  Valéry died in Ascension Parish in February 1826, age 30.  Adélaïde remarried to fellow Acadian Olivier Landry, widower of Marie Culere, at the Donaldsonville church in July 1827.  

Oldest son Antoine Valéry married cousin Delphine Élisabeth or Élisabeth Delphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Éloi Joseph Landry and Madeleine Sidalise Babin, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1838.  They lived near the boundary between Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their son Alexandre Amédée, called Amédée, was born in March 1839; Caliste Valmond in October 1841; Albert or Antoine Hiriart in February 1844 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1845; and Louis Despalier was born in August 1847.  Antoine V., as the recording priest called him, died "at New River," Ascension Parish, in November 1849, age 32.  His daughter Delphine Sidalise was born the following February. 

Oldest son Amédée married double cousin Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Anselme Landry and Joséphine Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1862.

Antoine Valéry's third and youngest son Louis Despalier married fellow Acadian Marie Evelina Hébert.  Their son François Terence was born near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in October 1869. 

Alexandre Valéry's second son Alexandre Maximilien married Marie Clementine, called Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Dupuy and Marianne Blanchard, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in August 1842.  They, too, lived near the boundary between Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their son Eusèbe Alcée, called Alcée, was born in August 1843; Martin Alfred in November 1845; Michel Alcide, called Alcide, in September 1847 but died at age 1 in November 1848; and Louis Auguste Marchand was born in September 1853.  Alexandre Maximilien died near St. Gabriel in September 1853, age 33.  His youngest son had been born a week earlier. 

Oldest son Alcée married Adelina, daughter of fellow Acadians Arsène Hébert and Euphrosine Gaudin, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1870. 

Alexandre Eusèbe's second son Narcisse, by first wife Anne Duhon, born at Ascension in December 1797, died in Ascension Parish in February 1816, age 18.  He did not marry.  

Alexandre Eusèbe's third son Maximilien le jeune, called Émilien and Milien, by first wife Anne Duhon, born at Ascension in February 1802, married cousin Marie Victoire, called Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Braud and Victoire Babin, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in July 1825; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their infant son, name unrecorded, died in Ascension Parish several days after his birth in January 1833; Alexandre Germain, called Germain, was born in February 1834; and Étienne Adélard in December 1836.  Their daughters married into the Dugas and Lamarre families.  Milien died in Ascension Parish in September 1853, age 51. 

Second son Germain married cousin Aimée, daughter of fellow Acadians Siffrien Babin and Jeanette Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1855.  Their son Marc Ulysse was born in Ascension Parish in October 1860; and Simon Gilbert, called Gilbert, in February 1868 but died the following August.

Alexandre Eusèbe's fourth son Vital Trasimond, called Trasimond, by second son Madeleine LeBlanc, born in Ascension Parish in November 1809, married cousin Clarisse Zoe, daughter of fellow Acadians Jérôme Melançon and Madeleleine LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in August 1829; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Alexandre Sosthène, called Sosthène, was born in Ascension Parish in October 1830; Vincent Vital, called Vital, in April 1845; and Jules in May 1847.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Braud, Bullian, Lavergne, and LeBlanc families.  ...

Older son Alexandre Sosthène married Marie Euphémie, called Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry Braud and Marie Rose Hébert, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1851.  Their son Alexandre Sosthène, fils was born in Ascension Parish in December 1851; Auger Vileor in February 1855; and Jean Vintrex in October 1856. 

Younger son Vital may have been the V. Babin who served in the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry during the War of 1861-65.  Vital married cousin Emelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Hébert and Delite Babin, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in January 1868.  Their son Michel Just was born near Gonzales in September 1868, and Ursin Hippolyte in August 1870. 

Alexandre Eusèbe's fifth and youngest son Alexandre Homer or Homer Alexandre, by second son Madeleine LeBlanc, born in Ascension Parish in September 1811, died at age 1 in September 1812. 

Amand's fourth son Simon-Raphaël, called Simonet and Raphaël, born at Ascension in August 1773, married cousin Marguerite-Apolline, called Apolline, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Landry and Marguerite LeBlanc of San Gabriel, at Ascension in January 1796.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, Landry, LeBlanc, and Melançon families.  Simon Raphael died in Ascension Parish in July 1822, age 49. 

Oldest son Simon-Sifroi, called Sifroi, Siffren, Siffrin, Siffrien, and Siphrin, born at Ascension in November 1796, married cousin Madeleine Julienne, called Julienne and Sevastienne, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Bénoni Landry and his Creole wife Marie-Jeanne Chauvin, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in June 1818; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Raphaël Jacques or Raphaël Guy was baptized at the Donaldson church, age unrecorded, in June 1819.  Siffrien remarried to cousin Marie Loraide or Zorai, daughter of fellow Acadians Francois Landry and Constance Babin, at the Donaldsonville church in May 1823.  Siffrien remarried again--his third marriage--to another cousin, Léocade, daughter of fellow Acadians Nicolas Landry and Osite LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1826.  Siffrien remarried yet again--his fourth marriage--to cousin Marie Jeanette, called Jeanette, daughter of fellow Acadians Jérôme Melançon and Madeleine LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1829; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of affinity and fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Jérôme Émile, called Émile, was born in Ascension Parish in January 1830; an infant son, name unrecorded, died a week after his birth in April 1831; Édouard was born in April 1832 but died at age 1 1/2 in January 1834; Simon Siffrien, called Siffrien, fils, was born in July 1840; Félix in July 1842 but died in August; and Joseph Tailor was born posthumously in May 1847 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1848.  Their daughter married a Babin cousin.  Siffrien died in Ascension Parish in February 1847, age 50. 

Oldest son Raphaël, by first wife Julienne Landry, married cousin Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Landry and Judite Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church in May 1840.  Their son Paul Olime was born in November 1845, and Jacques Olivier in May 1847.  Their daughter married into the Bourgeois family. 

Siffrien's second son Émile, by fourth wife Jeanette Melançon, married Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Ulgère Dugas and Émelie Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1851.  Their son Albert was born in Ascension Parish in November 1852; Jérôme Alcée in September 1854; Ambroise Émile in April 1861; Joseph A. in October 1863 but died at age 3 in September 1866; Wilfrid Édouard was born in October 1867, and Pierre Victor in November 1869. 

Siffrien's fifth son Siffrien, fils, by fourth wife Jeanette Melançon, married Athanaise, daughter of fellow Acadian Derosier Braud and his Creole wife Madeleine Denoux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in January 1860.  Their son Siffrien Quentin was born in Ascension Parish in October 1860, Laurent Eugène in October 1861 but died at age 6 in December 1867, Louis Alexandre was born in March 1863 but died at age 3 in August 1866, Martin Ozémé was born in November 1864, and Simon Alcide in September 1866. 

Simonet's second son Alexandre-Eugène, born at Ascension in April 1799, evidently died young.

Simonet's third son Evariste, born at Ascension in October 1801, married cousin Marie Rose, called Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Melançon and Marguerite Élisabeth Orillion, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1828; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They settled near the boundary of Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their son Corentin Joseph was born in February 1837; Trasimond Aulime or Olivier in May 1839 but at age 2 1/2 in October 1841; and Vincent Adonis, called Adonis, was born in September 1845.  Their daughters married into the Braud and Denoux families. 

Oldest son Corentin married Élise, called Lise, daughter of Joseph Delmaire Lavergne and his Acadian wife Eléonore Braud, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1856.  They settled near boundary between Iberville and Ascension parishes before moving to the Gonzales area of Ascension Parish.

Evariste's third and youngest son Adonis married Juliette, daughter of Creoles Albert Poché and Malvine Lavergne, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in January 1866; Juliette's mother was the sister of Adonis's brother Corentin's father-in-law. Adonis and Juliette's son Albert Vincent was born near Gonzales in October 1868. 

Simonet's son Maxille married cousin Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Donat Landry and Angèle Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in August 1828; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Duval, called Duval, was born in Ascension Parish in March 1829; Simonet Osémé in November 1830; Maxille Comes in September 1833; Sabat or Sala Oscar, called S. Oscar and Oscar S., in December 1834; Homer in March 1838; and Raphaël Viléon in July 1839.  Their daughter married into the Marchand family. 

Oldest son Duval married Françoise Adams probably in Ascension Parish in the early 1850s.

Maxille's fourth son S. Oscar married cousin Elene, Elina, Elisca, or Elvina Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadians Trasimond Babin and Clarisse Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1858; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joachim Hercule was born in Ascension Parish in March 1862, and Joseph Homerum near Gonzales in March 1864. 

Simonet's son Louis Survandeau in April 1805, probably died young. 

Simonet's sixth son, name unrecorded, died in Ascension Parish in August 1808 while still an infant.

Simonet's seventh son Valentin Jean, born in Ascension Parish in March 1810, married cousin Clothilde Emeranthe, called Emeranthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Landry and Eliza Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1833; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Valentin Privat or Privat Valentin, was born in Ascension Parish in August 1837, and Félix Édouard in August 1842.  Their daughter married into the Braud family.  Valentin remarried to Marie Serasine, Sarrazine, or Séraphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry Braud and Marie Rose Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1846.  They lived near the boundary between Ascension and St. James parishes.  Their son Jean Albert was born in Ascension Parish in February 1847; Adam in November 1852; Colombe Dema near Gonzales, St. James Parish, in December 1863 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1865; Joseph Edgard was born in November 1865; and Louis Vincent in December 1867.  Their daughters married into the Braud and Hébert families. 

Oldest son Privat Valentin, by first wife Emeranthe Landry, married cousin Emelia or Ersilia, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Hébert and Alzina Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1858.  Their son Laurent Camille was born in Ascension Parish in May 1859, Jean Baptiste Sylvère in October 1860, and Odeam Hersila in September 1864. 

Valentin Jean's second son Félix, by wife Emeranthe Landry, married double cousin Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadians Norbert Landry and Elisa Landry, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in November 1866.

Simonet's eighth and youngest son Marcellin Michel, born in Ascension Parish in September 1811, died in Ascension Parish in February 1831, age 19.  He did not marry.  

Amand's fifth son Jean-Jacques, born probably at Ascension in c1774, died at age 19 months in July 1775.  

Amand's sixth son Jacques, born at Ascension in January 1775, also may have died young.  

Amand's seventh son Augustin, born at Ascension in April 1781, died at age 2 1/2 in July 1783.  

Amand's eighth son Landry, born at Ascension in November 1782, married Marie-Louise, called Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians François Landry and Rose Dugas, at Ascension in April 1802.  In the late 1810s or 1820s, Landry moved his family to Lafourche Interior Parish.  Their daughters married into the Denoux (also called Gaillard), LeBlanc, Melançon, and Robichaux families.  Landry died in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1827.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial called him Lanory and said he died "at age 47 yrs.," but he was 44.  Some of his children and grandchildren settled in Ascension Parish, perhaps on the upper bayou, while others remained farther down bayou in Lafourche Interior Parish. 

Oldest son Édouard Landry, born at Ascension in November 1805, married double cousin Clotilde Hortense, called Hortense, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Jacques Landry and Marie Louise Dugas, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1825.  Their son Édouard Landry, fils, called Landry le jeune, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1828; Nicolas Émile in March 1831 but died at age 1 1/2 in July 1832; Jean Baptiste died a few days after his birth in February 1833; and Joseph Casimir, called Casimir, was born in July 1835.  Their daughter married into the Bernier and Juneau families. 

Oldest son Landry le jeune married Adveline, daughter of Ambroise Grabert and Eléonore Hamiliton, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1851.  They settled in Ascension Parish, perhaps on the upper bayou. 

Édouard's fourth and youngest son Joseph Casimir died in Ascension Parish in June 1854.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Casimir was 20 years old when he died, but, like his namesake uncle, he was only 18.  He probably did not marry. 

Landry's second son Pierre Trasimond, born in Ascension Parish in May 1810, married Marie Estelle, called Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Ambroise Mathurin Hébert and Élisabeth Madeleine Guillot, at the Thibodauxville church in April 1834.  Their son Pierre, fils died in Lafourche Interior Parish at age 3 months in November 1850.  Their daughters married into the Breaux, Landry, Provost, and Simoneaux families, two of them on lower Bayou Teche.  Except for its blood, did this family line survive? 

Landry's third son Nicolas, Colas, or Colin, born in Ascension Parish in November 1814, married Gertrude, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Gaudin and Rosalie Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in September 1834.  They settled not on the upper bayou but along the river.  Their son Marius Nicolas was born in Ascension Parish in December 1838; Pierre Julien in August 1840 but died in September; Édouard Césaire was born in August 1841 but died at age 2 in October 1843; Théodore Jean Baptiste was born in the early 1840s; Cyrille Landry, called Landry le jeune, in August 1845; Césaire Trasimond, called Trasimond, in August 1847; and Sandon Joseph Félix, called Félix S., in October 1850.  Their daughters married Landry cousins.  Colin died in Ascension Parish in September 1853, age 38.  All of his surviving sons settled in Ascension Parish and, like their sisters, most of them married Landry cousins. 

Oldest son Marius Nicolas married Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul LeBlanc and Lodoisca Braud, at the Donaldsonville church in March 1859. 

Nicolas dit Colin's fourth son Théodore Jean Baptiste married cousin Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Landry and Mélanie Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1861; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Nicolas dit Colin's fifth son Landry le jeune married cousin Marie Cécile, called Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadians Norbert Landry and Élise Landry, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in March 1868; they had to secure a dispensation for third and fourth degrees of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Demas Colin was born near Gonzales in November 1868. 

Nicolas dit Colin's sixth son Trasimond married cousin Zelamie, daughter of fellow Acadians Apollinaire Landry and Élise Landry, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1868; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity. 

Nicolas dit Colin's seventh and youngest son Félix S. married first cousin Eugénie A., daughter of fellow Acadians Adélard Landry and Ursule Gaudin, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1869; Eugénie's mother was Félix's maternal aunt, so they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They settled near Gonzales. 

Landry's fourth and youngest son Casimir Sifrien, born in Ascension Parish in March 1817, died in Ascension Parish in November 1835, age 18.  He probably did not marry.  

Amand's ninth son Pierre-Maximilien, called Maximilien and Émilien, born at Ascension in November 1784, married cousin Julie Rosalie or Rose Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Athanase Dugas and Rose LeBlanc, at Ascension in May 1804; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Pierre Maximilien died in Ascension Parish in January 1837; the priest who recorded his burial said that Maximilien was 54 years old when he died, but he was 52.  His daughter married into the Braud family.  Six of his 11 sons created their own families on the river, but many of them died young, and only a few of their lines survived. 

