BOOK TEN-2:  The Louisiana Acadian "Begats" - continued

The Foundational Acadian Families of South Louisiana - continued

Chiasson

Guyon, or Dion or Denis dit La Vallée, son of Pierre Chiasson or Giasson, a farmer, and Marie Péroché, was born at La Rochelle, France, in c1638.  Guyon came to Acadia and settled at Port-Royal by c1666, when he married Jeanne, daughter of ____ Bernard and Andrée Guyon, at the English-occupied Acadian capital.  They had eight children, including four sons and three daughters.  Three of their daughters married into the Morin, Poirier dit de France, and Breau families.  All four of Guyon's sons married, into the Savoie, Blou, Le Moyne, and Mourier families, the younger two in Canada.  Guyon was not listed in the first Acadian census of 1671 because he had moved to Mouchecoudabouet, now Musquodoboit Harbor, near present-day Halifax, by June 1668 and was still there in October 1674.  They moved on to Chignecto, where Jeanne died during the early 1680s.  Guyon remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Canadians Pierre Martin and Joachine Lafleur of Sillery, at Québec in October 1683.  They settled at Chignecto.  Marie-Madeleine gave him no more sons but four more daughters, all born at Chignecto, three of whom married into the Carret, Pothier, De La Forestrie, and Pineau families.  Guyon died probably in his mid-50s at Chignecto by c1693, when his wife remarried there.  One of his daughters by his second wife moved to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, by the 1720s and was among the earliest European settlers on the island.  Another daughter by the second wife married a Canadian and settled at Rimouski on the lower St. Lawrence.  Guyon's four sons also created their own families, the older ones in Acadia, the younger ones in Canada, by marrying into the Savoie, Blou, Le Moyne, and Mourier families.  By 1755, Guyon Chiasson dit La Vallée's descendants could be found in the St. Lawrence valley, where they had gone as early as the late 1690s; on Île St.-Jean; and at Chignecto.  

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered the family even farther.  The first Acadians in Nova Scotia rounded up by the British in the fall of 1755 were the ones at Chignecto.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New English forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto settlers, perhaps including Chiassons, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  Chiassons were among them.  A family was shipped to South Carolina aboard the British transport Cornwallis.  Another Chiasson, a bachelor, went to South Carolina aboard the sloop Endeavor.  Two Chiasson wives also ended up in South Carolina.  At least one Chiasson from South Carolina left the colony in late 1763 for Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, with hundreds of his fellow Acadians. 

Some of their kinsmen escaped the roundup at Chignecto and fled to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where, at Shediac and Mirimichi, they survived as best they could.  Later, they moved on to Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  One Chiasson family, kin to the family that had gone to South Carolina, eluded the British for a number of years but eventually was captured or surrendered.  

When the British rounded up their cousins still at Chignecto, the Chiassons of Île St.-Jean, living on an island still controlled by France, remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up the Acadians on the island and deported them to France.  The crossing to France decimated this branch of the family.  Two Chiasson wives and their families were lost at sea when their ship, the British transport Violet, sank in a mid-Atlantic storm in December 1758.  There were no survivors.  Many Chiassons and their families also crossed on the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  Most of them did not survive the terrible crossing.  Some of the survivors died at St.-Malo soon after reaching the Breton port.  Those who endured the rigors of the crossing did what they could to make a life for themselves in St.-Malo's teeming suburbs.  Meanwhile, Chiassons from Île St.-Jean landed at ports other than St.-Malo, including Cherbourg and Rochefort.  They, too, did their best to make a life for themselves in the mother country.  In the early 1770s, Chiassons from St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, and from Cherbourg participated in an attempt by French authorities to settle Acadians on marginal land owned by an influential nobleman in the Poitou region.  There, they had more children and buried more of them.  The settlement failed after two years of effort.  In November and December 1775, the Chiassons retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians and their families to the port city of Nantes, where, again, they subsisted as best they could on government handouts.  One Chiasson worked as a sailor and a cooper, the other as a carpenter.  During the American Revolution, in late 1778, a Chiasson couple, recently married, were deported along with dozens of other Acadians from the French-controlled island of Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland to La Rochelle, France.  Two sons were born to them there, and one of the sons died an infant.  The family probably returned to Miquelon in 1784 after the British returned the island to France.  In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  The two Chiasson families still at Nantes agreed to take it.  Both families originally booked passage on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, one family's infant son was too ill to travel when L'Amitié left Paimboeuf, the port for Nantes, in late August 1785.  The infant died the following month, and the family crossed on La Caroline, the last of  the Seven Ships, which left Nantes in late October and reached New Orleans in December.

Back in North America, some of the Chiassons of Île St.-Jean had managed to escape the British roundup of 1758 and joined their Chignecto cousins on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore and at Restigouche.  The British attacked Restigouche in July 1760 and captured 300 Acadians before sailing away.  Most of Chiassons at Restigouche eluded capture.  After the war ended, one family moved down to Nipisiguit, now Bathurst, on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, where they were living in 1772, and then  moved to Miscou, an island on the southern end of the Baie des Chaleurs, later in the decade.  Their sons settled at Carleton and Paspébiac on the southern coast of the Gaspé Peninsula in present-day Québec Province, and at Caraquet in northeastern New Brunswick.  Other Chiassons who had escaped the British also settled at Rustico and Tignish on Île St.-Jean, renamed Prince Edward Island in 1798; at Chéticamp, Grand-Étang, and Margaree on Cape Breton Island, formerly Île Royale; on Île Miquelon; and on the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, now part of Québec Province.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

When the war with Britain finally ended, the Acadians being held as prisoners in Nova Scotia, including at least one family of Chiassons, faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles, including Chiassons, chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies, including a Chiasson from South Carolina, already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, four were Chiassons.

One of the Chiassons in Nova Scotia may have heard through the Acadian grapevine that his parents, who had been deported from Chignecto to South Carolina in 1755, died in that British colony but that his younger brother had survived the ordeal and emigrated to French St.-Domingue.  Beginning in November 1764, 600 Acadian prisoners from Halifax and other Nova Scotia compounds, the first group of 200 led by the Beausoleil Broussards, began leaving Halifax on chartered vessels heading for Cap-Français.  The Chiassons joined one of the later expeditions that left Halifax for the island port.  One could be certain that if the older brother knew his younger brother was still languishing on St.-Domingue, he would search for him as soon as he reached the island port. 

Chiassons had settled early in Acadia and were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  The first to reach New Orleans was a family from Halifax, which arrived via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in 1765.  Evidently on their way to Louisiana, the head of this family, Pierre, retrieved his younger brother Paul from the island colony.  Pierre and Paul settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans, where Pierre and his wife had more children, and where Paul created a family of his own.  Also with Pierre and Paul was nephew Jean-Baptiste Chiasson, who grew up on the river; however, after Jean-Baptiste came of age, he moved to the Opelousas District during the late 1780s and, with a cousin recently arrived from France, helped create a western branch of the family.  Meanwhile, a second wave of  Chiassons appeared in late 1785 on two of the Seven Ships from France.  Jean-Baptiste Chiasson came with his third wife, a Frenchwoman, and his two sons.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, where they and their descendants created another center of family settlement.  Basile Chiasson also came to Louisiana from France in 1785, but he and his family did not settle on the upper Lafourche.  They went, instead, to the Opelousas District, the first of the family to settle west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  By the late antebellum period, only a single Chiasson family remained on the river, in Ascension Parish.  The others lived on the western prairies or on bayous Lafourche and Terrebonne.  Although they all were related, there seems to have been little interaction between the two branches of the family, such was the barrier imposed by the Atchafalaya Basin even during the steamboat era.  

A few Chiassons owned slaves during the late antebellum period.  The largest slaveholder in the family was Adrien Chiasson of Ascension Parish, who held eight slaves in 1860.  Two of his cousins in Lafayette Parish and a cousin in Lafourche Parish also held a hand full of slaves each, but, like Adrien, none of them owned enough bondsmen to be considered part of the planter class.  The great majority of Chiassons owned no slaves at all, at least none who appeared on the federal slave schedules of 1850 and 1860.  

Over a dozen Chiassons served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  Several of them were captured and held by the Federals, one of them at Camp Morton, Indiana, outside of Indianapolis, but all the Chiasson prisoners of war returned to their families.  Not so lucky was Adrien Charles Chiasson, who served in Company K of 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Ascension Parish, which fought under General Robert E. Lee in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania.  According to his Confederate service record, Adrien Charles died in a general hospital at Culpeper Courthouse, Virginia, in May 1862, a few weeks before General Lee became commander of the Army of Northern Virginia.  Adrien Charles lies buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Richmond, so one wonders if he was transferred to a hospital in the capital city and died there instead of in Culpeper. 

The war took its toll on the Chiasson family fortunes back home.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every farm and plantation their forces could reach.  Meanwhile, Union navy gunboats shelled and burned dozens of houses along the river.  Successive Federal incursions devastated the Bayou Lafourche valley early in the war, and the valley lay under the hard hand of Federal occupation for most of the conflict.  Federal armies marched three times through the Teche and upper Vermilion valleys, including the Grand Coteau area, and burned and pillaged many farms, some of them no doubt owned by Chiassons.  Thanks to these Federal invasions, emancipation came early to the area, with its resulting economic and social turmoil.  Confederate foraging parties and cutthroat Jayhawkers also plagued the areas where Chiassons lived, adding to the family's misery. ...

Today, members of the family on both sides of the Atchafalaya Basin use the spelling Chaisson almost as often as they do the older spelling, Chiasson.  The family's name also is spelled Chaison, Chaseant, Cheasson, Chiassond, Chianson, Chiasmon, Chiason, Chieason, Chieçon, Chiesson, Giason, Giasson, Schiasson, Sciasson, Siachon, Siasson, Seisson, Siesson.01

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Five Chiassons, including two brothers and a nephew, came to Louisiana from Halifax and French St.-Domingue in 1765.  They settled along the river above New Orleans on what became known as the Acadian Coast, but the nephew did not remain there.  He crossed the Atchafalaya Basin in the 1780s and helped create a new center of family settlement there:

  Pierre (c1729-?) à Gabriel dit Pierre à Guyon dit La Vallée Chiasson

Pierre, oldest son of Abraham Chiasson and Marie Poirier, born probably at Chignecto in c1729, married Osite, daughter of Paul Landry and Marie Hébert, probably at Chignecto in c1755.  They escaped the British in 1755 and took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By the early 1760s, they had either been captured by, or surrendered to, the British, who sent them to a prisoner-of-war camp in Nova Scotia.  The British counted them at Fort Cumberland, formerly French Beauséjour, near their former home at Chignecto, in August 1763.  With a young son and a young nephew in tow, they emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, French-St.-Domingue, in 1764-65.  They evidently retrieved Pierre's younger brother Paul at Cap-Français on the way to New Orleans.  Osite had been pregnant when they left Nova Scotia.  She gave birth to a daughter either on the voyage to Louisiana or at New Orleans in October 1765.  After baptizing the baby in early December, the family settled at Cabahannocer, a settled Acadian community on the river above New Orleans, where Osite gave Pierre more children.  Pierre died probably in his 60s by November 1794, when his wife remarried at Cabahannocer.  His daughter evidently died young.  Only one of his three sons married and settled on what was called the Lower Acadian Coast.

Oldest son Michel, born in c1759 during exile, followed his parents into imprisonment in Nova Scotia and his widowed mother to Louisiana and Cabahannocer.  He died at Cabahannocer in September 1777, age 18.  He did not marry.  

Pierre's second son Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in March 1771, married Angélique, also called Leonie Anne and Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcel LeBlanc and Marie Breaux, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in April 1792.  Jean Baptiste died near Convent, St. James Parish, in March 1832, age 63.  His daughters married into the Lacoste and Poirier families. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born at Cabahannocer in April 1795, married Francoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Athanase Dugas and Françoise Broussard of Ascension Parish, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1817.  Their son Jean Adrien, called Adrien, was born in Ascension Parish in March 1824.  They may have had a son named Adrien Charles, born in c1834.  Jean Baptiste, fils died in Ascension Parish in October 1861, age 66.  One of his sons created a family of his own, and the other one died in Virginia during the War of 1861-65. 

Older son Jean Adrien, married Marie Anaïse, daughter of Dominique Drivon and Anna Duval, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in July 1849.  Their son Jean Ernest was born in Ascension Parish in April 1852 but died the following June; Louis Joseph Fernand, called Fernand, was born in June 1853 but died at age 10 in June 1863; Paul John Henry was born in July 1856; Charles Maurice in July 1857; Robert in March 1860 but died at age 7 in August 1867; and René Adrien, also called Victorin, was born in November 1862 but died at age 5 months the following April.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Ascension Parish counted eight slaves--five males and three females, all black, ranging in age from 52 years to 3 months, living in 2 houses--on Adrien Chiasson's farm between James Hewitt's plantation, which held 176 slaves, and J. François, a "Negro," who owned five slaves, in the parish's Third Ward.  

During the War of 1861-65, Jean Baptiste, fils's younger son Adrien Charles served in Company K of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Ascension Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  According to his service record, Adrien Charles died in a Confederate hospital at Culpeper, Virginia, in May 1862.  He lies buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Richmond, which may mean that he died in a hospital in the Confederate capital, not in Culpeper.  

Baptiste's second son Michel le jeune, also called Paul, born at Cabahannocer in June 1797, died near Convent, St. James Parish, age 17 in September 1814.

Baptiste's third son Zenon, born near Convent, in St. James Parish, in June 1809, died near Convent, age 17, in February 1827. 

Baptiste's fourth and youngest son Louis Charles, born probably in St. James Parish in c1814, died in Ascension Parish in April 1840, age 27.  He evidently did not marry.  

Pierre's third and youngest son Simon-Pierre, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahnnocer, age unrecorded, in May 1773, probably died young.  

Paul (c1746-1820) à Gabriel dit Pierre à Guyon dit La Vallée Chiasson

Paul, perhaps the youngest son of Abraham Chiasson and Marie Poirier, born probably at Chignecto in c1746, followed his parents to South Carolina, where colonial officials counted him as an 18-year-old orphan in August 1763.  Later that year, he followed other Acadian exiles in the colony to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, to work on a new French naval base on the north side of the island at Môle St.-Nicolas.  He did not remain there.  His older brother Pierre evidently retrieved him at Cap-Français on the voyage down from Halifax.  Paul accompanied his brother and sister-in-law to New Orleans and settled with them at Cabahanocer, where he appeared in a Spanish censuses in April 1766 on the east bank of the river.  The Spanish counted him there in September 1769, this time on the west bank of the river.  He was still a bachelor.  He married fellow Acadian Marie-Madeleince Blanchard probably at Cabahannocer in c1770.  They settled upriver at San Gabriel in what became Iberville Parish.  Paul died in Iberville Parish in March 1820, age 74.  His daughters married into the Babin, Charpentier, Hébert, Hernandez, Jaeleus, and LeBlanc families.  Two of his four sons settled in Iberville Parish, but, except for the blood, none of their lines endured.

Oldest son Paul, fils, baptized at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in October 1776, died at San Gabriel in December 1790, age 14.  

Paul, père's second son Étienne, born at San Gabriel in c1784, married Marie Julie, called Julie, daughter of Joseph Sharp and Marie Anne Choquette of Baton Rouge, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in August 1809.  Étienne died near St. Gabriel in March 1821, age 27.  His daughter married into the Cobb family.  Except for its blood, this line of the family did not endure. 

Only son Lucien, born near St. Gabriel in December 1810, probably died young. 

Paul, père's third son Victorin or Victor, born at San Gabriel in March 1786, married Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Joseph Dupuis and Ludivine Landry, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in May 1809.  Their daughter married into the Labauve family.  Victorin remarried to Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac LeBlanc and Félicité Melançon, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1820.  Their daughter married into the Boote family.  Victorin died near St. Gabriel in April 1824.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Victorin was age 30 when he died, but he was 38.  He had no sons by his second wife, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with his only son in the late 1820s.  

Only son Victor, fils, by first wife Henriette Dupuis, born probably in Iberville Parish in c1815, died at age 14 in January 1829. 

Paul, père's fourth and youngest son Félicien was buried at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in November 1791.  

Jean-Baptiste (c1762-1854) à Abraham à Gabriel dit Pierre à Guyon dit La Vallée Chiasson

Jean-Baptiste, only son of Joseph Chiasson and Annette Sonnier and nephew of Pierre and Paul, was born at Halifax in c1762.  His parents died soon after, and his uncle Pierre raised him.  He accompanied his uncle's family to Louisiana via French St.-Domingue in 1764-65 and followed them to Cabahannocer on the river, but he did not remain there.  After he came of age in the 1780s, he crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Opelousas District, where he married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean LeBlanc and his Anglo wife Marie Hayes, in c1786.  They settled on Prairie Bellevue east of present-day Opelousas and then moved farther out on the prairies to upper Bayou Plaquemine Brulé.  Jean-Baptiste died at the home of his youngest son Magloire at Beaumont, Texas, in July 1854.  His family insisted that Jean-Baptiste died at age 109, but he was closer to 92--one of the last of the Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join his ancestors.  His daughters married into the Cart and Dugas families.  Four of his five sons settled on the prairies and bayous of southwest Louisiana and southeast Texas. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, fils, called Baptiste, born at Opelousas in April 1792, married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Olivier dit Pierrot Dugas and Sophie Gautreaux of Prairie Sorel, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1820.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted four slaves--one male and three females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 1--on Jean Bte. Chiaisson's farm in the parish's western district.  Jean Baptiste, fils died in Lafayette Parish in April 1852, age 60. His succession record was not filed at the Vermilionville courthouse until November 1855.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted six slaves--one male and five females, all black, ages 58 to 6--on Mrs. John Bt. Chiason's farm next to Louis Chiason; this was Jean Baptiste, fils's widow, Julie Dugas.  Baptiste and Julie's daughters married into the Michel, Nezat, and Sonnier families.  Six of Baptiste and Julie's eight sons created their own families on the prairies.

Oldest son Gédéon, called Zédé, born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in October 1821, died in Lafayette Parish at age 8 in September 1829.

 Baptiste's second Jean Baptiste III, called fils, born in Lafayette Parish in October 1824, married Amelie, daughter of Narcisse Begnaud and Frances Guilbert, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in April 1845.  Their son Alexandre was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 15 months, in March 1851; Paul Ambroise was born in April 1853; and Jean Baptiste IV in February 1857.  Jean Baptiste III died in Lafayette Parish in November 1868.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the marriage, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jean Baptiste died "at age 50 yrs.," but he was 44.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in December.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Alexandre Alexandre married Eveline, daughter of fellow Acadians Sosthène, also called Lasty, Vincent and Oliva Benoit, at the Vermilionville church in August 1868. 

Baptiste's third son Paul or Hippolyte Oscar, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 9 days, in February 1828, married Divine, daughter of Adolphe Nezat and Virginia Patin, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1848.  Their son Pierre Aniset was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1849.  Divine died two weeks later, probably from the rigors of childbirth.  Hippolyte remarried to Sidalise Morvant probably in the 1850s, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Élisabeth, daughter of John Caruthers and his Acadian wife Adélaïde Hébert, at the Vermilionville church in June 1859.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--a 65-year-old black male--on Hypolite Chiuson's farm.  Hippolyte's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in March 1863.  He would have been age 35 that year.

Baptiste's fourth son Pierre, baptized at the Vermilionville church at age 5 months in November 1831, married Fanelie, daughter of Francois Guilbert and Émelie Begnaud, at the Vermilionville church in September 1852.  Their son François was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1853 but died at age 3 in October 1856; Pierre Numa was born in September 1857; Jacques in December 1859; and Pierre, fils in March 1862 but died at age 5 (the recording priest said age 3) in July 1867. 

Baptiste's fifth son Narcisse, baptized at the Vermilionville church at age 4 months in January 1834, married Julie, daughter of French Canadians Cyprien Roy and Celina Roy, at the Breaux Bridge church in March 1859.  Their son Joseph Marius was born near Breaux Bridge in November 1861, and Jean Baptiste Genesis in Lafayette Parish in February 1869.  During the War of 1861-65, Narcisse, like his brother Joseph le jeune, was a conscript from St. Martin Parish, but Confederate records do not reveal if he served in an organized unit.  He and his family were living near Arnaudville soon after the war. 

Baptiste's sixth son Edmond le jeune, baptized at the Vermilionville church at age 4 months in May 1837, married Helena or Hélène, daughter of William Beard and his Acadian wife Julie Trahan, at the the Vermilionville church in February 1860.  Their son Joseph Théophile was born in Lafayette Parish in September 1869. 

Baptiste's seventh son Joseph le jeune, baptized at the Vermilionville church at age 3 months in May 1839, married Adriske or Advise, daughter of fellow Acadians Symphorien Prejean and Eugènie Breaux, at the Vermilionville church in September 1861.  During the War of 1861-65, Joseph, like his brother Narcisse, was a conscript from St. Martin Parish, but Confederate records do not reveal if he served in an organized unit.  Joseph le jeune's succession record may have been filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in February 1866.  He would have been age 27 that year. 

Baptiste's eighth and youngest son Ignace, born in Lafayette Parish in December 1840, died at age 2 1/2 in August 1843. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's second son Joseph, born at Opelousas in April 1796, married Marie Tarsile, daughter of fellow Acadians Augustin Dugas and Marie Rose Duhon of La Butte and widow of Alexandre Leger, at the St. Martinville church in February 1818.  Their daughter married into the Begnaud and Doucet families.  Joseph remarried to Rosalie Vizina in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1826.  They settled near Grand Coteau.  Three of his six sons by both wives married by 1870. 

Oldest son Joseph Drosin, called Drosin, from first wife Marie Tarsile Dugas, born in St. Martin Parish in July 1819, married Madeleine Gatt in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1840, and remarried to Marie Myrza Lejeune, perhaps a fellow Acadian, in the 1850s.  They settled near Grand Coteau.  Their son Alexis was born in November 1857.  Drosin's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in December 1865.  He would have been age 46 that year.  

Joseph's second son Edmond le jeune, by first wife Marie Tarsile Dugas, baptized at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, age 14 months, in May 1822, married Phelonise, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Boutin and his Creole wife Uranie Miller, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in December 1845.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Théodore was born in November 1849. 

Joseph's third son Valmont, by second wife Rosalie Vizina, born near Grand Coteau in January 1829, married Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Hébert and Célestine Trahan, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1850, and sanctified that marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1851.  Their son Valmont, fils was born near Grand Coteau in November 1850.  Valmont remarried to Célestine David, also called Bienville, perhaps a fellow Acadian.  Their son Napoléon was born near Grand Coteau in October 1861; Joseph Adam near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in December 1863; Froisin at Coulee Triffe in July 1867; and Paul in January 1870.  During the War of 1861-65, Valmont enlisted in Company K of the 10th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Valmont's Confederate service was short, however.  Two days after he enlisted at Camp Moore, Louisiana, in July 1861, he was discharged "on account of physical disability," so he did not leave the Bayou State. 

Joseph's fourth son Valcour, by second wife Rosalie Vizina, born near Grand Coteau in March 1832, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Joseph's fifth son Drosin, by second wife Rosalie Vizina, born near Grand Coteau in August 1837, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Joseph's sixth and youngest son Joseph Azolin, by second wife Rosalie Vizina, born near Grand Coteau in March 1846, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.  

Jean-Baptiste, père's third son Edmond, born at Opelousas in November 1798, died at the home of Louis Lavigne at Prairie du Large, St. Landry Parish, in February 1819, age 21.  Edmond evidently did not marry.  

Jean-Baptiste, père's fourth son Gérard Christopher, baptized at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, age 2, in July 1807, married Aspasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Guidry and Adélaïde Duhon, at the Vermilionville church in May 1826.  Their daughters married into the Gatt family.  Gérard, père, at age 63, may have remarried to French Canadian Susanne, called Suzette, Istre, widow of Édouard Cortine or Courtine, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1868. 

Oldest son Edmond le jeune, by first wife Aspasie Guidry, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 16 months, in May 1826, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Gérard Christopher's second son Onésime, by first wife Aspasie Guidry, baptized at the Vermilionville church, at age 2 in March 1833, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Gérard Christopher's third son Agerin, by first wife Aspasie Guidry, baptized at the Vermilionville church at age 6 months in September 1834, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Gérard, fils, by first wife Aspasie Guidry,born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in September 1848, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.   

Jean-Baptiste, père's fifth and youngest son Magloire, also called McGuire, born at Opelousas in March 1807, settled in Beaumont, Texas, by 1840.  It was at Magloire's home in Beaumont that his father Jean-Baptiste died in July 1854, in his early 90s.

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Six more Chiassons--two families led by first cousins--came to Louisiana in 1758 aboard two of the Seven Ships from France.  One family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche and created a large center of family settlement there.  The other cousin settled on the western prairies, where he helped create another new center of family settlement:

Jean-Baptiste (c1728-?) à Gabriel dit Pierre à Guyon dit La Vallée Chiasson

Jean-Baptiste le jeune, oldest son of François Chiasson and Anne Doucet, born probably at Chignecto in c1729, followed his family to the French Maritimes, where he married Louise, daughter of Joseph Precieux and Anne Haché, probably at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, the church for Havre-St.-Pierre and Havre-aux-Sauvages, in c1752.  Between 1753 and 1757, Louise gave him three children, a son and two daughters.  One of the daughters evidently died in infancy.  The British deported Jean-Baptiste le jeune, Louise, and their two surviving children to St.-Malo, France, in 1758.  The two children died at sea.  Louise died at St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, soon after they reached the French port.  Jean-Baptiste le jeune remarried to Marguerite-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Dugas and Marguerite Benoit, at St.-Melior-des-Ondes, near St.-Malo, in June 1761. She gave him two sons at La Blanche and St.-Melior-des-Ondes in 1763 and 1765.  Marguerite-Josèphe died at St.-Servan in June 1766, and Jean-Baptiste le jeune remarried again--his third marriage--to Frenchwoman Anne-Perrine, daughter of Jacques Joanne and Perrine Charpentier, at St.-Servan in January 1769.  She gave him another son at St.-Servan in 1769.  In the early 1770s, they followed other Acadians exiles to Poitou, where Anne-Perrine gave Jean-Baptiste le jeune another daughter in 1775.  They retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes in December 1775.  A decade later, Jean-Baptiste le jeune took Anne-Perrine and two of his sons to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships of 1785, which reached New Orleans in early November.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where the two sons created vigorous lines in a new center of family settlement. 

Older son Joseph-François, by second wife Marguerite-Josèphe Dugas, born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in October 1769, followed his father, stepmother, and younger half-brother to Louisiana.  He settled with them at Ascension on the river above New Orleans, where he married Marie, daughter of François Simoneaux of Lorraine, France, and his Acadian wife Marie-Osite-Anne Corporon, in July 1789.  Marie's family had come to Louisiana from Maryland in 1766.  Spanish officials counted Joseph-François and Marie on the left, or east, bank of the river at Ascension in 1791.  Four years later, they had settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughter married into the Culere or Tulere family.  Joseph-François remarried to Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Lejeune and Anastasie Levron, at Assumption on the upper Lafourche in January 1797.  Marguerite also had come to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, she and Joseph-François probably had known one another for years.  They settled near the boundary of what became Assumption and Ascension parishes.  Their daughter married into the Guidry family.  Four of Joseph-François's six sons created their own families in Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes.  His second son's line was especially prolific; the son's descendants settled in the Chackbay area of Lafourche Parish, north of present-day Thibodaux. 

Oldest son François-Victor, by first wife Marie Simoneaux, born at Ascension in July 1790, married Claire Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Benoît Comeaux and Anne Blanchard, probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in the 1810s.  Claire had been born aboard L'Amitié on it way from France to Louisiana in 1785, so she was nearly five years older than François.  Their son Pierre Eugène was born probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in c1815; and Jean Faustin, called Faustin, in March 1826.  Their daughters married into the Aisenne, Aupied, and Boudreaux families.  François-Victor's sons also created their own families on the bayou. 

Older son Pierre Eugène married Françoise Hortense or Hortense Françoise, daughter of Jean Lagarde and his Acadian wife Françoise Adélaïde Templet, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1837.  Their son Joseph Justineau was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1840.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin and Thibodeaux families.  Pierre Eugène remarried to Felonise, daughter of fellow Acadians Benjamin Landry and Delphine Breaux and widow of Valéry Boutary, at the Thibodeaux church in October 1860.  Their son Joseph Fernand, called Fernand, was born in Lafourche Parish in December 1863; and François Augustin in April 1866.  Pierre Eugène died in Lafourche Parish in October or November 1867, age 42.  A petition for his succession inventory was filed at the Thibodeaux courthouse the following month.  

François-Victor's younger son Faustin married Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry Bourgeois and Rosalie Richard, at the Thibodaux church in May 1851.  During the War of 1861-65, Faustin served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment of Militia, which fought at the Battle of Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in October 1862.  He was captured with most of his regiment and paroled at Thibodaux a few weeks later.  

Joseph-François's second son Pierre-Alexandre, by first wife Marie Simoneaux, born at Assumption in August 1793, married Marcelline or Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Thibodeaux and Rose D'Amours, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1815.  Their son Pierre Eugène, called Eugène, was born in Assumption Parish in November 1818; Evariste Alexis in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1824; Sylvain Théodule in May 1826; Paul Adrien, called Adrien, in February 1829; Jean Léon, called Léon in October 1831; Pierre Aurelien Georges Bedford, called George, in June 1834; Henry Octave, called Octave, in July 1837; and Joseph Aurelien died 32 hours after his birth in April 1840.  Pierre Alexandre died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in July 1865, age 71.  His daughter married into the Martin family.  Six of his eight sons created their own families in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes. 

Oldest son Eugène married Sophie, also called Jolivette and Solidele, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Usé and Marie Quimine, at the Thibodauxville church in May 1835.  Their son Pierre Edmond, called Edmond, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1836; Théodore in July 1840; Joseph Ulysse, called Ulysse, in April 1842; Eugène Ernest, called Ernest, in February 1844 but died at age 18 months in October 1845; and Evariste Adam was born in October 1847.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in Lafourche Parish counted five slaves--two males and three females, two blacks and three mulattoes, ranging in age from 28 to 1--on P. Eugène Chiasson's farm in the parish's First Ward.  Four of his five sons created their own families on the Lafourche.