Oldest son Onésime, born probably at Ascension in c1805, married Marie Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of fellows Acadian Raphaël Landry and Marie-Madeleine Braud, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1824.  Onésime died in Ascension Parish in July 1825, age 21.  His son Pierre Onésime, called Onésime, fils, born posthumously in Ascension Parish in February 1826, died at age 10 months the following December.  This line of the family died with him.  Arthémise also died in December 1826, age 22.  

Maximilien's second son Anauville or Merville Rosémond, born probably at Ascension in July 1806, died in Ascension Parish in September 1825, age 18.  He probably did not marry.  

Maximilien's third son Pierre Duval, born in Ascension Parish in May 1808, married cousin Rosalie Euphrosine, called Euphrosine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Gaudin and Rosalie Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1830; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Pierre died in Ascension Parish, age unrecorded, in April 1831; and Pierre Gustave was born in February 1835.  Their daughter married a Richard cousin.  Pierre Duval died in Ascension Parish in December 1836, age 28. 

Maximilien's fourth son Jérôme Léon, called Léon, born in Ascension Parish in January 1810, married Élise, daughter of fellow Acadians Victor Landry and Jeanette Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1835.  Léon died in Ascension Parish in February 1836, age 26.  He probably fathered no children.  If so, his line of the family died with him. 

Maximilien's fifth son, name unrecorded, died in Ascension Parish at age 1 month in September 1811.

Maximilien's sixth son Sifroi Henri, born in Ascension Parish in July 1812, probably died young. 

Maximilien's seventh son Amand Prudent, called Prudent born in Ascension Parish in October 1816, married Marguerite Celina, Selima, or Zeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Jérôme Rivet and Marie Élisabeth Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1839.  Their son Pierre was born in Ascension Parish in July 1840.  They also had a son named Turiaffe, unless he was Pierre.  Their daughter married into the Boudreaux family. 

During the War of 1861-65, Turiaffe served in the Donaldsonville Artillery, an old militia company from Ascension Parish mustered into Confederate service in August 1861.  He enlisted at Donaldsonville in September 1861 and followed his battery to Virginia, where it fought in what became General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia--so he was one of R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Turiaffe was still with the battery when it surrendered with the rest of Lee's army at Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia, in April 1865.  Back home, Turiaffe married cousin Louise Lodoiska, daughter of fellow Acadians Aulime LeBlanc and Ethelvina Babin, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in January 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Maximilien's eighth son Sifroi Victorin, called Victorin, born in Ascension Parish in September 1818, married cousin Marie Laurenza, daughter of Jean Denoux, also called Gaillard, and his Acadian wife Justine Babin, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1839.  Their son Jean Baptiste Théodule was born in Ascension Parish in October 1840.  Victorin died in Ascension Parish in April 1846, age 27. 

Maximilien's ninth son Gotraud Théodule, called Théodule, born in Ascension Parish in March 1821, married double cousin Aureline Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Babin and and his Creole wife Madeleine Denoux, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1843.  Their son Rémi Prudent was born in Ascension Parish in October 1845; and Maxille Amédée, called Amédée, in September 1848 but died at age 4 1/2 in July 1853.  Théodule died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in October 1859, age 38 

Maximilien's tenth son Rupert Detrean, Théodule's twin, died in Ascension Parish at age 5 months the following September.  

Maximilien's eleventh and youngest son Pierre Sylvanie, born in Ascension Parish in November 1827, also may have died young. 

Amand's tenth and youngest son Louis, born at Ascension in April 1786, married Anne Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Théodore Dugas and Marie Victoire Forest, at Ascension in May 1806.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche near the boundary between Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Their daughters married into the Dugas and Landry families.  Like his father, Louis had many sons, but nearly half of them died young.  Most of them remained on the upper bayou near the Ascension/Assumption line.  Louis died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in December 1862.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Louis died at "age 78 years," but he was 76. 

Oldest son Alexandre Louis, born in Ascension Parish in April 1807, married cousin Henriette Phelonise, called Phelonise or Felonise, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Babin and Marguerite Pélagie Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in August 1827; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They, too, lived near the boundary of Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Their son Joseph Vileor, called Vileor, was born in March 1833; Jean Osémé, called Osémé, in February 1835; Joseph Telesphore, called Telesphore, in June 1840; and Joseph Achille, called Achille, in January 1843.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc family.  Henriette Phelonise died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in September 1853; the priest who recorded her burial said that she died at "age 50 years."  At age 48, Alexandre remarried to Marie Pouponne, called Pouponne, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier LeBlanc and Madeleine Braud, at the Paincourtville church in January 1856.  Their son Louis Alexandre was born near Paincourtville in March 1859, and Paul Amard in January 1863. 

Oldest son Vileor, by first wife Phelonise Babin, died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in September 1855, age 22.  He did not marry. 

Alexandre Louis's second son Osémé, by first wife Phelonise Babin, married Oside or Ozite, daughter of fellow Acadians Hubert Landry and Victorine LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church in January 1861.  Their child, perhaps a son, name and gender unrecorded, died a newborn near Paincourtville in November 1861.  Osémé remarried to first cousin Laurenza, daughter of fellow Acadians Magloire Landry and Justine Babin and widow of Clovis Dugas, at the Paincourtville church in January 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Alexandre's third son Telesphore, by first wife Phelonise Babin, married Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadians Hermogène LeBlanc and Marie Melançon, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1867.  They lived at St. James Parish on the river before returning to upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Alexandre Louis's fourth son Achille, by first wife Phelonise Babin, married cousin Noemie, daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte Landry and Justine Guédry, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1867; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Félix was born near Paincourtville in September 1867, and Joseph Hippolyte in February 1870. 

Louis's second son Cyprien Sevin, a twin, born in Ascension Parish in September 1808, died at age 11 in January 1820.

Louis's third son Rosémond Ambroise, born in Ascension Parish in May 1812, probably died young. 

Louis's fourth son Eugène Hubert, Hubert Ulgère, or Ulgère Hubert, called Hubert, born in Ascension Parish in March 1814, married cousin Marie Eugènie, called Eugènie, another daughter of Paul Babin and Marguerite Pélagie Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1831.  Their son Joseph François Xavier was born in Ascension Parish in December 1831; Joseph Numa, called Numa, in February 1838; Joseph Aristide, called Aristide, in March 1840; Joseph Félix in March 1842; Édouard Joseph died 8 days after his birth in February 1844; and Joseph Artur was born in November 1845.  Hubert died in Ascension Parish in December 1847, age 33. 

Second son Joseph Numa married cousin Elmire Zoe, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Bujole and Lisa Elmire Gaudin, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1859; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Hubert's third son Aristide married Hortence, daughter of Prussian Immigrant Jean Paulin Schomer and his Acadian wife Élisabeth LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1865.  Their son Aristide Bruno was born in Ascension Parish in June 1866. 

Louis's fifth son Pierre Casimir, called Casimir, born in Ascension Parish in February 1818, married Anne dite Nanette, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Marie Boudreaux and Anne dite Nanette Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1842.  Their son Édouard Joseph Casimir was born in Ascension Parish in March 1843, Joseph Théodule in June 1844 but died a few weeks later, and Louis Léonce was born in April 1852.  Their daughters married into the Babin and Rougeau families.  Casimir died in Ascension Parish in April 1853.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial said that Casimire died at "age 30 years," but Pierre Casimir would have been 35. 

Louis's sixth son Léon Laurent, born in Assumption Parish in August 1823, married cousin Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry LeBlanc and Hortense Landry and widow of Jean Paulin Schomer, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1850; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They lived on the upper Lafourche near the boundary of Assumption and Ascension parishes before settling on the river.  Their son Léon Boniface was born near Paincourtville in June 1853, Louis Jean Baptiste in Ascension Parish in December 1854, and Joseph Hector near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in August 1861. 

Louis's seventh son Joseph Magloire, born in Assumption Parish in February 1826, married cousin Apolline, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Gautreaux and Henrietta Landry and widow of Joseph LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1854; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Louis's eighth son Joseph Faustin, born in Ascension Parish in February 1830, died at age 2 months the following April. 

Louis's ninth and youngest son François Xavier died in Ascension Parish at age 18 months in June 1833.

Vincent-Ephrèm (c1745-1810) à Jean à Antoine Babin

Vincent-Ephrèm, called Ephrèm, third and youngest son of Paul Babin and Marie Landry, born probably at l'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1745, came to Louisiana from Maryland with two siblings in September 1766.  They settled at Cabahannocer, where Ephrèm married fellow Acadian Marguerite LeBlanc in c1767.  A decade later, Ephrèm and Marguerite were living on the left, or east, bank of the river at Ascension, just above Cabahannocer.  Ephrèm contracted smallpox at Ascension in October 1787 but survived.  He died in Ascension Parish in September 1810, age 67.  His daughter married into the Landry family.  Only one of his four sons seems to have married, but, other than its blood, even that line may not have endured. 

Oldest son Paul-Dominique, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in June 1770, may have been the Paul Babin who died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, at age 45 in April 1815.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  

Ephrèm's second son Jean-Jacques, called Jacques, baptized at the Ascension church, age unrecorded, in April 1777, married Marie Françoise, called Françoise and also Jeanne, daughter of fellow Acadians Hyacinthe Landry and Marguerite LeBlanc, at Ascension in November 1796.  Jacques died in Ascension Parish in March 1816, age 38, a widower, so his wife may have died from complications of childbirth a few weeks earlier.  Their daughter married into the Bujole and LeBlanc families.  One wonders if any of their sons survived childhood and married. 

Oldest son Joseph-Ephrem was born at Ascension in July 1799 but died at age 2 in December 1801.

Jacques's second Leufroi Ephrem, born in Ascension Parish August 1811, also may have died young. 

Jacques's third son Honoré, born in Ascension Parish in August 1813, may have died young. 

Jacques's fourth and youngest son Sylvestre, born in Ascension Parish in January 1816, died at age 7 in February 1823. 

Ephrèm's third son Joseph-Alexandre, born at Ascension in March 1779, may have died young.  

Ephrèm's fourth and youngest son Simon, born at Ascension in December 1781, may have died in Ascension Parish at age 22 in March 1804.  He did not marry.  

Joseph, fils (c1745-?) à Jean à Antoine Babin

Joseph, fils, elder son of Joseph Babin and Anne Thériot, born probably at Pigiguit in c1745, came to Louisiana from Maryland in September 1766 with his widowed mother and two siblings.  They settled at Cabahannocer on the river, where Joseph, fils married fellow Acadian Marie Landry in February 1768.  In 1770, they were living on the left, or east, bank of the river at Ascension, just upriver from Cabahannocer.  By 1777, they had crossed the river to the right, or west, bank at Cabahannocer; they probably lived near the boundary with Ascension.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois, Gautreaux, Robichaux, and Roger families.  At age 52, Joseph, fils remarried to Anne-Appoline, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Doiron and Marguerite Michel and widow of Jean-Baptiste Chênet dit La Garenne, at St.-Jacques in February 1797.  Anne, also a native of Pigiguit, had come to Louisiana from France in 1785.  She was age 59 when she married Joseph, fils, so she gave him no more children.  The only one of his three sons who married settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  

Oldest son Jean-Louis, called Louis, from first wife Marie Landry, born at Ascension in November 1775, died at age 21 in July 1796.  He did not marry.  

Joseph's second son Joseph, fils, by first wife Marie Landry, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in March 1777, also may have died young.  

Joseph's third and youngest son Auguste, by first wife Marie Landry, born at Ascension in November 1778, married Marianne or Anne Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Bergeron and Marie Foret of Ascension, at Assumption on the upper Bayou Lafourche in May 1800.  They settled in what became Lafourche Interior Parish, although they may have lived for a time at New Orleans.  Their daughters married into the Hébert and Picou families.  Some of Auguste's grandsons settled in Terrebonne Parish. 

Oldest son Alexis-Charles, born at Assumption in July 1802, probably died young.   

Auguste's second son Jean Auguste, called Justin and Augustin, born in Assumption Parish in December 1809, married Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Honoré Breaux, fils and Marie Félicité Richard, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1827.  Their son Eugène Marcellin was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1831; Joseph Hermogène, called Hermogène, in November 1839; and Ozémé Florantin in August 1843.  Their daughters married into the Daigle and Robson families.  In March 1870, Augustin, as the parish clerk called him, donated land to three of his married children. 

Oldest son Eugène married fellow Acadian Adèle Hébert in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in January 1854.  Their son Joseph Augustin was born near Montegut in August 1867.

Jean Auguste's second son Hermogène married Marie, daughter of Isidore Dupré and his Acadian wife Théotiste LeBlanc of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in April 1860.  They settled near Montegut.  Their son Paulin Ozémé was born in July 1865, François Valéry Élie in April 1868, and Joseph Arthur in November 1870.

Auguste's third son Onésime, called Olésime, Lésime, and Clézime, born in Assumption Parish in May 1816, was living in Terrebonne Parish when he married Pauline, daughter of German Creole François Malbrough and his Acadian wife Madeleine Duhon, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in January 1842.  Their son Émile Omer was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1845, Frank Henry in March 1847, Clinton Vega in June 1849, Joseph Ignace in August 1854, and Auguste Washington in September 1855.  Their daughters married into the Lirette and Robichaux families. 

Second son Frank Henry married Théolene, daughter of Émile Fangui or Fanguy and Uranie Chauvin, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in September 1870.

Auguste's fourth and youngest son François Omer or Homer, also called François Bernard, born in Orleans Parish in c1820, married Estelle Anne or Anne Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Florentin Boudreaux and his Creole wife Marianne Durocher, at the Thibodaux church in June 1839.  Their son Joseph Numa was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1843.  Their daughters married into the Chauvin and Duplantis families.  François Homer remarried to Eve, 17-year-old daughter of Pierre Bertin Roussel and Marie Madeleine Alexandre, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in June 1848.  Their son Félicien Léon was born at Bayou Black in June 1849.  François Homer remarried again--his third marriage--to German Creole Ursule Malbrough, widow of Francis Darce, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in January 1856, and remarried yet again--his fourth marriage--to Victorine, daughter of Jean Baptiste Navarre and his Acadian wife Melicere Guillot and widow of Ulysses Toups, at the Montegut church, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1867.  Their son Augustin was born near Montegut in December 1867, and Joseph in December 1869. 

Jean-Jacques (c1748-1780s?) à Jean à Antoine Babin

Jean-Jacques, called Jacques, younger son of Joseph Babin and Anne Thériot, born probably at Pigiguit in c1748, came to Louisiana from Maryland in September 1766 with his widowed mother and two siblings.  They settled at Cabahannocer on the river, where Jacques married Marguerite, daughter of perhaps fellow Acadians Abraham dit Petit Abrahm Landry and his second wife Marguerite Flan of Pigiguit, in c1771.  (If his wife was that Marguerite Landry, she also had come to Louisiana from Maryland in 1766.)  Later in the decade, Jacques and Marguerite were living on the right, or west, bank of the river at Cabahannocer near the boundary with Ascension farther up.  Jacques may have died by May 1787, when his wife may have remarried at Cabahannocer.  His daughters married into the Boudreaux and Richard families; one of them lived in St. Martin Parish, west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  Most of Jacques and Marguerite's five sons died young or did not marry.  The older married son remained in Ascension Parish, where his line of the family, except for its blood, died out early.  The younger married son settled on Bayou Lafourche, where his line thrived. 

Oldest son Donat, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in September 1773, was counted with his family at Cabahannocer in January 1777 but probably died young.  

Jacques's second son Paul, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in September 1776, may have been the Paul Babin who died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in April 1816.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Paul was 38 years old when he died but did not give his parents' names or mention a wife. 

Jacques's third son Éloi or D'Artoise, also called Eusèbe, born at Ascension in December 1778, married cousin Anne Francoise, called Francoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Anselme Landry and Françoise Blanchard, at Ascension in June 1805; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard, Braud, and Lambert families. 

Eusèbe Rosémond, perhaps Éloi's only son, was born in Ascension Parish in December 1809 but died at age 11 months in October 1810.  Except for its blood, then, this line of the family did not endure.  

Jacques's fourth son Jacques-Alexandre, born at Ascension in December 1783, married Julienne, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Melançon and Osite LeBlanc, at St. Jacques in November 1804.  They had many children, especially sons, at St. Jacques and Ascension.  By the early 1820s, they had moved to lower Bayou Lafourche.  Jacques died in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1849, age 65.  A petition for his succession inventory was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse in July.  His daughters married into the Bourgeois and Part families.  Five of his seven sons created families of their own and settled in Lafourche Interior Parish. 

Oldest son Ursin, also called Justin, born at St.-Jacques in September 1805, married cousin Marcelline, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Bourgeois and Marguerite Babin, at the Thibodauxville church in April 1826.  Their son Ursin Aurelien, called Aurelien, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1826; Joseph Rémi, called Rémi, in August 1828; Jean Onésime, called Onésime, in August 1830; Jacques Justin in August 1833 but died at age 3 1/2 in January 1837; Crescence died at age 2 1/2 in February 1847; Omer Magloire was born in January 1847; Eugène le jeune died 6 days after his birth in November 1849; Trasimond Adam was born in December 1850; and Louis Ernest in August 1852.  They also had a son named Marcellin Maximin.  Their daughters married into the Breaux and Guillot families.  Four of Ursin's sons married, three of them to sisters. 

Oldest son Aurelien married Marie Anaïs, called Anaïs, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Breaux and Clementine Robichaux, at the Thibodaux church in February 1848.  Their son Ursin Léo was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1850.  Their daughter married a Breaux cousin. 

Ursin's second son Rémi died in Lafourche Parish in July 1855, age 26.   He may not have married. 

Ursin's third son Jean Onésime married Marie Estelle, called Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Guillot and Hortense Pélagie Richard, at the Thibodaux church in January 1852.  Their son Joseph Onésime, fils was born in Lafourche Parish in September 1865.

Ursin's son Marcellin Maximin married Angeline or Engeline, another daughter of Paul Breaux and Clementine Robichaux, at the Thibodaux church in January 1866.  Their son Joseph Philippe was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1868.

Ursin's son Omer married Odilia, yet another daughter of Paul Breaux and Clementine Robichaux, at the Thibodaux church in April 1869. 

Jacques Alexandre's second son Jean Jacques le jeune, called Jacques or Jacquin, born at Ascension in November 1806, married Anne Séraphine, called Séraphine, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Marie Boudreaux and Anne Dugas, at the Thibodauxville church in September 1827.  Their son Jérôme Adam, called Adam, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1834; Joseph Augustave in May 1836; Jean Baptiste Laurence, called Laurence, in September 1838; Eugène Delphin, called Delphin, in November 1845; and Jean Jacques, fils near Lockport in October 1853.  Their daughters married into the Badeaux and Gautreaux families. 

Oldest son Adam married Lise, daughter of fellow Acadian Ursin Savoie, fils and his German Creole wife Azélie Matherne, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in November 1860.

Jacquin's second son Joseph Augustave married Rosema, daughter of fellow Acadians Trasimond Trahan and his Creole wife Virginie Carmouche, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in February 1860.

Jacquin's third son Laurence married Mathilde, daughter of William Wilton and his Creole wife Marcelline Guitreau, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in September 1860, and sanctified the marriage at the Thibodaux church in June 1863.  Their son Louis Lawrence was born near Lockport in August 1870.  During the War of 1861-65, Laurence served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment Militia and, along with most of his unit, was captured at Labadieville in nearby Assumption Parish in late October 1862; the Federals released him in early November. 

Jacquin's fourth son Delphin married cousin Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadians Adélard Boudreaux and Joséphine LeBlanc, at the Lockport church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1867. 

Jacques Alexandre's third son Joseph Oleus, born in Ascension Parish in May 1808, probably died young. 

Jacques Alexandre's fourth son Paul Onésime, called Onésime and Lésime, born in Ascension Parish in January 1810, married Mélasie, 19-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Donat Landry and his Creole wife Geneviève Stieven, at the Thibodauxville church in July 1829.  Their son Paul Onésime, fils was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1830; Jacques Donat, called Donat, in January 1836; Félix Julien in January 1839; and Pierre Euphrosin, called Froisin, in June 1844.  Their daughters married into the Bourgeois and Robichaux families.  All four of Onésime's sons created their own families on the lower Lafourche. 

Oldest son Paul Onésime, fils married Eugènie, daughter of French Creoles Edmond Bourgeois and Adèle Baudoin, at the Raceland church, Lafourche Parish, in May 1856; one of Paul Onésime's sisters married Eugènie's brother.  Their son Paul III was born near Raceland in February 1857, Félix le jeune in January 1861, Joseph Apollinaire in April 1863, and Pierre Alix in February 1870. 

Onésime's second son Donat married Séraphine, daughter of fellow Acadian Furcy Theriot and his Creole wife Marie Autin, at the Raceland church in May 1857.  Their son Justinien was born near Raceland in November 1865. 

Onésime's third son Félix married Céleste, another daughter of Furcy Theriot and Marie Autin, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in April 1869.  Their son Louis Félix was born near Raceland in March 1870. 

Onésime's fourth and youngest son Froisin married Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadian Rosémond Usé and his Creole wife Geneviève Maigret, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in May 1867.

Jacques Alexandre's fifth son Jacques Eugène, called Eugène, born in Ascension Parish in November 1811, married Adèle, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Charles Broussard and his Creole wife Anne Stieven, at the Thibodauxville church in July 1832.  Their son Eugène Charles was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1836; Joseph Adélard, called Adélard, in April 1841 but died at age 8 in June 1849; and Pierre Octave, called Octave, was born in January 1844.  Their daughters married into the James and Legendre families.  Eugène, père died in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1849, age 38, a widower. "Letters of tutorship" for his children were filed at the Thibodaux courthouse three weeks after his death. 

Jacques Alexandre's sixth son Jacques Alexandre, fils, born near Convent, St. James Parish, in March 1816, probably died young. 

Jacques Alexandre's seventh and youngest son Louis David, called David, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1821, married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry Breaux and Marguerite Roger, at the Thibodaux church in April 1847.  Their son Louis was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1848, David Cleopha died at age 2 months in March 1850, and Joseph David was born posthumously near Lockport in November 1854.  David, père died in Lafourche Parish in October 1854, age 33.  A petition for tutorship of his children was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse the following February. 

Oldest son Louis married Agnès, also called Eme, daughter of fellow Acadians Adélard Boudreaux and Joséphine LeBlanc, at the Lockport church, Lafourche Parish, in December 1869.

Jacques's fifth and youngest son Pligio, born probably at Ascension, perhaps posthumously, in the late 1780s, died at Cabahannocer in November 1797.  The St.-Jacques priest who recorded his burial said Pligio died at age 9, hence the likelihood that he had been born posthumously.  

Joseph (c1748-1809) à Jean à Antoine Babin

Joseph, son of Jean-Baptiste Babin and Ursule Landry, born at Minas in c1748, came to Louisiana from Maryland in September 1766 with his widowed mother and three sisters.  They settled at Cabahannocer on the river, where Joseph married Osite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques LeBlanc and Catherine-Marie-Josèphe Forest, in January 1771.  Osite also had come to Louisiana from Maryland in 1766.  By 1777, she and Joseph were living on the right, or west, bank of the river at Ascension, just above Cabahannocer.  Joseph died in Ascension Parish in March 1809.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 66 years old when he died, but he was closer to 61.  His daughters married into the Babin, Boudreaux, Landry, and LeBlanc families.  Five of his seven sons married and settled in Ascension Parish, but some of his grandsons moved upriver into the Iberville and West Baton Rouge parishes.  

Oldest son Joseph-Ephrèm, born at Ascension in November 1774, married Anne Marie or Marine, called Marie or Marine, daughter of fellow Acadians François Hébert and Marie LeBlanc, at San Gabriel, just upriver from Ascension, in April 1797.  Joseph Ephrèm died in Ascension Parish in March 1838.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 61 years old when he died, but he was 63.  His daughters married into the Doiron, Dupuy, Hébert, and Lopez families.  Two of his four sons married, and both of them settled farther upriver in West Baton Rouge Parish. 

Their oldest son, name unrecorded, died probably at St.-Gabriel 8 days after his birth in February 1799. 

Joseph Ephrèm's second son Alain-Joseph or Joseph-Alain, also called Joseph Élien and Élien, born at Ascension in August 1802, married Rosalie Amelie or Amelie Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Daigre and Marie Josèphe Henry, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1824.  They settled near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Joseph Arsène, also called Philogène and Philosine, was born in July 1827; and Ernest Daigre in April 1828.  They also had a younger son named Adélard.  Their daughters married into the Allen and Hébert families.  Élien died near Brusly in June 1855, age 52. 

Oldest son Philogène married Arthémise Élodie, called Élodie, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Longuépée and Constance Comeaux, at the Brusly church in April 1852.  Their son Jean died near Brusly 2 days after his birth in June 1854, and Joseph Adonis was born in June 1860. 

Élien's second son Ernest Daigre died near Brusly in April 1851, age 23.  He did not marry.   

Élien's third and youngest son Adélard married first cousin Antoinette, daughter of fellow Acadians Célestin Templet and Hortense Babin, at the Brusly church in September 1864; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Joseph Ephrèm's third son Trasimond Ephrèm, born at Ascension in December 1813, while living in West Baton Rouge Parish married Julienne, daughter of French Creole Pierre Clément and his Acadian wife Marie-Madeleine Legendre of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in August 1845.  They settled across the river near Brusly.  Their son Trasimond Arthur or Arthur Trasimond was born in May 1846; Joseph Arnileas in December 1847; Jean Ephrem in November 1849; Pierre Magloire in October 1851; Étienne David in December 1853; and Arcade Telesphore in January 1856 but died the following August. 

Oldest son Arthur Trasimond married Augustine or Anne Anastasie, called Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Élie Hyacinthe Lejeune and his Creole wife Eléonore Aillet, at the Brusly church in January 1867.  

Joseph Ephrèm's fourth and youngest son Liboise Apollinaire, called Apollinaire, born at Ascension in June in 1816, died at age 2 in June 1818. 

Joseph's second son Paul, born at Ascension in March 1776, married cousin Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Landry and Marie Babin, at Ascension in September 1797.  Paul died in Ascension Parish in July 1835, age 59.  His daughters married into the Denoux, also called Gaillard, Dupuis, and Landry families.  All three of his sons married, but only one of their lines seems to have endured. 

Oldest son Simon Leufroi, called Leufroi, born in Ascension Parish in 1818, married cousin Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bénoni Babin and Marguerite Gaudin, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in April 1834.  A "procuration" filed for Rosalie at the Houma courthouse, Terrebonne Parish, in April 1843, says that "Leufroy died in Ascension Parish" but gives no date of his death, and lists her heirs as her siblings, so she and Leufroi may have had no children, or at least none who survived childhood.  Evidently she joined her siblings in Terrebonne Parish after Leufroi died. 

Paul's second son Hippolyte Adolphe, called Adolphe, born in Ascension Parish in December 1813, married Marie Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jérôme Rivet and Élisabeth Melançon and stepdaughter of Nicolas Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1836.  They settled near the boundary of Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their son Hippolyte Germain was born in July 1839, Sandon in October 1842, and Lucian Gerent in October 1844.  Their daughter married into the Favre family. 

Paul's third and youngest son Raphaël Valéry, called Valéry, born in Ascension Parish in 1816, married Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Poirier and Caroline Mire, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1844.  Valéry may have died in Ascension Parish in August 1858.  If so, he would have been age 41.  His daughter married into the Dugas family.  His line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him. 

Joseph's third son Jean-Charles, called Charles, born probably at Ascension in the late 1770s, married cousin Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac LeBlanc and probably his first wife Marie-Rose Melançon, probably at Ascension in the late 1790s.  Charles remarried to Madeleine, daughter of Frenchman Pierre Denoux, also called Gaillard, and his Creole wife Marie Lagrange of Ascension, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in December 1822.  Their daughter, born posthumously, married a Babin cousin.  Charles died probably in Assumption Parish by February 1827, when his wife remarried there.  Of his four sons, all from his first wife, only one of them created a family of his own.  