Oldest son Edmond married Louisa, daughter of Jacques Duet and his Acadian wife Adèle Molaison, at the Thibodaux church in April 1858.  Their son Pierre was born in Lafourche Parish in October 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Edmond served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment of Militia, which fought at the Battle of Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in October 1862.  He was captured with most of his regiment and paroled at Thibodeaux a few weeks later.  

 During the War of 1861-65, Eugène's second son Théodore served in Company E of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia, and Alabama.  One source says he died in July 1863, but he was actually captured near Jackson, Mississippi, forwarded to Snyder's Bluff, and then sent to Camp Morton, Indiana, a prisoner-of-war compound near Indianapolis.  Meanwhile, his unit roster listed him as a deserter.  Théodore survived his ordeal at Camp Morton and married Séverine, daughter of  Jacques Adam and Julie Navarre, at the Vacherie church, St. James Parish, in May 1866; the marriage also was recorded in Lafourche Parish the same month.  Their son Eugène le jeune was born in Lafourche Parish in April 1869.  

War of 1861-65, Eugène's third son Ulysse served in Company I of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Ulysse married Julie, daughter of Célestin Guyot, perhaps a Foreign Frenchman, and his Anglo wife Marie Elizabeth Ferguson, at the Thibodaux church in September 1865.  Their son Joseph Ulysse, fils was born in Lafourche Parish in September 1865; and Joachim Célestin was born in January 1870.  

Eugène's fifth son Evariste Adam married Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte Hébert and Victoire Boudreaux, at the Thibodaux church in May 1867.  

Pierre Alexandre's second son Evariste Alexis married Marie Adele, called Adele, daughter of Alexis Hymel and Marcelline Badeaux, at the Thibodaux church in January 1843.  Their son Pierre Numa, called Numa or Luma, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1845; Onesime Augustin in November 1848; and Julien Anatole in November 1864.  Their daughter married into the Rodrique family.  Two of Evariste Alexis's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Numa married Célestine, daughter of Michel Montz and Marie Portier, at the Thibodaux church in January 1864.   

Evariste Alexis's second son Onésime married Céleste, another daughter of Jacques Adam and Julie Navarre, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in January 1869, and sanctified the marriage at the Vacherie church, St. James Parish, in February.  Their son Camille was born in Lafourche Parish in November 1870.  

Pierre Alexandre's third son Sylvain Théodule married Marie Eugènie, called Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Celanie Breaux, at the Thibodaux church in June 1847.  Their son Pierre Octave, called Octave le jeune, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1848; Léo Oscar near Lockport in September 1853; Henry Isaac in March 1856; Sylvain Osémé near Raceland in July 1862; Joseph near Lockport in February 1865; Jean William in June 1867; and Joseph Félix in August 1869.  One of Sylvain's sons married before 1870. 

Oldest son Octave le jeune married Laiza, daughter of fellow Acadian Urbain Aucoin and his Creole wife Céleste Adam, at the Lockport church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1869.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born near Lockport in November 1869.  

Pierre Alexandre's fourth son Adrien married Marie, also called Clelie, daughter of Jacques Pontiff and Emeranthe Hymel, at the Thibodaux church in February 1850.  Their son Ernest died in Lafourche Interior Parish at age 2 months in January 1851.  Adrien remarried to Hypoline or Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Charles Richard and Scholastique Bourgeois, at the Thibodeaux church in April 1853.  Their son Adam Augustin was born in Lafourche Parish in December 1855, and Joseph Alcide in August 1857.  Adrien remarried again--his third marriage--to Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Edmond Thibodeaux and Élisabeth Robichaux and widow of T. Richard, at the Thibodaux church in March 1860.  Their son Albert was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1866.  

Pierre Alexandre's fifth son Jean Léon died in Ascension Parish in October 1853.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Léon was age 26 when he died, but he was only 22.  He did not marry.  

Pierre Alexandre's sixth son George married Doralise, another daughter of Alexis Hymel and Marcelline Badeaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in July 1854.  Their son Oleus was born in Lafourche Parish in late 1855 but died at age 2 1/2 in January 1858; Wilfrid Édouard was born in April 1861; Augustin Clerville near Vacherie, St. James Parish, in October 1867; and Joseph Lovinci near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in March 1870.  

Pierre Alexandre's seventh son Octave married Marie Estelle, called Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Molaison and Marie Louise Hébert, at the Thibodaux church in February 1858.  Their son Pierre Édouard was born in Lafourche Parish in November 1860, Joseph Ernest in October 1864, and Joseph Arthur in December 1866.

Joseph-François's third son Joseph-Marcellin, by first wife Marie Simoneaux, born at Assumption in December 1795, probably died young.  

Joseph-François's fourth son Jean-Baptiste-Prudent, by second wife Marguerite Lejeune, born at Assumption in June 1800, also probably died young.  

Joseph-François's fifth son Joseph Florentin Bernard, by second wife Marguerite Lejeune, born at Assumption in August 1804, married Marie Pauline, called Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Guidry and Marguerite Bergeron, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in October 1826.  Their son Jean Pierre, called Pierre, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1829; Marcellin in May 1834; Bernard in September 1836; and Joseph Justinien, called Justinien, in October 1840.  Joseph died in Terrebonne Parish in May 1854.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 45 when he died, but he was 49.  His daughters married into the Boucher, Clément, Marcel, and Watkins families.  Two of his three sons married by 1870, and two of them served Louisiana in uniform.

Oldest son Jean Pierre married Celina, daughter of fellow Acadians Nicolas Leandre Crochet and Madeleine Bergeron, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in April 1856.  Their son Adam had been baptized at the Houma church, age unrecorded, in July 1854; Leandre Richard was born in April 1856; Jean Pierre, fils in April 1859; and Joseph Lovenci in February 1867.

During the War of 1861-65, Joseph Florentin Bernard's second son Bernard served in Company H of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Terrebonne Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He married Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadians Evariste Aucoin and Émilie Boudreaux, at the Houma church in March 1864 while he was home waiting to be exchanged with his unit, which has been captured at Vicksburg the previous July.  Their son Élie Joseph was born in Terrebonne Parish in January 1865, Helesse Paulin in December 1866, and Evariste Audressi in October 1869.   

During the War of 1861-65, Joseph Florentin Bernard's third and youngest son Justinien served in Company E of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia, and Alabama.  

Joseph-François's sixth and youngest son Paul François Romain, also called Hippolyte, by second wife Marguerite Lejeune, born in Ascension Parish in January 1808, married fellow Acadian Marie Bathilde, called Bathilde, Bergeron in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in May 1830, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church in July 1855.  Their son Joseph Votcius was born in Terrebonne Parish in March 1850; twins Jean Baptiste and Théodule Léonard in February 1853; and Édouard Henry in July 1854.  Their daughters married into the Escassus, Henry, Klinke, Lacarr, Malbrough, Roos, and Whitney families.  

Jean-Baptiste's younger son Pierre-Louis, by third wife Anne-Perrine Joanne, half-brother of Joseph-Francois was born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in October 1769.  He followed his parents and older half-brother to Louisiana and settled with them on upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marguerite, daughter of Jean Le Boeuf and Renée Matherne of St.-Jean-Baptiste on the German Coast, in July 1805.  They settled in what became Terrebonne Parish.  Pierre's succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse in July 1833.  He would have been age 64 that year.  His daughters married into the Cunningham, Dugas, and Naquin families.  Two of three sons married and remained in Terrebonne Parish, settling near Montegut at the edge of the coastal marshes.  

Oldest son Joseph André, called André, born in Assumption Parish in December 1813, married Félicité Cilda, Ernildor, or Esilda Billiot probably in Terrebonne Parish in the late 1840s or early 1850s.  Their son Andrécis was born in Terrebonne Parish in October 1855, Marcel Florentin in June 1859, Faustin Paul in January 1865, Arthur Adam near Montegut in January 1868, and Joseph Alfred in June 1870. 

Pierre Louis's second son Jean Pierre Gabriel, called Gabriel and Briel, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1819, married Henriette Scholastique, also called Louise, daughter of Jean Dupré, fils and Eléonore LeBoeuf, at the Thibodaux church in September 1840.  Their son Jean Pierre, called Pierre, was born in Terrebonne Parish in July 1849; Ferdinand Léon in July 1851; Hermogène Maximin in August 1853; and Jean Placide in October 1855.  Their daughter married into the Guidry family.  Gabriel remarried to Elise, daughter of Jean Pierre Ledet and his Acadian wife Marie Josèphe Roger and widow of W. Bélanger, at the Montegut church in August 1869.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Pierre, by first wife Henriette Scholastique Dupré, married Marie, daughter of Marcellin Bélanger and Élize Ledet, at the Montegut church in February 1870.   

Pierre Louis's third and youngest son François Henry, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1821, married Marie Geneviève, also called Élisabeth, daughter of French Creole François André Dubois and Geneviève Durocher of Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodaux church in May 1844.  Their son François Martial, called Martial, was born in Terrebonne Parish in May 1845; Apollinaire Marcel in November 1848; and Édouard in October 1850.  Their daughter married into the Bourg and Malbrough families.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Martial married Basilise Elmire, daughter of Jean Charles Dupré and his Acadian wife Marie Céleste Naquin, at the Montegut church, Terrebonne Parish, in June 1870. 

Basile (c1749-c1808) à Jean-Baptiste à Gabriel dit Pierre à Guyon dit La Vallée Chiasson

Basile, only son of Pierre Chiasson and Catherine Bourgeois and Jean-Baptiste le jeune's first cousin, was born at Pointe Beauséjour, Chignecto, in c1750.  He followed his parents to Île St.-Jean and to Cherbourg, France.  He married fellow Acadian Monique Comeau probably at Cherbourg in c1772.  Between 1773 and 1775, Monique gave him three daughters, one of whom died an infant.  They joined other Acadian exiles in Poitou during the early 1770s and retreated to Nantes with other Poitou Acadians to Nantes in November 1775.  From 1780 to 1784, Monique gave him three sons at Nantes, but two of them died young.  In 1785, Basile and his family chose to go to Louisiana in the Seven Ships expedition.  They signed up to cross aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, but the illness of their youngest son delayed their crossing.  After the boy died, the family booked passage aboard La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in mid-December.  They chose to settle on the Opelousas prairies, where Monique died a few years later.  Basile remarried to Anne-Marie, called Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Thibodeaux and Françoise Sonnier, widow of L'ange Bourg, and sister of one of his daughter's husband, at Opelousas in July 1789.  Marie gave Basile more children, including three more sons.  His daughters by both wives married into the Thibodeaux, Cormier, Doucet, Petit dit Parrain, and Richard families.  Three of his sons by both wives married, but only one of the lines endured, in what became Lafayette Parish.

Oldest son Louis-Basile, by first wife Monique Comeau, baptized at Ste.-Croix, Nantes, in December 1780, died at age 21 months in August 1782.

Basile's second son Charles-Albert, by first wife Monique Comeau, born at Nantes in c1782, married Madeleine, daughter of French Canadian Charles Bourassa and his Acadian wife Madeleine Lalande, at Opelousas in September 1802.  Their child, perhaps a son, name unrecorded, died "du mal de machoire (from a hurt jaw; perhaps lockjaw)" at Opelousas in December 1804.  Charles's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in November 1848.  He would have been age 66 that year.  His daughters married into the Matte family.  He and his wife had no sons, at least none who survived childhood, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him.  

Basile's third son Louis-Joseph, by first wife Monique Comeau, baptized at Ste.-Croix, Nantes, in September 1784, died at Chantenay, near Nantes, in September 1785 on the eve of the family's departure for Louisiana.

Basile's fourth son Pierre, by second wife Anne-Marie Thibodeaux, born at Opelousas in September 1792, married Ludivine or Severine, daughter of Eustache Moreau and Dorothée Roy, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in September 1819.  Their daughter married into the Lanclos family.  Did Pierre father any sons?  

Basile's fifth son Louis, by second wife Anne-Marie Thibodeaux, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in October 1796, married Marie dite Doralise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Sonnier and Marie Thibodeaux of La Butte, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1817.  Their daughter married into the Bertrand and Melançon families.  Louis remarried to Susanne, daughter of fellow Acadians Augustin Dugas and Marie Duhon, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1828.  Their daughters married into the Albarado and Richard families.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted five slaves--fouir males and one female, all black, ranging in age from 35 years to 3 months--on Louis Chiaisson's farm in the parish's western district.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted six slaves--five males and one female, all mulatto except for one black, ages 50 to 6--on Louis Chiason's farm next to Mrs. John Bt. Chiason.  Louis may have remarried again--perhaps his third marriage--to Marie Carmelite Sidalise, daughter of fellow Acadians Leufroi Sonnier and Carmelite Comeaux and widow of Pierre Anaclet Richard, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in February 1869.  If so, Louis would have been in his early to mid-70s at the time of the wedding!  Five of his six sons by both wives created their own families on the prairies. 

Oldest son Louis Dupré, called Dupré and Dupréville, from first wife Doralise Sonner, born in St. Martin Parish in November 1818, married Marie Josephine, called Josephine, daughter of Simon Durio and his Acadian wife Marie Madeleine Landry of Grand Coteau, at the Vermilionville church in February 1840.  Their son Louis Dupré, fils was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1840; and twins Simon Homere, called Homere, and Simonet Emard or Aymar, called Aymar, in August 1848.  Louis Dupré, père died in Lafayette Parish in November 1859, age 41.  His three sons created their own families on the prairies.

Oldest son Louis Dupré, fils married Marie Émelie, called Émelie, daughter of Antoine Clavel and his Acadian wife Léontine Hébert, at the Vermilionville church in April 1860.  Their son Adam Ebrard was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1868.  During the War of 1861-65, Louis Dupré, fils served with his uncle Théogène in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

Dupré's second son Homere married cousin Adoiska, daughter of fellow Acadians Théodule Melançon and Elisa Chiasson, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1866. 

Dupré's third son Aymar married Augustine, another daughter of Antoine Clavel and Léontine Hébert, at the Vermilionville church in May 1870.  Aymar died in Lafayette Parish in November 1870.  Did he father any children? 

Louis's second son Joseph, by first wife Doralise Sonnier, born in St. Martin Parish in October 1819, married Marie Odile, called Odile, daughter of Francois Begnaud and his Acadian wife Mélanie Robichaux, at the Vermilionville church in December 1840.  Joseph died in Lafayette Parish in May 1842, age 22.  Did he father any sons?  

Louis's third son Pierre, also called Clerville, by first wife Doralise Sonnier, born in Lafayette Parish in July 1823, died at age 3 in August 1826. 

Louis's fourth son Théogène, by second wife Susanne Dugas, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 months, in April 1831, married Azema or Azémie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Trahan and his Creole wife Claire Dubois, at the Vermilionville church in November 1854.  Their son Cleopha was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1855, Jean Louis in August 1856, and Joseph Selma was born in May 1864.  During the War of 1861-65, Théogène served with his nephew Louis Dupré, fils in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Théogène's son Joseph was born a month after he returned to his unit following its exchange.  Théogène's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in February 1867.  He would have been age 36 that year.  

 Louis's fifth son Théodule, by second wife Susanne Dugas, born in Lafayette Parish in June 1832, married Adonatille or Donatille, daughter of fellow Acadian Olivier Guidry, fils and his Creole wife Marie Meaux, at the Vermilionville church in December 1858.  Their son Edgar was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1862, Louis Olivier in February 1864, Hebrard in May 1866 but died the following September, and Adam was born in September 1868.  

Louis's sixth and youngest son Aurelien, also called Chretien, by second wife Susanne Dugas, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 12 days, in November 1839, married fellow Acadian Marie Aphanelie, called Fanelly, Dugas in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in April 1860.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in September 1864.  He would have been age 25 that year.  Did he father any sons? 

Basile's sixth and youngest son Basile, fils, by second wife Anne-Marie Thibodeaux, born at Opelousas in c1800 and baptized there, age 4, in October 1804, died in Lafayette Parish in October 1862, age 62.  He evidently did not marry.  

Clément

Jean Clément, born at Jeffrets, bishopric of Coutances, France, in c1707, was not kin to the Vincent dit Cléments of British Nova Scotia and Île St.-Jean.  Jean came to Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, by c1722 probably as a young fisherman.  He married Marie-Josèphe Druce of Minas at Port-Toulouse on the island in c1726.  Marie-Josèphe's roots were in British Nova Scotia.  Her father Benjamin was an Englishman, son of John Druce and Anne Turner of Benson, Oxfordshire.  Benjamin had been baptized an Anglican there on 25 January 1685.  He came to Acadia by 1710, probably as a British soldier.  He had to convert to Catholicism to marry Madeleine, daughter of Acadians Robert Henry and Marie-Madeleine Godin of Minas.  Witnesses to his profession of faith, recorded on 6 December 1710, were Pierre Melanson and Pierre Thériot of Minas.  Benjamin died at Minas in March 1714, age 29; one wonders if his death was war-related.  Daughter Marie-Josèphe, born at Minas in late January 1712, was his only child.  Benjamin's widow Madeleine remarried to Jean-Baptiste Radoux in c1715, and he likely took them to Île Royale.  Between 1732 and 1754, Marie-Josèphe gave Jean Clément at least 10 childern, eight sons and two daughters, all born on the island.  Jean and Marie-Josèphe's daughters married into the Lirard and LeHardy families from France.  The extended family settled at St.-Esprit, on the Atlantic side of the island, where a French official counted them in February 1752.  Jean was still working as a fisherman at the time. 

When the British rounded up the Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755, the Cléments on Île Royale, living in territory controlled by France, remained unmolested.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the British rounded up most of the island Acadians.  Hilaire, son of Jean Clément and Marie-Josèphe Druce, was only age 12 and living with relatives probably at St.-Espirit when the British deported the island Acadians to France.  Hilaire, his older sister Marguerite, her husband François Hardy, and six-year-old nephew Hilaire Hardy made the crossing aboard the British transport Queen of Spain, which reached St.-Malo in mid-November.  Marguerite did not survive the ordeal.  

Hilaire Clément lived in France for over a quarter century, working as a domestic.  In the early 1770s, still a bachelor in his late 20s and living at Trigavou, near St.-Malo, he took part in a settlement venture in the Poitou region and found a wife there.  While living at Monthoiron, south of Châtellerault, he married Tarsile, daughter of fellow Acadians François Naquin and Angélique Blanchard, at Leigné-les-Bois in October 1774.  Their daughter Marie was born at nearby Bonneuil-Matours in July 1775.  In March 1776, Hilaire and his family left Poitou with most of the other disgruntled Acadians and retreated to the port city of Nantes.  There they survived as best they could on government handouts and what work Hilaire could find as a domestic servant and a carpenter.  They had three more children at Nantes:  Jean-Hilaire was born at Chantenay, near Nantes, in November 1776; Madeleine in February 1779 but died the following August; and François was born in October 1780.  Wife Tarsile died at Nantes in April 1784, age 38.  Son François died by September 1784, when Spanish officials counted the family at Nantes and noted that Hilaire had only two children left in his household. 

About the time of Tarsile's death, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Hilaire Clément, a widower with two young children, agreed to take it.  He and his children crossed on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in August 1785, and chose to follow the majority of their fellow Acadians to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Hilaire died there in the late 1780s.  His son Jean-Hilaire married a fellow Acadian and settled on the bayou.  Jean-Hilaire's sons and grandsons, most of whom married fellow Acadians, settled on the middle Lafourche around present-day Thibodaux.  Soon after the War of 1861-65, one of Jean-Hilaire's descendants moved from the Lafourche valley to upper Bayou Teche, but most of his descendants remained on the Lafourche. ...

The family's name also is spelled Clemant, Clemente, Climent.02

Hilaire (c1746-late 1780s) Clément

Hilaire, sixth son of Jean Clément and Marie-Josèphe Druce of Île Royale, was deported to France in 1758 and came to Louisiana in 1785, a widower, with two young children, a son and a daughter.  His daughter Marie married into the Dugas family.  His son created a family of his own along Bayou Lafourche.

Surviving son Jean-Hilaire, born at Chantenay, near Nantes, France, in November 1776, followed his widowed father and his sister to Louisiana and to upper Bayou Lafourche.  After his father died, he lived with his sister and relatives on the upper bayou.  He married Geneviève-Sophie, called Sophie, daughter of fellow Acadians Victor Boudreaux and his second wife Geneviève Richard, at Assumption on the upper bayou in September 1801.  Sophie, a native of St.-Servan near St.-Malo, had come to Louisiana in 1785 aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships.  Jean-Hilaire died in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1844.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Hilaire died "at age 69 yrs.," but he was 67.  His daughters married into the Benoit, Hébert, Levron, and Morvant families.  All four of his sons created their own families on the bayou.  They and their sons settled on the middle Lafourche around present-day Thibodaux.  Two of Jean Hilaire's grandsons married first cousins.  Some of his descendants moved on to the Bayou Teche valley after the War of 1861-65, but most of them remained on Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Jean-Hilaire, fils, called Hilaire, born at Assumption in April 1803, married Marie Florine, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Archange Bernard and Justine Arceneaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1826.  Their son Jean Hilaire III, also called Hilaire, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1827; Georges Edmondville in April 1829; and Trasimond Dumini in August 1839.  Their daughters married into the Guillot family.  Hilaire's three sons also created their own families on Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Jean Hilaire III married Marie Aglae, called Aglae, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin Breaux and Azélie Dugas, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in June 1850.  Their son Cordeluis Hilaire was born in Lafourche Parish in November 1856, Jean Beauregard in July 1861, Émile in c1863 but died at age 3 in May 1866, Simplice Césaire Camille was born in March 1866, and Émile Julien was born in May 1867.  

Hilaire's second son Georges Edmonville married Marie Roseline, daughter of fellow Acadian Olivier Guillot and his Creole wife Anne Marguerite Oncale, at the Thibodaux church in June 1849.  Their son Joseph Glalsey was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1850, Maurice Théophile in September 1852, Georges Dosilien in July 1859, Jean Trasimond in January 1862, Liber Cleodomi in March 1867, and Joseph Alphonse in February 1870.  During the War of 1861-65, Georges Edmondville served as a lieutenant in the Lafourche Parish Regiment of Militia.  

Hilaire's third and youngest son Trasimond Dumini married Odile, another daughter of Marcellin Breaux and Azélie Dugas, at the Thibodaux church in April 1864.  Their son Grégoire Alcée was born in Lafourche Parish in September 1866, Joseph Alfred in June 1868, and Alphonse in October 1870.  

Jean-Hilaire's second son Paul Valéry, called Valéry, born in Assumption Parish in March 1811, married Delphine, another daughter of Michel Archange Bernard and Justine Arceneaux, at the Thibodauxville church in February 1835.  Their son Joseph Paul was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1839; Joseph Michel in August 1840 but died at age 12 in July 1852; Onésiphore Ulysse was born in September 1842; Odesoe in April 1846; Michel Oleus or Élisée, called Élisée, in December 1848; and Louis Joseph in September 1853.  Their daughter married into the Tauzin family on upper Bayou Teche.  One of Valéry's six sons married by 1870 and, like his sister, moved to the upper Teche after the War of 1861-65. 

Fifth son Élisée married first cousin Eliska, daughter of Eugène Morvant and his Acadian wife Delphine Clément, Élisée's paternal aunt, at the Thibodaux church in April 1867.  Soon after their marriage, Élisée and Eliska moved to upper Bayou Teche.  Their son Edgard was born near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in April 1868. 

Jean-Hilaire's third son François Ursin, called Ursin, born in Assumption Parish in December 1812, married Adeline Severine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Marie Benoit and Marie Élisabeth Darois, at the Thibodauxville church in January 1836.  Their son Jean Arsène, called Arsène, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1839; Arsène or Ursin Ulysse in November 1839; Joseph Marcellin, called Marcellin, in September 1841 but died at age 11 months in August 1842; and Auguste died at age 6 months in December 1843.  Their daughter married a Clément first cousin.  Ursin remarried to Azéma, daughter of Michel Sevin and his Acadian wife Théotiste Hébert, at the Thibodaux church in July 1853.  Their son Émile was born probably in Lafourche Parish in c1854 but died at age 4 in November 1858, Joseph Paul was born in October 1854, Jean Baptiste in September 1856, Joseph Treville Clémile in November 1859, Joseph in January 1862, and Arthur Ulysse in October 1868.  One of Ursin's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Arsène, by first wife Adeleine Severine Benoit, married Adèle, daughter of  Noël Navarre and his Acadian wife Doralise Naquin, at the Thibodaux church in January 1864.  Their son Anatole Olésime was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1869.   

Jean-Hilaire's fourth and youngest son Charles Joseph or Joseph Charles, called Charles, born probably in Assumption Parish in the 1810s, married Marie Arthémise, called Arthémise, daughter of Nicolas Sevin and his Acadin wife Marie Hébert, at the Thibodauxville church in July 1836.  Their son Charles Joseph Adam, called Joseph, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1838; Auguste Ovile in October 1839; Théophile in August 1843; Paulin in February 1853; Joseph Paul in October 1854; Joachim Émile in February 1855 but died at age 3 in October 1858; Bernard Clesia was born in August 1857; and Joseph Treville Clémile in November 1859.  They also had a son named Alexis or Félix.  Their daughters married into the Morvant and Sevin families.  Four of Charles's eight sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Joseph married Marie Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Boudreaux and Marie Rosalie Hébert, at the Thibodaux church in January 1862.  Their son Joseph Deve was born in Lafourche Parish in October 1862, Davis Anatole in February 1868, and Isidore Cyprien in April 1870.  During the War of 1861-65, Joseph served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment of Militia.  

Charles's second son Auguste married Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Guillaume Boudreaux and Françoise Gautreaux, at the Thibodaux church in May 1861.  Their son Oleus Joseph was born near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in March 1864; Octave Émile in Lafourche Parish in January 1866; Justilien in c1867 but died at age 15 months in March 1869; and Camille Klebert in July 1870.  

Charles's third son Théophile married first cousin Melina, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Clément and Severine Benoit, his uncle and aunt, at the Thibodaux church in January 1864.  Their son Émile Ulysse was born in Lafourche Parish in September 1868.  Théophile remarried to Victorine, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Hébert and Tersile Boudreaux and widow of Pierre Rabbas or Robbas, at the Thibodaux church in February 1870.  

Charles's fourth Alexis married Victorine, daughter of Polinaire Durocher and Mathilde Jolibois, at the Thibodaux church in March 1869.  Their son Marcel Félicien was born in Lafourche Parish in January 1870.  

Clouâtre

Pierre Cloistre dit Clouâtre, a French gunsmith, reached Nova Scotia by 1722, the year he married Marguerite, daughter of André LeBlanc and Marie-Jeanne Dugas of Minas.  They settled at Grand-Pré.  Between 1723 and 1750, Marguerite gave the gunsmith at least eight children, three daughters and five sons, at Minas.  One of their daughter's marriage record calls her a native of "St. Jean, Acadia," so Pierre dit Clouâtre and his family may have lived on French-controlled Île St.-Jean during the 1740s.  Only one of Pierre's sons seems to have married before Le Grand Dérangement:  Third son Dominique married Françoise, daughter of Claude Boudrot, fils and Catherine Hébert, probably at Minas in c1750.  Oldest daughter Marie-Josèphe married into the Hébert family at Grand-Pré in October 1747.  In 1755, the gunsmith and his family could still be found at Minas.  And then Le Grand Dérangement scattered the family to the winds. 

In 1755, the British deported son Dominique and his wife Françoise Boudrot, as well as Pierre and Marguerite's daughter Marie-Josèphe and her husband Pierre Hébert, to Massachusetts.  Colonial officials counted Marie-Josèphe and her family at Newton in 1761.  After the war with Britain finally ended, Dominique and Françoise left Massachusetts and followed dozens of their fellow exile to Canada.  Though now also a British possession, the province was populated largely by fellow French Catholics, many of them Acadian exiles.  So, in a colony nearly as old as Acadia, the siblings and their families began the slow, inexorable process of becoming Canadiennes.  They settled at Trois-Rivières before moving downriver to St.-Philippe-de-Laprairie, across from Montréal.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

Meanwhile, in 1755, the British deported the old gunsmith, his wife Marguerite LeBlanc, and the rest of his family to Maryland.  For over a dozen years, they endured life among British colonists who, despite their colony's Catholic roots, did not care much for the French "papists" who had been thrust upon them.  In July 1763, colonial authorities counted Marguerite LeBlanc, now a widow, at Port Tobacco, Maryland.  With her were sons Louis, Pierre-Sylvain, and Joseph, and daughters Anne and Marthe-Marie.  Son Georges, who had married fellow Acadian Cécile Breau in Maryland, their children Joseph le jeune and Madeleine, and orphan Joseph Breau, also were counted at Port Tobacco that month.  Georges died probably at Port Tobacco sometime between July 1763 and December 1767.  Older brother Louis married fellow Acadian Marguerite Landry in Maryland after July 1763. 

When word reached the Acadians in Maryland that they would be welcome in Louisiana, where many of their relatives had gone, they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them to New Orleans.  The Clouâtres had no close kin in Louisiana, but that was of little consequence.  Certainly life had to be better there than in a British colony where they were treated like pariahs.  The first contingent of Acadians left Maryland in late June 1766, the second in April 1767, but the Clouâtres were not on either of them.  They departed with their widowed mother in the third contingent of exiles from Maryland, which left Port Tobacco for New Orleans in December 1767.

The Clouâtres in Maryland reached New Orleans in February 1768 with the large party from Port Tobacco led by brothers Alexis and Honoré Breau of Pigiguit.  (One of the older Clouâtre sons had married a Breau in Maryland.)  Spanish governor Ulloa forced the party to settle at remote Fort San Luìs de Natchez, across the river from present-day Natchez, Mississippi, but in 1769, after Ulloa's ouster, the Clouâtres moved downriver to San Gabriel d'Iberville and Cabahannocer, where other exiles from Maryland had settled in 1766 and 1767.  A number of Clouâtre lines were started in those settlements, but only two of them endured.  One of the Cabahanoocer lines, that of Joseph le jeune, was especially prolific.  During the early antebellum period, two of Joseph le jeune's cousins moved from their native Iberville Parish on the river to the bayous Lafourche and Terrebonne and established a second center of family settlement.  No Clouâtre family put down roots on the western prairies before the War of 1861-65, though at least two Clouâtre wives may have lived there during the late colonial and early antebellum periods. 