Oldest Joseph Valéry, called Valéry, by first wife Françoise LeBlanc, born at Ascension in March 1799, married Marie Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Orillion and Marie Rose Breaux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in November 1819.  They settled near the boundary of Iberville and Ascension parishes. Their son, name unrecorded, died a day after his birth in October 1820; and Valéry, fils died a month after his birth in January 1828.  Their daughter married into the Leroy family.  Joseph Valéry remarried to Andrea, daughter of Joseph Corbo and Marie Barrienta, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in June 1829.  They settled near the boundary of Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Their son Joseph Ovid, called Ovid, was born in Ascension Parish in September 1830 but died at age 14 1/2 in February 1845; Charles Antoine or Antoine Charles was born in July 1832; and Terence in September 1837.  Their daughter married into the Gomez family.  Joseph Valéry died in Ascension Parish in October 1847, age 48. 

Fourth son Antoine Charles, by second wife Andrea Corbo, married Spanish Creole Carmelite Diez probably in Ascension Parish in the late 1850s.  Their son Joseph Antoine was born in Ascension Parish in January 1861.

Charles's second son Joseph-Hubert, by first wife Françoise LeBlanc, born at Ascension in November 1800, may have died young. 

Charles's third son Charles, fils, by first wife Françoise LeBlanc, born in Ascension Parish in February 1809, died at age 20 months in October 1810; and

Charles, père's fourth and youngest son Isaac Colin, by first wife Françoise LeBlanc, born in Ascension Parish in June 1811, died at age 1 in December 1812. 

Joseph's fourth son Pierre-Delage, called Delage, born at Ascension in April 1779, died at age 6 in August 1785.

Joseph's fifth son Simon-Joseph, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in May 1787, married Sidalise Marguerite or Marguerite Sidalise, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Landry and Angèle LeBlanc of Ascension, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in April 1814. 

Oldest son Honoré, born in Ascension Parish in March 1815, married cousin Marie Mathilde, called Mathilde, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Landry and Marine Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in April 1838.  Honoré died in Ascension Parish in March 1840.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Honoré was 26 years old when he died, but he was 25.  His line of the family probably died with him. 

Simon Joseph's second son Anselme, born in Ascension Parish in April 1817, may have died young. 

Simon Joseph's third son Désiré, born in Ascension Parish in May 1819, also may have died young. 

Simon Joseph's fourth son Joseph Leufroi, born in Ascension Parish, in July 1830, may not have married. 

Simon Joseph's fifth and youngest son Simon Valsin, born in Ascension Parish in May 1832, married Martha Laurenda Wallis.  Their son William Honoré was born near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in January 1866. 

Joseph's sixth son Claude-Raphaël, born at Ascension in September 1793, married Marie Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Donat Landry and Angèle Landry, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in August 1819.  Claude Raphaël died in Ascension Parish in July 1828, age 34. 

Oldest son Michel Raphaël or Raphaël Michel, born in Ascension Parish in September 1821, married cousin Alzire Apolline, called Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadians Corentin LeBlanc and Phelonise Babin, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1844.  Their son Michel Dosilia or Damas was born in Ascension Parish in December 1847 but died the following April.  Their daughter married into the Braud family.  Raphaël remarried to Marie Tarsile, called Tarsile, daughter of Antoine Léon Duplessis and his Acadian wife Céleste Dupuis, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in June 1853.  Their son Marcellus Malcour was born in Ascension Parish in December 1855, Rigobert Nelville in January 1861, Bertin Raphaël in September 1862, and Relique Sylvère near Gonzales in June 1866. 

Claude Raphaël's second son Denis Dosile, called Dosile or Dozilia, born in Ascension Parish, in October 1823, in his early 40s married Malvina, daughter of French Creole Joseph Delmaire Lavergne and his Acadian wife Eléonore Braud, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in December 1865.  Their son Joseph Denys was born near Gonzales in September 1866, and Paul Johnny in January 1870. 

Claude Raphaël's third and youngest son Varis Théodule, born in Ascension Parish in February 1826, may have died young.

Joseph's seventh and youngest son Valéry Damase, born at Ascension in December 1796, died at his brother Paul's home in Ascension Parish in March 1824, age 28.  He probably did not marry.  

Joseph dit Dios (c1754-1782) à Joseph à Vincent à Antoine Babin

Joseph dit Dios, elder son of Pierre Babin and Anne Forest, born probably at Pigiguit in c1754, came to Louisiana from Maryland in September 1766 with his widowed mother and younger brother Charles.  Their mother remarried at New Orleans soon after they reached the colony but returned to Cabahannocer.  Joseph dit Dios married Marine, daughter of fellow Acadians Désiré LeBlanc and Marie-Madeleine Landry, at Ascension, above Cabahannocer, in February 1775.  A few years later, they were living on the right, or west, bank of the river at Ascension.  Joseph dit Dios died at Ascension in February 1782, age 28.  Only one of his four sons produced a line of the family that survived, but, in spite of the son's early death, it became a substantial one in what became St. James and Ascension parishes.  

Oldest son Paul-Hippolyte, called Hippolyte, born at Ascension in November 1775, married first cousin Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon LeBlanc and Marie-Anne Arceneaux, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in June 1796; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Hippolyte died in St. James Parish in August 1811; the priest who recorded his burial said that Hippolyte was 27 years old when he died, but he was 35.  Two of his three sons survived childhood and moved to the upper Bayou Teche valley, where they died in their mid-20s, unmarried.  As a result, this line of the family did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Oldest son Eugène, born at Cabahannocer in March 1797, died at the home of Rosémond LeBlanc at Fausse Pointe, St. Martin Parish, in June 1822, age 25.  He probably did not marry.  

Hippolyte's second son Antoine, born near Assumption, on upper Bayou Lafourche, in November 1800, died at the home of Widow Rosémond LeBlanc at Fausse Pointe in September 1826, age 26.  He also did not marry.  His father's line of the family probably died with him.

Hippolyte's third and youngest son Désiré was born at St. James in June 1805 but died at age 6 in September 1811. 

Joseph dit Dios's second son Charles, born at Ascension in May 1777, died at age 2 in December 1779.  

Joseph dit Dios's third son Benjamin, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age not recorded, in July 1778, married Félicité, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Marie Richard and Rose Bourgeois, at St.-Jacques de Cabahanncoer in May 1797.  Benjamin, père died in St. James Parish in September 1811, age 33.  His daughters married into the LeBoeuf and Richard families.    

Oldest son Joseph, born at Cabahannocer in March 1799, married Théotiste Basilise or Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Éloi Landry and Marie Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1827.  They settled near Convent, St. James Parish.  Their son Benjamin Rigobert was born in January 1828; Philias Constant, called Constant, in February 1829; Joseph Landry, called Landry, was baptized at the Convent church, age 1 year, 26 days, in October 1835; and Nicolas le jeune was born in May 1837.  Their daughters married into the Falgout and Theriot families. 

Second son Constant married Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadiand Michel Gaudin and Scholastique Hébert, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1851.

Joseph's third son Joseph Landry married Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadian Félix Arceneaux and his Creole wife Virginie Minvielle, at the Convent church in June 1859.  They lived in St. James Parish before and during the War of 1861-65 and moved upland into the area around Gonzales, Ascension Parish, after the war.  Their son Louis Joseph Landry was born near Convent in June 1865. 

Benjamin's second son Adélard, born at Cabahannocer in January 1801, married Henriette Elise or Lise, 21-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Melançon and Apollonie LeBlanc, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in June 1820.  Their son Simon Oscar, called Oscar, was born in Ascension Parish in February 1828; and Adélard, fils died several days after his birth in August 1831.  Their daughter married into the Braud family.  Adélard remarried to Célanie, Céline, or Cléonise, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Braud and Élise Braud, at the Donaldsonville church in December 1835.  Their son Pierre Adélard was born in March 1838.  Their daughter married into the Poché family.  Adélard, père died in Ascension Parish in November 1839, age 39.

Oldest son Oscar, by first wife Henriette Melançon, died in Ascension Parish in January 1853, age 24.  He probably did not marry. 

Benjamin's third son Benjamin Ursin, called Ursin, born in St. James Parish in August 1808, married fellow Acadian Marie Adèle or Odile, called Odile, Berteau probably in Ascension Parish in the early 1830s.  Their son Joseph Ursin or Ursin Joseph was born in Ascension Parish in October 1836; Fortunat, despite his name, died hours after his birth in July 1840; and Joseph died at age 9 days in June 1845.  Their daughter married into the Gautreaux and Landry families.

During the War of 1861-65, oldest son Ursin served in Company A of the 3rd Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Iberville Parish, which fought in Arkansas, Missouri, and Mississippi.  Ursin was a plasterer, with a dark complexion, light-colored hair, and gray eyes, standing 5 feet 11 inches tall, when he enlisted as a sergeant at New Orleans in May 1861, age 24.  He was his company's first lieutenant when he was captured at Iuka, Mississippi, in September 1862.  Later that month, the Federals sent him to Corinth, Mississippi; Camp Douglas, Illinois, near Chicago; and then to the exchange deport at Cairo, Illinois.  He was exchanged aboard the steamer Esmerelda near Vicksburg, Mississippi, in early November 1862, returned home, and married cousin Marie Élise, daughter of Luc Lesassier and his Acadian wife Aveline Babin, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, later that month.  Their son Joseph Georges was born in Iberville Parish in October 1864, Charles Samuel in March 1866, and Paul Ursin in November 1867.  Meanwhile, Ursin returned to his company and was captured and paroled at Vicksburg in July 1863.  In early 1865, he transferred to Company H of Ogden's Regiment Louisiana Cavalry and served as the company's captain.  His command operated in eastern Louisiana along the Amite River and in the Baton Rouge area and surrendered with General Richard Taylor's army at Gainesville, Alabama, in May 1865. 

Benjamin's fourth and youngest son Nicolas, born in St. James Parish in April 1810, married Marie Antoinette, called Antoinette, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Braud and Marguerite Richard, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1837.  Their son Jean Baptiste Théodore was born in Ascension Parish in April 1837; Joseph Alexandre, called Alexandre, in March 1838; Louis Albert in August 1839; and Joseph Nicolas in April 1842 but died at age 3 1/2 in December 1845.  Nicolas died in Ascension Parish in January 1842, age 31. 

Second son Alexandre married Avelina or Evelina, daughter of fellow Acadians Isidore Landry and Élisabeth Gautreaux, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1860.  Their son Paul Oscar was born in Ascension Parish in December 1864. 

Joseph dit Dios's fourth and youngest son Jérôme, baptized at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer, age not recorded, in May 1780, may have died young.  

Charles (c1760-1783) à Joseph à Vincent à Antoine Babin

Charles, younger son of Pierre Babin and Anne Forest, born probably in Maryland in c1760, came to Louisiana from Maryland in September 1766 with his widowed mother and older brother Joseph dit Dios.  Charles died at Ascension in January 1783, age 22.  He probably did not marry.  

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Five Babin families and a number of Babin wives and widows--20 more members of the family, including two sets of brothers--arrived from Maryland in July 1767.  Spanish officials sent them to the new Acadian community of San Gabriel d'Iberville on the river above Cabahannocer, where several new family lines emerged, though not all of them endured.  One of the younger brothers followed an older married sister to the Attakapas District and created a western branch of the family there:

Joseph (c1713-?) à Antoine Babin

 Joseph, son of Vincent Babin and Anne Thériot, born at Minas or Pigiguit in c1713, married Anne-Marie, daughter of Pierre Landry and Marguerite Forest, at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, probably in the early 1730s.  According to Bona Arsenault, between the early 1730s and 1750, Anne-Marie gave Joseph perhaps as many as seven children, six sons and a daughter.  Joseph, wife Anne-Marie, daughter Anne-Élisabeth, unmarried sons Jean-Baptiste, Étienne, and Cyprien, and married sons Dominque and Pierre and their families, did not escape the British in 1755.  They were deported to Maryland with dozens of their Babin cousins.  Most of Joseph and Anne-Marie's sons created their own families, though Bona Arsenault cannot definitively link two of them--Dominique and Jean-Baptiste--to the couple.  In 1767, Joseph, now a 54-year-old widower, three of his younger children, and putative son Jean-Baptiste and his family emigrated, to Louisiana from Maryland.  Joseph, père did not remarry.  His only daughter Anne-Élisabeth married twice into the Hébert family in the Spanish colony. 

Older son Jean-Baptiste, born at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in the late 1730s, came to Louisiana from Maryland in July 1767 with his wife Isabelle- or Élisabeth-Marguerite LeBlanc, who he had married in Maryland in the late 1750s or early 1760s.  With them on the voyage to Louisiana were a 2-year-old daughter, an infant son, and a 3-year-old orphan.  Jean-Baptiste and Isabelle-Marguerite settled on the "right back ascending" at St.-Gabriel, where they had more children, including many more sons.  Their daughters married into the Allain, Braud, and LeBlanc families.  Five of Jean-Baptiste and Isabelle's eight sons created their own families on the river. 

Oldest son Pierre, born in Maryland in January 1767, only a few months before the family sailed to Louisiana, probably died young.   

Jean-Baptiste's second son Grégoire, born at San Gabriel in c1768, married Marie-Anne, called Manette, Marine, or Marinette, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Marguerite Landry, at San Gabriel in May 1800.  Their son Sylvère or Sylvestre was born at St. Gabriel in December 1804; Grégoire Napoléon, called Napoléon, in April 1810; Balthazar in September 1814; and Édouard Marcellin in October 1816.  Grégoire died near St. Gabriel in October 1828; the priest who recorded his burial said that Grégoire was 60 years old when he died.  His daughters married into the Comeaux and LeBlanc families.  Three of his four sons created their own families upriver in what became West Baton Rouge Parish. 

Oldest son Sylvère or Sylvestre married Marie Euphémie, called Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Bénoni Hébert and his second wife Adélaïde Dupuy of West Baton Rouge Parish, probably at St. Gabriel in the early 1830s.  Their son Telesphore was born near Baton Rouge in December 1834.  Sylvestre remarried to Ameline, Amelina, or Melvina, another daughter of Bénoni Hébert and Adélaïde Dupuy, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1838; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of affinity in order to marry.  Their son Antoine Omer was born near Baton Rouge in September 1838; Édouard near St. Gabriel in July 1842; Joseph Buffington, called Buffington, near Baton Rouge in November 1843; Edgar in September 1845; and Jean Baptiste Forester in November 1850.  Their daughter married into the Langlois family.  Sylvestre died near Baton Rouge in November 1851, age 46. 

Fourth son Buffington, by his second wife Ameline Hébert, married Mazelia, daughter of François Xavier Zimmer and Célestine Grose, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in September 1869. 

Grégoire's second son Napoléon married fellow Acadian Marie Virginie, called Virginie, Hébert perhaps in West Baton Rouge Parish by the early 1840s.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born near Baton Rouge in December 1849, Jean Baptiste Winfield Scott in November 1852, Albert in February 1859, and Jean Charles in December 1862. 

Grégoire's third son Balthazar married Martha, daughter of Louis Buckner and Marie Treger, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1853.

Grégoire's fourth and youngest son Édouard Marcellin  may not have married.   

Jean-Baptiste's third son Joseph-Casimir, born at San Gabriel in c1773, married Anne or Marie Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Hébert and Anne Landry, at San Gabriel in October 1798.  Their son Joseph-Casimir, fils, called Casimir, was born at St.-Gabriel in March 1803 and died at age 7 1/2 in December 1810; Jean Baptiste le jeune in May 1804; François Napoléon Théophile, called Théophile, in April 1806; twins Derosin and Jean Pierre in June 1808 but Jean Pierre died at St. Gabriel, age 7, in February 1816; François Célestin, called Célestin, was born in October 1810; Henri Valmond, called Henry V. and H. V.,  in September 1814; and Jean Baptiste Joseph Marcellin, called Joseph Marcellin, in February 1818.  Joseph Casimir, père may have died near Baton Rouge in May 1830.  If so, he would have been in his late 50s.  His daughters married into the Aubin, Philips, Provenché, and Thomas families.  Six of his eight sons created their own families. 

Second son Jean Baptiste le jeune married Judith, daughter of French Canadian David Provenché and his Acadian wife Anne LeBlanc, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1828; Judith's brother married one of Jean Baptiste's sisters.  Their son Jean Baptiste, fils died near St. Gabriel 8 days after his birth in March 1832.  Jean Baptiste le jeune died near St. Gabriel in June 1833, age 31.  His daughter married into the Hébert family, so the blood of this family line may have endured.   

Joseph Casimir's third son Théophile married cousin Phelonise, daughter of Bénoni Hébert and his second wife Adélaïde Dupuy of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1827, and remarried to Victorine, daughter of French Creole François Souchon Aubin and his Acadian wife Mélanie Daigre and widow of Théophile's youngest brother Joseph Marcellin, at the Baton Rouge church in December 1848.  Théophile and Victorine's son Théophile Joseph or Joseph Théophilus was born near Baton Rouge in December 1849. 

Only son Joseph Théophilus, by second wife Victorine Aubin, married Virginia, daughter of Spanish Creoles Jean Baptiste Fuentes and Marie Navarre, at the Baton Rouge church in November 1869. 

Joseph Casimir's fourth son Derosin married French Creole Catherine Bouillon probably at Baton Rouge in the early 1830s.  Their son Gilbert Derosin was born near Baton Rouge in February 1835, Joseph Théophile in February 1843, and François le jeune in February 1845.  Their daughter married into the Aubin family. 

Joseph Casimir's sixth son Célestin married Marie Eloise, Heloise, or Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Rémi Doiron and Julie Richard, at the Baton Rouge church in July 1836.  Their son Palmiro Marien was born near Baton Rouge in May 1841; François Célestin, fils in February 1843; and Apollinaire in January 1851 but died at age 14 in February 1865.  Their daughters married into the Bradshaw, Grear, Heroman, and Oldham families.  François Célestin, père remarried to Caroline, daughter of Anglo Americans Luke Blount and Sarah Powers and widow of Louis Powers, at the Baton Rouge church in May 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for "difference of religion" in order to marry. 

Joseph Casimir's seventh son Henry V., while living in West Baton Rouge Parish, married fellow Acadian Faustine Trahan of West Baton Rouge Parish at the Baton Rouge church in June 1838.  Their daughter married into the Haynes family.  Henry V. and his wife evidently had no sons, so his line of the family, except for its blood, probably did not endure. 

Joseph Casimir's eighth and youngest son Joseph Marcellin married Victorine, daughter of French Creole Francois Souchon Aubin and his Acadian wife Mélanie Daigre, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1844.  Their son François Jean Baptiste was born near Baton Rouge in October 1845.  Joseph Marcellin's widow remarried to his older brother Théophile in December 1848. 

Jean-Baptiste's fourth son Senateur, sometimes called Nateur, Nator, and Joseph-Senateur, born at St.-Gabriel in September 1774, married Élise, Eloise, or Heloise, another daughter of Joseph LeBlanc and Marguerite Landry, at San Gabriel in April 1799.  Their son Senateur-Victor or Victor-Senateur was born at San Gabriel in August 1801; Joseph Neville in August 1803 but died at age 1 in June 1804; and Guillaume or William Neuville, called Neuville, was born in December 1809.  Senateur died near St. Gabriel in March 1821.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Senateur was age 40 when he died, but he was 46.  His daughters married into the Dupuy, Joly, and Lesassier families. 

Oldest Senateur-Victor or Victor-Senateur married cousin Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac LeBlanc and Félicité Melançon and widow of Victorin Chiasson, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in December 1826.  Their son Michel Adolphe, called Adolphe, was born near St. Gabriel in September 1827.  Victor Senateur died near St. Gabriel in July 1844, age 42.  His daughter married into the Berry family. 

Adolphe, perhaps their only son, married Léocade, daughter of Venance St. Amant and Marianne Joly, at the St. Gabriel church in March 1851.  Their son Victor Alfred was born near St. Gabriel in January 1856; Michel Adolphe, fils in April 1858; and Paul Firmin in September 1866. 

Senateur's third and youngest son Neuville married Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Part and his Anglo-American wife Constance Henderson, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1836.  Their son Louis Senateur was born near St. Gabriel in June 1838; Michael Oscar, called Oscar, in September 1842; Alexandre Neuville in October 1847; Lucien Arthur in April 1849 but died at age 1 1/2 in December 1851; Alphonse in October 1852; and Joseph in September 1854.  Their daughters married into the Boissac family.  

Oldest son Louis Senateur married Mary Odile, called Odile, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard LeBlanc and Lucille Allain, at the St. Gabriel church in November 1868.  Their son Henry Édouard had been born in Iberville Parish in October and was baptized perhaps on the day of his parents' wedding. 

William Neuville's second son Oscar married Marie Louise, daughter of Timoléon Boissac and his Acadian wife Odile LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1869; two of Marie Louise's brothers married two of Oscar's sisters. 

Jean-Baptiste's fifth son Pierre-Olivier, called Olivier, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, downriver from San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in June 1777, died at age 10 in March 1787.  

Jean-Baptiste's sixth son Jean-Pierre, born at San Gabriel in November 1778, died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in September 1826.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Pierre was 45 years old when he died, but he was 47.  The priest said nothing of a wife, so Jean-Pierre may not have married.  

Jean-Baptiste's seventh son Félix-Simon, called Simon, born at San Gabriel in May 1781, married cousin Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Landry and Devine Babin, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1804.  Their son Simon Eugène, called Eugène, was born near St. Gabriel in April 1807; Simon Rosémond, called Rosémond, in September 1813; Jean Baptiste Dorville or Dorval, called Dorval, was baptized at the St. Gabriel church, age unrecorded, in May 1818; and Jean Adolphe was born in December 1820.  Simon may have died near St. Gabriel in June 1826.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Simon was 40 years old when he died, but Jean-Baptiste's son Félix Simon would have been 45.  His daughters married into the Christen and Desbains families.

Oldest son Eugène married double cousin Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Henri Babin and Marie Louise Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1845.  Eugène died near St. Gabriel in November 1852, age 45.  His line of the family probably died with him. 

Simon's second son Rosémond married Hermina, daughter of French Creoles Firmin Duplessis and Louise Tusson, at the St. Gabriel church in November 1843.  Their son Anthony was born near St. Gabriel in November 1846 but died at age 1 in December 1847, and George Dallas was born in October 1851.  Rosémond died near St. Gabriel in October 1853, age 40. 

Simon's third son Dorval married cousin Marie Alazida, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Babin and Sidalise Babin of Ascension Parish, at the St. Gabriel churchin February 1844.  Their son Alcée Elphége was born near St. Gabriel in July 1846, Austin in June 1848, and Léonard Lorenz in November 1852. 

Simon's fourth and youngest son Jean Adolphe may have married cousin Elvina Babin and settled in Ascension Parish by the early 1840s. 

Jean-Baptiste's eighth and youngest son Paul, born at San Gabriel in June 1783, married Marie-Céleste, called Céleste, daughter of Frenchman Jean Pierre Cullere or Dulaire and his Acadian wife Madeleine LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1813.  Their son Pierre Paul, called Paul, fils, was born near St. Gabriel in May 1816.  Their daughter married into the Brasset and Duplessis families.  

Only son Paul, fils married cousin Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Paul LeBlanc and Marguerite Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1837.  Their son Pierre Paul, fils was born near St. Gabriel in October 1838; and Jean Numa in January 1843 but died at age 1 1/2 in November 1844.  Paul, fils died near St. Gabriel in December 1845 "of blows received the preceeding[sic] day in a battle with Adams and others." He was age 29.  One wonders what caused the altercation "with Adams and others" and who was Adams

Joseph's younger son Étienne, born probably at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1749, followed his widowed father and siblings to Louisiana in 1767 and married a woman perhaps at San Gabriel whose name has been lost to history.  Evidently she gave him two sons who did not survived childhood.  Étienne remarried to Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Bonaventure LeBlanc and Marie Thériot, at Cabahannocer, downriver from San Gabriel, in January 1778.  Étienne died at San Gabriel in December 1788, age 39.  His daughters married into the Lacave, Lopez, and Seguinaud families.  None of his five sons seems to have married, so this branch of the family, except for its blood, evidently did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Oldest son Joseph by his second wife Madeleine LeBlanc, born at San Gabriel in October 1778, died at age 10 months in 1779.  

Étienne's second son Isaac by second wife Madeleine LeBlanc, born at San Gabriel in September 1780, died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in September 1844.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Isaac died at "age 63 yrs., unmarried."  One wonders if Isaac ever married. 

Étienne's third son Joseph-Bénoni by second wife Madeleine LeBlanc, born at San Gabriel in December 1781, died at age 3 in October 1784.  

Étienne's fourth and youngest son Augustin by second wife Madeleine LeBlanc, born at San Gabriel in March 1786, may have been the Auguste Babin who died near St. Gabriel in March 1827.  If so, he would have been age 41.  The priest who recorded the burial did not bother to give Auguste's parents' names or mention a wife.  One wonders if Augustin married. 

Joseph's youngest son Cyprien, born probably at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1750, came to Louisiana from Maryland in July 1767 with his widowed father and two siblings and followed them to San Gabriel.  In the late 1700s or early 1800s, he moved upriver to the Baton Rouge area, where he died in January 1814.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Cyprien was 70 years old when he died, but he was closer to 64.  He never married.   

Pierre, fils (c1723-?) à Charles à Antoine Babin

Pierre, fils, son of perhaps Pierre Babin and Madeleine Bourg of Minas, born probably at Minas in c1723, came to Louisiana from Maryland in July 1767 with his wife Madeleine, daughter of perhaps Joseph Richard and Mare LeBlanc of Minas.  With Pierre and Madeleine were a teenage daughter, a young son, and a teenage orphan.  The couple remained at San Gabriel, where they had more children.  In 1777, they were living on the "right bank ascending" at San Gabriel.  Pierre died by April 1778, when his wife remarried to Théodore Dugas at nearby Cabahannocer.  Pierre and Madeleine's daughters married into the Bujole and Landry families.  Their older son settled on the river near the boundary of what became Iberville and West Baton Rouge parishes, where most of his sons died young or did not marry.  One of them, however, did create a family of his own and became a prosperous sugar planter in West Baton Rouge.  Pierre's younger son's line died out despite two marriages.  

Older son Simon-Pierre or Pierre-Simon, born in Maryland in c1764, married cousin Marguerite-Constance, called Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Anne Landry, at San Gabriel in April 1795.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Simon Pierre died near St. Gabriel in December 1809.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Simon Pierre was 50 years old when he died, but he was closer to 45.  Only one of his sons created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Simon, born at San Gabriel in December 1796, may have died young. 

Simon-Pierre's second son Simon-Pierre, fils, also called Vernon-Pierre, born at San Gabriel in August 1801, died near St. Gabriel in January 1835, age 33.  He probably did not marry.  

Simon-Pierre, père's third son Joseph-Valery, called Valéry, born at San Gabriel in May 1803, died near St. Gabriel in February 1822, age 19.  He did not marry.  

Simon-Pierre, père's fourth and youngest son Pierre Paul or Paul Pierre, born posthumously in Iberville Parish in June 1810, married Henriette, also called Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles LeBlanc and Élisabeth Hébert of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in May or June 1836.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Ernest was born in July 1840.  They also had a son named Pierre Paul, fils.  Pierre Paul and Henrientte's daughter married into the Blanchard family.  In 1860, Paul P. Babin, as he was called, owned 1,400 acres, 800 of them "improved," in West Baton Rouge Parish, and 110 slaves worked his plantation and its steam-powered sugar mill. 

Pierre Paul, fils married Rosalie Amilisser, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Doiron and Rosalie Bourg, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1864.

Pierre, fils's younger son Joseph-Dosité, called Dosité, born at San Gabriel in January 1774, married cousin Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and Anne Landry, at San Gabriel in October 1798; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Dosité remarried to Marie Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Daigre and Marie Jeanne Richard and widow of Augustin Templet, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1819.  Dosité died in Ascension Parish in January 1857.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Dosité died at "age 90 years," but he was "only" 83.  He seems to have produced no sons by either of his wives, so his line of the family may have died with him.  