Judging by the number of slaves they heled during the antebellum period, the Clouâtres of St. James and Terrebonne parishes participated only peripherally in the South's plantation economy.  According to the federal census slaves schedules of the late antebellum period, one of the Clouâtres in St. James Parish held five slaves at one time, and his cousins in the Lafourche-Terrebonne valley held none, at least none who appeared on the federal slave schedules in 1850 and 1860. 

According to state and Confederate service records, only two Clouâtres served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  Judging by their dates of enlistment, they probably were conscripts.  Both of them survived the war, which was not kind to their home parishes.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every farm and plantation their forces could reach.  Meanwhile, Union gunboats shelled and burned dozens of houses along the river.  Successive Federal incursions devastated the Lafourche and Terrebonne valley, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Chiadtre, Cloac, Cloat, Cloate, Cloatre, Cloeta, Cloistre, Clouac, Clouain, Clouard, Clouatte, Clouet, Colaitre, Collaitre, Colloite, Collouer, Collouette, Colluete, Coloitre, Colonot, Colouet, Colwat, Couatre, Coulaitre.03

.

With perhaps one exception, the Clouâtres of Minas--seven of them--came to Louisiana from Maryland in 1768.  With them came Marguerite LeBlanc, their mother and grandmother, who was age 62 when she reached the colony.  She never remarried.  She died at San Gabriel on the Upper Acadian Coast in April 1782, in his late 70s.  Three of her sons and two of her grandsons created families of their own on the Acadian Coast, but not all of the lines endured.  During the early antebellum period, two of Marguerite's grandsons established a second center of family settlement in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley: 

Louis (1724-?) Clouâtre

Louis, eldest son of Pierre Cloitre dit Clouâtre and Marguerite LeBlanc, born at Grand-Pré in August 1724, was deported to Maryland with his parents and siblings in the fall of 1755.  He was counted with his widowed mother at Port Tobacco, Maryland, in July 1763, when he would have been in his late 30s.  The colonial census mentioned no wife, so he must have married after July 1763, in his 40s.  He may have come to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768 (his widowed mother and four of his siblings were in that party). If so, he followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez that spring and then to downriver to San Gabriel in 1769.  He married fellow Acadian Marguerite Landry probably at San Gabriel.  Evidently they had no sons, but two of their daughters, Marie-Anne and Marguerite, born probably at San Gabriel, married into the Flore, Morales, Prosper, Schlatre, and Suire families, so the blood of this line of the family endured.  After her remarriage at San Gabriel in May 1802, Louis's daughter Marguerite followed her new husband, François Suire, to the Opelousas District, where she died in April 1803, perhaps from complications of childbirth.  Louis's daughter Marie-Anne remained on the river. 

Pierre-Sylvain (1740-1798) Clouâtre

Pierre-Sylvain, fourth son of Pierre Cloitre dit Clouâtre and Marguerite LeBlanc, born at Grand-Pré in March 1740, was deported to Maryland with his parents and siblings in the fall of 1755 and counted with his widowed mother at Port Tobacco, Maryland, in July 1763.  With his widowed mother and siblings, he came to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768 and followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez that spring.  In 1769, he followed them downriver to San Gabriel, where he married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Boudreaux and Madeleine Hébert and widow of Joseph Landry, in the 1770s.  He and his wife were counted on the "left bank ascending" at St.-Gabriel in 1777.  Pierre died at San Gabriel in May 1798.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was age 60 when he died, but he was 58.  His daughter married into the Blanchard and Dupuis families.  He and his wife had no sons, so this family line, except for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State.  

Joseph (c1750-?) Clouâtre

Joseph, fifth and youngest son of Pierre Cloitre dit Clouâtre and Marguerite LeBlanc, born at Grand-Pré in c1750, was deported to Maryland along with his parents and siblings in the fall of 1755 and counted with his widowed mother at Port Tobacco, Maryland, in July 1763.  With his widowed mother and siblings, he came to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768 followed them to Fort San Luis de Natchez that spring.  In 1769, he followed them downriver to San Gabriel, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Dominique Babin and Marguerite Boudreau, in June 1780, and remarried to Élisabeth-Marie or Marie-Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Thibodeau and his second wife Élisabeth Boudreau, at San Gabriel in February 1787.  All of his children were by his second wife.  Their daughters married into the Babin Bergeron, and Pitre families.  In the late 1810s, Joseph's oldest son established a new center of family settlement on Bayou Lafourche.  Joseph's other married son and his daughters followed, some of them moving down the valley to Bayou Terrebonne.  

Oldest son Joseph, fils, by second wife Élisabeth-Marie Thibodeaux, born at San Gabriel in December 1789, married Marie Henriette, called Henriette, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Molaison and Marie Gautreaux of Lafourche, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1818.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Dantin, Gaspard, Gautreaux, and Laperouse families.  Two of Joseph, fils's four sons created their own families in Terrebonne Parish by 1870. 

Oldest son Joseph III, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1832, married, at age 33, Philomène, daughter of Zedeon Calahan and his Acadian wife Cléonice Boudreaux, at the Chacahoula church, Terrebonne Parish, in July 1865.  Their son Ferdinand Joseph was born near Chacahoula in February 1869. 

Joseph, fils's second son Joseph Viléon, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1834, if he survived childhood did not marry before 1870.  

Joseph, fils's third son Joseph Claiborne, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1836, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1851, age 15.    

Joseph, fils's son Pierre, perhaps the fourth and youngest, married Tarsile, daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte Pitre and Rosalie Naquin, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in December 1858.  

Joseph, père's second son Louis le jeune, by second wife Élisabeth-Marie Thibodeaux, born at San Gabriel in January 1798, was living in Terrebonne Parish when he married Marguerite Elmire, daughter of Pierre Victor Chatagnier and his Acadian wife Marie Modeste Hamon of Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in April 1837.  They also settled in Terrebonne Parish.  Their daughter married into the Echete family.  None of their three sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Louis Amédée, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in January 1840, if he survived childhood did not marry before 1870.  

Louis le jeune's second son Émile Marcel, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in June 1841, if he survived childhood did not marry before 1870.  

Louis le jeune's third and youngest son Marcellin Jackson, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in August 1844, if he survived childhood did not marry before 1870.  

Joseph, père's third and youngest son Pierre Treville, by second wife Élisabeth-Marie Thibodeaux, born at St. Gabriel in October 1804, probably died young.  

Joseph le jeune (c1760-1841) à Pierre Cloitre dit Clouâtre

Joseph le jeune, older son of Georges Clouâtre and Cécile Breau and nephew of Louis et al., was born in Maryland in c1760.  He was counted with his parents at Port Tobacco in July 1763.  With his mother, now a widow, two siblings, and other Clouâtre kin, he came to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768 and followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez that spring.  Meanwhile, his mother remarried to fellow Acadian Charles Gaudet at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans in May 1768.  In 1769, Joseph followed his stepfather and his mother back downriver to Cabahannocer, where he married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Poirier and Marie-Madeleine Richard, in c1785.  Their daughters married into the Breaux and Melançon families.  Joseph remarried to Félicité, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Louvière and Isabelle Melançon, at Cabahannocer in February 1801.  Joseph died in St. James Parish in February 1841.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 87 when he died, but he probably was in his early 80s.  Only half of his six sons by both wives created families of their own.  Like their father, they remained in St. James Parish.  One grandson moved upriver to Pointe Coupee Parish, but the others remained in St. James.  .

Oldest son Joseph, fils, by first wife Marie Poirier, born at Cabahannocer in October 1786, probably died young.  

Joseph le jeune's second son Olidon, by first wife Marie Poirier, born at Cabahannocer in May 1789, probably died young.  

Joseph le jeune's third son Michel, by first wife Marie Poirier, born at Cabahannocer in August 1791, married Marcellite, also called Manette, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Bourgeois and Scholastique Arceneaux, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in May 1815.  Michel died near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1834.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Michel was age 45 when he died, but he was 43.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted five slaves--three males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 28 to 2--on Wdw Mel Cloitre's farm in the parish's eastern district; this was Michel's widow, Marcellite Bourgeois.  Michel's daughters married into the Dugas and Rome families.  Only one of his six sons created a family of his own, in St. James Parish.

His oldest son, name unrecorded, died in St. James Parish at birth in February 1816.

Michel's second son Michel, fils, born in St. James Parish February 1817, may have died young.

Michel, père's third son Félix, born in St. James Parish in September 1821, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in May 1849, age 27.  He probably did not marry.  

Michel, père's fourth son Edward, born in St. James Parish in April 1824, also may have died young. 

Michel, père's fifth son Drosin Clément, called Clément, was born in Ascension Parish in April 1826.  In July 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted a single slave--a 9-year-old mulatto male--on Drauzin Cloitre's farm in the parish's eastern district.  Drosin Clément married Céline Odile, daughter of Foreign Frenchman Pierre Désiré Letulle and his Acadian wife Amelie Boudreaux, at the Convent church in November 1851.  Their son Joseph Eugène was born near Convent in July 1853, and Félix le jeune in March 1855.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish again counted a single slave--this time a 13-year-old black female--on Clément Clouatre's farm in the parish's Fourth District on the river's Left Bank.  Clément died near Convent in October 1868.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Clément died at "age ca. 35 years"; he was 42.  His wife gave birth to a daughter only four months before his death.  

Michel, père's sixth and youngest son Clairville, born posthumously near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1834, died at age 5 in October 1839. 

Joseph le jeune's fourth son Georges-Jérôme, called Jérôme, from first wife Marie Poirier, born at Cabahannocer in November 1799, married Émelite, called Melite, another daughter of Amand Bourgeois and Scholastique Arceneaux, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in January 1818.  Jérôme died near Convent, St. James Parish, in November 1847.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jérôme was age 50 when he died, but he was 48.  In June 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted two slaves--a 27-year-old black female and a 1-year-old mulatto female--on Widlow Jérôme Clouatre's farm in the parish's Fourth District on the river's Left Bank; these probably were Jérôme's widow, Émelite Bourgeois's, slaves.  His daughters married into the Berthelot and Bourgeois families.  Four of his five sons created their own families in St. James, Ascension, and Pointe Coupee parishes. 

Oldest son Jérôme, fils was born in St. James Parish in October 1818.  Called Evariste by the recording priest, it may have been Jérôme, fils who married Clara Marguerite or Marguerite Clara Chutz probably in Pointe Coupee Parish in the late 1840s or early 1850s.  Their son Jérôme III was born in Pointe Coupee Parish in February 1855, and Jean Uranus in January 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Evariste may have served in Company F of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee.  

Jérôme, père's second son Joseph le jeune, born in St. James Parish in November 1819, married Marie Ezilda, called Ezilda, daughter of Nicolas Rome and Eurasie Webre, at the Convent church in January 1849.  Their son Léon Joseph was born near Convent in July 1851.  Their daughter married into the Duhon family.  Joseph le jeune remarried to Virginie Berthelot, widow of Émile Favrange, at the Convent church in February 1860. 

Jérôme, père's third son Sylvain, called Sylvanie, born in St. James Parish in January 1822, married cousin Marie Scholastique, called Colastie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Estival Bourgeois and his Creole wife Véronique Keller, at the Convent church in January 1849, the day after his older brother Joseph le jeune married in the same church; Sylvain and his wife had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Sylvain was born near Convent in December 1849, Florian in September 1851 but died at age 20 months in June 1853, Joseph le jeune was born in February 185[4] but died at age 6 months the following August, and Adam Fulgence was born in September 1863.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted two slaves--a 40-year-old black female and a 14-year-old black female--on Sylvanie Clouâtre's farm in the parish's Fourth District on the river's Left Bank.  

Jérôme, père's fourth son George Livingston, born in St. James Parish in 1830, if he survived childhood did not marry before 1870. 

Jérôme, père's fifth and youngest son Amand Théogène, called Théogène, baptized at the Convent church, St. James Parish, age 10 months, 25 days, in June 1835, married Marie Anne Victorine, called Victorine, daughter of Louis Isidore or Isidore Victor Letulle and Berthilde Legendre, at the Convent church in January 1857.  Their son Louis Jérôme was born near Convent in March 1858, and Arthur Stanislas in March 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Amand Théogène served in the 5th Battery Louisiana Artillery, also called the Pelican Artillery, raised in St. James Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  He remarried to Eugénie Lucenty at the Donalsonville church, Ascension Parish, in January 1870. 

Joseph le jeune's fifth son Joseph Marcellin, called Marcellin, from second wife Félicité Louvière, born in St. James Parish in September 1808, married Philomène Gilchrist, sometimes Gilbert, a native of Alabama, in either Alabama or St. James Parish in the late 1830s or early 1840s.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Older son Pierre Adam, called Adam, born in St. James Parish in January 1844, died there the following May. 

Marcellin's younger son Joseph Elphége, called Elphége, born in St. James Parish in September 1846,  married Ernestine Fourroux in St. John the Baptist Parish and settled at Lucy and Edgard. 

Joseph le jeune's sixth and youngest son Joseph Drosin, by second wife Félicité Louvière, born in St. James Parish in January 1812, may have died young.  

Charles (c1765-1802) à Pierre Cloitre dit Clouâtre

Charles, younger son of Georges Clouâtre and Cécile Breau, was born in Maryland in c1765.  With his mother, now a widow, two siblings, and other Clouâtre kin, he came to Louisiana with the Breau party from Port Tobacco in 1768 and followed them to Fort San Luìs de Natchez that spring.  In 1769, Charles followed his stepfather Charles Gaudet and his mother dowriver to Cabahannocer, where he married Marianne, also called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Arceneaux and Judith Bergeron, in January 1786.  Charles died at Cabahannocer in January 1802.  The St.-Jacques parish priest who recorded his burial said that Charles was age 45 when he died, but he was closer to 37.  His daughters married into the Frederick, Hakle, and Selvis families.  His only son never married, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him.  A daughter, Marie-Marin, wife of Charles Frederick of Sweden, followed her husband to the western prairies. 

Only son Bélisaire, born probably at Cabahannocer in c1801, died near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1831, age 30.  He evidently did not marry.  

Comeaux

Pierre Comeau, a cooper, born in France in c1598, came to Acadia with Isaac Razilly and the sieur d'Aulnay in 1632, four years before the first French families came to the colony.  Pierre Comeau worked his trade at La Hève, Razilly's headquarters, before moving to Port-Royal, where, at age 51, he married Rose Bayon in c1649.  Rose, who was age 18 at the time of their marriage, may have come to Acadia with her father in 1636 aboard the St.-Jehan, the ship that brought the first French families to the colony.  Between 1652 and 1665, Rose gave Pierre nine children, six sons and three daughters.  Their daughters married into the Gaudet, Hébert, and Rivet families.  Five of Pierre's six sons, all born at Port-Royal, married into the Lefebvre, Landry, Bourg, Hébert, Joseph dit Lejeune, Bourgeois, and Babin families.  Pierre was counted at Port-Royal in 1686, age 88.  The date of his death has been lost to history.  By 1755, descendants of Pierre Comeau the cooper could be found at Grand-Pré, Rivière-aux-Canards, and Pigiguit in the Minas Basin; at Chepoudy and Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto; and in the French Maritime islands on Île St.-Jean and on Île Madame off the southern coast of Île Royale.  Most of them, however, were still living at the family's home base at Annapolis Royal.  Some of them also had resettled in Canada before Le Grand Dérangement

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this large family even farther.  The Acadians in the Chignecto area, including Chepoudy and Petitcoudiac in the trois-rivières, were the first victims of the British roundup of the so-called French Neutrals in the fall of 1755.  One Comeau family was rounded up and transported to South Carolina, where colonial officials counted them in August 1763.  Some of the Comeaus at Chepoudy escaped the British roundup and took refuge at Shediac, Richibouctou, Miramichi, and Restigouche on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore. 

Later that fall, the British shipped the Acadians in the Minas Basin to Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.  One family from Pigiguit ended up in Massachusetts, where they were mentioned in "an acct of Sundrys provided by the Select men of Medfield for the Support of twelve of the Late Inhabitance of Noveschoca, which were ordered to the Town of Medfield from November 10th (1756) to the first day of June 1757."  The report stated that "Stephen Commour an old Man a Eighty two years old [was] unfit for any Buisness" and that "Elisaby Commour his wife seventy four years old [was] Capeable of but Little Buisness ...."  A similar evaluation was made of "Achan Commo age 83" and "Elisabeth Commo age 72" early the following year.  On 21 June 1758, the frugal Yankees of Medfield noted in "the account of what was Expended towards the maintanence of the French Neutrals formerly Inhabitance of Noveschoscha ordered to Medfield by authority from the Sixth day of January to this Date" that "For 12 weeks Bording an old French man Nursing and other expenses in his Last Sickness & Fenural" the town incurred "Charges L2-14s-2d."  The "old French man" no doubt was Étienne, grandson of the family's progenitor.  

Comeaus shipped to Virginia endured a fate worse than most of the other refugees deported from Minas.  In mid-November 1755, when five transports appeared unexpectedly at Hampton Roads, Virginia's governor Robert Dinwiddie protested the deportation of so many "Neutral French" to his colony without his consent.  Many of the exiles died on the filthy, crowded ships anchored in Hampton Roads while the Virginia authorities pondered their fate.  Acadians from one vessel were moved up to Richmond, two of the vessels were unloaded at Hampton, and two more at Norfolk.  A hand full of young Acadians managed to slip away and trek overland through fields and forests and over the mountains, to French territory, but most of the exiles remained in Virginia.  Finally, in the spring of 1756, Virginia's House of Burgesses made its decision ... the Acadians must go!  In May, the first shipment of Acadians in hired vessels left for England, and in two weeks all of them had gone--299 to Bristol, 250 to Falmouth, 340 to Southampton, and 336 to Liverpool--1,225 of the original 1,500.  Their ordeal only worsened in the English ports, where they were grossly neglected and treated like common criminals and where hundreds died of smallpox.  By 1763, more than half of them were dead.  In May of that year, after prolonged negotiations between the French and British governments, the Acadians in England, including Comeaus, were repatriated to France.

In late autumn of 1755, the British shipped the Acadians in the Annapolis Basin to Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, and North Carolina.  Many Comeaus were on these vessels, too.  However, the ship heading to North Carolina, the Pembroke, never got there.  Soon after the Pembroke embarked from Goat Island in the lower basin with 232 exiles aboard, the Acadians seized the vessel, sailed it to Baie Ste.-Marie on the western coast of Nova Scotia and then crossed the Bay of Fundy to the lower Rivière St.-Jean, where they abandoned the ship and escaped into the wilds of present-day New Brunswick.  The rest of their Annapolis valley brethren were not so lucky.  After their ships had reached their destinations, the Acadians who ended up in New England and New York eventually were allowed to come ashore and endure the disdain of the English colonists.  Meanwhile, the Comeaus who escaped the British roundup at Annapolis Royal crossed the Bay of Fundy the following winter, found refuge on Rivière St.-Jean and on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, or endured the long, dangerous trek to the St. Lawrence valley, where their fellow Frenchmen also treated them poorly.  Church records show that Comeaus from Annapolis Royal and Chepoudy were buried at Québec in 1757 and 1758, some of them victims of a smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian exiles in the Québec area that summer, fall, and winter. 

Living in territory controlled by France, the Comeaus in the French Maritimes escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British swooped down on the rest of Île Royale and on nearby Île St.-Jean and deported most of the Acadians there to France.  A Comeau wife made the crossing aboard the British transport Duke William with her husband and two brothers.  They survived the mid-ocean explosion that killed many aboard the vessel, but she died in a hospital at St.-Malo soon after the ship limped into port.  Her brother lived at St.-Malo from 1758 to 1761, and then at nearby Plouër from 1761 to 1764.  In April 1764, he left France aboard the ship Le Fort for the new colony at Cayenne, French Guyanne, in South America.  He does not appear in the census of inhabitants at Sinnamary, Cayenne, in March 1765, so he may have returned to France by then.  The younger brother lived at St.-Malo probably with his brother from 1758 to 1760.  In March 1760, he was at Lorient in Brittany, where he embarked on the corsair Le Travignon, which the Royal Navy soon captured.  He languished in an English prison to the end of the war, returned to St.-Malo in 1763, and was still living there when his older brother shipped out to Cayenne.  In May 1763, Comeaus who had endured the seven years of exile in England were repatriated to France.  Most landed at St.-Malo aboard La Dorothée.  They lived in the teeming St.-Malo suburbs of St.-Servan, Plouër, and St.-Suliac.  Remarkably, no Comeau family from England joined other Acadian exiles on Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany, where many of them went in November 1765.  One of the Comeaus from England became a sailor.  In 1770, he embarked on the ship L'Americain but deserted his vessel at a port in French St.-Domingue, where he remained.  Comeaus deported or repatriated to France in 1758 and 1763 ended up in ports other than St.-Malo, including Cherbourg, Bordeaux, and Rochefort. 

Comeau cousins from Pigiguit and Chepoudy ended up in France by a different route.  After escaping the British round up on Île St.-Jean in late 1758, they may have waited out the war somewhere in the Maritimes, perhaps on the French-controlled island of Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland, where they were counted in 1767.  Or, more likely, they escaped from Île St.-Jean to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, fell into British hands, became prisoners of war in Nova Scotia, and followed other Acadians from Halifax to Île Miquelon in 1763.  Soon Miquelon and nearby Île St.-Pierre became overcrowded, and French officials insisted the Acadians there be resettled in France.  Comeaus from Île Miquelon ended up at Cherbourg in 1767.  In 1778, during the American Revolution, the British deported Acadians, including Comeaus, from Île Miquelon to La Rochelle, France.  One of them returned to the island in 1783, but others remained in the mother country. 

In the early 1770s, Comeaus, with other Acadian exiles languishing in the coastal cities, ventured to the Poitou region as part of a settlement scheme that lured hundreds of other Acadians to marginal land owned by an influential French nobleman near the city of Châtellerault.  When the venture collapsed in 1775, they retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where they survived on government handouts and what work they could find there.  In the early 1780s, when the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a better life in faraway Louisiana, many of the Comeaus agreed to take it.  Some did not.  The Comeaus at Bordeaux, along with other members of the family, chose to remain in France.  

In North America, Comeaus who had endured exile in New England and New York made their way up to Canada to join their kinsmen already there.  Though now also a British possession, the northern province was populated largely by fellow French Catholics, many of them Acadian exiles.  So, in a colony nearly as old as Acadia, descendants of Pierre Comeau the cooper began the slow, inexorable process of becoming Canadiennes.  Especially after 1766, Comeaus settled on the upper St. Lawrence at Bécancour, Nicolet, St.-Grégoire, L'Acadie, Trois-Rivières, Gentilly, La Prairie, St.-Jacques de l'Achigan, St.-Pierre-de-la-Becquets, Pointe-du-Lac, and Yamachiche; at St.-Denis, St.-Ours, and Chambly on the Richelieu; and on the lower St. Lawrence at Berthier, St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse, St.-Roch-des-Aulnaies, and Montmagny.  Many Comeaus were determined to live as closely as they could to their old homes in greater Acadia.  They settled on the southern Gaspé Peninsula at Carleton, and at Pointe-de-l'Est on the remote Îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, both part of present-day Québec Province; at Caraquet in present-day northeastern New Brunswick; on the St. John River; at Nipisiguit, now Bathurst, and at nearby Petit-Rocher on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore; and at Memramcook in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto.  Comeaus also returned to Île Miquelon and even to Nova Scotia, where they settled at Yarmouth and Chédabouctou, now Guysborough, on the Atlantic shore; and at Windsor, formerly Pigiguit, on the Fundy side, before moving on to Baie Ste.-Marie on the west coast of the peninsula, a few dozen miles southwest of their old homes in the Annapolis Basin.  One of the towns on the mainland shore of St. Mary Bay was founded by Jean-Baptiste Comeau of Chepoudy and is still called Comeauville.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

After the war with Britain ended and the sea lanes were clear again, some of the Comeaus who had been exiled in the seaboard colonies chose to go to the French Antilles.  In 1763, French officials lured Acadian exiles in the British colonies to French St.-Dominique, today's Haiti, to work on a huge naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas.  Although driven from North America by the Seven Years' War, the French were determined to hang on to what was left of their shrinking empire.  The new naval base on the north shore of the big sugar island would protect the approaches to their remaining possessions in the Caribbean Basin.  The Acadians provided a ready source of cheap labor.  The French promised them land of their own if they came to St.-Domingue.  A Comeau couple from Connecticut were among the takers.  Their marriage was blessed at Le Mirebalais, St.-Domingue, in September 1764, but they did not remain.  Later in the decade, or perhaps in the early 1770s, they joined their cousins in Spanish Louisiana.  Comeaus also ended up on other islands in the French Antilles, including Martinique and Guadaloupe.  Some of the Comeaus on Martinique also joined their kinsmen in Spanish Louisiana.

The Comeaus held in Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles, including Comeaus, chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 Acadians who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, nine were Comeaus. 

Meanwhile, the Comeaus in Maryland endured life among English colonists who, despite their colony's Catholic roots, did not care much for the French "papists" who had been thrust upon them.  In the late 1760s, word reached the Acadians in Maryland that they would be welcome in Louisiana, where many of their relatives had just settled, including Comeaus.  So they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them to New Orleans.  No Comeaus were part of the first contingent of exiles that left Maryland in late June 1766, but they were part of the second and third contingents that departed Baltimore and Port Tobacco in April and December 1767.

Comeaus were among the first families of Acadia and among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  Arriving in the colony in ripples and waves over a 20-year period, they came from Halifax in 1765, Maryland in 1767 and 1768, St.-Domingue and Martinique in the late 1760s, and from France in 1785--54 of them in all.  The first of them--a family of four from Chepoudy via Halifax--came to the colony in February 1765 with the Broussards.  They followed the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche and survived the epidemic that killed dozens of their fellow Teche Acadians that summer and fall.  A year or so later, they settled at Carencro at the northern edge of the Attakapas District.  Also coming to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765, two more Comeau families headed by cousins settled near present-day Opelousas.  They, too, remained on the western prairies, where their family lines thrived.  By the early antebellum period, most of the Opelousas Comeauxs had moved south to Attakapas, settling at Côte Gelée near present-day Youngsville, near Abbeville on the lower Vermilion, and near their cousins at Carencro.  The few Comeauxs who remained in the Opelousas country settled near Grand Coteau north of Carencro, at Church Point on upper Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé in present-day Acadia Parish, and out on the prairie near Ville Platte in present-day Evangeline Parish.  Comeauxs also settled on upper Bayou Teche near Breaux Bridge, near New Iberia farther down the Teche, and far down the bayou in St. Mary Parish.

Meanwhile, Comeaus from Halifax, Maryland, France, and even the Caribbean Basin, established lines along the Mississippi River above New Orleans on what became known as the Acadian Coast.  in 1765, two Comeau wives arrived with their families from Halifax via St.-Domingue and settled at Cabahannocer, present-day St. James Parish.  A few years later, in 1767 and 1768, two Comeau families, one led by a widower, the other by a widow, came to Louisiana from exile in Maryland and went to San Gabriel d'Iberville and San Luìs de Natchez on the river above Cabhannocer.  In 1769, the Natchez family moved to San Gabriel to join their cousins there.  One of the San Gabriel settlers had 11 sons, 10 by his second wife, adding substantially to the number of Comeaus on the river.  Sometime in the late 1760s, a Comeau family reached the colony directly from French St.-Domingue and settled at Cabahannocer.  Two more Comeau males, one of them a widower, came to the colony in the late 1760s, married, and settled at Cabahannocer, but from whence they came is anyone's guess. 

The largest contingent of Comeaus to reach Louisiana--30 individuals and half a dozen families--came from France on six of the Seven Ships of 1785.  One Comeau wife went to the Attakapas District and another to Opelousas, but most of the 1785 arrivals settled on the river at Baton Rouge and along Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge.  Surprisingly, this influx of new families added only marginally to the number of Comeauxs on the river.  During the antebellum period, Comeauxs were living at Baton Rouge, across the river in West Baton Rouge Parish, on both sides of the river in Iberville Parish, and farther downriver in Ascension and St. James parishes on what came to be called the Acadian Coast.  They were especially numerous around St. Gabriel, on the east bank of the river in Iberville Parish. 

Many of the Comeaus from France chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche, where a cousin from the river had settled in the 1780s.  After the Acadians abandoned the Bayou des Écores settlement in the early 1790s, most of them, including Comeauxs, relocated to upper Bayou Lafourche, adding substantially to this third center of family settlement that eventually stretched all the way down into the Terrebonne country.  Few Comeauxs, however, lived in what became Lafourche Parish, at least before the War of 1861-65.  During the late antebellum period, one family from the upper bayou settled near Pierre Part on the north shore of Lake Verret. 

Beginning in the late 1820s, four Comeaux brothers from Assumption Parish moved to lower Bayou Teche, where one of them became a major sugar planter in St. Mary Parish.  Two of the brothers and a nephew returned to Assumption Parish during the late antebellum period, but the others remained on the lower Teche.  By the end of the antebellum period, there were as many Comeauxs on the western prairies as along the river, with the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley cousins adding substantially to the eastern branch of the family.  The western Comeauxs had come from Chepoudy, the eastern Comeauxs from Minas and Port-Royal.  Although they all were descendants of the same Acadian progenitor, there seems to have been little interaction between the two branches of the family, such was the physical barrier imposed by the Atchafalaya Basin.

Judging by the number of slaves they held during the late antebellum period, some Comeauxs lived comfortably on their vacharies, farms, and plantations across South Louisiana.  By far the largest slave holder in the family was sugar planter Antoine Comeaux of the western district of St. Mary Parish, who held 34 slaves in 1850, and who more than doubled that number, to 77, by the summer of 1860.  In 1850, a Comeaux cousin in Assumption Parish owned 17 slaves; a decade later, he held 43 slaves on his plantation along upper Bayou Lafourche.  His older brother held 13 slaves on his farm in Assumption Parish in 1850; a decade later, the brother's widow still owned 14 slaves.  Along the river, a Comeaux's widow held 10 slaves on her farm in Iberville Parish in 1860.  In nearby East Baton Rouge Parish, another Comeaux owned eight slaves that year.  Family slave holdings on the southwestern prairies tended to be a bit smaller.  A Comeaux in Lafayette Parish owned six slaves in 1850 and nine a decade later.  Another Comeaux of the same parish owned seven slaves in 1860.  Up in St. Landry Parish, a Comeaux cousin held half a dozen slaves in 1850 and the same number in 1860.  The great majority of their kinsmen, however, on the river, along the Lafourche, and west of the Atchafalaya Basin, owned only a few slaves or no slaves at all, at least none who appeared on the federal slave schedules of 1850 and 1860. 