Ignace (c1741-1791) à Joseph à Vincent à Antoine Babin

Ignace, elder son of Dominique Babin and Marguerite Boudrot and a grandson of Joseph of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, was born at Minas in c1741.  He came to Louisiana from Maryland in July 1767 with his wife Marguerite Breau, who he had married in Maryland, and an infant son.  They settled at San Gabriel on the river, where they had more children.  Their daughter married into the Moreau family and settled in the Attakapas District.  Ignace remarried to Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Landry and Marie-Josèphe Comeau and  widow of Joseph Blanchard, at Cabahannocer, downriver from St.-Gabriel, in February 1778.  She gave him another son.  Ignace died at St.-Gabriel in November 1791, age 50.  His sons did not create families of their own, so, except for its blood, this line of the family did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Older son Paul, by first wife Marguerite Breau, born in Maryland in December 1766, may have been the Paul Babin who died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in April 1815.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Paul was age 45 when he died but did not give his parents' names or mention a wife.    

Ignace's younger son Pierre-Paul, by second wife Marie-Josèphe Landry, baptized at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in December 1779, died at age 17 in January 1797. 

Paul (c1751-1802) à Joseph à Vincent à Antoine Babin

Paul, second son of Dominique Babin and Marguerite Boudrot and another grandson of Joseph of Pigiguit, was born at Minas in c1751.  He came to Louisiana from Maryland in July 1767 with the family of kinsman Pierre Babin and followed them to San Gabriel, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Brasseaux and Élisabeth Richard, in February 1784.  Paul died near San Gabriel in January 1802, age 50.  His daughters married into the Gomes, Hébert, Landry, LeBlanc, Seguinot, and Thibodeaux families.  Two of his four sons married and settled in what became Iberville Parish. 

Oldest son Paul-Henri, called Henri, born at San Gabriel in March 1785, married cousin Marie Louise, called Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Landry and Brigitte Babin, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in August 1809.  Their daughters married into the Babin and Joly families. 

Oldest son Paul Célestin, called Célestin, born in Iberville Parish in June 1810, died near St. Gabriel in January 1839, age 28.  He probably did not marry.  

Henri's younger son Jean Charles, called Charles, born in Iberville Parish in November 1824, married cousin Marguerite Élise, Eliza, or Elysa, daughter of French Creole Edmond Joly and his Acadian wife Adeleine Babin, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1855.  Their son Edmond Henri was born in Iberville Parish in September 1859, Charles Joseph in July 1861, Louis Florian in September 1863, Gabriel Ignace in July 1866, and Cyrille in January 1870. 

Paul's second son Pierre, born at San Gabriel in May 1786, married cousin Marine or Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Chiasson and Madeleine Richard, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1811.  Pierre died near St. Gabriel in June 1851, age 65.  His daughters married into the Brown, LeBlanc, and Ross families. 

Oldest  son Pierre Ursin, born in Iberville Parish in November 1811, may have died young.

Pierre's second son, name unrecorded, died in Iberville Parish a few days after his birth in December 1813.

Pierre's third son Jean Trasimond, called Trasimond, born in Iberville Parish in April 1818, married Domitille, daughter of Spanish Creole Antoine Lopez and his Acadian wife Elisa Comeaux, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1848.  Their son Magloire was born in Iberville Parish in October 1848; Antonio Oscar in January 1850 but died the following July; Pierre Alexandre was born in June 1851; Philippe de Osselis in August 1858; Marcel Alonzo in November 1860; Joseph Dhema in November 1865; and Trasimond, fils in November 1867. 

Pierre's fourth and youngest son Adolphe Pierre or Pierre Adolphe, born in Iberville Parish in August 1827, married Carmelite Telcide, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Augustin Hébert and his Creole wife Carmelite Gareuil, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1854.  Their son Paul Ostere was born in Iberville Parish in November 1854, Pierre Enos in August 1857, Henry Alphonse in July 1860, Alfred in March 1863, twins Amédée and Émile in February 1867, and Joseph Armand in November 1869. 

Paul's third son Hubert, born at San Gabriel in July 1796, died near St. Gabriel in April 1827, age 30.  He probably did not marry.  

Paul's fourth and youngest son Victor, born at San Gabriel in June 1801, died at age 15 months in October 1802.  

Joseph (c1755-1820) à Joseph à Vincent à Antoine Babin

Joseph, third and youngest son of Dominique Babin and Marguerite Boudrot and yet another grandson of Joseph of Pigiguit, was born in Maryland in c1755.  He came to Louisiana probably in 1767 with his older brothers Ignace and Paul.  He probably followed them to San Gabriel on the river before moving to the Attakapas District, where he first appeared in the general census of 1771 as a 16-year-old living in the household of Claude Martin and Marie Babin, probably his older sister.  Joseph appeared again on an Attakapas District militia list in January 1773.  He was the first Babin male to remain on the western prairies and the only one to settle there during the colony and antebellum periods.  He married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Honoré Melançon and Marie Breau, at Attakapas in February 1778.  They settled at La Pointe on upper Bayou Teche near present-day Breaux Bridge.  Joseph died at his home at La Pointe, St. Martin Parish, in October 1820.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph died at "age about 60 years," but he was closer to 65.  His daughters married into the LeBlanc, Savoie, and Sonnier families.  Two of his three sons created families of their own along the middle Teche.  His second son's family line was especially vigorous. 

Oldest son Julien, born at Attakapas in September 1786, married Séraphine, daughter of fellow Acadians François Guilbeau and Madeleine Broussard of La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1807.  Julien, père died at his home at La Pointe in October 1819, age 33.  His daughters married into the Decuir and Hébert families.  His surviving son settled  near Breaux Bridge. 

Oldest son Jean or Julien Nelson, called Nelson, born at La Pointe in October 1809, married Marcellite Arthémise, daughter of Charles Cohem, Cohen, Comb, Combe, Come, or Comme and Marie Lavoiolette, at the St. Martinville church in July 1834.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son, name unrecorded, died 3 days after his birth in May 1835; Julien Fostin was born in August 1836; Eudgar Numa in March 1838; Charles Orel in October 1842; Omer was baptized at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, age unrecorded, in August 1848; and Jean was born in March 1850.  They also had an older son called Jules N. and Jean Baptiste, unless he was Julien Fostin.  Nelson's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in December 1867; he would have been 58 years old that year.  His daughters married into the Hébert and Romero families.  At least two of his seven sons created their own families. 

Second son Julien Foster/Jules N./Jean Baptiste married Agnès Victorine, called Victorine, daughter of Bernard Romero and Lise Caroline Feignant, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in August 1857.  Their son Jules Aubin was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1859 but probably died at age 9 1/2 in October 1868, Léonce Numa was born in January 1861, Léonard in June 1863 but died at age 1 1/2 in May 1865, Eugènat was born in January 1866 but died the following August, Adam Omer was born in August 1867 but died at age 2 in September 1868, and Lucas was born near Breaux Bridge in December 1869.  A succession record for Jules Babin was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in November 1867.  If this was Julien Fostin, a.k.a. Jean Baptiste, he would have been 31 years old that year; and, judging by the birth of one of his sons, it would not have been a post-mortem succession. 

Nelson's third son Numa, probably Eudgar Numa, married Spanish Creole Marie C. Romero.  Their son Numa Eusèbe was born near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in April 1863. 

Julien's younger son, name unrecorded, died at his parent's home at La Pointe in January 1819 age 17 days. 

Joseph's second son Pierre-Alexandre or Alexandre-Pierre, born at Attakapas in October 1792, married Marie Tarsile, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac Thibodeaux and Félicité Bernard of La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church in February 1817.  Alexandre, père died in St. Martin Parish in December 1855, age 63.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following February.  His daughters married into the Broussard, Cormier, Guilbeau, Hébert, and Mouton families.  At least six of his 10 sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre-Alexandre, fils, born at La Pointe in December 1817, died at age 8 1/2 in January 1830.

Alexandre's second son Placide, born at La Pointe in March 1819, may have died near Lydia, Iberia Parish, in December 1870.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that P. Babin died "at age 50 yrs."  Placide would have been 51.  One wonders if he married.  

Alexandre's third son Joseph Dermancourt, called Dermancourt, born at La Pointe in November 1820, married Marguerite Cléonise or Cléonide, daughter of Joseph Allegre and his Acadian wife Marguerite Cormier and widow of Achille Sonnier, at the St. Martinville church in April 1853.  Their son Ubalde was born in St. Martin Parish in May 1854, and Albert in March 1858.

Alexandre's fourth son Charles Sidné, born at La Pointe in August 1822, married cousin Marie Léomire or Louise, also called Marie Henri, daughter of fellow Acadians Colin LeBlanc and Marcellite Arthémise Babin, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, April 1844.  They settled up bayou near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Charles, fils was baptized at the Breaux Bridge church, age unrecorded, in January 1848; Pierre Egmard was born in January 1852; Joseph Gaston in November 1864; and Luc in October 1868.

Alexandre's fifth son Julien le jeune, born at La Pointe in January 1826, died in St. Martin Parish in May 1864, age 38.  He may not have married.  One wonders if his death was war-related.  

Alexandre's sixth son Jean Omer, called Omer and also Amédé, born at La Pointe in October 1827, married cousin Uranie, daughter of fellow Acadians Élisée Paul Thibodeaux and Marie Thibodeaux, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1851.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Omer, fils was born in December 1851; Élisée in May 1860 but died at age 1 1/2 in December 1861; Honoré was born in October 1862; and Oser in January 1865 but died at age 1 1/2 in June 1866.  Omer died in St. Martin Parish in November 1867.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Omer died "at age 37 yrs.," but he was 40. His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in December.

Alexandre's seventh son Michel, born at La Pointe in September 1829, married Marie Azéma, called Azéma, another daughter of Joseph Allegre and Marguerite Cormier, at the St. Martinville church in February 1853.  Their son Gabriel was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1855, Ernest in November 1855[sic], Alexandre le jeune in March 1858, and Michel Alcibiades in December 1860.  Michel's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in November 1867; he would have been 38 years old that year. 

Alexandre's eighth son Alexandre, fils, born at La Pointe in March 1833, if he survived childhood may not have married. 

Alexandre's ninth son Placide Émile, called Émile, born at La Pointe in January 1835, married Joséphine Letitia, called Letitia, daughter of Joseph Baptiste Castille and Adeleine Nerault and widow of Alexandre Girard, at the St. Martinville church in December 1860. 

Alexandre's tenth and youngest son Iréné Théogène, called Théogène, born at La Pointe in March 1837, married Mathilde, daughter of Lucien Decuir and his Acadian wife Cléonise Breaux, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in January 1861.  Their son Joseph Alcide was born near New Iberia in January 1866.   

Joseph's third and youngest son Joseph, fils, born at Attakapas in September 1793, probably died young.  

.

Twenty more Babins, including three brothers, came to Louisiana from Port Tobacco, Maryland, in February 1768.   Spanish Governor Ulloa insisted that they go to the new outpost at San Luìs de Natchez, far upriver from the other Acadian settlements.  Like most of their fellow passengers, the Babins hoped to live among their relatives at Cabahannocer, Ascension, or San Gabriel, so they settled only reluctantly at the isolated settlement.  The following year, after suppressing a French-Creole-led rebellion at New Orleans, Spanish Governor-General Alejandro O'Reilly, Ulloa's successor, allowed the Natchez Acadians to abandon Fort San Luìs and settle where they wanted.  Most of the Natchez Babins resettled at Ascension and in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley, where two more vigorous family lines emerged: 

Joseph l'aîné (c1730-late 1760s or early 1770s) à ? à Antoine Babin

Joseph Babin l'aîné, born at Minas in c1730, married cousin Rosalie, daughter of Paul Babin and Marie Landry, probably in Maryland.  Colonial officials counted them with a son at Port Tobacco on the lower Potomac in July 1763.  They came to Louisiana in February 1768 with two young children and Joseph's younger brother and followed their fellow passengers to Fort San Luìs de Natchez.  After the Acadians were allowed to leave Natchez, Joseph took his family to San Gabriel.  Joseph died there by January 1773, when wife Rosalie remarried to an Hébert widower.  Josephs daughter married into the Landry family.  His only son died young, so this line of the family, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State.  

Simon, born in Maryland in c1763, died at age 5 at San Luìs de Natchez soon after reaching Louisiana.  

Joseph le jeune (c1754-?) à ? à Antoine Babin

Joseph Babin le jeune, born at Minas in c1754, came to Louisiana in February 1768 with the family of his older brother Joseph l'aîné.  He followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez and perhaps to San Gabriel.  He does not seem to have married. 

François-Marie (c1742-1796) à Vincent à Antoine Babin

François-Marie, eldest son of Antoine Babin and Catherine Landry, born at Minas in c1742, came to Louisiana from Maryland in February 1768 with his wife Marguerite-Hélène, called Hélène, daughter of Amand Breau and Marie Landry of Pigiguit, who he had married in Maryland in c1763.  Also with them were two small sons and two young orphans.  They settled at Fort San Luìs de Natchez and then, after the Acadians were allowed to leave the place, moved to Ascension and then to San Gabriel, where they had more children.  François died at San Gabriel in October 1796, age 54.  His daughters, one of them baptized at New Orleans in April 1772, married into the LeBlanc (French Canadian, not Acadian) and Rivet families.  His oldest son remained on the river, though two of his sons moved to upper Bayou Lafourche.  François-Marie's middle son's line, except for its blood, died out early.  His youngest son left the river and moved to Terrebonne Parish.  

Oldest son Charles, born in Maryland in c1765, married Madeleine-Angélique, called Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre-Paul Foret and Marguerite Orillion dit Champagne of Ascension, at San Gabriel on the river above Ascension in January 1801.   Charles, père died in Ascension Parish in December 1826, age 61.  His daughter married into the Dugas family.  Two of his three sons settled on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Charles-Édouard, called Édouard, born at San Gabriel in October 1801, married cousin Mathilde, 23-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Dugas and Rosalie Foret, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1825; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They settled at Bruly on the west side of the river in Ascension Parish near the boundary with Assumption Parish and had many sons there.  Their son Joseph Michel was born in Ascension Parish in September 1827; Joseph Achille, called Achille, in October 1829; Joseph Édouard, called Édouard, fils, in Assumption Parish in February 1832; Joseph Napoléon in Ascension Parish in April 1833; and Joseph Dernon in July 1835.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Édouard remarried to Marie Domitille, daughter of Jean Baptiste Gros and Marie Englehardt, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1838.  They settled near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish.  Their son Joseph Melite was born in July 1847; and Joseph Anatole, called Anatole, in April 1849.  Their daughter married into the Gautreaux family.  Charles Édouard died near Paincourtville in January 1852, age 50.  Four of his seven sons by both wives created their own families.  His youngest son settled on lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65, but the others remained on Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Joseph Michel, by first wife Mathilde Dugas, died in Assumption Parish at age 4 in July 1831. 

Édouard's second son Joseph Achille, called Achille, from first wife Mathilde Dugas, married Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian Godefroi Breaux and his Creole wife Rosalie Copelle, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1853.  They settled between Paincourtville and Pierre Part.  Their son Joseph Camille, called Camille, was born in March 1856 but died at age 7 in January 1864; Joseph Théophile was born in April 1858; and Nere Lusignant in May 1861.

Édouard's third son Joseph Édouard, called Édouard, fils, from first wife Mathide Dugas, married Laura Angeline, called Angeline, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Hébert and Eléonore Giroir, at the Paincourtville church in February 1854.  They also settled between Paincourtville and Pierre Part.  Their son Joseph Édouard, fils was born in August 1856.  Édouard, père died near Paincourtville in January 1860, age 27. 

Édouard's fourth son Joseph Napoléon, from first wife Mathilde Dugas, died near Paincourtville, age 15, in January 1849.

Édouard's fifth son Joseph Dernon, called Dernon, from first wife Mathilde Dugas, married cousin Aimée, daughter of fellow Acadians Eugène Landry and Françoise Landry, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1860; they had to secure a dispensation for third or fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They lived near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes. 

Édouard's sixth son Joseph Melite, by second wife Marie Domitille Gros, may not have married, at least not before the War of 1861-65. 

Édouard's seventh and youngest son Joseph Anatole, called Anatole, from second wife Marie Domitille Gros, married Caroline, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Broussard and Cléorie Louvière and a widow, at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in January 1868.  Their son Joseph Catoire was born near New Iberia in September 1868. 

Charles's second son Joseph Arsène, called Arsène, a twin, born at St. Gabriel in February 1805, married Marie Louise, called Louise, daughter of François Constant Peignier and Rosalie Foutelet, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1837.  They also settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their son Joseph Félix, called Félix, was born in Assumption Parish in August 1842.  Arsène died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in January 1847, age 43.   His only son settled in Ascension Parish, perhaps on the upper bayou. 

Félix married cousin Amelina, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Casimir Babin and Nanette Boudreaux, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in December 1868. 

Charle's third and youngest son Zéphirin Napoléon, born at St. Gabriel in August 1812, evidently did not marry.   

François-Marie's second son Paul, born in Maryland in August 1767, married Marguerite-Pélagie, another daughter of Michel Dugas and Rosalie Foret, at Ascension in April 1802.  They settled near the boundary of what became Ascension and Iberville parishes.  Their daughters married into the Babin and L'Alemand families.  Except for its blood, this line of the family did not endure. 

Older son Valéry Joseph or Joseph Valéry, born in April 1804, died in Ascension Parish in January 1824, age 20.  He probably did not marry.

Paul's younger son Jean or Paul Laurent, born in August 1806, died at age 7 in August 1813.

François-Marie's third and youngest son François, fils, born at Ascension in May 1774, married Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Broussard and Madeleine Landry, at Ascension in April 1799.  Their daughter married into the Foret family.  François, fils remarried to Marie Marcellite, called Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Clouâtre and Marie Thibodeaux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in October 1809.  Their daughters married into the Chatanier, Crochet, Olivier, Pitre, and Pye families.  In the early 1820s, Francois, fils moved his family to what became Terrebonne Parish.  François, fils died in Terrebonne parish in January 1850, age 75.  His succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse in February.  Six of his nine sons by both wives created their own famililes.  His older sons settled in Ascension Parish, but his younger ones remained on the southeastern bayous and settled in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  Three of his sons married Babin cousins who were sisters! 

Oldest son Louis-Étienne, by first wife Henriette Broussard, born at San Gabriel in October 1801, probably died young.   

François, fils's second son Firmin Henri, by first wife Henriette Broussard, born at Ascension in July 1804, married cousin Renée or Rosalie Sidalise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bénoni Babin and Madeleine Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in February 1830; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They remained in Ascension Parish on or near the river.  Their son Henri Joseph was born in Ascension Parish in July 1831; Vincent Telesphore, called Telesphore, in March 1836; François Dorville, called Dorville, in February 1839; Eugène Hilarion in October 1844; and Jacques in c1847 but died at age 3 in October 1850.  Rosalie died near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in May 1865; the priest who recorded her burial said that she died at "age 64 years, 9 months."  Evidently none of of their surviving sons created a family of his own.

Oldest son Henri Joseph died in Ascension Parish in August 1848, age 17.

Firmin Henri's second son Vincent Telesphore, called Telesphore, died near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in April 1864, age 28.  He evidently did not marry. 

Firmin Henri's third son François Dorville, called Dorville, during the War of 1861-65 seems to have served in Company D of the 14th Regiment Confederate Cavalry and Company A of Ogden's Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Ascension Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama.  Confederate records called him Dorvalle

Firmin Henri's fourth son Eugène Hilarion died near Gonzales in August 1865.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Eugène died at "age ca. 18 years," but he was 21.  He did not marry.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

François, fils's third son François Maximilien, called Maximilien, from first wife Henriette Broussard, born either at St. Gabriel or Ascension in the mid- or late 1800s, married cousin Adélaïde, another daughter of Joseph Bénoni Babin and Madeleine Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1836.  They remained in Ascension Parish.  Their son Joseph Maximilien was born in Ascension Parish in March 1837, and François Xavier in March 1854.  Maximiliani Babin died near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in February 1864.  One wonders if this was François Maximilien; if so, he would have been in his late 50s at the time of his death.  One wonders if either of his sons married. 

François, fils's fourth son Joseph Dorville, called Dorville, from second wife Marcellite Clouâtre, born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in December 1811, married cousin Rosalie Mathilde, called Mathilde, yet another daughter of Joseph Bénoni Babin and Madeleine Dugas, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in October 1838.  Their son Joseph Treville was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1843, and Adam Marc in April 1848.  Their daughter married into the Robichaux family. 

François, fils's fifth son Pierre Achille, called Achille, from second wife Marcellite Clouâtre, born near St. Gabriel in March 1813, married Marie Angelina, called Angelina, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Ambroise Pitre and his Creole wife Rose Adélaïde Lirette, at the Thibodauxville church in May 1836.  Their son Achille Pierre was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1837; Onésime Lloyd, also called James and Lesin, in October 1838; and Damase d'Orvil in Terrebonne Parish in August 1848.  Their daughters married into the Babin and Bonvillain families. 

Oldest son Achille Pierre married Luvinia, daughter of Narcisse Marcel and Celestin Rhodes of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in April 1859.

Achille's second son Onésime married Elvire, daughter of fellow Acadian Léonard Crochet and his Creole wife Élise Pichoff, at the Houma church in December 1860.  Their son Adam Aubin was born in Terrebonne Parish in March 1864 but died at age 2 1/2 in November 1866. 

François, fils's sixth son Dreville Adrien, by second wife Marcellite Clouâtre, born near St. Gabriel in March 1817, may have died young. 

François, fils's seventh son Élie Napoléon, called Napoléon, from second wife Marcellite Clouâtre, baptized at the St. Gabriel church, age 9 months, in May 1819, married double cousin Marie Sylvanise, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Eugène Babin and Céleste Babin, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in January 1847, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1848.  Their daughter married into the Cadiere family. 

François, fils's eighth son Louis Théodule, by second wife Marcellite Clouâtre, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in January 1824, may have died young. 

François, fils's ninth and youngest son Jacques, by second wife Marcellite Clouâtre, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in July 1828, married Marianne, daughter of Jacques Labit and his Acadian wife Henriette Roger, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in September 1853, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in June 1854.  Their son Jacques Justilien was born in Terrebonne Parish in January 1855; François Eugène in November 1856; Jean Marie in November 1862; and Surville Privat, called Privat, in October 1864 but died at age 3 in November 1867.

Firmin (c1747-1790s) à Vincent à Antoine Babin

Firmin, second son of Antoine Babin and Catherine Landry, born at Minas in c1747, came to Louisiana from Maryland in February 1768 with his widowed mother and siblings.  He followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez, where he married Bibianne, another daughter of Amand Breau and Marie Landry, in January 1769; she was the sister of Firmin's older brother François-Marie's wife.  After the Acadians left Natchez later that year, Firmin and Bibianne followed his family to Ascension.  Their daughters married into the Hébert, Landry, and Lavergne families.  Firmin remarried to Isabelle, daughter of Arche and Isabelle Brousse or Brusse, at Ascension in November 1781.  She gave him more children.  In 1788, they were living on the right, or west, bank of the river at Ascension.  Their daughter married into the Dugas family.  Firmin died at Ascension by January 1792, when his wife remarried there; he would have been in his mid-40s that year.  His two oldest sons settled on Bayou Lafourche, but his younger sons remained on the river.  

Oldest son Paul-Firmin, by first wife Bibianne Breau, born at San Luìs de Natchez in c1770, married Dorothée, daughter of Joseph Pichoff and Marguerite Bilique of the Upper German Coast, at Assumption in May 1802.  Although their children were baptized at Ascension, they probably were born at Assumption.  One of his sons and a grandson "returned" to the river.  Another son and a grandson settled in Terrebonne Parish. 

Oldest son Michel Eugène, called Eugène, born probably at Assumption in May 1805, married first cousin Marie Célesie, Céleste, or Célestin, called Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bénoni Babin and Madeleine Dugas and widow of Zenon LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1830; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph died in Ascension Parish 5 days after his birth in October 1830; Joseph Paul was born in September 1832; and Pierre Derosin, called Derosin, in February 1835.  Their daughters married into the Babin and Villeneuve families.  Eugène may have died in Lafourche Parish in September 1853 during a yellow fever epidemic; if so, he would have been age 48 at the time of his death. 

Third and youngest son Derosin left the upper Lafourche valley and married Marie Eléonore, called Eléonore, daughter of Norbert Villeneuve and his Acadian wife Marcellite Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1856.  They settled on the river near the boundary between Ascension and St. James parishes.  Their son Eugène was born in Ascension Parish in September 1857, Alzide N. in July 1859, Adam was born near Gonzales in June 1865, and Ulger in February 1868.  

Paul Firmin's second son Marcellin, born probably in Assumption Parish in August 1808, died at age 2 in October 1810.  

Paul Firmin's third son Paul Victorin, called Victorin, born probably in Assumption Parish in October 1811, married Marie Marcelline or Marcellite Frosite, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Bergeron and his Creole wife Euphroisine Bellanger of Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in January 1833.  Their son Telesphore was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1841.  Their daughters married into the Agnelly and Lalonde families; they both settled in St. Landry Parish.  Victorin's only son settled in Terrebonne Parish. 

During the War of 1861-65, only son Telesphore served in Company H of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Terrebonne Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He married Marguerite Paola, daughter of Alexis Jolet and Marie Azélie Falgout, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in September 1866.  Their son Jean Franklin was born in Terrebonne Parish in July 1868, and Joseph Ferdinand in July 1870.

Paul Firmin's fourth son Pierre Destival, called Destival, born probably in Assumption Parish in February 1815, married Marcelline, daughter of fellow Acadians Donat Landry and Angèle Landry and widow of Placide LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in February 1844.  They remained on the river.  Their son Blaise Félix was born in Ascension Parish in February 1847. 

Paul Firmin's fifth and youngest son Auguste Alexandre, born probably in Assumption Parish in February 1818, married Eléonore, another daughter of Alexandre Bergeron and Euphroisine Bellanger, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1839.  Their son Leufroi was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1840.  Auguste remarried to Félicité, also called Émelie, 19-year-old daughter of Jacques Bonvillain and his Acadian wife Émelie Crochet, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in June 1849, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in June 1850.  Their son Auguste Adams was born in Terrebonne Parish in April 1850, and Edwin in May 1856.  Their daughters married into the Bacon or Baron and Lester families.  Auguste, père died in Terrebonne Parish in July 1858, age 40. 

Firmin's second son Joseph-Bénoni, called Bénoni, from first wife Bibianne Breau, born at Ascension in January 1774, married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Athanase Dugas and Rose LeBlanc, at Ascension in July 1800, where their children were born.  In the 1820s, they moved to Lafourche Interior Parish, where their children also settled close to their cousins.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Lambert, and LeBlanc families.  Joseph Bénoni died in Ascension Parish in December 1836.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Bénoni was 75 years old when he died, but he was 62.  

Oldest son Joseph, born in Ascension Parish in October 1809, may have died young.  

Bénoni's second son Eugène, born in Ascension Parish in January 1817, married Céleste, another daughter of Alexandre Bergeron and Euphroisine Bellanger, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1838.  Their son Joseph Alexandre was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1839; Valentin le jeune in November 1841; Leufroi Homer in Terrebonne Parish in October 1847; and Eugène Adam in September 1854.

Oldest son Joseph Alexandre married Marie Elfreda or Elfrida, daughter of Auguste Chete, Echete, or Eschete and Héloise Bellanger of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in January 1864.  Their son Ernest Leufroi was born in Terrebonne Parish in December 1866, and François Xavier in April 1869. 

During the War of 1861-65, Eugène's second son Valentin le jeune served in Company E of the 1st (Dreux's/Rightor's) Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in Terrebonne Parish, which fought in Virginia during the first year of the conflict.  Valentin married cousin Elvina, daughter of fellow Acadians Justin Hébert and Azélie Bergeron, at the Houma church in March 1863 after he returned from Virginia.  Their son Eugène Augustin was born in Terrebonne Parish in December 1864, and Joseph Albert in November 1868. 

Bénoni's third and youngest son Valentin, born in Ascension Parish in April 1820, married Anne Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Clouâtre and Marie Élisabeth Thibodeaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in June 1840.  One wonders if they had any children, at least any who survived childhood. 

Firmin's third son Pierre-Firmin, called Firmin, from first wife Bibianne Breau, born at Ascension in December 1775, died at age 17 in October 1792.   

Firmin's fourth son Simon-Théodore, by second wife Isabelle Brousse, born at Ascension in December 1782, married Marie Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Landry and Marie Babin, at Ascension in February 1805.  Their daughters married into the Lamarre and Landry families.  Simon Théodore remarried to cousin Henriette, also called Sidalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Babin and Olide LeBlanc and widow of Firmin Landry, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1815.  Their daughters married Babin and Landry cousins.  Simon Théodore died in Ascension Parish in November 1842.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Simon died at "age 66 yrs.," but he was 59. 