As befitting the size of the family, dozens of Comeauxs served Louisiana and the Southern Confederacy in uniform during the War of 1861-65. ...

In Louisiana, the family's name picked up an "x" and became Comeaux, pronounced with the emphasis on the first syllable--KOH-mo.  Up in Canada, however, it is still spelled Comeau and pronounced with the emphasis on the second syllable--kuh-MOH.  In Louisiana, the family's name also is spelled Caumau, Caumaux, Caumeau, Caumeaux, Caumo, Caumon, Caumot, Comand, Comau, Comaud, Comaut, Comaux, Commau, Commaud, Commault, Commaux, Commeau, Commeaux, Commo, Commot, Como, Comon, Comont, Comot, Comu, Coumeau, Coummeau.04

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Three Comeaus--a father and two sons--came to Louisiana with the Broussards in February 1765.  They followed the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche and remained on the western prairies: 

Victor (c1740-1760s) à Abraham à Pierre l'aîné dit L'Esturgeon à Pierre Comeau

Victor, second son of Jean Comeau le jeune and Brigitte Savoie, born probably at Chepoudy in c1740, evidently escaped the British roundup in the trois-rivières area in 1755 and sought refuge with his family on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By the early 1760s, however, he was a prisoner at Halifax.  He married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Michel and Jeanne Breau and widow of Michel Brun, probably at Halifax in the early 1760s.  They followed the Broussards from Halifax to the lower Mississippi valley via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in late 1764.  Their younger son was born at Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, on the voyage down.  They reached New Orleans with the Broussards in February 1765.  Victor was one of the Acadians in the party who attempted to exchange Canadian card money for Louisiana currency at New Orleans in late April.  He and his family then followed the Broussards to the Attakapas District, where they helped establish La Nouvelle-Acadie on the banks of lower Bayou Teche.  They had no more children in Louisiana.  Victor died at Attakapas in the late 1760s, in his late 20s.  In April 1771, soon after his death, Anne remarried again--her third marriage--to widower Joseph Cormier of Chignecto and Prairie Bellevue in the Opelousas District.  Her older son by Victor Comeau died young, but her younger Comeaux son settled at Carencro on the northern edge of the Attakapas District.  Though he had only one son of his own, that son created a vigorous line at Carencro. 

Older son Thomas, born probably at Halifax in c1763, was age 14 in May 1777 when he was counted with his mother and stepfather Joseph Cormier at Opelousas.  Thomas did not marry.  

Victor's younger son Jean, born at Cap-Français probably in January 1765, followed his parents to the lower Teche that spring and his widowed mother to the Opelousas District in the early 1770s.  Jean married Esther, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon LeBlanc and his second wife Marguerite Guilbeau, at Attakapas in January 1786.  They settled at Carencro, near the boundary between the Opelousas and Attakapas districts, just south of where Jean had been raised on Prairie Bellevue.  Jean died in Lafayette Parish in February 1828.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean was age 68 when he died, but he was closer to 63.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse later that month; in March.  His heirs petitioned the court to emancipate "a faithful slave, Jacques."  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted two slaves--a 46-year-old black female, and a 19-year-old black male--on Mrs. John Comaux's farm between Marie Coralie Comaux and "Mrs." Julien Comaux.  Jean daughters married into the Babineaux and Savoie families.  His son's line was a vigorous one. 

Only son Julien, born probably at Carencro in August 1793, married Marie Céleste or Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Athanase Breaux and Marie Catherine Arceneaux, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1817.  They settled at Carencro.  Their son François Hippolyte, called Hippolyte, Polyte, and also Jean Hippolyte, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age unrecorded, in February 1823; Jean Homere or Omer, called Omer, at age 3 months in April 1827 but died at age 8 in August 1835; Joseph Osémé, called Osémé, was born in January 1829; Athanase in May 1833; Pierre Edvin, Edwin, or Televin was baptized at age 6 months in November 1835; Alexis Hippolyte at age 2 months in October 1837; and Eusèbe was born in c1839.  Their daughters married into the Mouton and Sonnier families.  Julien remarried to Arthémise Caruthers, also Credeur, probably at Carencro in the late 1840s.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted seven slaves--three males and four females, all black, ranging in age from 16 years to 10 months--on "Mrs." Julien Comaux's farm next to Mrs. John Comaux.  Julien, a widower again, died probably at Carencro in July 1864, age 17.  Five of his seven sons created their own families on the prairies by 1870. 

Oldest son Hippolyte, by first wife Marie Catherine Arceneaux, married Esselle or Estelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Augustin Benoit and Anastasie Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church in July 1841.  They settled probably at Carencro.  Their son Hippolyte, fils was born in August 1846; Rosémond in August 1848; Julien le jeune in February 1850; and Jean in June 1862 but died at age 3 1/2 in March 1866.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted three slaves--a 23-year-old black female, a 3-year-old black male, and a 1-year-old mulatto male, living in a single house--on Hypolite Comaux's farm next to P. Edvin Comaux.  Two of Hippolyte's older sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Hippolyte, fils married Onésima, daughter of fellow Acadian Onésime Richard and his Anglo Creole wife Marguerite Arthémise Credeur, at the Vermilionville church in January 1867, and remarried to Eveline, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Blanchard and Marguerite Trahan, at the Vermilionville church in July 1869.

Hippolyte, père's second son Rosémond married Céleste Adolice, Adolie, or Adalie, daughter of French Canadian Louis Roger le jeune and his Acadian wife Marie Azélima Prejean, at the Vermilionville church in January 1870.  Their son Louis Steve had been born in Lafayette Parish in October 1869. 

Julien's third son Oséme, by first wife Marie Catherine Arceneaux, married cousin Marie Odoisea, Adoiska, Adoliska, Ladaiska, Lodaiska, or Lodovisca, daughter of fellow Acadians Symphorien Prejean and Eugènie Breaux, at the Vermilionville church in April 1849.  They settled probably at Carencro.  Their son Omer was born in January 1852; Jean Alphée, called Alphée, in June 1856 but died at age 2 1/2 in February 1859; Dominique G. was born in August 1858; and Symphorien in January 1861 but died at age 9 1/2 in August 1870.  Osémé died probably at Carencro in December 1865, age 36.  One wonders if his death was war-related.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in July 1866.  His daughter Zemea was born in January 1866, a month after his death.  His daughters married into the Breaux and Hernandez families.  Evidently neither of his two surviving sons married by 1870. 

Julien's fourth son Athanase, by first wife Marie Catherine Arceneaux, married Louisa or Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians Caliste LeBlanc and Marguerite Eurasie Bernard, at the Vermilionville church in January 1854.  They settled probably at Carencro.  Their son Jean Athanase was born in November 1854 but died at age 10 months in October 1855, Joseph Bernard was born in August 1856 but died at age 3 1/2 in May 1860, Aurelien was born in February 1863, and Caliste Ozémé in January 1868. 

Julien's fifth son Pierre Edwin, by first wife Marie Catherine Arceneaux, married Anatalie or Nathalie, another daughter of Onésime Richard and Marguerite Arthémise Credeur, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1858.  The settled probably at Carencro.  Their son Joseph was born in March 1861.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--a 6-year-old mulatto female--on P. Edvin Comaux's farm next to Hypolite Comaux

Julien's seventh and youngest son Eusèbe, by first wife Marie Catherine Arceneaux, married Evelina, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Lessaint Prejean and Julienne Richard, at the Vermilionville church in January 1860.  Eusèbe died in Lafayette Parish in June 1863, age 24.  Was his death war-related?  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse later in the month.  He and his wife had a daughter, Julienne, born in October 1861, but she died at age 2 in November 1863, and they had no sons, so Eusèbe's line of the family did not endure.

.

Four more Comeaus--Victor's older cousin and his family, and Victor's younger brother and his wife--also came to Louisiana from Halifax via St.-Domingue in 1765, probably in a later party.  They did not remain with Victor and his family on lower Bayou Teche but settled, instead, in the Opelousas District farther up the bayou.  Victor's younger brother's line was especially vigorous: 

Michel (c1734-1804) à Pierre l'aîné dit L'Esturgeon à Pierre Comeau

Michel, second son of Jean Comeau and Madeleine Amireau, born probably at Chepoudy in c1734, married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Michel Girouard and Marie Thibodeau, at Chepoudy in March 1756 while in exile.  As their marriage date attests, the young couple escaped the British roundup of 1755 and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  In the late 1750s, they either were captured by, or surrendered to, the British and were held in the prisoner-of-war compound on Georges Island, Halifax harbor, where Marie-Madeleine gave Michel a son in c1760.  British authorities counted Michel, Marie-Madeleine, and three children at Halifax in August 1763.  Late the following year, they emigrated to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, and reached New Orleans in the spring of 1765.  They brought only a single child with them.  However, Marie-Madeleine was pregnant on the voyage, and another son was born to them in late April 1765 either aboard ship, at La Balize, or in New Orleans.  After baptizing their newborn son on May 16, they followed 200 other Acadians to lower Bayou Teche but did not remain there.  They settled, instead, on upper Bayou Teche in the Opelousas District, where Marie-Madeleine gave Michel more children.  Michel became a prosperous cattleman in the district.  He held only four head of cattle in 1771, but by 1788 his herd had grown to 500 head!  In 1796, he held a dozen slaves.  Michel died at Opelousas in the spring of 1804.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Michel was age 80 when he died, but he was closer to 70.  His daughters married into the Bellard and Doucet families.  His youngtest son moved down to the Attakapas District in the late 1790s or early 1800s but returned to the Opelousas area and created a family of his own on the western prairies. 

Oldest son Jean, born probably at Halifax in c1760, was counted in the Opelousas census of 1777, age 17.  Did he marry? 

Michels second son Louis, born either aboard ship or at New Orleans in April 1765 and baptized at New Orleans in May, was counted in the Opelousas census of May 1777 as age 7, but he would have been closer to 12.  Did he survive childhood and marry? 

Michel's third and youngest son Michel, fils, born probably at Opelousas in November 1772, married Marie-Louise, called Louise, daughter of Joseph Latiolais and Julienne Barre of Coquelin, at Opelousas in December 1800.  They settled at Fausse Pointe on lower Bayou Teche near present-day New Iberia.  Michel, fils died at Fausse Pointe in May 1808, age 36.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following January.  His widow Marie-Louise moved up the Teche to Grande Pointe, where she bore a "natural son," name unrecorded, who died at birth in November 1816.  One of her and Michel, fils's daughters married into the Fontenot family.  Michel, fils's sons "returned" to St. Landry Parish and settled near Grand Coteau and Church Point out on the prairies.  

Oldest son Onésime, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in November 1800, married Éloise, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Doucet and his Creole wife Céleste Bellard, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1823.  Their son Onésime, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1827; and Joseph in May 1830 but died at age 1 in July 1831.  Their daughter married into the Labbé family.  Onésime, père remarried to Marie Eléonore or Léonore, daughter of Antoine Labbé and his Acadian wife Modeste Hébert, at the Opelousas church in January 1838.  Their son Antoine was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1839 but died the following July; Théodule was born in April 1842; Jules in February 1848; Jean Demosthène near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in January 1854; Homer in June 1857; and Joseph le jeune in September 1861, when his father was in his early 60s.  Their daughter married into the Ramoin family.  Two of Onésime's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Onésime, fils, by first wife Éloise Doucet, married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Doucet III and Marie Carmelite Richard, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1849.  Their son Joseph was born near Church Point in May 1851, Onésime III in March 1853, Julien in March 1858, and Pierre Faustin in February 1860.  Onésime, fils's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in January 1866.  He would have been age 39 that year. 

Onésime, père's fifth son Jules, by second wife Marie Eléonore Labbé, married Marie Doralise, daughter of André Veroni and Elisa Carrière, at the Church Point church in August 1867.  Their son Joseph Nesat was born near Church Point in September 1867, and Élisée in July 1870.  Was he the Jules Comeaux whose succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in December 1870?  If so, he would have been age 22 that year.  And if so, one wonders why his succession record would have been filed in St. Martin Parish. 

Michel, fils's second son, name unrecorded, died 6 days after his birth in July 1802. 

Michel, fils's third and youngest son Michel III, born probably at Fausse Pointe in August 1805, married Madeleine Lacombe in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1834.  Their son Michel IV was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1836, Edmond in December 1842, Onésime le jeune near Grand Coteau in October 1846, Joseph in August 1848, François near Church Point in February 1853, and Jean Martial in February 1858.  Michel III may have remarried to Clara Dacieux or Dussieux in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1862, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church the following October.  One of Michel III's sons married by 1870.

Second son Edmond, by first wife Madeleine Lacombe, married Virginie, daughter of French Canadian Noël Roy III and his Creole wife Eugènie Menard, at the Church Point church in April 1866.  They settled at Coulee Triffe near Church Point.  

Michel, fils's daughter Marie-Louise, age 20, gave birth to a "natural son," Edmond, in St. Martin Parish in December 1823.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism called him a Comeaux and did not give the father's name.  Marie-Louise may have had a "natural daughter" named Marie in June 1821.   

Grandson Edmond, who called himself a Comeaux, married Marie Tarsile, called Tarsile, daughter of fellow Acadians Achille Savoy and Marie Elisa Prejean, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1854, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in November.  Their son Jean was born near Grand Coteau in December 1855, Aymar or Numa in September 1859 but died the following January, Joseph near Church Point in March 1861, and Joseph Numa near Grand Coteau in August 1866.

Charles (c1742-1805) à Abraham à Pierre l'aîné dit L'Esturgeon à Pierre Comeau

Charles, third and youngest son of Jean Comeau le jeune and Brigitte Savoie and Victor's younger brother, was born probably at Chepoudy in c1742.  He followed his family to Île St.-Jean and into exile, but, like older brother Victor, probably did not follow his mother and stepfather to Canada.  Chalres also ended up as a prisoner of war in Nova Scotia.  He married cousin Anastasie, daughter fellow Acadians Paul Savoie and Judith Michel of Chepoudy, probably at Halifax in c1763 or 1764.  They, too, emigrated to Louisiana via French St.-Domingue in 1764-65.  If they followed his brother Victor to lower Bayou Teche, they did not remain there.  By the spring of 1766, Charles le jeune and Anastasie were living in the Opelousas District, where they remained.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1765 and 1781, Anastasie gave Charles eight children, five sons and three daughters, but Louisiana records give them three daughters and only four sons.   Charles, like his cousin Michel, became a prosperous cattleman in the district.  He held 19 head of cattle in 1771.  By 1788, his herd had increased to 643 head!  In 1796, he owned 10 slaves.  Charles died at Opelousas in August 1805, "age about 60 yrs."   His succession record had been filed at the Opelousas courthouse the previous March.  His daughters married into the Broussard, Langlinais, Mouton, and Sonnier families.  All four of his sons married and created vigorous lines on the western prairies.

Oldest son Antoine-Charles or Charles Antoine, called Charles, fils, born at Opelousas in the late 1760s, married Perpétué, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Broussard and his first wife Anne Brun, at Attakapas in January 1786.  They settled along the lower Vermilion near Côte Gelée.  Charles, fils died in Lafayette Parish in July 1830.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Charles was age 66 when he died, but he probably was in his early 60s.  His succession records were filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January 1849 and September 1850, years after his death.  Daughter Marie Estelle "died ... in a drowning accident at age 8" a week before Charles died.  One wonders if their deaths were related.  His other daughters married into the Baudoin, Broussard, Mouton, and Sonnier families.  Three of his four sons created their own families on the prairies and in the Bayou Teche valley. 

Oldest son Camille, born at Attakapas in August 1792, probably did young. 

Charles, fils's second son Éloi, baptized at Attakapas, age 3 months, in June 1795, married Marie Cléonise, also called Phelonise, daughter of fellow Acadians François Louvière and Marie Louise Thibodeaux of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1813.  They settled at Côte Gelée on the lower Vermilion.  Their son Éloi, fils was born on the Vermilion in April 1816; Joseph in January 1824 but died at age 5 in November 1829; Charles Émile, called Émile, was born in June 1828; François was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 7 months, in October 1830; and Louis Valéry, called Valéry, at age 1 in July 1834.  Éloi, père died in Lafayette Parish in September 1847, probably a widower.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Éloi died "at age 48 yrs.," but he was 52.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in February 1848.  His daughters married into the Bourg and Broussard families.  Four of his five sons created their own families on the prairies.

Oldest son Éloi, fils married Marguerite Meline, Amelina, or Mélanie, daughter of Moïse Bonin and his Acadian wife Marie Denis Breaux, at the St. Martinville church in September 1836.  They settled at Fausse Pointe near New Iberia.  Their daughters married into the Broussard, Landry, and Oubre families.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted two slaves--a 12-year-old black female and an 8-year-old black female--on Eloy Comeau's farm at Fausse Pointe.  This probably was Éloi, fils.  He remarried to Marie Zéolide, called Zéolide, daughter of fellow Acadians Gilbert Hébert and Céleste Labauve, at the St. Martinville church in February 1851.  They also settled at Fausse Pointe.  Their son Joseph Luke was born in May 1852, and Joseph in December 1857.  Éloi, fils may have remarried again--it would have been his third marriage--to cousin Azélie Comeaux in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in February 1864.  Their son Julien was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1867. 

Élois, père's third son Charles Émile, married Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Granger and Susanne dit Suzette Granger, at the Vermilionville church in November 1845.  Charles Émile, called Émile by the recording priest, who did not give Émile's parents' names, mention a wife, or record his age, may have died in Lafayette Parish in October 1856.  If so, he would have been age 28 when he died.  His daughter married into the Missonnier family.  Did he father any sons?

Élois, père's fourth son François, married Marie Clara, called Clara, daughter of fellow Acadians Leufroi Sonnier and Françoise Aureline Landry, at the Vermilionville church in March 1852.  Their son Éloi le jeune was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1853, and Esperat in October 1858.  They were living near Youngsville by 1860. 

Élois, père's fifth and youngest son Valéry, married Célanie or Célamine, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Richard and Adélaïde Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church in January 1856.  Their son Gustave was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1856; Octave in November 1858; Éloi le jeune near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in February 1861; Émile in April 1863; O'Neil in April 1866; Dupré near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in August 1868; and Joseph Sevigne near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in August 1870. 

Charles, fils's third son Édouard, perhaps also called Cadet, born at Attakapas in February 1798, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Granger and Françoise Landry of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church in February 1817.  They settled on the lower Vermilion near Côte Gelée.  Their son Édouard, fils was born in November 1817; Baptiste Axaris was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 7 1/2 months, in April 1826 but died at age 6 in August 1832; Valéry was born in October 1827; and Fusien or Lucien in December 1833.  Their daughters married into the Bell, Bernard, Dubois, Landry, and Melançon families, and perhaps into the Nunez family as well.  Édouard, père, at age 48, remarried to Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Landry and Françoise Landry and widow of Charles Granger, fils, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in April 1846.  Their daughter married into the Broussard family.  Édouard, père died in Lafayette Parish in August 1850.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Édouard died "at age 60 years," but he was 52.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in September.  His three surviving sons settled on the prairies and on lower Bayou Teche. 

Oldest son Édouard, fils, by first wife Marguerite Granger, married Marguerite Célanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Melançon and Susanne Landry, at the Vermilionville church in April 1836.  They settled at Côte Gelée, near present-day Youngsville.  Their son Alfin or Valsin was born in February 1839 but died at age 3 1/2 in September 1842, Aladin was born in February 1841, Ursin in March 1843, Edmond in July 1850, and Édouard III or Edward in November 1855.  They also had a son named Théoville, also called Théonide.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--an 18-year-old black female--on Édouard Comeau's farm in the parish's western district, three farms up from Désiré Comeau.  Was this Édouard, fils?  Édouard, fils died probably at Côte Gelée in June 1860.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Édouard died "at age 45 yrs.," but he was 42.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--a 16-year-old black female--on Edward Comeaux's farm next to Napoléon Melançon and several farms up from Mrs. Désiré Comeaux.  If this was Édouard, fils, he died a few weeks before his slave was counted.  Four of his surviving sons married by 1870. 

Second son Aladin married fellow Acadian Marie Celima, called Celima, Broussard at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in July 1865.  Their son Ernest was born near Abbeville in October 1869. 

Édouard, fils's third son Ursin married Marie Irma, called Irma, daughter of fellow Acadians Arvillien Broussard and Marie Boudreaux, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in September 1865.

Édouard, fils's fourth son Théoville married Aurore, daughter of Joseph Viator and Clementine Viator, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in January 1866.  Their son Joseph was born near New Iberia in November 1866.  They were living near Youngsville a few years later. 

Édouard, fils's fifth son Edmond married Élodie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Osémé Boudreaux and Céleste Melina Cormier, at the Youngsville church in April 1870.

Édouard, père's third son Valéry, by first wife Marguerite Granger, married Aspasie or Anastasie Leleu at the New Iberia church in April 1848.  Their son Alcide was born near New Iberia in October 1848, and Aristide in September 1851.  Valéry died near New Iberia in February 1852.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Valéry died "at age 26 yrs.," but he was 24.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in April 1853.  His two sons married by 1870.

Older son Alcide married Telvina, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Valière Robichaux and his Creole wife Doralie Bodin, at the New Iberia church in December 1868.  Their son Adolphe was born near New Iberia in April 1870. 

Valéry's younger son Aristide married Delphine, another daughter of Simon Valière Robichaux and Doralie Bodin, at the New Iberia church in April 1870.

Édouard, père's fourth son Fusien, by first wife Marguerite Granger, married Spanish Creole Coralie Viator at the New Iberia church in May 1854.  Their son Édouard was born near New Iberia in April 1858, Alcide in October 1859, Homere in March 1861, Joseph in November 1862, Jean Octave in September 1864, Gustave in June 1866, and Pierre Eustache in March 1870. 

Charles, fils's fourth and youngst son Charles-Valière, born at Attakapas in November 1800, married Gertrude, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Broussard and Gertrude Thibodeaux of Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church in May 1820.  Their son Charles Valière, fils was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 months, in March 1827; Valéry le jeune was born in September 1832; Adolphe was baptized, age 3 1/2 months, in August 1834; Lauzin at age 45 days in April 1837; and François at age 2 months in February 1839.  They also had an older son named Jean.  Their daughters married Broussard cousins.  Charles Valière, père may have died in Lafayette Parish in November 1849.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial of Charles Comeaux, husband of ____ Broussard, said that Charles died "at age 40 yrs.," but this Charles would have been 49.  Five of his six sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Jean married cousin Euphémie, daughter of Pierre Meaux and his Acadian wife Céleste Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in December 1850.  They were living near Abbeville a few years after their marriage.  Their daughter married a Broussard cousin.  Jean remarried to cousin Azelima, Azelina, or Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Guidry, at the Vermilionville church in December 1855; Azelina's mother, also, was a Broussard.  Their son Rémi was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1858.  They were living near Abbeville a decade later. 

Charles Valière's second son Charles Valière, fils, at age 34, married Azema, daughter of fellow Acadian François Benoit and his Creole wife Cléonise Montet, at the Vermilionville church in April 1861.  Their son Eustache was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1862, Onésiphore in May 1863, Alcée near Youngsville in June 1866, Albert in January 1868, and Duha in April 1870. 

Charles Valière, père's fourth son Adolphe married cousin Eugènie, another daughter Pierre Meaux and Céleste Broussard, at the Abbeville church in April 1855, and remarried to double cousin Marie Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Jean Olidon Broussard and Marie Eurasie Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in January 1858.  Their son Aymar was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1858.  Adolphe remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie Gadrate or Godrate, daughter of fellow Acadians Désiré Benoit and Celima Thibodeaux, at the Vermilionville church September 1865. 

Charles Valière, père's fifth son Lauzin married double cousin Asima, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Isidore Broussard and Célanie Comeaux, at the Vermilionville church in February 1860.  They settled near Youngsville.  During the War of 1861-65, Lauzin, called Lozin in Confederate records, served in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He enlisted in the company only a few weeks after his daughter Ophelia was born, and he fathered another daughter, Rose, during the war while he was waiting to be exchanged.  After his unit surrendered in northwestern Louisiana in May 1865, Lauzin returned home to Azema.  Their son Ernest was born near Youngsville in December 1866, and Omer in April 1868. 

Charles Valière, père's sixth and youngest son François married double cousin Marie Sylvanie, called Sylvanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Jean Olidon Broussard and Marie Eurasie Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in January 1867.  Their son Luc was born near Youngsville in December 1867, and Jean Horace in November 1869. 

Charles, père's second son Pierre, born at Opelousas in c1770, married Cécile, daughter of Philippe Langlois and his Acadian wife Marie-Jeanne Sonnier, at Opelousas in October 1791.  They may have settled near Côte Gelée in the Attakapas District.  Pierre died at brother Charles, fils's home at Côte Gelée in February 1810, age 40.  His daughter married into the Gaspard family.  His son returned to St. Landry Parish.  One of his grandsons settled near Breaux Bridge on upper Bayou Teche.

Only son Pierre, fils, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in September 1799, married Louise, Lisa, Lise, or Élise, daughter of Simonet Durio and his Acadin wife Madeleine Landry, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1826, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in July 1830.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born in St. Landry Parish in May 1834, and Cleopha in December 1836.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted six slaves--three males and three females, all black except for one mulatto, ranging in age from 40 to 1--on Pierre Comeau's farm.  In 1860, the federal census in St. Landry Parish counted six slaves again--two males and four females, all black except for one mulatto, ages 58 to 9--on Pierre Comeau's farm.  His daughters married into the Anselm, D'avy or David, Guilbeau, Raulin, and St. Blancat families, and perhaps into the Richard family as well.  His sons also created families of their own on the Teche and out on the prairies.

Older son Jean Baptiste married Cephalide, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles Dupuis and his Creole wife Célestine Patin, at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in March 1858.

Pierre, fils's younger son Cleopha married Estelle, daughter of French Canadian Jean Baptiste Roy, fils and his Acadian wife Lise Pitre, at the Opelousas church in May 1860.  Their son Cleopha Henry was born in St. Landry Parish in February 1861, and Pierre Hebard in July 1866. 

Charles, père's third son Auguste or Augustin baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in June 1779, married Céleste or Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Sylvain Sonnier and Madeleine Bourque and widow of Élisée Missonier, at Opelousas in February 1797.  In the early 1800s, they moved down to the old Attakapas District and settled on the Vermilion River south of present-day Lafayette.  Augustin died a widower in Lafayette Parish in September 1829, age 50.  His daughters married into the Bernard and Guidry families.  Six of his seven sons also created families of their own along the Teche and out on the prairies, but not all of the lines endured. 

Oldest son Hippolyte, baptized at Opelousas, age 4, in August 1801, married Marie Eugènie, called Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre LeBlanc and Hortense Broussard of Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1820.  They settled on the Vermilion.  Their son Hippolyte, fils was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1823 but died the following January; Charles was born in September 1827; Augustin le jeune was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 17 months, in October 1831; and Pierre or René Edgar, called Edgar, at age 2 1/2 in July 1837.  Hippolyte, père died near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in June 1867.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Hippolyte died "at age 68 yrs.," but he may have been a year or two older.  His daughters married into the Belaire, Guidry, and Landry families.  Three of his sons created their own families in Lafayette Parish.

Second son Charles married Adveline, Adeline, or Eveline, daughter of fellow Acadian Gédéon Landry and his Creole wife Anne Josèphe Lormand, at the Vermilionville church in February 1850.  Their son Charles Augustin was born in Lafayette Parish in April 1857, Nicolas Desmartiniere near Abbeville in June 1862 but died the following November, and Pierre Odelon was born near New Iberia in November 1863.  They were living near Abbeville again by the mid-1860s.  Their daughter married into the Harrington family. 

Hipployte's third son Augustin le jeune married Marie Euranie, called Euranie, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Jean Olidon Broussard and Marie Eurasie Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in February 1854.  Their son, name unrecorded, died in Lafayette Parish, age 7 days, in October 1857.  Augustin le jeune "of Vermillion" remarried to Lydia, daughter of fellow Acadians Lezin LeBlanc and Alzere Broussard, at the St. Martinville church in August 1865.  Their son Désiré was baptized at the Abbeville church, age 10 months, in November 1866, Hippolyte le jeune was born in March 1868, and Lezin Henri in near New Iberia in August 1869. 

Hippolyte's fourth and youngest son Edgar married Eusèide, daughter of Nicolas Walleau, Valleau, or Vallot and Marguerite Domingues and widow of Dominique Girouard, at the Vermilionville church in June 1856.  Their son Pierre Nicolas was born near Abbeville in February 1863; and Edgar, fils in March 1870.  In 1860, the federal census taker in Vermilion Parish counted two slaves--a 21-year-old black female, and a 5-year-old black male, living in 1 house--on Edgar Como's farm in the parish's western district. 

Auguste's second son Pierre Valmont, called Valmont and also André, baptized at Opelousas, age 6 months, in November 1802 married fellow Acadian Eugènie Landry in Lafayette Parish in the early 1820s.  Their son Pierre, fils, also called Déopalière, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 3 days, in June 1827, Augustin le jeune at age 3 months in October 1837; and Alexandre in July 1844.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted two slaves--a 44-year-old black female, and a 44-year-old black male, living in one house--on Valmond Comeaux's farm near Lefroy Comeaux.  Valmont died in Lafayette Parish in March 1863.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Valmont died "at age 48 yrs.," but he was 61.  One wonders if his death was war-related.  His daughters married Landry cousins.  Two of three sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Pierre, fils married Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadians Onésime Melançon and Mélanie Prejean, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1868.  Their son Zacharie was born near Youngsville in January 1869. 

Valmont's third and youngest son Alexandre married Aurelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Octave Granger and Marcellienne Trahan, at the Vermilionville church in June 1868.  Their son Pierre Galbert was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1870. 

Auguste's third son Norbert, baptized at Opelousas, age 3 in February 1808, married first cousin Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Comeaux and Rosalie Prejean, his uncle and aunt, at the Vermilionville church in November 1826.  Their son Norbert, fils was born probably in Lafayette Parish in c1832; Émile was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 2 months, in May 1833; Dorcili at age 2 months in January 1835; Charles Sevigne was born in November 1836; Seville was baptized at age 8 months in December 1839 but died at age 9 months in January 1840; Charles Ovide was born in March 1840; and a second Norbert, fils was born in September 1852 three months before the death of his older brother with the same name.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted two slaves--a 25-year-old black female, and a 17-year-old black male--on Norbert Comeau's farm in the parish's western district.  Clarisse died in Lafayette Parish in January 1853, age 40.  Her succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in March 1856.  Norbert, père died in Lafayette Parish in November 1858.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Norbert died "at age 50 yrs.," but he was 53.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January 1859.  Two of his seven sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Norbert, fils l'aîné died in Lafayette Parish in December 1852, age 20.  He probably did not marry. 

During the War of 1861-65, Norbert, père's third son  Dorcili served in Company F of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana; and in Company I of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Infantry, which fought in Louisiana.  After surviving the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862, Dorcili was "sent to interior" on sick leave.  He returned to his unit in southern Alabama by July and followed it to South Louisiana that autumn.  He was absent sick again, this time at New Iberia, not far from home, in the early summer of 1863.  He may have fought with his new regiment, the Consolidated 18th Infantry, at Mansfield, Louisiana, in April 1864.  Like younger brother Charles Ovide, Dorcili survived the war.  He married Edita, daughter of fellow Acadian Napoléon R. Lalande and his Creole wife Suzanne Fabre and widow of Leufroi Richard, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in November 1865.  Dorcili's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in November 1869.  He would have been age 35 that year. 

Norbert, père's sixth son Charles Ovide married cousin Hebertville, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Landry and Azélie Comeaux, at the Vermilionville church in February 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Charles Ovide served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He enlisted in the company in March 1862, only a month after his wedding.  He was wounded at Vicksburg on 24 Jun 1863 but survived the war. 

Auguste's fourth son Drosin, baptized at Opelousas, age 2 months, in February 1808, died in St. Martin Parish at age 1 1/2 in October 1809.

Auguste's fifth son Symphorien, baptized at the Opelousas church, age 2 months, in February 1808, married Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Landry and Julienne Breaux, at the Vermilionville church in August 1831.  Did they have any children?

Auguste's sixth son Charles le jeune, a twin, baptized at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, age 4 months, in October 1811, married Marie Elise, Elisa, Eleine, or Hélène, daughter of Hippolyte Bonin and his Acadian wife Marie Doiron, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1834.  Their son Hippolyte was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 2 months, in December 1836 but died at age 1 in September 1837; Louis was born in St. Martin Parish in September 1841; Henri Hertelle in December 1843; Valérien in November 1845; and Cyprien near Breaux Bridge in January 1849.  Charles le jeune may have died near Breaux Bridge in March 1867.  The priest who recorded the burial did not give Charles's parents' names or mention a wife, but he did say that Charles died "at age 50 yrs."  This Charles would have been 56.  His daughter married into the Thibodeaux family.  One of his sons married by 1870.

 Third son Henri married Élodie, daughter of Sellerive Domengeaux and Idalie Cailler, at the Breaux Bridge church in January 1865.  Their son Jean was born Breaux Bridge in March 1867. 

Auguste's seventh son Martin, Charles le jeune's twin, baptized at the St. Martinville church, age 4 months, in October 1811, married Emeranthe Eremise or Eremise Emeranthe, also called Eloise, daughter of perhaps fellow Acadians François Arceneaux and Marie Mouton, at the Vermilionville church in July 1833; the marriage was recorded at the Vermilionville courthouse in May 1844.  Their son Martin Telesphore, called Telesphore, was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1834; François Thelesmar in March 1837; and Pierre Théole near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in August 1845.  Martin died in Lafayette Parish in April 1850, age 38.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Telesphore married Aurore, daughter of Louis Dautreuil and Émeranthe Leleu and widow of Charles Bertrand, at the St. Martinville church in January 1858.  Their son Martin Elzean or Azarius was born in St. Martin Parish in September 1858 but died in Lafayette Parish, age 11 months, in August 1859.  During the War of 1861-65, Telesphore served in Company F of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana.  He survived the war.  Telesphore died in St. Martin Parish in June 1866.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Telesphore died "at age 38 yrs.," but he was 32.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse later in June.  One wonders if his early death was war-related. 

Martin's second son François Thelesmar married fellow Acadian Elzina Thibodeaux, widow of Stanislas Garrigues, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in February 1868.

Charles, père's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, baptized at Opelousas, age 6 weeks, in October 1781, married Rosalie, 22-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Prejean and Marguerite Richard, at Attakapas in October 1802.  They remained in Attakapas and settled at Côte Gelée near present-day Broussard.  Their daughters married into the Bernard, Breaux, Broussard, Comeaux, and Landry families.  Baptiste remarried to fellow Acadian Marguerite Adélaïde Mouton, widow of Cyprien Arceneaux, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in June 1845.  Baptiste died in Lafayette Parish in June 1847.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste died "at age 56 yrs.," but he was 66.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following August.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted six slaves--four males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 60 to 6--on Ww. Bte Comeau's farm; these probably were the slaves of Baptiste's widow, Marguerite Adélaïde Mouton

Oldest son Jean Baptiste Désiré, by first wife Rosalie Prejean, born St. Martin Parish in July 1814, married Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Edmond Landry and Anastasie Giroir, at the Vermilionville church in November 1836.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted six slaves--two males and four females, all black, ranging in age from 29 to 2--on Désiré Comeau's farm in the parish's western district next to François Landry and three farms down from Édouard Comeau.  Was this Jean Baptiste Désiré?  Did he father any sons?  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted nine slaves--three males and six females, five blacks and four mulattoes, ages 42 years to 4 months, living in one house--on Mrs. Désiré Comeaux's farm several farms down from Edward Comeaux; these may have been the slaves of Jean Baptiste Désiré's widow, Céleste Landry.  Jean Baptiste Désiré's daughter married a Landry cousin. 

Baptiste's second son Charles Duclise, Euclis, or Euclide, by first wife Rosalie Prejean, in St. Martin Parish in November 1818, married fellow Acadian Marie Élodie Landry probably in Lafayette Parish by the late 1840s.  Their son Alphonse was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1851, and Jean in August 1852.  The federal census taker in Lafayette Parish in September 1850 counted five slaves--one male and four females, all black, ranging in age from 30 to 3--on C. D. Comeau's farm next to Émilien Landry in the parish's western district; this probably was Charles Duclise.  Charles Duclise may have died near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in March 1867.  The priest who recorded the burial did not give Charles's parents' names or mention a wife, but he did say that Charles died "at age 50 yrs.".  This Charles would have been age 48.  His daughters married into the Landry and Larriviere families. 

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Two more Comeaus--a widow and a wife--came to Louisiana in 1765 from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, but they did not follow their cousins to the western prairies.  They settled, instead, at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans where 20 Acadians from Georgia had settled the year before.  The area soon became known as the Acadian Coast.

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Five more Comeaus--a widower, his three children, and a Comeau orphan--came to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767 and settled in a new Acadian community on the river above New Orleans.  The widower's older son created a vigorous line there:

Charles (c1742-1805) à Jean l'aîné à Pierre Comeau

Charles, second son of Étienne Comeau and his first wife Marguerite Forest, born probably at Port-Royal in c1709, married Madeleine, daughter of Germain Landry and Marie Melanson, in c1744 and settled at Pigiguit.  The British deported Charles and his family to Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted Charles, now a widower, and three of his children, two sons and a daughter, at Port Tobacco on the lower Pototmac in July 1763.  They, along with a Comeau orphan, emigrated to Louisiana from Maryland in 1767.  The Spanish placed them in the new Acadian community of San Gabriel along the river south of Bayou Manchac.  Spanish officials counted them at San Gabriel on the "right bank ascending"--the east bank of the Mississippi--in March 1777.  Charles was livng with his older son at the time.  Charles's daughter married into the Doucet family.  One of his sons married and settled on the river in what became Iberville Parish.

Older son Jean-Charles, called Charles, fils, born probably at Pigiguit in c1749, followed his family to Maryland and his widower father to Louisiana.  He married Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and Cécile Bergeron, at Cabahannocer downriver from San Gabriel in September 1776.  They settled at San Gabriel.  Their daughter married into the Cointment, Dehon, and Henry families.  Charles, fils remarried to Anne-Catherine, called Catherine, daughter of Daniel Boush and Dina Louis of Virginia, at San Gabriel in July 1781.  They remained at San Gabriel.   Their daughters married into the Hébert and LeBlanc families.  Jean Charles died in Iberville Parish in July 1823.  The St. Gabriel priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Charles was age 79 when he died, but he was closer to 74.  Nine of his 11 sons created families of their own and settled in Iberville, East and West Baton Rouge, and Ascension parishes, adding substantially to the number of Comeauxs living on the river.  Most of the Comeauxs on the river, in fact, are descendants of Jean-Charles of Pigiguit.

Oldest son Firmin le jeune, by first wife Cécile Dugas, was buried at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in March 1781.

Jean-Charles's second son Jean-Louis-Laurent, called Jean-Louis and Louis, by second wife Catherine Boush, born at San Gabriel in January 1784, married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and Marie Itna Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1808.  Their son Louis Joachim Laurent or Laurent Joachim, called Joachim, was born near St. Gabriel in December 1809; Victorin in September 1811; Louis Valsin, called Valsin, in May 1813; and Jean Louis, fils or Louis Eugène in January 1815 but died at age 2 in January 1817.  Jean Louis died near St. Gabriel in May 1825.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Louis was age 35 when he died, but he was 41.  His daughter married into the Aillet and Dehon families.  Two of his four sons created their own families on the river, but not all of the lines endured.

Oldest son Joachim married Carmelite, daughter of Louis Julien Aillet and his Acadian wife Marie Victoire Lejeune, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1832.  Their son Augustin was born near St. Gabriel in December 1837; Augustin died near St. Gabriel, age 2 1/2 years, in July 1840; Laurent was born in July 1840 but died at age 11 1/2 in January 1852; and Cyprien Lucas was born in September 1847.  Their daughters married into the Covington and Parks families, and perhaps into the Landry family as well. 

Jean Louis Laurent's second son Victorin died near St. Gabriel in August 1838, age 26.  He did not marry.  

Jean Louis Laurent's third son Valsin married Zerbine, daughter of fellow Acadian Magloire Dupuy and his Creole wife Henreitte Serret and widow of Onésime Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in July 1838.  The federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish in August 1850 counted seven slaves--four males and three males, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 1--on V. Comeaux's farm; this may have been Valsin.  Valsin died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1854.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Valsin died at "age 44 yrs.," but he was 41.  Did Valsin and Zerbine have any children of their own?  In July 1860, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted two slaves--both females, both black, ages 72 and 16--on Widow Val. Comeaux's farm near Adolphe Dupuy; these may have been the slaves of Valsin's widow, Zerbine Dupuy

Jean-Charles's third son Bernard-Guillaume, by second wife Catherine Boush, born at San Gabriel in January 1786, married Marie Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Cécile Dupuis, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1809.  Their son Bernard Lesime or Onésime, called Onésime, was born near St. Gabriel in January 1810; and Treville in May 1811.  Bernard died in August 1816, age 30.  Their daughter married into the Gomez family.  One of their sons also created his own family on the river. 

Oldest son Onésime married Ann Bordon, Borgon, or Bogan at the Baton Rouge church in June 1840.  Their son James was born near St. Gabriel in August 1841. 

Jean-Charles's fourth son Charles-Daniel, called Charles D., by second wife Catherine Boush, born at San Gabriel in September 1787, married Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Bénoni Hébert and Marie Madeleine Allain, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1813.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son, name unrecorded, was born near St. Gabriel in October 1813 but died the following December; Jean Ternault, Dameau, Darneau, d'Arnaux, Darno, Dermon, Dernon, or Valence was born in April 1815; Charles Daniel, fils in February 1817; Lucillio Laurent in November 1818; and Pierre Fulsi in January 1834.  Charles D., père died probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in December 1850.  The Baton Rouge priest who recorded his burial said that Charles died at "age 60 years," but he was 63.  He was buried "in Highland Cemetary."  His daughters married into the Doiron, Legendre, and Stumpley families.  Two of his sons also created their own families on the river. 

Second son Jean d'Arnaux married Felonise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Theriot and Céleste Breaux of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in March 1836.  Like their parents, they settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Jean Eugène was born in December 1836, and Pierre Paul in June 1845.  Jean d'Arnaux, called John Darno by the recording priest, remarried to Julienne Celina or Celima, daughter of fellow Acadians John Henry and Hermegilde Gaudin, at the Baton Rouge church in November 1851.  Their son Jean d'Arnaux, fils was born near Baton Rouge in May 1855, and James Daniel in December 1858. 

Charles D.'s third son Charles Daniel, fils married Forestine or Florestine Sylvanie Tullier probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in the late 1830s or early 1840s.  Their son Pierre Victorin was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in August 1848; and Charles Daniel III in February 1862.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted two slaves--a 44-year-old black female, and a 7-year-old black female, living in 1 house--on Chas. D. Comeaux's farm.  One wonders when he moved to that parish.  Charles Daniel, fils remarried to cousin Désirée, daughter of fellow Acadian Florestin Aucoin and his Creole wife Élisabeth Verdou, at the Baton Rouge church in September 1867; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of affinity in order to marry.

Jean-Charles's fifth son Gilbert, by second wife Catherine Boush, born at San Gabriel in c1788, married Marie Mélisaire, daughter of fellow Acadians Arsène Breaux and Marie Geneviève Daigre, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1818.  Their son Étienne Hermogène, called Hermogène, was born near St. Gabriel in March 1819; and Gilbert, fils posthumously in April 1820.  Gilbert, père died near St. Gabriel in November 1819, five months before his younger son was born.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Gilbert was age 30 when he died.  His two sons created their own families on the river.

Oldest son Hermogène married cousin Elisa or Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadian Janvier Allain and his Creole wife Élise Boush, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1848.  Their son Joseph Edgard was born near St. Gabriel in December 1848 but died at age 5 months in May 1849, Gilbert Rodolph was born in March 1850, Hermogène Edwin in January 1854, and Egbert Amédée in December 1856. 

Gilbert's second son Gilbert, fils married Mary Adeline, called Adeline, daughter of Francis Gallaugher and his Acadian wife Marguerite Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1843.  Their daughters married into the Allain and Arbour families.  Gilbert, fils died near St. Gabriel in December 1845; he was only 25 years old; he was buried "in St. Raphaël's cemetary."  Gilbert, fils fathered no sons, so his line of the family, except for its blood, died with him. 

Jean-Charles's sixth son Henri-Firmin, by second wife Catherine Boush, born at St.-Gabriel in September 1789, married Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Hébert and Anne Marie Dupuy, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1811.  Their son Henri, fils was born near St. Gabriel in January 1813 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1814; a son, name unrecorded, died at age 1 month in December 1814; Firmin Gerville was born in January 1816; twin Jean Surville, called Surville, in May 1818 but died at age 9 in February 1827; and another Firmin was born in November 1820.  Henri died near St. Gabriel in September 1823, age 34.  His daughter married an Hébert cousin.  One of his sons also created his own family on the river.

Third son Firmin married Marie Emma, Aimée, or Irma, daughter of J. B. Friou and Marcelline Prosper of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in December 1838.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Joseph Saturnin, called Saturnin, was born in November 1842; and Alfred near Brusly in January 1849.  Their daughters married into the Broussard and Bourgogne families.  One of Firmin's sons married by 1870. 

Older son Saturnin married Marie Victoire, daughter of Fortune Gonet or Gonnet and his Acadin wife Marie Braud, at the Brusly church in October 1869.

Jean-Charles's seventh son Étienne, a twin, by second wife Catherine Boush, born at San Gabriel in December 1791, married Marie Céleste, called Céleste, another daughter of Arsene Breaux and Marie Geneviève Daigre, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1820.  Their son Sosthène Breau was born near St. Gabriel in March 1826, and Étienne Fergus or Jasque in June 1833 but died the following September.  Their daughters married into the Breaux, Hébert, Rils, and Rivet families.  One of their sons also created his own family on the river.

Older son Sosthène married Elvenia, Elvania, Elvira, or Helvenia, daughter of Joseph Barthélémy Ramouin and his Acadian wife Émilie Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church in December 1851.  They settled across the river near Plaquemine.  Their son Walton Emerson was born in October 1852; Joseph O. in July 1863; and a son, name and age unrecorded, died near St. Gabriel in February 1866. 

Jean-Charles's eighth son Pierre-Amand, Étienne's twin, by second wife Catherine Boush, born at San Gabriel in December 1791, married Marie Hortense, called Hortense, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire LeBlanc and Marie Barbe Babin, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1820.  Their son Pierre, fils was born in Ascension Parish in December 1826.  Pierre, père died in Ascension Parish in January 1828, age 36.  His daughter married into the Melançon family.  His son also created his own family on the river.

Only son Pierre, fils married Virginie, daughter of Achille Altazin and Sarah Krage, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1858.  Their son Jean Achille, called Achille, was born near Convent, St. James Parish, in August 1863 but died in Ascension Parish, age 10 months, 9 days, in July 1864; and Louis Adam was born in November 1864.  Pierre, fils died in Ascension Parish in June 1865, age 38. 

Jean-Charles's ninth son Joseph-Julien, called Julien, by second wife Catherine Boush, born at San Gabriel in January 1794, married Anne Delphine, daughter of Jean Lambremont and Marguerite Hamiliton, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1819.  Their son Joseph Joachim was born near St. Gabriel in October 1820; Joseph Firmin in May 1822 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1823; Joseph Trasimond, called Trasimond, was born in October 1824; Jean Baptiste Ernest, called Ernest, in January 1831; and Joseph Émile in September 1844 but died at age 9 months in July 1845.  Joseph Julien died near St. Gabriel in May 1849, age 55.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted 10 slaves--four males and six females, all black, ranging in age from 35 to 1, living in two houses--on Widow Julien Comeaux's farm next to Widow T. Comeaux; these were the slaves of Julien's widow, Anne Delphine Lambremont.  Julien's daughters married into the Breaux, Mears, and Verret families.  His three surviving sons also created their own families on the river.

Oldest son Joseph Joachim married Mathilde or Mathilda, daughter of Pierre Treville Marrionneaux and Lydia Billings, at the St. Gabriel church in October 1848.  Their son Julien Edward was born near St. Gabriel in August 1849, and Joseph Walter in August 1850. 

Julien's third son Trasimond married Marie Domitille, called Domitille, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Davat Landry and Mellisere Braud, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1847.  Their son Julien Gaspard was born near St. Gabriel in March 1852, and Joseph Trasimond, fils in September 1855.  Trasimond, père died near St. Gabriel in April 1856, age 31.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted a single slave--a 55-year-old black female--on Widow T. Comeaux's farm next to Widow Julien Comeaux; this probably was the slave of Trasimond's widow, Domitille Landry

Julien's fourth son Ernest married Lavinia, Livinia, or Luricia, another daughter of Pierre Treville Marrionneaux and Lydia Billings and widow of Ulgère Baugnon, at the St. Gabriel church in December 1852.  Their son Duncan Duillius was born near St. Gabriel in December 1857. 

Jean-Charles's tenth son Marion, by second wife Catherine Boush, born at San Gabriel in August 1796, probably died young.  

Jean-Charles's eleventh and youngest son Philippe, by second wife Catherine Boush, born at San Gabriel in May 1800, married Eugènie, daughter of fellow Acadians Honoré Daigle and Adélaïde Hébert, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1822.  Their daughter married into the Danos and Lacave families.  Philippe remarried to fellow Acadian Victorine Arianne or Uranie Landry at the St. Gabriel church in February 1825.  Their son Pierre Joachim was born near St. Gabriel in December 1825 but died at age 10 months in November 1826; Philogène was born in December 1828; and Jean Lovinski, called Lovinski, in November 1830.  Their daughter married into the Capdevielle family.  Philippe died near St. Gabriel in March 1855.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Philippe died at "age 56 years," but he was 54.  His two surviving sons created their own families on the river.

Second son Philogène, by second wife Victorine Landry, married cousin Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Arvillien Rivet and Roseline Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in October 1858.  Their son Philippe André was born near St. Gabriel in July 1859; and Philogène, fils near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, in October 1866. 

Philippe's third and youngest son Lovinski, by second wife Victorine Landry, married Joséphine, daughter of Louis Édouard Guitteau and Joséphine Pignoux, at the St. Gabriel church in January 1853.  Their son Joseph Lovinski was born near St. Gabriel in August 1859. 

Charles, père's younger son Firmin, born probably at Pigiguit in c1753, followed his family to Maryland and his widower father to Louisiana.  In March 1777, in his early 20s, he was still a bachelor and living with his father and older brother at San Gabriel.  He died at San Gabriel in March 1781, age 28.  He did not marry. 

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A widow--Marguerite Babin, wife of Charles Comeau of San Gabriel's youngest brother Alexis--brought her Comeau children--three sons, including a set of twins, and a daughter--to Louisiana from Maryland in 1768 with the party of refugees from Port Tobacco led by the Breau brothers of Pigiguit.  Spanish Governor Ulloa forced them to settled at Fort San Luìs de Natchez, far upriver from their kinsmen below Baton Rouge.  They did not remain there long.  Ulloa's successor, Governor-General O'Reilly, allow the Natchez Acadians to settle where they chose.  The widow took her children to San Gabriel, where her children created families.  The daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  One of the younger son's lines did not endure.  In the late 1780s, the widow's oldest son followed his in-laws to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he helped create a new center of Comeaux family settlement: 

Joseph (c1751-1817) à Étienne à Jean l'aîné à Pierre Comeau

Joseph, oldest son of Alexis Comeau and Marguerite Babin, born probably at Minas in c1751, followed his family to Maryland in 1755 and his widowerd mother them to Louisiana in 1768.  After leaving Fort San Luis de Natchez in 1769, he followed his family to San Gabriel.  He married Anne-Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre dit La Vielliarde Landry and his first wife Anne-Élisabeth Dupuis, at nearby Cabahannocer in June 1778.  The settled at nearby Ascension.  Anne-Isabelle was a native of Maryland and also had come to Louisiana in 1768.  In the late 1780s, they followed her family to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Hébert and Malbrough families.  Joseph remarried to Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Blanchard and Anne-Symphore Hébert and widow of Mathurin Trahan, at Assumption on the upper Lafourche in November 1798.  Marie-Madeleine was a native of St.-Suliac near St.-Malo, France, and had come to Louisiana with her widowed mother aboard La Bergère in 1785.  Their daughters married into the Giroir and Viola families.  Joseph died in Assumption Parish in February 1817, age 65.  Half of his six sons either died young or did not marry.  His oldest son returned to the river and settled near Baton Rouge before returning to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Joseph's younger married sons remained on the Lafourche.  His youngest son became a major planter in Assumption Parish.

Oldest son Pierre-Vital, called Vital, by first wife Anne-Isabelle Landry, born at Ascension in April 1779, married Céleste, daughter of Jean Prosper, also called Gascogne, and his Acadian wife Marie Madeleine Lavergne, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1818.  They lived at Baton Rouge before moving to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Vital died in Assumption Parish in June 1833.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Vital was age 52 when he died, but he was 54.  His daughter married into the Hébert family in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Only one of his three sons created a family of his own, on upper Bayou Lafourche

Oldest son Jean Baptiste, born near Baton Rouge in June 1819, may have died young. 

Vital's second son Joseph Telesphore, called Telesphore, born near Baton Rouge in March 1823, married Octavie, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Hébert and Eléonore Girouard, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in December 1845.  Their son Joseph Aristide was born near Paincourtville in May 1847, and Jules Hernest in February 1851.  Joseph Telesphore died near Paincourtville in October 1851, age 28. 

Vital's third and youngest son Joseph Manuel, baptized at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, age 2, in April 1830, also may have died young. 

Joseph's second son Pierre-Alexis, by first wife Anne-Isabelle Landry, born at Ascension in April 1792, may have died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in February 1824.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was age 34 when he died, but he did not give Pierre's parents' names or mention a wife.  

Joseph's third son Jean-Louis, by first wife Anne-Isabelle Landry, born at Assumption in May 1794, died there at age 5 in July 1799.  

Joseph's fourth son Augustin, by first wife Anne-Isabelle Landry, baptized at Assumption, age unrecorded, in October 1797, died in February 1817, age 20.  He did not marry.  

Joseph's fifth son Élias- or Élie-Joseph, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Blanchard, born at Assumption in September 1799, married Constance, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Landry and Marguerite Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, October 1820.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted 13 slaves--nine males and four females, all black except for one mulatto, ranging in age from 46 to 6--on Élie Comeau's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District.  Élie died near Plattenville in October 1853, age 54.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted 14 slaves--12 males and two females, all black, ages 65 to 17--on Widow Élie Comeaux's farm in the parish's Tenth Ward between Eugène E. Comeaux and Maxille LeBlanc; these were the slaves of Élie's widow, Constance Landry.  Élie's daughter married into the Aubry and LeBlanc families.  Two of his four sons also created their own families on the upper Lafourche, but one of the lines, except for its blood, did not endure. 

Élie Joseph's oldest son, named unrecorded, died in Assumption Parish a day after his birth in January 1822,

Élie Joseph's second son Eugène E., probably Élie, born in Assumption Parish August 1824, married cousin Aureline, daughter of fellow Acadians Maxille LeBlanc and Marie Landry, at the Paincourtville church in January 1848; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted three slaves--a 28-year-old black female, and 2 black males, ages 6 and 4--on Eugène E. Comeaux's farm in the parish's Tenth Ward next to Widow Élie Comeaux and near Maxille LeBlanc.  Eugène E.'s daughters married into the Hébert and Landry families.  Did he father any sons? 

Élie Joseph's third son Paul Caiphas or Cleopha, called Cleopha, born in Assumption Parish in September 1826, married Léonelle, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon LeBlanc and Basille Babin, at the Paincourtville church in June 1849.  Their son Célestin Vileor was born near Paincourtville in April 1850, Adrien Elevoide in May 1851, Joseph Simon in January 1856, Adam Élie in March 1857 but died the following May, Édouard Lucien was born in March 1858, and Cleopha Prosper in December 1859 but died the following April.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted four slaves--three males and one female, all blacks, ranging age from 34 to 16, living in one house--on Cleophas Comeaux's farm next to Widow Simon LeBlanc in the parish's Tenth Ward.  One of Cleopha's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Célestin Vileor married first cousin Marie Alice, daughter of fellow Acadian Terence LeBlanc and his Creole wife Elina Simoneaux, his maternal uncle and aunt, at the Paincourtville church in January 1869; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Élie Joseph's fourth and youngest son Joseph Telesphore, called Telesphore, born in Assumption Parish in August 1831, died there at age 6 in January 1838. 

Joseph's sixth and youngest son Eugène-Florentin, by second wife Marie-Madeleine Blanchard, born at Assumption in October 1801, married Henriette, also called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and Marie Marguerite Adélaïde Landry of Ascension Parish, at the Plattenville church in January 1820.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted 17 slaves--nine males and eight females, all black, ranging in age from 55 years to 6 months--on Eugène Comeau's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District; this probably was Eugène Florentin.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted 43 slaves on Eugène Comeaux's plantation in the parish's Ninth Ward on Bayou Lafourche next to L. O. Comeaux.  Eugène died near Plattenville in October 1864.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Eugène died at "age 60 years," but he was 63.  His daughter married into the Noveret family.  His two sons also created their own families on the upper Lafourche. 

Older son Jules, born in Assumption Parish in January 1823, married Victorine, daughter of Louis Darbois or Verbois and his Acadian wife Marie Carmelite Bourgeois, at the Plattenville church in January 1843.  Their son François Richard was born near Plattenville in January 1849; Hippolyte, also called Galbert, was born in July 1850 but died the following December; and Jules Omer was born in September 1857.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted two slaves--both black females, ages 45 and 15--on Jules Comeaux's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District.  He and his family may have resided briefly at Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, in the mid-1850s.  His daughter married into the Blanchard family in St. James Parish. 

Eugène's second son Louis Octave, called Octave, born in Assumption Parish in February 1832, married Louise Marie, daughter of William A. Sims and Éloise Marie Sims, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1856; the marriage also was recorded at the Plattenville church.  In August 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted a single slave--a 26-year-old black female--on L. O. Comeaux's farm in the parish's Ninth Ward on Bayou Lafourche next to Eugène Comeaux's plantation. 

Étienne (c1760-1819) à Étienne à Jean l'aîné à Pierre Comeau

Étienne, also called Charles, second son of Alexis Comeau and Marguerite Babin and twin brother of Pierre, born probably in Maryland in c1760, came to Louisiana with his widowed mother and siblings in 1768, followed them to San Luìs de Natchez and then to San Gabriel, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Blanchard and Marie-Jeanne Landry, in May 1792.  Étienne died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in December 1819.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Étienne was age 65 when he died, but he was closer to 60.  His daughters married into the Gil, Landry, and Templet families.  His two sons settled at St. Gabriel and died young, but not before they married and had sons of their own.  Étienne's grandsons settled at Baton Rouge. 

Older son Joseph-Valéry, called Valéry, born at San Gabriel in August 1793, married cousin Marcelline, daughter of fellow Acadians Grégoire Babin and Marine LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in June 1819; they had to secure a dispensation for consanguinity and relationship in order to marry.  Valéry died near St. Gabriel in November 1822, age 29.  His son created his own family on the river. 

Only son Jean or John Dugregey, called Dugregey and John D., born near St. Gabriel in April 1820, married Doralise Virginie, daughter of fellow Acadians Rémi Doiron and Julie Richard, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1845.  Their son Alfred Valéry was born near Baton Rouge in December 1847, and Théodore Victor in March 1850. 