Oldest son Raphaël Simon or Simon Raphaël, by first wife Madeleine Landry, born at Ascension in September 1806, died at age 2 in July 1809.  

Simon Théodore's second son, name unrecorded, from first wife Madeleine Landry, died at age 2 months in October 1811. 

Simon Théodore's third son Gédéon, by second wife Henriette Babin, born in Ascension Parish in October 1824, married fellow Acadian Clémence Guidry probably in Ascension Parish in the late 1840s.  Their son François Numa was born in Ascension Parish in April 1851, Albert Séverin in October 1853, Pierre Dorza in December 1855, and Alexandre in March 1858.

Firmin's fifth son François le jeune, by second wife Isabelle Brousse, born at Ascension in March 1785, married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Braud and Monique Guidry, at the St. Gabriel church in October 1813.  François le jeune died near St. Gabriel in June 1835.  The priest who recorded his burial said that François was 45 years old when he died, but he was 50. 

Oldest son Joseph Pierre, born near St. Gabriel in June 1819, may have died young. 

François le jeune's second Simon Missael or Marcellus, called Marcellus, born near St. Gabriel in January 1823, married Marie Amenaïde, called Amenaïde, daughter of Alexandre Reine and Marguerite Poché, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1841.  They lived near the boundary between Iberville and Ascension parishes.  Their son Joseph Marcellus was born in February 1845, Laurent died at age 18 months in April 1852, and Calixte was born in October 1859. 

Oldest son Joseph Marcellus married Marie Lezida, called Nizida, daughter of fellow Acadians Eugène Braud and Joséphine LeBlanc, at the Gonzales church, Ascension Parish, in February 1869.  Their son Pierre Amilcar was born near Gonzales in August 1870. 

François le jeune's third son Henri Dreville or Treville, born near St. Gabriel in March 1825, died at age 3 in July 1828.   

Firmin's sixth and youngest son Joseph-Toussaint, by second wife Isabelle Brousse, born at Ascension in November 1789, died at age 1 in September 1790.

Charles (c1750-1773? 1779?) à Vincent à Antoine Babin

Charles, third and youngest son of Antoine Babin and Catherine Landry, born at Minas in c1750, came to Louisiana from Maryland in February 1768 with his widowed mother and siblings.  He followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez and then to Ascension.  He may have been the Charles Babin who died, probably from drowning, in June 1774, or the Charles Babin who died at Ascension in December 1779. The priest who recorded the 1779 burial did not give Charles's age or his parents' names, nor did he mention a wife. 

Olivier (c1750-?) à ? à Antoine Babin

Olivier Babin, born at Minas in c1750, came to Louisiana from Maryland in February 1768 as an 18-year-old orphan with the family of Pierre Guédry.  He followed his fellow passengers to Fort San Luìs de Natchez and resettled with some of them downriver at San Gabriel, where he married fellow Acadian Marie Breau.  One wonders if this line of the family endured.  

Older son Jacques, born at New Orleans in February 1770, may have died young.

Younger son Jean-Baptiste-Olivier, born at San Gabriel in March 1773, may have been the Jean Baptiste Babin, "widower," who died in Terrebonne Parish at age 77 in January 1850.  If so, who had he married?  And who were his children, if he had any?

Mathurin (c1756-?) à ? à Antoine Babin

Mathurin Babin, born in Maryland in c1756, came to Louisiana from Maryland in February 1768 as a 12-year-old orphan with his younger sister Anne and the family of kinsman Francois-Marie Babin and followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez.  If he survived childhood, there is no evidence in local church and civil records that he created his own family. 

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Another young Babin came to Louisiana from Maryland during the late 1760s, but no new family line came of it:

Étienne (c1754-?) à ? à Antoine Babin

Étienne Babin, born probably at Minas in c1754, came to Louisiana by March 1777, when Spanish officials counted him on the "left bank ascending" at San Gabriel.  He was 23 years old and still a bachelor.  One wonders what became of him. 

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Five more Babins came to Louisiana aboard three, perhaps four, of the Seven Ships from France.  Two of them, a sister and brother, crossed on Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in late July 1785.  They settled first on the river before moving to upper Bayou Lafourche, where the sister remarried and the brother created a new center of family settlement: 

François-Marie (c1766-1810s) à Jean à Charles à Antoine Babin

François Marie, younger son of Simon Babin and his first wife Anastasie Thériot, born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in November 1766, came to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa with his older sister Marie, her husband Louis-William Stebens, and their three children.  He followed them to Manchac below Baton Rouge, where he married Marie-Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Ignace Usé and his second wife Cécile Bourg, in December 1786.  Marie-Anne also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa.  They were still living at Manchac in 1788, but by the mid-1790s they had moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, the first Babin family to settle there.  Their daughters married into the Comte or Lecompte, Robichaux, and Toups families.  François-Marie's succession inventory record was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1816; he would have been age 50 that year.

Oldest son François-Auguste, called Auguste, born at Ascension in January 1792, married Justine, 22-year-old daughter of  André Toups and Marie Dervin and widow of Charles Rome, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1822.  Their daughters married into the Grabert, Martin, Pertuit, and Robichaux families.

Oldest son Toussaint Marcellin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1825, married French Creole Carmelite Grabert probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in the 1840s.  Their son Auguste le jeune was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1847.  Toussaint remarried to Marie Ernestine, called Ernestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Landry and Melicère Bourgeois, at the Raceland church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1854.  Their son Pierre Froisin was born near Raceland in November 1862; Joseph was baptized at the Raceland church, age unrecorded, in January 1865 but died the following day; and Joseph Melous was born in July 1869.  During the War of 1861-65, Toussaint served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment Militia and, along with most of his unit, was captured at Labadieville in nearby Assumption Parish in late October 1862.  The Federals released him in early November. 

Auguste's second son Auguste, fils, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1830, married Émelia, daughter of Léonce Walker and Aimée Price, at the Raceland church in March 1855.  Auguste, fils died near Raceland the following July, age 24.  His line of the family evidently died with him. 

Auguste, père's third son Justin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1837, married Alexina, daughter of Hippolyte Laneuville and Anaïs Texier, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in January 1866.  Their son Robert died near Raceland at age 2 months in September 1866, and Richard was born in September 1869.

Auguste, père's fourth and youngest son Amédée, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1838, married French Creole Julie Zulma or Zulema Folse in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in November 1858.  Their son Amédée, fils was born near Raceland in December 1865.  During the War of 1861-65, Amédée may have served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment Militia with brother Toussaint.  If so, most of their unit was captured at Labadieville in nearby Assumption Parish in late October 1862 and released by the Federals in early November.

François-Marie's second son Jean-Baptiste, born at Assumption in July 1797, married Marie Aglae, called Aglae, 21-year-old daughter of Pierre Gisclard and Françoise Mayer, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in November 1828. 

Older son Jean Baptiste, fils, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1829, married Roseline, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Martin LeBlanc and Marie Lejeune, at the Thibodaux church in August 1854; the marriage also was recorded in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Jean Baptiste III was born in Lafourche Parish in December 1858; François was born in c1860 but died at age 3 in April 1864; Joseph Collin was born in October 1861; and Léo Joseph near Montegut, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1870.

Younger son François le jeune, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1832, married Rosa, daughter of François Picou and his Acadian wife Irma Aucoin, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in April 1854.  They settled near Montegut.  Their son Anatole was born in July 1855, Jean Baptiste Arthur in August 1860, Théophile Gustave in October 1862, Augustin Henri in September 1864, Joseph Edwin in August 1868, and François Hamilton in October 1870.

François-Marie's third son François, fils, born at Assumption in October 1799, married Elise Euphrosine, called Frosine, 21-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Martin and his Creole wife Marie Charpentier, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1821, and sanctified the marriage at the Thibodauxville church the following February. 

Oldest son Joseph François, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1822, may have died young. 

François, fils's second son Louis, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1823, also may have died young. 

François, fils's third son Édouard, born in Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1827, may have died young. 

François, fils's fourth and youngest son Guillaume, or William, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1829, may have married Victoria Ordalie ____.  Their son Joseph William was born near Lockport, Lafourche Parish, in January 1864.   

François-Marie's fourth and youngest son Raphaël-Édouard, born at Assumption in January 1803, may have been the Édouard Babin of Ascension Parish who "drowned in [the] Mississippi River" in May 1845 and was buried near Convent, St. James Parish.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Édouard was age 43 when he died but did not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  Raphaël Édouard would have been age 42. 

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A young Babin, brother of Marie and François-Marie, came to Louisiana from France aboard L'Amitité, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early November 1785.  He settled at Baton Rouge near his kin before moving on to Bayou Lafourche, but his many children remained on the river:  

Magloire-Simon or Simon-Magloire (1762-c1833) à Jean à Charles à Antoine Babin

Magloire-Simon or Simon-Magloire, called Simon, elder son of Simon Babin and his first wife Anastasie Thériot and brother of François-Marie, was born in England in January 1762.  He came to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, perhaps as a stowaway and joined his siblings at Manchac, where he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Eustache Lejeune and his first wife Marie Carret, in June 1787.  Marie-Madeleine had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships.  She gave him no children, or none who lived.  Simon remarried to Anne-Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Quimine and his first wife Marie-Louise Grossin, at Manchac in December 1789.  Anne also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa.  Their daughter married into the Daigre family.  In the early 1800s, Simon and Anne moved to Bayou Lafourche, where, at age 60, he remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie-Jeanne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Achée and Anne Boudreaux and widow of François Sevin, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in April 1822.  Marie-Jeanne, like Simon's other wives, also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa.  Simon's succession inventory was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse  in January 1833.  The parish clerk who recorded his succession noted that Simon was age 56 at the time of the filing, but he was closer to 71.  All four of his sons married and remained on the river in Iberville, East Baton Rouge, and West Baton Rouge parishes, but not all of their lines endured.  

Oldest son Auguste or Augustin, by second wife Anne-Louise Quimine, born probably at Manchac in the early 1790s, married fellow Acadian Théotiste Templet probably at Manchac in the early 1810s.  Their daughter married into the Labadiole family. 

Only son Treville, born at Manchac in February 1814, married Marie Eléonore, called Eléonore and Léonore, daughter of French Creoles Valéry Bergeron and Marie Madeleine Prosper, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1836.  They settled near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, and may have moved to southeastern Pointe Coupee Parish after the War of 1861-65.  Their son Léon Treville was born in March 1840; Treville, fils in July 1846; Alphonse in April 1849; Auguste Valéry in July 1853; and Louis Martial in July 1855.  Their daughter married into the Eckles and Simoneaux families. 

Simon's second son Placide, by second wife Anne-Louise Quimine, born at Manchac in November 1793, married Marie Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean André Grégoire Marie Templet and Marie Doiron of Baton Rouge, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in August 1816.  Their daughters married into the Doiron and Hébert families.  Both of their sons married, but only one of the family lines seems to have endured. 

Older son Florentin married Cerasine, daughter of Louis Terence De Richebourg and his Acadian wife Mathilde Granger, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1847.  One wonders if they have any children, at least any who survived childhood.

Younger Valsin Derosin, called Derosin, baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age unrecorded, in March 1824, married Emma, daughter of fellow Acadian Élie Hyacinthe Lejeune and his Creole wife Eléonore Aillet, at the Brusly church in January 1861. 

Simon's third son Paul-Joachim, by second wife Anne-Louise Quimine, born at Manchac in February 1796, married Caroline, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Lejeune and Marie Doiron, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in September 1817.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Paul died near Brusly in September 1853, age 57.  His daughter married into the Foret family. 

Oldest son Hermogène or Armogène, baptized at the St. Gabriel church, age 8 months, in May 1820, married Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Dorville Landry and Aureline Daigle of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1844.  Their son Jean Armand was born near Brusly in April 1846.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Armogène remarried to Marie Célestine, called Célestine, daughter of Foreign Frenchman Pierre Gassie and his Creole wife Elmire Marson, at the Brusly church in October 1851.  Their son Samuel David was born near Brusly in December 1854, Paul Émile in June 1858, Jean Homere in June 1859, and Pierre Olivier in November 1861.  In his late 40s, Armogène remarried again--his third marriage--to Adolphine, daughter of Anglo American Isaac Gibson and his Acadian wife Euphrosie Templet and widow of Thomas C. White, at the Brusly church in May 1867.   

Paul Joachim's second son Philogène, born in November 1822, may have died young. 

Paul Joachim's third son Antoine Coriolan or Coriolas, born in June 1824, married Gertrude Ernestine, called Ernestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Magloire Dupuy, fils and Eugènie Hébert, at the Brusly church in February 1852.  Their son Paul Louis Hotaire was born near Brusly in July 1853, and Laurent Émile in August 1860. 

Paul Joachim's fourth son Joseph Alfred, called Alfred, born in November 1830, married Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Élie Landry and Henriette Hébert and widow of Aristide Hébert and Maximilien Trosclair, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1860.

Paul Joachim's fifth son Auguste, born in February 1834, may not have married.

Paul Joachim's son Paulin married Elodie, daughter of Jean Alexandrie and his Acadian wife Emerante Foret, at the Brusly church in January 1861.

Simon's fourth and youngest son Eusilien, also called Louis, from second wife Anne-Louise Quimine, born at Manchac in February 1798, married Marie Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Doiron, fils and Rosalie Bourg of West Baton Rouge Parish, probably at St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in the late 1810s.  One wonders if they had any children, at least any who survived childhood. 

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An aging Babin came to Louisiana from France aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early December 1785, but no new family line came of it. 

Paul (c1732-?) à Vincent? à Antoine Babin

Paul, son of perhaps Pierre Babin and Marie Landry, born perhaps at Minas in c1733, was deported from one of the French Maritimes islands to France in 1758 and settled at Pleudihen, near St.-Malo.  He may have been the Paul Babin who embarked on corsair duty aboard the ship Le Tigre in 1761, was captured by the British, released in 1763, returned to Pleudihen, sailed from France to the Falkland Islands aboard L'Aigle in November 1765, and returned to France.  In his early 50s and still unmarried, he sailed with the family of his widowed brother-in-law René Landry from St.-Malo in 1785, followed them to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores, north of Baton Rouge, and probably never married.  

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Another Babin came to L