Étienne's younger Gilbert, born at San Gabriel in October 1798, married Constance, daughter of George Kleinpeter and Margarita Judith Rither, at the Baton Rouge church in April 1820.  Their son Étienne le jeune was born near St. Gabriel in August 1822; and Gilbert, fils in December 1830.  Gilbert, père died near St. Gabriel in January 1832, age 33.  His married son settled at Baton Rouge. 

Second son Gilbert, fils married Mary Anne, also called Susan, daughter of James West and Nancy Hawes, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1852.  Their son Robert was born near Baton Rouge in October 1862.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted eight slaves--four males and four females, all black, ranging in age from 70 to 3, living in two houses--on Gilbert Comeaux's farm.   Gilbert, fils died near Baton Rouge in May 1865, age 34.  He was buried "in the Kleinpeter cemetery."  Was his death war-related? 

Pierre (c1760-?) à Étienne à Jean l'aîné à Pierre Comeau

Pierre, third son of Alexis Comeau and Marguerite Babin and twin brother of Étienne, was born probably in Maryland in c1760.  He came to Louisiana with his widowed mother and siblings in 1768, followed them first to San Luìs de Natchez and then to San Gabriel, where he married Claire, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Charles Breau and Marie-Josèphe Landry, in January 1785.  Their daughter married into the Domingue family.  Pierre and Claire may have had no sons or at least none who survived childhood, so this line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him. 

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A family of three more Comeaus emigrated to Louisiana directly from St.-Domingue in the late 1760s and created a small family line on the Lower Acadian Coast:   

Charles (c1725-?) à Étienne à Pierre Comeau

Charles, third and youngest son of Alexandre Comeau and Marguerite Doucet, born posthumously at Port-Royal in October 1725, was deported to Connecticut in 1755.  He married Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Babineau dit Deslauriers and Marguerite Dugas, probably in Connecticut in c1758.  Marguerite used the surname Deslauriers, not Babineau.  They were still in Connecticut in 1763.  Later that year or early the following year, they followed other Acadians from the New England colonies to French St.-Domingue.  Their marriage was blessed at La Mirebalais on the island in September 1764.  They lost at least three young sons during their shore stay on the island.  They were among the few Acadians who emigrated to Louisiana directly from St.-Domingue, probably in the late 1760s, perhaps with one of the Acadian parties from Maryland that transshipped at Cap-Français in 1767 or 1768.  With them was a daughter who had been born probably in Connecticut in c1762.  They at Cabahannocer on the Lower Acadian Coast and had more children in Louisiana, including another son.  Spanish officials counted them on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in 1777.  Daughter Anne married into the Bernard, Gaudet, and Levert families.  Only one of their four sons, the one born in Louisiana, created a family of his own.  He remained at Cabahannocer, later St. James Parish, one of the few Comeaux families to settle there.  Charles's grandsons and great-grandsons settled near Convent. 

Oldest son Joseph, perhaps a twin, born in Connecticut in c1759, died at La Mirebalais, St.-Domingue, age 5, in September 1764.

Charles's second son Pierre, perhaps Joseph's twin, born in Connecticut in c1759, died at La Mirebalais, St.-Domingue, age 5, in October 1764.

Charles's third son Joseph, the second son so named, born at La Mirebalais, St.-Domingue, in November 1766, probably died soon after birth.  

Charles's fourth and youngest son François, born probably at Cabahannocer in c1767, married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Charpentier and Jeanne Moutard of New Orleans, at Cabahannocer in February 1790.  Later in the decade they lived for a time at St.-Jean-Baptiste on the Upper German Coast, where François was called a "creole" in a daughter's baptismal record in August 1798.  François died at Cabahannocer in August 1799, age 33.  His daughter married into the Guidry family.  Only his younger son had sons of his own; he and his descendants remained in St. James Parish.  

Older son Charles le jeune, born at Cabahannocer in July 1793, married Marie Josephine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Marie Bourgeois dit Cabot and Hélène LeBlanc, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in April 1817.  Charles le jeune died near Convent in October 1819.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Charles was age 28 when he died, but he was 26.  His daughter married into the Mire family.  He and his wife probably had no sons, so this line of the family, except for its blood, may have died with him.  

François's younger son François-Célestin, called Célestin, born at Cabahannocer in November 1795, married Scholastique, daughter of Jacques Caillouet and his Acadian wife Scholastique Theriot, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in September 1822.  Their son Célestin Numa, called Numa, was born near Convent across the river in September 1823; Thomas H. in August 1828 but died at age 15 in November 1843; Jacques or James Casimir was born in March 1829[sic]; and their infant son, named unrecorded, died in July 1832.  Célestin died near Convent in December 1848.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Célestin died at "age 50 yrs.," but he was 53.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in St. James Parish counted four slaves--two males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 15 to 9--on Ww. Cn. Comeau's farm in the parish's eastern district; these probably were the slaves of Célestin's widow, Scholastique Caillouet.  Célestin's only married son settled near Convent before moving to Bayou Lafourche after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Numa died near Convent in October 1855, age 32.  He probably did not marry. 

Célestin's third son Jacques Casimir, called James Como by the recording priest, married Azélia, daughter of fellow Acadian Olivier Thibodeaux and his Creole wife Azélie Hymel, at the Convent church in November 1857.  Did Jacques "anglicize" his name, or was this simply what the Convent priest recorded?  Their son Numa Félicien was born near Convent in June 1861; Joseph Jacques in November 1863; Louis Noe Vincent in August 1867; and Thomas Félix near Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, in September 1870. 

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The arrival date of three more Comeaus--two wives and a widower--who settled on the Acadian Coast is anyone's guess, but they likely reached the colony in the late 1760s.  One came from the French island of Martinique.  The others may have come from Halifax, Maryland, or, more likely, directly from St.-Domingue.  The widower established another small family line on the Lower Acadian Coast: 

Joseph (?-?) à ? à Pierre Comeau

Joseph Comeau was a widower when he came to Louisiana in the late 1760s, his wife Anne Bourgeois having died during Le Grand Dérangement.  Joseph remarried to Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Babineau dit Deslauriers and Marguerite Dugas, at Cabahannocer in January 1768; this made him a brother-in-law of the Charles Comeau who had come to the colony directly from French St.-Domingue about the same time.  Madeleine, a native of Annapolis Royal, was exiled with her family to Connecticut in 1755, followed them to St.-Domingue in the early 1860s, and came to Louisiana from St.-Domingue in the late 1760s with her sister and brother-in-law.  She and Joseph settled at Cabahannocer, where she gave him more children.  Joseph does not appear in either the January 1777 or March 1779 censuses at St.-Jacques, so he probably had died by then.  His daughter married into the St. Pierre family.  His son by his second wife died young, but Joseph's older son by his first wife, though he, too, had died by 1777, managed to father a son by then, though one wonders if the line endure

Older son Charles, by first wife Anne Bourgeois, born probably in British Nova Scotia in c1749, married cousin Marie, daughter of Jean Marquis and his Acadian wife Marie Comeau, at Cabahannocer in January 1773.  Charles died at Cabahannocer in February 1775, age 26. 

Only son François, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in September 1774, married Euphrosine, daughter of François Croiset and Jeanne Carrière, at Cabahannocer in January 1800.  Their son Godefroi died at Cabahannocer 9 days after his birth in November 1800, Laurent was born in August 1803, and Jean François posthumously in June 1814.  François died in St. James Parish in January 1814.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Francois died at "age about 37 yrs.," but he was closer to 40.  Did his family line survive?

Joseph's younger son Louis, by second wife Madeleine Deslauriers, died at St.-Jacques, age unrecorded, in February 1773. 

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The largest contingent of Comeaus to go to Louisiana did not arrive until 20 years after the first of their kinsmen came to the colony.  Half a dozen Comeau families, 30 individuals in all, crossed on six of the Seven Ships from France in 1785.  Most of them chose to settle in river communities, though only one of the lines endured there.  Others helped create a new center of family settlement on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

The first of them--a wife and her 2-year-old Comeau son--crossed on La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in mid-August 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  No new family line came of it:

Jean-Baptiste, fils (1783-?) à Alexis à Claude à Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin à Pierre Comeau

Jean-Baptiste, fils, son of Jean-Baptiste Comeau and Marie-Madeleine-Adélaïde Landry, was born at St.-Similien, Nantes, France, in December 1783.  His father, a sailor, remained in France, but his mother took Jean-Baptiste, fils to Louisiana in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jean-Baptiste may have died young, taking his line of the family with him.  

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Three more Comeaus--a husband and his wife and two wives and their families--crossed on Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in late August 1785.  They went to the river and the upper Lafourche.  No new family lines came of it:

Charles (c1748-1775?) à Étienne à Jean l'aîné à Pierre Comeau

Charles, son of Jean Comeau and Marguerite Turpin, was born on Île Royale in c1748.  In February 1752, a French official counted him with his widowed father and four siblings on the north shore of Île Madame off the southern coast of Île Royale.  He was deported to France with his brother David and sister Marguerite and her husband, Jean Dupont of Louisbourg, aboard the English transport Duke William, which reached St.-Malo in December 1758.  He resided at St.-Malo from 1758 to 1761 and at nearby Plouër from 1761 to 1764 before going to Cayenne, French Guyenne, in South America, aboard the ship Le Fort in April 1764.  He soon returned to France, where he married fellow Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Clossinet dit Moulin and Marguerite Longuépée and widow of Pierre-Mathurin Girard dit Dumoulin.  She was 21 years older than Charles!  They came to Louisiana in 1785 and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Baton Rouge.  Charles may have died at Cabahannocer, downriver from Baton Rouge, in February 1775, age 26.  He evidently fathered no children, so his line of the family died with him.

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Two more Comeaus--a 71-year-old with his second wife and a much younger bachelor cousin--crossed on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early September 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where the younger Comeau, recently married, helped create a third center of family settlement:

Honoré (c1714-1780s) à Jean l'aîné à Pierre Comeau

Honoré, oldest son of Jean-Baptiste Comeau and Anne-Marie Thibodeau of Minas, born at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, in c1714, married Marguerite, daughter of Michel Poirier and Marie Chiasson of Beaubassin, at Beaubassin in January 1735 and settled there or at Pigiguit before moving on to the French Maritimes in c1741.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1737 and 1751, Marguerite gave Honoré seven children, five daughters and two sons.  In August 1752, a French official counted Honoré, his wife, and six children, five daughters and a son, at Malpèque on the north shore of Île St.-Jean.  The family escaped the British roundup on the island in late 1758 and may have waited out the war somewhere in the Maritimes, or, more likely, they escaped from Île St.-Jean to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore, fell into British hands, became prisoners of war in Nova Scotia in the early 1760s, and followed other Acadians from Halifax to Île Miquelon in 1763.  French officials counted Honoré, Marguerite, and four of their children--Anne, Monique, Marguerite, and Joseph--on the island in 1767.  That year, when Miquelon and nearby Île St.-Pierre had become overcrowded, French officials insisted the Acadians there be resettled in France.  By 1772, Honoré, now a widower, was living at Cherbourg.  A year later, he and his son Joseph participated in a settlement scheme in Poitou.  When the venture collapsed in 1775, they retreated with dozens of other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes.  Meanwhile, Honoré's daughter Marguerite married into the Broussard family at Cherbourg, in July 1773.  Honoré's daughter Anne, widow of Grégoire Morin, remarried into the Le Clerc family of St.-Malo on Île Miquelon in October 1774, so some of his family must have returned there after the French "deportation" of the late 1760s.  Honoré, at age 70, remarried to Anastasie, 45-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Célestin dit Bellemère and Marie Landry and widow of Jean-Baptiste Boudrot, at St.-Martin de Chantenay near Nantes in August 1784.  He, his wife, and two Boudrot stepsons emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Honoré, in fact, was one of the oldest Acadian exiles to go to the Spanish colony.  He died there by January 1788, in his early 70s, when his wife was called a widow in a Bayou Lafourche census.  His surviving son Josesph created a family in France, returned to Île Miquelon, and was deported to France again, but he did not follow his father to Louisiana. 

Mathurin (c1760-1805) à Claude à Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin à Pierre Comeau

Mathurin, oldest son of Simon Comeau and Marie-Madeleine Thériot, was born at Bristol, England, in August 1760.  His father died there soon after his birth.  In May 1763, Mathurin followed his widowed mother to France aboard La Dorothée and lived with her at Plouër, near St.-Malo, that year, and at nearby St.-Servan from 1764 to 1765.  His mother remarried to a widowed Thériot cousin in July 1766 but died in May the following year, age 28.  Mathurin was raised probably by relatives and became a sailor in France.  He crossed to Louisiana in 1785, still a bachelor, and married fellow passenger Sophie-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and his second wife Marie Benoit, at New Orleans in October 1785, soon after they reached the city on the same vessel.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Mathurin died by May 1805, when his wife remarried at Assumption on the upper bayou.  His daughters married into the Bélanger family.  Only one of his four sons married.  Moreover, he settled in Terrebonne Parish, the first of the Comeauxs to go there. 

Oldest son Jean-Charles, born at Ascension on the river in December 1790, probably died young.  

Mathurin's second son Jean-Pierre, born at Assumption in July 1799, married Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Julien Crochet and his Creole wife Marguerite Belanger, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in January 1823.  Jean died in Terrebonne Parish in November 1848.  The Houma priest who recorded his burial said that Jean died "at age 51 yrs.," but he was 49.  Apetition for succession inventory in his name was filed at the Houma courthouse in May 1855.  His daughters married into the Belanger, Bergeron, and Marcel families.  One of his three sons also created this own family in Terrebonne Parish.

Oldest son Henry Julien, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in March 1831, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Jean-Pierre's second son Jean Baptiste, born in Terrebonne Parish in February 1833, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Jean-Pierre's third and youngest son Jean Élie, called Élie, born in Terrebonne Parish in April 1835, married Marie Lutetia, called Lutetia, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Bergeron and Joséphine Pitre, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in October 1855.  Their son Désiré Lucian was born in Terrebonne Parish in July 1857, Henri Alfred in December 1858, and Ernest Albert near Montegut in August 1869. 

Mathurin's third son Charles-Raymond, born at Assumption in August 1801, may have died young. 

Mathurin's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste-Zéphirin, born at Assumption in April 1803, also may have died young. 

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Eight more Comeaus--a family of seven and a Comeau wife--crossed on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early November 1785.  The wife and her husband chose to go to Attakapas, and the family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Despite the size of the family, no new family line resulted.

Benoît (c1737-?) à Pierre l'aîné dit L'Esturgeon à Pierre Comeau

Benoît, only son of Maurice Comeau and Marguerite Thibodeau, born at Chepoudy in c1737, followed his parents into exile and into imprisonment in Nova Scotia.  Benoît married fellow Acadian Anne Blanchard of Petitcoudiac at Halifax in c1762.  They evidently followed his parents to Chédabouctou and to Île Miquelon in 1764.  According to Bona Arsenault, Anne gave Benoît two sons in 1763 and 1765.  They followed his parents to France in 1767 and settled at Cherbourg, where, from 1769 to 1773, Anne gave Benoît three daughters.  He worked at Cherbourg as a carpenter.  Along with hundreds of other Acadians in the coastal cities, Benoît and his family may have been part of a settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s and retreated to the port city of Nantes in late 1775 or early 1776.  Anne gave Benoît another daughter at Chantenay, near Nantes, in 1779.  The family, which now included a son and three daughters, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Anne was pregnant on the voyage and give birth to another daughter at sea.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Benoît's daughters married into the Richard, Hébert, LeBlanc, Guillot, and Chiasson families on the bayou and the river.  One of his daughters settled in the Opelousas District.  His youngest daughter was one of the last Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join our ancestors.  His only surviving son evidently did not create a family of his own. 

Only son Jean, born probably on Île Miquelon in c1766, followed his family to Cherbourg, France, in the late 1760s, to Louisiana in 1785, and to upper Bayou Lafourche.  He does not seem to have married, so his family line, except for its blood, probably died with him.  

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Fourteen more Comeaus--nine in one family, five in another led by a widow, and a wife and her family, the largest single group of Comeaus to come to Louisiana--crossed on La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early December 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge, but they did not remain there.  Two of the sons settled at Baton Rouge, but only one of the lines there endured.  The other sons joined their cousins on upper Bayou Lafourche and created three more family lines there: 

Simon (c1760-1805) à Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin à Pierre Comeau

Simon, oldest son of Jean-Baptiste Comeau and Marie Aucoin, born probably at Rivière-aux-Canards, in c1741, followed his family to Virginia in 1755 and to England in 1756.  He married cousin Marguerite-Geneviève Aucoin in England in c1763, on the eve of repatriation.  In May 1763, Simon, his bride, and his two younger brothers sailed aboard La Dorothée to St.-Malo, France, with dozens of other Acadian refugees who had been held in England and repatriated to France.  Simon took his family to Plouër and to nearby St.-Servan in 1766.  Between 1764 and 1785, Marguerite gave Simon 11 children, six daughters and five sons, only one of whom, a son, died very young.  Two of their daughters also may have died young.  They did not follow their fellow exiles from England to Belle-Île-en-Mer in November 1765, nor did they participate in the settlement scheme in Poitou in the early 1770s.  Instead, they remained at St.-Servan, where Simon may have worked in the maritime trade.  Simon, Marguerite, and eight of their children, four sons and four daughters, ages 21 to infant, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  After a series of hurricanes decimated the Bayou des Écores community in the early 1790s, Simon took most of his family to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Marguerite either did not survive the voyage or their time at Bayou des Écores; she died by December 1795, when Simon was counted in an upper Lafourche census without a wife.  Simon died in Assumption Parish on the upper bayou in June 1818, age 77.  Three of his daughters married into the Bourg, Aucoin, Marion, Renaud, and Poulosky or Pulasky families at Bayou des Écores and on the Lafourche.  All four of his sons married and settled at Baton Rouge or on the upper Lafourche. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born at St.-Servan near St.-Malo, France, in May 1771, followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana and Bayou des Écores, where he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Bourg and his first wife Anne-Josèphe Daigre, in February 1792.  When his family moved on to the upper Lafourche, Jean-Baptiste and Marie-Josèphe went, instead, to Baton Rouge.  Their daughter married into the Hommie family.  Jean Baptiste remarried to Julie Thérèse, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Bourg and Modeste Molaison, probably at Baton Rouge in the late 1790s.  Their daughters married into the Longuépée family.  Only his oldest son seems to have created a family of his own, in West Baton Rouge Parish. 

Oldest son Simon-Pierre, by second wife Julie Bourg, born at Baton Rouge in December 1797, married Marie Rose, daughter of François Seguin and Pélagie ____, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1824.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Simon Jean Baptiste was born in October 1824, Auguste or Augustin was born in September 1826 but died at age 2 in September 1828, and Gilbert was born in March 1840.  One of his two surviving sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Simon Jean Baptiste "of West Baton Rouge Parish" married Irma, daughter of André Lemoine and Brigitte Paillot of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in July 1846.  They settled near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Émile was born in March 1848, and Amédée in December 1851.  Their daughter married into the Legendre family.  Simon Jean Baptiste remarried to first cousin Julie Ludivine, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Longuépée and Sophie Comeaux, his paternal uncle and aunt, at the Brusly church in May 1859; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Aristide was born probably at Brusly in March 1860. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Jean, by second wife Julie Bourg, baptized at Baton Rouge, age 1, in August 1801, may have died young. 

Jean-Baptiste's third son Alexis, by second wife Julie Bourg, born probably at Baton Rouge in c1804, died near Baton Rouge in November 1844, age 40.  The priest who recorded Alexis's burial did not give his parents' names or mention a wife, so one wonders if he was a son of Jean Baptiste and if he ever married. 

Jean-Baptiste's fourth and youngest son Thomas, by second wife Julie Bourg, born at Baton Rouge in 1808, may have died young. 

Simon's second son Alexandre-Simon, also called Alexis, born at St.-Servan near St.-Malo, France, in March 1775, followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana and Bayou des Écores.  By the mid-1790s, he was living with his family on upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marguerite-Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians François Blanchard and Hélène Giroir, at Assumption in February 1799.  Marguerite-Anne was a native of Nantes, France, and had come to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié in 1785.  Alexandre died in Assumption Parish in July 1837, age 62.  His daughters married into the Bertrand and Hayes families, and perhaps into the Vining family as well.  One, perhaps two, of them settled on lower Bayou Teche.  Six of his seven sons married.  The two older ones remained on Bayou Lafourche.  The four younger ones moved to lower Bayou Teche during the antebellum period, but two of them returned to Assumption Parish in the 1850s. 

Oldest son Simon-Joseph, called Simonet and Simonin, born at Assumption in November 1799, married Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Gaudet and Eulalie Guédry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1825.  Their son Simonet Jean Baptiste, called Jean Baptiste, was born in Assumption Parish in September 1827; Antoine Désiré in May 1832; and Édouard Désiré in January 1839.  Simonet died near Plattenville in October 1854, age 55.  His daughters married into the Aucoin, Bertrand, David, Foret, Friou, and Hébert families.  Only one of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, at age 38, married Eveline, daughter of fellow Acadians André Boudreaux and Pauline Foret and widow of François Gaspard, at the Plattenville church in April 1865; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of affinity in order to marry.  Their son Paul Homer was born near Plattenville in January 1866, and Alcide in May 1868. 

Simonet's second son Antoine Désiré died near Plattenville, Assumption Parish, in March 1855, age 27.  He did not marry. 

Alexandre-Simon's second son Apollinaire, born at Assumption in February 1801, died in June 1819, age 18, before he could marry. 

Alexandre-Simon's third son François, baptized at Assumption, age unrecorded, in March 1803, married Rose Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Francois Georges Bourg and Adélaïde Bertrand, at the Plattenville church in February 1825.  Their son Adrien François was born in Assumption Parish in August 1828, and Marcellin posthumously in July 1830.  François died in Assumption Parish in December 1829.  The priest who recorded his burial said that François was age 28 when he died, but he probably was closer to 25.   His younger son followed his uncles to St. Mary Parish. 

Younger son Marcellin "of St. Mary Parish" married Lucie or Lucille, daughter of fellow Acadians Apollinaire Girouard and Marie Théotiste Aucoin, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in September 1857.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted two slaves--a 21-year-old black female, and an 8-month-old black male, living in their own house--on Marcelin Comeaux's farm in the parish's Fourteenth Ward along Bayou L'Ours.  Marcellin joined his uncles in St. Mary Parish in the early 1860s but returned to upper Bayou Lafourche later in the decade.  Marcellin died near Paincourtville, Assumption Parish, in December 1868.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Marcelin died at "age ca. 37 years," but he was 38.  He was one of the few Comeauxs who lived in Lafourche Parish.

Alexandre Simon's fourth son Antoine Eusèbe, born at Assumption in December 1804, married fellow Acadian Elisa LeBlanc in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish on lower Bayou Teche, in October 1829.  They lived in Assumption Parish before returning to the lower Teche, where Antoine became a major planter in St. Mary Parish.  Their son Désiré was born in Assumption Parish in June 1834, Alexandre Aristide near New Iberia in June 1846, and Joseph Ernest in August 1849.  Antoine Eusèbe and Elisa's daughter married into the Charpentier family.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in St. Mary Parish counted 34 slaves--23 males and 11 females, all black, ranging in age from 80 to 1--on Antoine Comeaux's plantation.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Mary Parish counted 77 slaves on Antoine Comeau's plantation in the parish's western district--enough to make him one of the state's major planters.  Antoine, at age 60, remarried to Anne or Anna Raymond, daughter of Bertrand Audibert and Marie Bertrande Mistrot, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in March 1864.  They settled near New Iberia.  Only his oldest son, who returned to Assumption Parish, married before 1870. 

Oldest son Désiré married Clara Bertrand probably in St. Mary Parish in the late 1850s or early 1860s.  They returned to upper Bayou Lafourche during the 1860s, perhaps soon after the War of 1861-65.  Their son Félix was born near Plattenville in May 1866, and Jean Edgard in March 1870. 

Alexandre Simon's fifth son Jean Baptiste le jeune, born in Assumption Parish in November 1807, married Marie Adèle, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Doiron and Anne Daigle, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in January 1836, and sanctified the marriage at the Plattenville church the following month.  Evidently they lived in Assumption Parish before joining his brothers on lower Bayou Teche.  They returned to upper Bayou Lafourche in the early 1850s.  Their son Armand was born near New Iberia in May 1842; Jean Baptiste Orestile near Pattersonville, St. Mary Parish, in February 1849; and Auguste Aurelien near Plattenville in July 1854.

Alexandre Simon's sixth son Alexandre Simon, fils, born in Assumption Parish in July 1809, married Augustine, also called Azema, daughter of Adélard Verret and Augustine Gation, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in July 1832, and sanctified the marriage at the Plattenville church in April 1833.  Evidently they, too, lived in Assumption Parish before joining his brothers on lower Bayou Teche.  Their son Joseph Sérpahin was born in Assumption Parish in December 1834, Louis Telesphore in September 1836, and Édouard in either Assumption or St. Mary Parish in the late 1830s or early 1840s.  Alexandre, fils's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in January 1852.  He would have been age 43 that year.  Only one of their three sons married before 1870.

Youngest son Édouard married Teresa, daughter of Auguste Trastour and ____ Barrabino, at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in July 1864.  They settled near Franklin. 

Alexandre Simon, père's seven and youngest son Louis François, born in Assumption Parish in November 1815, married Nancy, daughter of Conrad Hartman, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in February 1843.  Their son Antoine Ferdinand was born near Pattersonville, St. Mary Parish, in November 1849; François Louis in September 1853; Conrad Adolphe, called Adolphe, in March 1855; Alcide Didiere probably near Plattenville in February 1864 but died there at age 2 in June 1866; David was born near Plattenville in February 1866; and Joseph Alexandre in January 1870.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in St. Mary Parish counted two slaves--both males, both black, both 40 years old--on Louis Comeaux's farm.  He and his family were living near Morgan City, at the southern end of St. Mary Parish, in 1861, but the baptismal records of their children show that they returned to upper Bayou Lafourche later in the decade. 

Simon's third son Pierre-Paul, born at St.-Servan near St.-Malo, France, in August 1776, followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana and to Bayou des Écores.  By the mid-1790s, he was living with his family on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Spanish officials were still counting him there with his widowed father a few years later.  Pierre-Paul married Marie-Clémence, called Clémence, daughter of René dit Simon Simoneaux and his first wife Isabelle-Luce Daigle, an Acadian, at Assumption in the early 1800s.  Pierre Paul died by March 1821, when he was listed as deceased in his youngest son's baptismal record.  His daughters married into the Giroir and Moïse families. Three of his four sons married, and one of them settled in Terrebonne Parish.  The others remained in Assumption Parish. 

Oldest son Eustache, in his early 40s, born in Assumption Parish in January 1808, married Rose Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Nicolas Thibodeaux and Mélanie Basilise Lejeune, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in September 1850.  His son Eustache Zémi or Ozémé, called Ozémé, was born at Bayou Black in August 1851; Joseph in September 1853; Alexis Octave in September 1857; Émile Adam, called Adam, in February 1860; Augustin Ernest in December 1861 but probably died at age 1 in December 1862; and Justin Trasimond, called Trasimond, was born in April 1864.  Eustache died in Terrebonne Parish in June 1866, age 58.   A "petition for inventory & tutor" was filed at the Houma courthouse for his children the following December. 

Pierre Paul's second son Simon Rosémond, born in Assumption Parish, in September 1811, married Azélie, also called Rosalie, Adèlie, and Arelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Hébert and Élisabeth Mazerolle, at the Plattenville church in December 1833.  Their son Adolphe was born near Plattenville in January 1850, and Joseph Ulysse in July 1853.  They also had an older son named Ursin.  Simon died near Plattenville in January 1866, age 54.  His daughters married into the Campeau, Crochet, and Landry families.  His only married son settled near Pierre Part on the north shore of Lake Verret. 

Oldest son Ursin married Sidalise, daughter of Marcellin Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Mélanie Landry, at the Plattenville church in September 1855.  Their son Joseph Osémé was born near Paincourtville in October 1856, Sylvestre Anatole Léonore near Pierre Part in December 1861, Jean Baptiste Sosthène in April 1864, and Émile Albert in July 1870. 

Pierre Paul's third son Alexandre Hyacinthe, born in Assumption Parish in September 1813, died at age 2 in August 1815.  

Pierre Paul's fourth and youngest son Louis Ulysse, born in Assumption Parish in March 1818, married Augustine, daughter of Augustin Campos and his Acadian wife Émelie Hébert, at Plattenville church in February 1839.  Their son Alexandre Merville was born near Plattenville in December 1844, Augustin Pierre in February 1847, Honoré in December 1848, Joseph Dosilia near Paincourtville in February 1851, and Étienne Désiré near Plattenville in December 1853.  Louis died near Plattenville in November 1854, age 36.  His daughter married a Simoneaux cousin. 

Oldest son Alexandre Merville may have been the Meuville Comeaux who died near Plattenville in December 1867.  The priest who recorded the burial did not give Meuville's parents' names or his age at the time of his death.  If this was him, he would have been age 23.  He probably did not marry. 

Simon's fourth and youngest son Joseph-Marie, born at St.-Servan near St.-Malo, France, in March 1785, followed his parents and siblings to Louisiana and to Bayou des Écores.  By the mid-1790s, they had moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, where Joseph, being the youngest child in his family, probably delayed creating a family of his own to care for his aging widowed father.  Joseph Marie, at age 37, married Marie Célesie, called Célesie, another daughter of Pierre Hébert and  Élisabeth Mazerolle, at the Plattenville church in January 1822, four years after his father died.  Joseph died in Assumption Parish in June 1850, age 65.  Only one of his four sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Joseph Léon, born in Assumption Parish in January 1826, may have been the Léon Comeaux who died near Plattenville in July 1870.  If so, he died at age 44.  Did he marry? 

Joseph Marie's second son Alexis Gédéon was born in Assumption Parish in August 1828.  Did he die young?  Did he marry? 

Joseph Marie's third son Jean Baptiste Duval, called Duval, born in Assumption Parish in February 1835, married Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Hippolyte Breaux and Hélène Duhon, at the Plattenville church in February 1859.  Their son Joseph Albert Ernest was born near Plattenville in September 1866. 

Joseph Marie's fourth and youngest son Alexandre Simon le jeune was born in Assumption Parish in May 1846, when his father was in his early 60s.  If he survived childhood, he did not marry by 1870. 

Élie-Marie (1765-1815) à Jean-Baptiste à Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin à Pierre Comeau

Élie-Marie, sometimes called Charles, oldest son of Joseph Comeau and Marie Thériot, born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in November 1765, followed his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana and to Bayou des Écores, where he married Marie-Renée, also called Iréné, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon-Pierre Trahan and Marie-Josèphe Granger, in April 1795.  Marie-Renée also was a native of France and had come to Louisiana in 1785 aboard Le Beaumont.  After the Acadians abandoned Bayou des Écores in the early 1790s, they moved to Baton Rouge.  Élie died probably at Baton Rouge by November 1815, when his wife remarried at Baton Rouge.  His daughters married into the Lopez and Martinez families.  His only son may have died young, so only the blood of this family line endured. 

Only son Joseph-Célestin, baptized at Pointe Coupée, age 11 months, in May 1801, may have died young. 

Joseph-Mathurin (1767-?) à Jean-Baptiste à Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin à Pierre Comeau

Joseph-Mathurin, second son of Joseph Comeau and Marie Thériot, born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in September 1767, followed his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana to Bayou des Écores.  He may have died young.  

Simon-Pierre (1769-?) à Jean-Baptiste à Jean le jeune dit Jean-Augustin à Pierre Comeau

Simon-Pierre, third and youngest son of Joseph Comeau and Marie Thériot, born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in October 1769, followed his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana and to Bayou des Écores.  He also may have died young. 

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A Comeau wife arrived with her husband and children aboard La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in late December 1785.  They were among the few Acadian immigrants from France who chose to settle in the Opelousas District.

Cormier

Cormiers emigrated early to French Acadia.  Robert Cormierborn in c1610, son perhaps of Abraham Cormier and Catherine Le Mayne of Dieppe, became a master ship's carpenter at La Rochelle.  In January 1644, while living in that port city, Robert signed an indenture calling for three years service at 120 livres per annum with Louis Tuffet, commander of Fort St.-Pierre, a post maintained by Cardinal Richelieu's Company on Cape Breton IslandAccompanied by wife Marie Péraud and two young sons, Thomas and Jean, Robert sailed from La Rochelle aboard Le Petit St.-Pierre and reached Fort St.-Pierre in late spring of 1644.  According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, after he fulfulled his indenture, Robert stayed on at Fort St.-Pierre, now St. Peter's, Nova Scotia, until 1650, when he took his family to Port-Royal.  Sometime in the 1650s, when trouble again shook the colony, Robert, Marie, and their younger son probably returned to La Rochelle, although Arsenault would have us believe that Robert remained at Port-Royal and died there in February 1712, age 101.  What is certain is that son Thomas, who turned 18 in 1654, the year the English seized Port-Royal again, remained in the colony despite the troubles erupting all around him.  He may have become a ship's carpenter like his father and worked in that capacity at Port-Royal, or he may have become an aboiteaux builder like most of his fellow immigrants.  

In 1668, at age 32, Thomas Cormier finally started a family of his own when he married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, 14-year-old daughter of François Girouard and Jeanne Aucoin at Port-Royal Madeleine gave Thomas 10 children, first at Port-Royal, then at Chignecto, which Thomas helped to pioneer in the early 1670s.  Five of his six daughters married into the Boudrot, Haché dit Gallant, Cyr, and Poirier families.  All four of his sons married LeBlancs from Grand-Pré.  The sons remained at Chignecto, as did their sons.  The Cormiers, in fact, were among the few early Acadian families that did not branch out to other Fundy settlements.  Most of them settled at Menoudy and along Rivière-des-Hébert east of the Baie de Beaubassin.  Not until the petit dérangement of the early 1750s did members of the family leave Chignecto to escape the chaos in the region. 

Le Grand Dérangement of 1755 scattered this family to the winds.  Descendants of Thomas Cormier ended up in the British Atlantic colonies of South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia, New York, and Massachusetts; in England; in eastern and northwestern New Brunswick; at Halifax; on the southern Gaspé Peninsula; up and down the St. Lawrence valley; at St.-Malo, France; in the Caribbean basin, especially in French St.-Domingue; on Cape Breton Island; in Newfoundland; on Île Miquelon; on the îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence; and in Louisiana.  

Cormiers were among the first Acadians to arrive in Louisiana.  Jean-Baptiste Cormier of Chignecto, with wife Madeleine Richard and five daughters, arrived at New Orleans in February 1764 from Savannah, Georgia, via Mobile with three other families from Chignecto who had been exiled to the southern British colonies.  The French caretaker government sent them to Cabahannocer on the Mississippi, above the German Coast.  During the late winter and spring of 1765, Jean-Baptiste's son Jean-Baptiste, fils, and two of his nephews, sons of older brother Pierre dit Palette of Chignecto, reached New Orleans from Halifax via Cap-Français with, or just after, the Broussards.  Jean-Baptiste, fils, the youngest of the three cousins, remained on the river with his parents, at least for a few years.  He married at Cabahannocer in c1768 and then followed his cousins to the western prairies, where he remarried.  Meanwhile, his first cousins, Joseph and Michel, settled in the Opelousas District. 

All three cousins created family lines on the southwestern prairies.  Cormier settlement patterns in Louisiana soon mirrored that of their Acadian ancestors before Le Grand Dérangement.  After Jean-Baptiste, père died at Cabahannocer in the late 1770s, no Acadian Cormier male remained on the Acadian Coast.  Even a relative of the Cormier cousins, who came to Louisiana from Haiti via Cuba in the early 1800s, moved to the prairies of St. Landry Parish, not to a settlement closer to New Orleans.  So the Cormiers concentrated in the prairie districts west of the Atchafalaya Basin much as they had done at Chignecto in old Acadia.  By the early 1800s, most of them (the majority descendants of Michel) could be found in a wide arc touching on three civil parishes, in over a half dozen communities--Grand Prairie, Anse La Butte, Beaubassin, and Carencro in what became Lafayette Parish; Grand Pointe in St. Martin Parish; and Grand Coteau, Prairie des Femmes, and Opelousas in St. Landry Parish.  Emulating their fellow Acadians, Cormiers moved westward and southward during the antebellum period deeper into the prairies and coastal marshes. 

Judging by the number of slaves they held during the late antebellum period, some members of the family lived comfortably on their farms and plantations on the western prairies.  A Cormier owned 56 slaves on his St. Martin Parish plantation in 1850.  That same year, another Cormier's widow held 24 slaves in St. Martin Parish.  A decade later, a third Cormier owned 28 slaves in St. Martin Parish, while his distant cousin Cormier held 30 slaves on his plantation near Carencro in Lafayette Parish.  The great majority of the Cormiers who owned slaves, however, owned fewer than the 20 needed to qualify as planters, and most members of the family held no slaves at all, at least none who appear on the federal slave schedules of the late antebellum period. 

During the War of 1861-65, Federal armies marched three times through the Teche and upper Vermilion valleys, including the Bayou Carencro area, and burned and pillaged many farms and plantations, some of them no doubt owned by Cormiers.  Thanks to these Federal incursions, emancipation came early to the area, with its resulting economic and social turmoil.  Confederate foraging parties and cutthroat Jayhawkers also plagued the area where Cormiers lived, adding to the family's misery.  Dozens of Cormiers served Louisiana in uniform during the war.  Most of them served honorably and returned to their loved ones after the fall of the Southern Confederacy.  The war took the lives of at least three Acadian Cormiers, at Vicksburg, Gettysburg, and along the Teche. 

After the war, seeking new opportunities in a free-labor Southern economy, especially as part of the burgeoning Louisiana rice industry, Cormiers moved west from their traditional enclaves into the prairies of Evangeline, Acadia, Jefferson Davis, and Calcasieu parishes, especially around Church Point, Rayne, Lyons Point, Mermentau, Lake Arthur, and Jennings.  Some moved south into Iberia, Vermilion, and Cameron parishes, especially around Abbeville, Maurice, Kaplan, and Creole.  The oil and natural gas industry that sprang up in the region during the early twentieth century lured more Cormiers to the western prairies and across the Sabine into east Texas.  A few moved to the urban centers of Baton Rouge and New Orleans.  Later in the twentieth century, as a result of military service and job opportunities in a material economy that Cajuns inevitably embraced, Cormiers became part of a new Acadian diaspora and moved to every corner of the United States.  However, according to a recent study of Louisiana families with French and Spanish surnames, most Cormiers have remained where their immigrant ancestors settled, in St. Landry, St. Martin, and especially Lafayette Parish, the heart of Acadiana.09  

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Cormiers came to Louisiana as early as February 1764: 

Jean-Baptiste, père (1709-?) à Thomas à Robert Cormier

Jean-Baptiste, second son of Pierre Cormier and Catherine LeBlanc, born at Chignecto in c1709, married Madeleine, daughter of Martin Richard and Marguerite Bourg, at Beaubassin in August 1733.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1734 and 1753, Madeleine gave Jean-Baptiste six children, a son and five daughters, at Chignecto.  In 1755, the British deported Jean-Baptiste, Madeleine, and their daughters to Georgia, where they remained until 1763.  The British counted them in South Carolina in August 1763, but they did not remain there either.  Jean-Baptiste, Madeleine, and their five daughters returned to Georgia.  With other related families--Landrys, Poiriers, and Richards--they left Savannah for Mobile, formerly a part of French Louisiana, in December 1763 and reached New Orleans the following February--the first Acadian families to venture to the Mississippi colony.  Their daughters married into the Lemire dit Mire, Poirier, Landry, Girouard, and Bourg families.  Two settled on the western prairies near their brother, but the others remained on the river. 

Only son Jean-Baptiste, fils, born at Chignecto in 1742, became separated from his family during exile and likely was raised by relatives.  He came to Louisiana with the Broussards in February 1765 and either followed them to Bayou Teche before returning to the river, or he remained with his parents at Cabahannocer on the way to Bayou Teche.  He was counted in Verret's Company of the Cabahannocer militia in April 1766 and married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bourg and Marie Landry, in c1768 probably at Cabahannocer.  In the late 1770s, perhaps after his wife died, he moved on to the Attakapas District, where he remarried to Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Blanchard and Élisabeth Thériot of Annapolis Royal and widow of Joseph dit Vieux Richard, in January 1779.  They settled on the upper Vermilion at Grand Prairie, today's downtown Lafayette.  As was his duty, Jean-Baptiste, fils served in the Attakapas militia.  In 1779, in his late 30s, he participated with his company in Governor Galvèz's attack against the British at Baton Rouge.  Meanwhile, he and his wives did well at Attakapas.  In 1781, he owned 56 animals on his four-arpent farm at Grand Prairie.  In 1785, he owned a single slave.  By the 1790s, he had accumulated a sizable holding of 350 acres at Grand Prairie as well as 560 acres on the prairie west of Bayou Nezpique in a thinly-settled quarter of the Opelousas District.  The church records of South Louisiana do not contain a burial record for Jean-Baptiste, fils, but he was recorded as deceased in the marriage record of son Jean-Baptiste III in May 1796.  He would have been age 54 that year.  His daughters, all by first wife Marguerite, married into the Mouton, Richard, and Savoie families.  Like his father, Jean-Baptiste, fils fathered only one son. 

Jean-Baptiste III, also called Jean-Baptiste dit Mano and Baptiste, by first wife Marguerite Bourg, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in November 1775, married Marie-Apolline, called Apolline, Polone, or Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadians Claude Martin and Marie Babin of Grand Pointe on the upper Teche, at Attakapas in May 1796.  (Claude was a trustee of the Attakapas church, now St. Martin of Tours in St. Martinville.)  Jean-Baptiste III and Pauline settled at Anse La Butte on the upper Vermilion and at Grand Prairie.  He died "at his home at La grand prairie" in July 1808.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was age 30 when he died, but he was closer to 33.  His daughters married into the Breaux, Dugas, and Mouton families.  Two of his four sons married, but only one of them had sons of his own. 

Oldest son Jean-Narcisse, called Narcisse and Narcisse dit Mano, born in February 1797, married Céleste or Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Basile Chiasson and Marie Thibodeaux, at the St. Martinville church in April 1818.  Narcisse died at his home on Grand Prairie in February 1821, age 24.  Narcisse was buried in the cemetery of the new church at Grand Prairie, L'Église St.-Jean du Vermilion, now the Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist in Lafayette.  His was one of the first interments there.  His succession record was filed at Vermilionville courthouse, Lafayette Parish, in May 1825.  His daughter married into the Ferguy family.  He fathered no sons, so his line of the family, except for its blood, died with him. 

Jean-Baptiste III's second son Jean-Baptiste-Luc, born in August 1798, died at age 6 in August 1804.

Jean Baptiste III's third son Valéry or Valière, born in August 1800, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and Élisabeth Duhon, at the Vermilionville church in November 1825.  Their son Valéry, fils was baptized at the Vermilionville church at age 1 1/2 months in October 1826; Jean Baptiste at age 21 days in August 1831 but died at age 4 (the priest said 6) in August 1835; Joseph Alexandre, called Alexandre, was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1835 but died at age 7 in September 1843; Émile Thelesmar was born in September 1839; Louis Adolphe, called Adolphe, in May 1841; Philippe Theseus in December 1847; and Henry Arctave in August 1850.  Valéry and Marguerite's daughters married into the Bouchez, Janet, and Monnier families.  Only two of his seven sons married and settled in Lafayette and St. Landry parishes.  

Oldest son Valéry, fils married Martha Louisa or Louise, daughter of Anglo Americans John and Elizabeth Montgomery, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1860.  Their son Joseph Ernest was born near Opelousas in February 1863; and Louis Adolphe, called Adolphe, named after his war-hero uncle, was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1864 but died at age 1 in November 1865.  During the War of 1861-65, Valéry, fils served in two units--Company D of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Mary Parish, in which he probably was a conscript; and Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought against area Jayhawkers.  

During the war, Valéry, père's fourth son Émile Thelesmar served as a lieutenant in Company C of the 6th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Émile Thelesmar survived the war but did not marry.  

Valéry, père's fifth son Louis Adolphe also served as an officer in Company C of the 6th Louisiana Infantry.  He rose, in fact, to the rank of captain and commanded the company, but, unlike his older brothers, Adolphe did not survive the war.  Mortally wounded in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on 2 July 1863, he died the following day surrounded by his comrades and some local ladies, and was buried on the Widow Wibles's farm north of Gettysburg, near the "back of the barn" in which he died, age 22.  In 1872, his remains were retrieved along with those of hundreds of other Confederate dead in the Gettysburg area and re-interred at Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia.

Valéry, père's seventh and youngest brother Henry Arctave was too young to serve in the war.  He married Mary Fanny Monnier in June 1870.  Their son Valéry le jeune was born in 1878, and Henry Arthur in 1880.  

Jean-Baptiste III's fourth and youngest son Célestin, born in February 1805, evidently did not marry. 

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Two Cormier brothers came to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in the spring of 1765 and settled at Opelousas: 

Joseph (c1740-1795) à Pierre à Thomas à Robert Cormier

Joseph, fifth son of Pierre dit Palette Cormier and Cécile Thibodeau of Chignecto,  had come to Louisiana with a year-old daughter and a very pregnant wife--Marguerite, daughter of Jacques Sonnier and Anne Hébert of Petitcoudiac, who he had married in exile in c1759.  Marguerite gave birth to twins daughters Félicité and Susanne at Opelousas soon after their arrival.  Joseph remarried to Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Michel and Jeanne Brea, and widow of Michel Brun and Victor Comeau, at Attakapas in April 1771 but remained at Bellevue in the Opelousas District.  In March 1768, Joseph, along with brother Michel, was among the 11 signers of a petition addressed to Spanish Governor Ulloa requesting assistance in the form of oxen and plows to help them grow wheat in the district.  In April, the governor, now angry with all Acadians in the colony, rejected the petition.  Joseph became a cattleman instead.  In 1771, the year of his second marriage, he owned 15 head of cattle.  Three years later, in 1773, he owned 78 head of cattle, 15 horses and mules, and 15 pigs.  By 1777, he owned 150 head of cattle, 15 horses, and 20 pigs.  His fortunes increased dramatically in the 1780s.  In 1788, on his 30-arpent vacherie on Bellevue Prairie south of Opelousas Post and on land he owned along Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé near present-day Church Point, Joseph ran 697 head of cattle and 60 horses, one of the largest herds in the district.  He also owned four slaves.  The year before, he was among the prominent cattle ranchers of the Opelousas District who "renewed demands that stray cattle 'in the woods and prairies of Plaquemines Brulées' be destroyed by firearms, because a few cattle from their own pens tended to join the strays during each winter pasturage."  Meanwhile, in January 1774, Joseph was one of seven residents who urged Opelousas District commandant Gabriel Fuselier de la Claire to construct a church for the district, which was done in 1776.  As was his duty, Joseph served in the Opelousas company of militia.  In 1776, he was a fusileer, described on the militia roll as 5 feet, 3 inches tall, an inch shorter than brother Michel.  Three years later, in their late 30s, Joseph and Michel participated with their company in Governor Gálvez's attack against the British at Baton Rouge.  Joseph died at Opelousas in August 1795, age 55.  His daughters by first wife Marguerite married into the Babineaux, Granger, and Thibodeaux families.  His daugher by second wife Anne married into the Arceneaux family.  Joseph fathered two sons, both by second wife Anne.  Both sons created families of their own, but one of their lines, that of younger son Joseph, fils, died off early, and that of older son Anaclet also came close to dying out.  Anne Michel died probably near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in June 1818, age 85, and outlived both of her Cormier sons.  Joseph's descendants remained at the southeastern edge of the old Opelousas District:  around Grand Coteau and Arnaudville in St. Landry Parish, and at Carencro in Lafayette Parish.   

Older son Anaclet, born at Opelousas in March 1772, married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Victor Richard and Marie Brasseur, at Opelousas in July 1793.  They settled in the southeastern section of what became St. Landry Parish, near Grand Coteau.  Anaclet died in St. Landry Parish in c1810; he was only 38 years old; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in January 1811.  Judging by the number of times he appeared in church records as a witness to a marriage or as godfather to a neighbor's child, Anaclet must have been a respected member of his community.  His daughters married into the Guilbeau, Melançon, and Patin families.  His two sons married and created families of their own. 

Older son Paul, also called Hippolyte, baptized at the Opelousas church, age unrecorded, in November 1800, married cousin Adélaïde Mathurin, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Richard and Isabelle Cormier, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in January 1820; Adélaïde's mother was a daughter of grandfather Joseph's first cousin, Jean Baptiste Cormier, fils.  Their son Valsin Hippolyte, called Hippolyte, fils, was baptized at age 1 at the Grand Coteau church in April 1823.  Hippolyte died near Grand Coteau  in November 1827, age 27.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in October 1829, so he must have owned property in both parishes.  Hippolyte, père's daughters married into the Broussard and Guidry families. 

Only son Hippolyte, fils married Marcellite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Guidry and Marie Bernard, at the Grand Coteau church in November 1846; the Grand Coteau priest and the St. Landry Parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Their son Hippolyte III was born near Grand Coteau in April 1852.  Their daughter married into the Bergeron (French Creole, not Acadian) family.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted five slaves--three males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 35 to 2--on Hippolyte Cormier's farm.  Hippolyte, fils died near Grand Coteau in September 1851, age 30.  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in January 1855. 

Anaclet's younger son Élisée, baptized at Opelousas, age 8 months, in November 1804, married Marie Christine or Célestine, called Christine, daughter of William Johnson of Copenhagen, Denmark, and Thérèse Ritter, at the Grand Coteau church  in January 1822.  Élisée and Christine's son Zéphirin was born near Grand Coteau in February 1825; Élisée, fils in January 1829 but died at age 2 1/2 in September 1831; and Joseph Numa was born in February 1843.  Evidently Élisée's marriage to a non-Acadian began a marked trend towards exogamy in this family line:  Élisée and Christine's daughters married into the Badeaux, Burleigh, Lalonde, Lanclos, Patin, and Rivet families; only one family, the Rivets, was Acadian.  Élisée remarried to Marguerite Hedwige, daughter French Creoles Pierre Bergeron and Eulalie Saizan and widow of André J. Chautin, at the Grand Coteau church in August 1850; Élisée was age 46 and Marguerite Hedwige age 50 at the time of the wedding, so she gave him no more children.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted five slaves--three males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 45 to 18--on Élisée Cormier's farm.  Élisée died near Grand Coteau in January 1879, age 75.  Only his oldest son seems to have created a family of his own, and he, too, continued the family's propensity to marry non-Acadians: 

Oldest son Zéphirin, by first wife Christine Johnson, married Marie Azéline, called Azéline, daughter of French Creoles Alexandre Lanclos and Azéline Bergeron, at the Opelousas church in October 1848.  Their son Similien was born near Grand Coteau in c1849 but died at age 4 in September 1853; and Anaclet le jeune was born in November 1850 but died at age 11 in September 1861.  Zéphirin remarried to Marguerite, also called Marie Edvine or Edvise, Chautin, widow of Placide Marks, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1855, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie Sidonise, called Sidonise, Bergeron, a French Creole, not an Acadian, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1859; they sanctified the marriage at the Arnaudville church, St. Landry Parish, in March 1888.  Their daughter married into the Dupuis family.  Despite his age--he was 36 when war broke out--Zéphirin served briefly in the Grivot Rangers Company Louisiana Partisan Cavalry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in southeastern Louisiana. 

Joseph's younger son Joseph, fils, born at Opelousas in c1776, married fellow Acadian Marie Thibodeaux probably at Attakapas in the late 1780s or early 1790s, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Guilbeau and his second wife Marguerite Bourg, at Attakapas in October 1794.  They settled near Carencro.  Joseph, fils died probably at his home near Carencro in August 1811, age 34.  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in February 1824.  Daughter Marguerite Carmesile was born posthumously two months after her father died, survived childhood, and married into the Robichaux family.  His only son did not marry.  This family line, then, except for its blood, was buried with Joseph, fils

Only son Placide, by first wife Marie Thibodeaux, born at Attakapas in April 1792 and baptized at age 2 in June 1794, probably died young. 

Michel (1741-1790) à Pierre à Thomas à Robert Cormier

Michel, sixth son of Pierre dit Palette Cormier and Cécile Thibodeau of Chignecto, was a 24-year-old bachelor when he came to the colony with his brother Joseph and sister-in-law Marguerite Saulnier.  Michel married Anne dite Nanette, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Saulnier and Anne Hébert of Petitcoudiac and widow of Basil Babin, at Opelousas in c1769; Nanette was sister-in-law Marguerite's sister.  Michel and Nanette settled at Prairie des Femmes south of the Opelousas post.  Michel remarried twice, first to Catherine, daughter of Johann George Stelly and Christine Edelmayer of St.-Charles des Allemands, at Opelousas in c1774, and then to Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Breaux and Claire Trahan and widow of Étienne Benoit, at Attakapas in February 1789.  Like brother Joseph, Michel remained in Opelousas.  In March 1768, Michel, along with his brother, was among the 11 signers of a petition addressed to Spanish Governor Ulloa requesting assistance in the form of oxen and plows to help them grow wheat in the district; in April, the governor, now angry with all Acadians in the colony, rejected the petition.  After the revolt against Ulloa, in which he and his Opelousas comrades probably did not participate, he signed with his mark an unconditional oath of allegiance to Spain in December 1769.  In the years that followed, he became a cattleman, not a wheat farmer.  In August 1771, Governor Unzaga granted him 253.04 arpents of land, to be occupied and cultivated, on Bayou Bourbeaux between present-day Leonville and Arnaudville, St. Landry Parish.  His house at Prairie des Femmes on Bayou Bourbeaux, "built prior to 1773 ... on ground level with 'poteaux-en-terre, ... had bousillage walls, and a dirt floor, and a gallery or porch surrounding the house."  In 1771, the year he received his land grant, Michel owned 28 head of cattle.  Three years later, he owned 20 head of cattle, six horses and mules, and 16 pigs.  In 1777, he owned 50 head of cattle, 16 horses, and 16 pigs.  His fortunes increased dramatically in the 1780s.  In 1788, on his vacherie at Prairie des Femmes, Michel owned a herd of 130 cattle and 15 horses.  He also owned seven slaves.  Meanwhile, as was his duty, he served in the Opelousas company of militia.  He was a fusileer in 1776, described on the militia roll as 5 feet, 4 inches tall, an inch taller than his brother Joseph.  In the summer of 1779, he and brother Joseph participated with their company in Governor Gálvez's attack against the British at Baton Rouge.  Michel died at his home at Prairie des Femmes in December 1790, age 49, without benefit of sacraments.  According to family tradition, he was buried in what became the old yellow fever cemetery at present-day Washington, St. Landry Parish.  His daughter, by second wife Catherine, married into the Royer and Sutter families.  He fathered five sons by his first two wives; he had no children by his third wife.  All five of his sons created families of their own.  Michel's descendants drifted south into what became Lafayette Parish, clustering around Carencro and Côte Gelée.  After the War of 1861-65, some of them moved even farther south, into Iberia, Vermilion, and Cameron parishes, or westward to the prairies of present-day Acadia Parish.  An eastern contingent of Michel's descendants settled on upper Bayou Teche in St. Martin Parish.  After the war, like their Lafayette cousins, some of them moved westward, to the Vermilion and Calcasieu prairies, far from their Bayou Teche birthplaces.  Most of the Cormiers of South Louisiana (the author included) are descended from Michel of Prairie des Femmes, his sons, and grandsons: 

Oldest son Amand, by first wife Nanette Sonnier, born at Opelousas in October 1770 and baptized by a Pointe Coupée priest at Opelousas in April 1771, married Marie-Angèlle, called Angèlle, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Benoit and Madeleine Breaux of Carencro, at Opelousas in October 1790.  Angèlle's mother was his father's third wife, so Amand married his stepsister.  They settled at Grande Pointe on upper Bayou Teche before moving west to Carencro.  Amand died probably at Carencro in c1795, age 25.  His son was tutored by Amand's brother Michel, fils of Grand Pointe until the boy came of age. 

Only son Raphaël, born on Bayou Teche in December 1782, married Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Melançon and Rose Doiron, at the St. Martinville church in June 1811.  The settled at Grand Pointe. Their son Colin Amand was born in May 1812; Paulin in February 1814 but died at age 3 months the following May; Jean Valmont was born in May 1815 but died at age 5 in October 1820; Pierre Philogène was born in February 1818 but died at age 14 in September 1832; Joseph Théogène was born in March 1820 but died at age 4 in November 1824; Simeon Valsin, also called Pierre Valsin, died at age 6 months in July 1828; and Alfred was born in November 1832.  Raphaël's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in January 1844; he would have been 51 years old that year.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted five slaves--two males and three females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 3--on the Widow Raphaël Cormier's farm; this was Carmelite Melançon.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted eight slaves--two males and six females, seven blacks and one mulatto, ages 60 to 1--on the Widow Raphaël Cormier's farm.   Raphaël's daughters married into the Castille and Melançon families.  Only two of his seven sons, his oldest and youngest, survived childhood or youth and created families of their own.  Raphaël's sons and grandsons invariably married fellow Acadians, but several of his granddaughters married non-Acadians. 

Oldest son Colin Amand married Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Guilbeau and Céleste Poirier, at the St. Martinville church in August 1833.  Their son Joseph Philogène was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1835, Alexandre in May 1837, Paulin in April 1839, Aristide in September 1841, and Raphaël le jeune in August 1846.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 56 slaves--30 males and 26 females, all black except for three mulattoes, ranging in age from 75 to 1--on Colin Amand Cormier's plantation.  In the same year, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted two more slaves--both black and both female, ages 40 and 18--on Colin Cormier's farm, so he must have owned land in that parish, too.  Colin Amand died in St. Martin Parish in September 1855, age 43.  One wonders what happened to his many slaves after his death.  (One also wonders who was the Colin Cormier who died "in Park," today's The Parks, near Plaquemine, Iberville Parish, in March 1861, age 60.  The Plaquemine priest who recorded the burial did not give any parents' names or mention a wife.)  Colin Amand's daughter married into the Huval family.  At least three of Colin Amand's sons created families of their own. 

During the War of 1861-65, third son Paulin served in Company D of the Orleans Guard Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862.  Paulin married Marie Eusèide or Zoide, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Benoit and his second wife Marie Eusède Guidry, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in August 1865.  They settled near Lake Arthur, once called Little Lake, then in Calcasieu but now in Jefferson Davis Parish.  Their son Alexandre was born in April 1866; Léonie in January 1873; Paul Adonis, called Adonis, in January 1875; Joseph Artellus in April 1881; and Joseph Philoges in May 1885.  Paulin's daughter married into the Gary family.  

Colin Amand's fourth son Aristide married Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Marin Blanchard and Annette Broussard, at the Breaux Bridge church in December 1863.  Their son Léonin was born near Breaux Bridge in January 1877.  Their daughters married into the Babineaux, Benoit, Dufton, and Huval families.  Aristide remarried to fellow Acadian Julie Broussard in a civil ceremony in Vermilion Parish in November 1889.  They settled in the northwest corner of Vermilion Parish near Lake Arthur.  Aristide's succession record was filed at the Abbeville courthouse in October 1893.  He would have been age 52 that year.  

Colin Amand's fifth and youngest son Raphaël le jeune may have married Thersile Benoit, probably a fellow Acadian, and settled near Abbeville by the late 1860s.

Raphaël's youngest son Alfred married Florentine or Laurentine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Babineaux and Céleste Richard, at the Vermilionville church in April 1853.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Alfred Jean was born in c1858 but died at age 2  in August 1860; Robert was born in November 1861; Joseph Ducoudret in February 1867; Alfred, fils or Albert in April 1874; Clebert in February 1876; and Engelbert or Angelbert in c1877.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted a single slave--an 18-year-old black male--on Alfred Cormier's farm.  During the War of 1861-65, Alfred was conscripted into Confederate service from St. Martin Parish but may not have served in a unit.  Long after the war, he remarried to fellow Acadian Cydalise Benoit at the Carencro church in November 1889; he was 57 years old at the time of the wedding.  He died near Carencro in April 1896.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Alfred was age 66 when he died, but he was 63. His daughters married into the Comeaux, Guilbeau, and Guidry families. 

Michel's second son Michel, fils, called Pierre-Michel, from first wife Nanette Sonnier, was born at Opelousas in September 1772 and baptized by a Pointe Coupée priest at Opelousas in May 1773.  Michel, fils married Ludivine, called Divine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Guilbeau and his first wife Anne Trahan, at Attakapas in January 1793.  Like older brother Amand, Michel, fils settled at Grande Pointe on the upper Teche.  Unlike his older brother Amand, Michel, fils remained there.  His and Ludivine's daughters married into the Allegre, Bertrand, Gauthier, and Ledoux families.  Ludivine died at Grande Pointe in January 1815, age 45, and Michel, fils remarried to Agnès, 32-year-old daughter of Canadian Jean-Baptiste Rodrigues and Marie Josèphe Baudoin and widow of Adam Webre of St. John the Baptist Parish on the river, in St. John the Baptist Parish in June 1816.  Agnès gave him another daughter but no more sons.  Their daughter married into the Richard family.  Michel, fils was affluent enough to hire a live-in tutor for his children and his nieces and nephew.  The tutor, Charles de Dernay Plassard of Brest, France, died at Michel's home at Grande Pointe in March 1817.  Michel, fils died probably at his home on Bayou Teche in August 1833.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial called him Michel of Opelousas and said he was age 65 when he died, but he was 60.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse a few days after his death, so he must have owned property in Lafayette Parish as well as.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 24 slaves--11 males and 13 females, all black, ranging in age from 85 to infancy--on Widow Michel Cormier's plantation; this was Michel, fils's second wife, Agnès Rodrigues.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 20 slaves--six males and 14 females, all black, ages 78 to 2, living in six houses--on Widow M. Cormier's plantation.  Agnès died in St. Martin Parish in November 1871, age 94.   Four of Michel, fils's five surviving sons, all by first wife Ludivine, created families of their own.  A significant number of his grandchildren married non-Acadians, but most of them married fellow Acadians. 

Oldest son Michel Onésime, by first wife Ludivine Guilbeau, born at Grande Pointe in March 1799, married Céleste or Silesie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Dupuis and Rosalie Monique Thériot of St. James Parish but residents of Grande Pointe on the Teche, at the St. Martinville church in July 1816.  Their son Michel Treville, called Treville, was born at Grand Pointe in November 1818; Sosthène in October 1829 but died at age 5 (the priest at the St. Martinville church said 6 years and 3 months) in December 1834; and Césaire was born in August 1840.  Michel Onésime and Silesie may also have had a son named Sylvain.  Michel Onésime died at his home on upper Bayou Teche in November 1853.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Michel, fils, as he called him, died "at age 60 yrs.," but he was 54.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in December 1854.  His daughters married into the Babineaux, Barras, Boudreaux, Melançon, Préjean, Thériot, Thibodeaux, and Wiltz families. Two of his three surviving sons created families of their own. 

Oldest son Michel Treville married Marie Azéma, also called Zena, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Melançon and Marie Savoie, at the St. Martinville church in November 1838.  Their son Michel Ernest, called Ernest, was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 7 months, in April 1840; and Camille Omer, called Omer, in c1850.  Michel Treville died in St. Martin Parish in December 1850, age 32.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following January.  His daughters married into the Barras and Periou families. 

Older son Ernest married Marguerite Alzima or Alzina, daughter of French Creoles Clairville Lasseigne and Joséphine Allegre, at the St. Martinville church in June 1859.  Their son Gabriel was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1860 but may have died near Breaux Bridge at age 19 in October 1879; and Joseph Ernest, called Ernest, was born in February 1863.  Ernest, père's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in March 1864.  He would have been age 24 that year.  If his succession was post-mortem, one wonders if his death was war-related. 

Michel Onésime's son Sylvain died in St. Martin Parish in December 1855.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial did not give any parents' names, mention a wife, or give Sylvain's age at the time of his death.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following February. 

Michel Onésime's youngest son Césaire married Séverine, daughter of Spanish Creole Émile Castille and his Acadian wife Marie Adélaïde Thibodeaux, at the Breaux Bridge church in January 1861.  Their son Simon Sylvain or Sylvain Simon was born near Breaux Bridge in October 1862; Joseph Adela or Adélard, called Adélard and Joseph D., in April 1866; Crejin or Crepin was baptized at the Breaux Bridge church, age unrecorded, in December 1869; and Émile le jeune, also called Émile C., was born in November 1877.  During the War of 1861-65, Césaire served in Company A of the Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  His daughters married into the Landry and Thibodeaux families. 

Michel, fils's second Louis le jeune, born at Grande Pointe in October 1800, died at age 1 in February 1801.

Michel, fils's third son Joseph Deterville, by first wife Ludivine Guilbeau, a twin, born at Grande Pointe in December 1801, married Aimée Scholastique, called Scholastique, daughter of German Creole Adam Webre and Canadian Creole Agnès Rodrigues of St. John the Baptist Parish, at the St. Martinville church in December 1822, so Joseph Deterville married his stepsister.  Their son Joseph Émile, called Émile, was born in St. Martin Parish in January 1824.  Joseph Deterville died at Grande Pointe in August 1827, age 26.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in January 1829.  His daughter married into the Guilbeau family. 

Only son Émile married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Sylvestre Broussard and Marie Aspasie Babineaux, at the St. Martinville church in February 1843.  Their son Joseph Arthur, called Arthur, was born in St. Martin Parish in September 1847, and Sylvain Numa, called Numa, in July 1851.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted four slaves--an 18-year-old male and three 16-year-old females, all black--on Émile Cormier's farm.  Émile remarried to Léontine, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Babin and Marie Therzile Thibodeaux, at the St. Martinville church in February 1857.  Their daughters married into the Babin and Hébert families.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 13 slaves--seven males and six females, all black, ages ranging from 60 to 2, living in three houses--on Émile Cormier's farm.  Émile, at age 44, remarried again--his third marriage--to cousin Alzire, daughter of Joseph Allegre and his Acadian wife Marguerite Denise Cormier, at the St. Martinville church in October 1868.  Alzire gave him more children but no more sons.  Their daughter married into the Thibodeaux family.  

Michel, fils's fourth son Hervillien Amand, also called Amand le jeune, by first wife Ludivine Guilbeau, Joseph Deterville's twin, born at Grande Pointe in December 1801, married Marie Cephalie, Cephalide, or Cophalite, daughter of Furcy Hollier and Juliette Collins, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1835.  Their son Amand, fils was born in St. Martin Parish  in March 1836; Joseph Cleopha, called Cleopha, in September 1837; Rosémond in September 1841; and Louis Homere in August 1845.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted five slaves--two males and three females, three blacks and two mulattoes, ranging in age from 38 to 3--on Amand Cormier's farm.  Amand le jeune, called Hervilien by the priest who recorded his burial, died near Breaux Bridge in October 1879.  The priest who recorded his burial said that "Hervilien" was age 79 when he died, but he would have been 77.  His daughters married into the Broussard, Lasseigne, and Periaux families.

Amand le jeune's second son Cleopha married Palestine, 18-year-old daughter of French Creoles Alexandre Beslin and Delphine Leleux, at the St. Martinville church in April 1857.  Palestine died in St. Martin Parish in July 1859; she was only 20 years old.  During the War of 1861-65, Cleopha served in Company A of the Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in Louisiana, and in Company A of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Infantry, into which the Yellow Jackets were incorporated in late 1863.  Cleopha died in St. Martin Parish in May 1869.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Cleopha died "at age 32 yrs.," but he was 31.  He evidently had not remarried, so his line of the family died with him.  

Amand le jeune's third son Rosémond , during the War of 1861-65, served in the same units as his older brother Cleopha.  After the war, Rosémond married Marie Félicie, called Félicie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Théodore Babineaux and Azélie Melançon, at the St. Martinville church in January 1866.  They settled near Breaux Bridge.  Their son Léon or Léonce was born in December 1868, and Cleopha le jeune in September 1871.  Rosémond's daughters married into the Benoit and Guidry families. 

Michel, fils's fifth son Nicolas, by first wife Ludivine Guilbeau, born at Grande Pointe, in September 1804, married Osite Delphine, called Delphine and also Josephine, daughter of fellow Acadians David Babineaux and Osite Melançon, at the St. Martinville church in February 1828.  Their son Nicolas, fils was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1829, and Joseph Declemir in December 1832.  Nicolas remarried to Marie Ozea, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Boudreaux and Félice Broussard, at the St. Martinville church in November 1838.  Their son Jules was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1840.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 11 slaves--eight males and three females, all black, ages 14 to 8--on Nicolas Cormier's farm.  Nicolas, père died in St. Martin Parish by October 1855, when his succession record was filed at St. Martinville courthouse.  He would have been age 51 that year. 

Oldest son Nicolas, fils, by first wife Delphine Babineaux, married first cousin Émilie, daughter of French Creole Antoine Auguste Ledoux and his Acadian wife Ludivine Cormier, Nicolas, fils's paternal aunt, at the St. Martinville church in September 1852.  Their son Nicolas Adolphe, called Adolphe, was born near St. Martinville in July 1853, and Anatole in June 1855.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 28 slaves--11 males and 17 females, 24 blacks and four mulattoes, ages 60 to 5, living in 16 houses--on Nicholas Cormier's plantation; this was Nicolas, fils.  During the War of 1861-65, Nicolas, fils, a captain, commanded Company C of the Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  He died probably at his home in St. Martin Parish in December 1863, age 34, perhaps from wounds suffered in Confederate service.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in October 1864.  His daughter married into the Olivier family.

Nicolas, père's second son Joseph Declemir, by first wife Delphine Babineaux, married Clara, daughter of Foreign Frenchman Laurent Tertron of Nantes and his French Creole wife Louise dite Louisianaise Beauvais of Pointe Coupee and Bayou Tortue, at the St. Martinville church in December 1852.  Joseph Declemir died in St. Martin Parish in October 1855, age 23.  One wonders if he fathered any children. 

Nicolas, père's youngest son Jules, by second wife Marie Ozea Boudreaux, likely married fellow Acadian Marie Louise Arceneaux.  Their son Joseph Adam was born near Vermilionville in November 1870. 

Michel, fils's sixth and youngest son Éloi, by first wife Ludivine Guilbeau, born at Grande Pointe in September 1810, died at at the home of Alphonse Oubre at St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in October 1839, but he was buried at Convent in nearby St. James Parish. age 30.  He probably did not marry.  Was Éloi working for Oubre at the time of his death?  

Michel, père's third son Pierre, by second wife Catherine Stelly, was born at Opelousas in September 1776, so he was often called "Pierre of Opelousas."  He married Marianne, 18-year-old daughter of German Creoles Jacob Miller and Anne-Marie Theigen of Alsace and Maryland, at Opelousas in August 1795.  Pierre and Marianne settled at Carencro, near the bayou of that name, at the northwestern edge of the Attakapas District.  Marianne died near Carencro in August 1796 probably from complications of childbirth; she was only 19 years old at the time of her passing.  Pierre remarried to Rosalie, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Dugas and Geneviève Robichaux of nearby Anse La Butte, at Attakapas in January 1798.  They also settled near Carencro.  Pierre, père died at Plaquemine Point, St. Landry Parish, in June 1847 and was buried at nearby Grand Coteau, age 71.  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse that month.  His widow Rosalie died at Carencro in March 1859.  The Grand Coteau priest who recorded her burial said that she died "at age 80," but she was 77.  Her succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse a week after her death.  Pierre's daughters married into the Courseau, Fontenot, Gautreaux, Guilbeau, Janis, LeBlanc, and Thibodeaux families.  All four of his sons created families of their own.  Their oldest son's line was especially prolific. 

Oldest son Pierre, fils, by second wife Rosalie Dugas, born at Carencro in March 1799, married, at age 19, Céleste, 25-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Dominique Babineaux and Marguerite Thibodeaux of Carencro, at the St. Martinville church in May 1818.  They settled at Carencro.  Their son Ursin was born in February 1819; Lucien in October 1822; Pierre Rosémond, called Rosémond, in February 1824; Bélisaire in July 1830; Joachim was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 3 months, in May 1832; Lasty at age 4 months in March 1834; and Camille or Clémile at age 5 months in May 1838.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 16 slaves--10 males and six females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 4--on Pierre Cormier, fils's farm in the parish's western district.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 30 slaves--15 males and 15 females, 21 blacks and 9 mulattoes, ages 59 years to 5 1/2 months, living in five houses--on Pierre Cormier's plantation at Carencro.  Céleste died at Carencro in August 1869.  The Grand Coteau priest who recorded her burial, and who did not to give any parents' names, said that Céleste died "at age 75 yrs.," but she was 76.  Pierre, fils died at Carencro in December 1871.  The Grand Coteau priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was age 75 when he died, but he was 72.  In his will, Pierre, fils donated land for a church and cemetery at Carencro with the stipulation that the name of the church be St. Pierre.  The land he gave, however, was exchanged for another piece of property closer to the center of the village, where St. Peter church was established in 1874.  For a time, in fact, the village of Carencro was called St. Pierre after the church.   His daughters married into the Babineaux, Brasseaux, and Simoneaux families. 

Oldest son Ursin married Marie Alexandrine, called Alexandrine, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Murphy Broussard and his first wife Marie Adélaïde Prejean, at the Grand Coteau church in April 1845.  Their son Onésime Numa, called Numa, was born near Grand Coteau in February 1848; Jean Murphy, called Murphy, in December 1849; Thelesmar in December 1851; Pierre Neuville, called Neuville, in February 1858; Ursin, fils in June 1860 but died age 5 in December 1865; and Joseph Clémile, called Clémile le jeune, was born in April 1865 but died at age 8 in January 1874.  In June of 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted three slaves--a male and two females, all black, ages 9, 20, and 4--on Ursin Cormier's farm.  During the War of 1861-65, Ursin served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought local Jayhawkers.  Ursin died near Carencro in April 1895, age 76.  His succession record was filed at the Lafayette courthouse the following August.  His daughters married into the Brasseaux and Prejean families.  At least two of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Onésime Numa married Alexandrine, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Guilbeau, fils and Françoise Savoie, at the Grand Coteau church in February 1870.  Their son Alexandre lwas born near Grand Coteau in April 1871, and Joseph Ernest in March 1878.  Onésime Numa's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January 1881.  He would have been age 32 at the time.  

Ursin's second son Jean Murphy, at age 16, married cousin Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Aurelien Brasseaux and Aurelia Cormier, at the Vermilionville church in June 1866.  Jean Murphy died probably at Carencro in July 1867.  The Grand Coteau priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Morphy, as he called him, died "at age 19 yrs.," but he would have been 17.  His succession record, calling him Jean Morphi, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in July 1868.  Did he father any children?

Pierre, fils's second son Lucien married cousin Céleste or Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph dit Joson Babineaux and Céleste Comeaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in August 1840 (Lucien's mother and wife shared the same first and last names!)  They settled near Carencro.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born in June 1845 (but, strangely, his baptism was recorded in the Grand Coteau parish's "Black Bk."); Joseph was born in December 1846; Joseph Adolphe in April 1848; Pierre le jeune "in Calcasieu" but his birth was recorded at the Grand Coteau church in November 1850 or 1851; Julien was born in May 1853; Louis Alcide, called Alcide, in February 1855; Placide in November 1856; and Lucien, fils in September 1860.  Lucien, père died near Carencro in February 1892, age 69.  His daughters married into the Babineaux, Benoit, Brasseaux, and Hoffpauir families.  At least three of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Jean Baptiste married Clara or Claire, another daughter of Edmond Roger and Urasie Prejean, at the Vermilionville church in February 1868.  Their son Edmond Lasty, called Lasty, was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1869.  Their daughter married into the Arabie family.  Jean Baptiste remarried to Célestine, daughter of French Creole Don Louis Carriere and widow of Marcel Arabie, at the Carencro church in May 1883. 

Lucien's second son Joseph married Marguerite Aspasie, daughter of French Canadian Edmond Roger and his Acadian wife Urasie Prejean, at the Vermilionville church in November 1866.  Joseph died in October 1870, age 25.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in November.  One wonders if he father any sons. 

Lucien's fourth son Pierre le jeune may have married French Creole Celima Lebleu.  They settled probably near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish.  Their son Martin was born in December 1868.  

Pierre, fils's third son Rosémond married cousin Cidalise, daughter of fellow Acadians Arvillien LeBlanc and Julienne Babineaux, at the Vermilionville church in May 1851.  They settled near Carencro.  Their son Émile, called Émelite, was born in December 1852; Telesphore in September 1855 but died at age 3 months the following January; Adam was born in January 1859 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1860; Alcide was born in February 1862; Joseph Lasty, called Lasty (named after his uncle who had just died in the trenches at Vicksburg) in August 1863; Aurelien le jeune, also called Augustin and Adrien, in October 1865; Arvillien in January 1868; Erestil, probably Aristide, in August 1870; Hippolyte in May 1873; and Arcade in October 1878.  Rosémond died near Carencro in January 1887.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Rosémond was age 64 when he died, but he was 62.  His daughter married a Dugas cousin. 

Pierre, fils's fourth son Bélisaire married cousin Aurelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Joachim Dugas and Marguerite Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in January 1857.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Joachim le jeune was born in July 1860; Anatole in May 1867; Ambroise in July 1874 but died at age 11 in November 1885; Jean Jacques was born in December 1877; and Romain in March 1881.  During the War of 1861-65, Bélisaire served probably as a conscript in Company D of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  His three younger brothers, Joachim, Lasty, and Clémile, served as volunteers in another company of that regiment.  Bélisaire's daughters married into the Babineaux, Leger, and Prejean families.

During the War of 1861-65, Pierre, fils's fifth son Joachim served with his younger brothers Lasty and Clémile in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, the Lafayette Prairie Boys, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  After the war, Joachim married Marie Euphémie, called Euphémie, daughter of Simonet Simoneaux and his first wife Acadian Azélie LeBlanc, at the Vermilionville church in August 1865; Euphémie's stepmother was Mélanie Cormier, Joachim's sister.  Joachim and Euphémie settled at Carencro.  Their son Honoré was born in July 1871.  Their daughters married into the Guilbeau and Richard families.  Soon after the death of his wife in the early 1880s, Joachim took up with Azélie, called Azèle, daughter of French Canadian Jean Baptiste Lantier and French Creole Christine Olivier of Grand Coteau.  Joachim and Azèle did not marry; Azèle had borne children by Jean Broussard in the 1870s but had not married him either.  Joachim and Azèle's son Honoré Lesseus, called Lesseus or Seaux, a deaf-mute, was born near Carencro in July 1884; and Léonce (the author's paternal grandfather) in April 1889.  Joachim died of tuberculosis at Carencro in October 1899, age 68. 

During the War of 1861-65, Pierre, fils's sixth son Lasty served in the same company as his older brother Joachim and younger brother Clémile.  Unlike his brothers, however, Lasty did not survive the war.  He was mortally wounded during the Siege of Vicksburg in June 1863 and buried at Soldier's Rest in the city's Cedar Hill Cemetery, age 29. 

Pierre, fils's seventh and youngest son Clémile served in the same company as his older brothers Joachim and Lasty.  After the war, Clémile married cousin Alice, also called Caliste, another daughter of Joachim Dugas and Marguerite Broussard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1866.  They settled at Carencro.  Their son Onésiphore was born in January 1867, Horace in December 1868, Esdras in September 1870, Joseph Saul in September 1872, Philibert in April 1874, Maurice in September 1877, Henry in September 1879, Moïse in September 1881, and Peter Théophile in November 1883.  

Pierre of Opelousas's second son Maximilien, by second wife Rosalie Dugas, born at Carencro in September 1807, married Marie Mélanie, called Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph dit Augustin Broussard and Anne Hébert, at the Vermilionville church in April 1828.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Maximilien, fils, also called Onésime, was born in November 1829; Narcisse in December 1831; Rémi in late 1834 but died at age 8 months in July 1835, and a child, named unrecorded, was born in April 1849 but died at age 4 months the following August.  The birth of Maximilien and Mélanie's final child must have proved fatal to the mother as well as the child.  Her succession record, probably post-mortem, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in July 1849.  Their daughters married into the Derosier, Richard, and Thibodeaux families.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted four slaves--two males and two females, ages 38 to 2--on Maximilien Cormier's farm.  Maximilien, at age 44, remarried to Alexandrine or Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Louis Richard and his first cousin Eugènie Richard and widow of James Baugh, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1852, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church in April 1853.  They settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.  Their daughters married into the Janis, Matte, and Thibodeaux families.  In the summer of 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted a single slave--a 36-year-old black male--on Maximilien Cormier's farm.  At age 58, Maximilien remarried again--his third marriage--to Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Doucet and Carmelite Richard and widow of Césaire Caruthers, at the Church Point church in April 1866.  Their son Pierre le jeune was born near Church Point in April 1870.  

Oldest son Maximilien, fils, by first wife Mélanie Broussard, married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Boudreaux and Marie Émelie Savoie, at the Grand Coteau church in September 1851.  Their son Léonal or Léoval was born near Church Point in December 1860, and François near Grand Coteau in February 1862 but died near Church Point at age 3 months the following May.  Maximilien, fils's daughters married into the Cormier and Mendoza families.  

Maximilien, père's second son Narcisse, by first wife Mélanie Broussard, married Marie Mélanie or Mélasie, daughter of French Creoles Jérôme Janis and Marie Bellard, at the Grand Coteau church in October 1851.  They settled near Church Point.  Their son Narcisse, fils was born in October 1852, Pierre le jeune in December 1856, Jérôme in March 1859, Arvillien in March 1872, Louis in August 1874, and another Pierre in October 1878.  They also had a son named Maxilien or Maximilien le jeune.  During the War of 1861-65, Narcisse served in Company K of the 29th (Thomas's) Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  His daughters married into the Allemand, Daigle, Leger, Matte, Meche, and Spears families.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Narcisse, fils married Marie Émilie or Amelie, daughter of Louis Lejeune, probably a fellow Acadian, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1870, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church in January 1872.  Their son Joseph was born near Church Point in January 1878, Cleopha in April 1884, Jérôme in April 1888, and Jean in June 1891.  Narcisse, fils's daughter married into the Miller family.  

Pierre of Opelousas's third son Amand le jeune, by second wife Rosalie Dugas, born at Carencro in October 1809, married Eurasie, 16-year-old daughter of Anglo American William Wood or Woods and his Acadian wife Marguerite Brasseaux, at the Opelousas church in July 1832.  Their son Aurelien was born near Opelousas in April 1833, and Treville in March 1838.  Amand le jeune's succession record, calling him Amanoo, was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in June 1878.  He would have been age 68 that year. 

Older son Aurelien married Marianne, daughter of French Creoles Augustin Frugé and Eléonore Lasage, at the Grand Coteau church in October 1851.  They settled at Pointe Émile Mouton in present-day Acadia Parish.  Their son Aurelien, fils, was born in December 1852; Tainville or Stanville in June 1857; Auguste in January 1860; Edval Joseph or Joseph Edval in October 1862; Aristide or Aurestile in August 1865; and Théodore, also called Théodose, in September 1868.  Aurelien and Eurasie's daughters married into the Matte and Richard families.  Aurelien remarried to Marie Celina, called Celina, Racca in a civil ceremony probably in St. Landry Parish, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church in June 1871.  Their son Clairville was born near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in September 1873; and Joseph near Vermilionville in April 1875.  Aurelien, père died in Acadia Parish by May 1892.  When his succession record was filed at the Crowley courthouse; he would have been age 59. 

Pierre of Opelousas's fourth and youngest son Symphorien, by second wife Rosalie Dugas, born at Carencro in August 1816, married Célesie, 25-year-old daughter of French Creole Noël Vasseur and his Acadian wife Angélique Richard and widow of Thomas Bacon, at the Opelousas church in April 1837.  Their son Symphorien, fils was born near Opelousas in June 1840; Louis Alfred near Grand Coteau in February 1843; and Pierre Mauléon in October 1849.  Symphorien died near Church Point in November 1884.  The priest who recorded his burial said that "Sifroyen" was age 73 when he died, but he was 68.  His daughters married into the Clark, Sonnier, and Vasseur families. 

Oldest son Symphorien, fils married Céleste, daughter of James Desales or Desaulles and Eleonore Bergeron, a French Creole, not an Acadian, at the Grand Coteau church in April 1868.  They settled near Church Point and at Plaisance in St. Landry Parish.  Their son Thomas Gabriel, called Gabriel, was born in September 1871; Jacques or Jacob in February 1876; Willy or William in November 1878; Lucien in October 1881; James in May 1884; and Léonard in July 1886.  Symphorien, fils died near Church Point in June 1894.  The priest who recorded his burial said he was age 58 when he died, but he was only 54. 

Daughter Angélique, born near Grand Coteau in September 1845, gave birth to son Symphorien le jeune (named after her father and brother) near Church Point in June 1864.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name.   

Michel, père's fourth son Louis, by second wife Catherine Stelly, was baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in June 1779.  Louis married Thècla, daughter of French Creole Michel Meaux from the Saintogne region of France and his Acadian wife Élizabeth Broussard, at Attakapas in October 1799.  Louis and Thècla settled on the upper Vermilion north of present-day Lafayette probably in an area the Acadians called Beaubassin.  They also may have lived for a time at La Pointe, on the upper Teche near Breaux Bridge.   Thècla died in the early 1820s.  Her succession record, filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in June 1823, noted that Louis "is not in a situation to have the tutorship of his minor children due to his being in a habitual state of deafness for the last 5 or 6 years."  Thècla's brother, Athanas Meaux, offered to be the tutor of his sister's minor children, sons Alexandre and Lesime, ages 14 and 12, and daughter Melite, age 8.  Louis and Thècla's daughter married into the Duhon family.  Deafness did not prevent Louis from remarrying to Marie, daughter of Antoine Ledoux and his Acadian wife Marguerite Gaudet of St. James Parish and widow of Joseph Melançon, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1823; Marie's brother, Antoine Auguste Ledoux, had married Louis's niece, Ludivine, daughter of his half-brother Michel, fils, only three months earlier.  Louis and Marie's daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  Louis died at his home along the upper Vermilion in June 1843.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Louis was age 60 when he died, but he was at least 64.  Five of his eight sons, three by first wife Thécla and two by second wife Marie, created families of their own.

Oldest son Célestin, by first wife Thècla Meaux, born on the upper Vermilion in October 1804, married first cousin Marguerite, 18-year-old daughter of Augustin Royer of Illinois and his Acadian wife Victoire Cormier, at the Grand Coteau church in May 1822; Marguerite's mother was Célestin's paternal aunt.  Their son Alexandre le jeune was baptized at age 14 days at the Vermilionville church in September 1825 but died the day after his baptism; Auguste or Augustin was baptized at age 4 months in April 1831; and Onésime, or Osémé, le jeune was baptized at age 7 1/2 months in April 1833.  In November 1835, Célestin bought 40.17 acres of land in Lafayette Parish from the federal government.  He "signed" the land deed with an X, so he probably was illiterate.  In the summer of 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted eight slaves--two males and six females, all blacks, ranging in age from 65 to 2--on Célestin Cormier's farm.  His daughter married into the Plaisance family.  Only one of his three sons married. 

Second son Augustin died in Lafayette Parish in April 1853, age 22.  He probably did not marry.  

Célestin's third and youngest son Onésime le jeune married Eurasie, daughter of Louis Clément and Marie Anne Stelly, at the Grand Coteau church in June 1851.  Their son Euphémon, also called Eupremont, Fernand, and Fremont, had been born near Grand Coteau the previous March, so they may have been married civilly.  Onésime le jeune died near Grand Coteau in May 1887, age 55. 

Only son Euphémon likely married fellow Acadian Aurelia or Aurelie Trahan in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1870.  Their son Joseph was born near Rayne, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in December 1879.  Euphémon remarried to Mélasie Beard, also called Melissa Hébert, in a civil ceremony in Acadia Parish in February 1889.  Their son Théogène was born in March 1894 and baptized at the Rayne church in May; and Jacob was born near Roberts Cove, Acadia Parish, in November 1898. 

Louis's second son Alexandre, by first wife Thècla Meaux, born on the upper Vermilion in June 1809, married cousin Susanne, daughter of Charles Alexandre Ledoux and his Acadian wife Susanne Cormier, at the Vermilionville church in January 1829; Susanne's mother was another daughter of Michel Cormier, fils.  Alexandre and Susanne's son Alexandre, fils was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1829; Césaire in St. Martin Parish in May 1834; and Louis Césaire in May 1839.  Alexandre's daughters married into the Mire and Sonnier families.  In September of 1860, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted eight slaves--four males and four females, all mulattoes, age 35 years to 6 months--on Alexandre Cormier's farm, so he probably had moved west of Bayou Nezpique or owned land there during the 1850s.  Alexandre remarried to Marie Élisabeth, called Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadian Prosper Villejoin and his Creole wife Clementin LaFosse and widow of Ignace Caruthers, at the Grand Coteau church in October 1876.  Their son Fernest was born near Rayne, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in December 1878 when his father was age 69.  Alexandre died in Acadia Parish by January 1891, when his succession record was filed at the Crowley courthouse.  He would have been age 81 that year.  The following April, another record filed in the Crowley courthouse provided for the tutorship of Alexandre's youngest son Fernest, who was only age 12. 

Louis's third son Onésime, also called Lésime and Louis, fils, by first wife Thècla Meaux, born on the upper Vermilion in September 1811, married Marguerite, also called Arthémise and Mary, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Melançon and his Creole wife Marie Ledoux, at the Vermilionville church in August 1831; Marie Ledoux was his father's second wife, so Onésime married his stepmother's daughter.  Onésime and Marguerite's son Onésime, fils or Osémé was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 7 weeks, in October 1832; Joseph at age 15 months in November 1838; and Adam was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1842 but died two months later.  A child, name unrecorded, died at age 2 months in October 1847; the Vermilionville priest who recorded the child's burial called the father "Onézime of Queue Tortue," so Onésime probably had moved to that bayou, which runs through the prairies west of Vermilionville, now the city of Lafayette.  Son Jean Baptiste Adam was born there in September 1852; Placide Antoine, called Antoine, in July 1856; and Jacques in December 1863.  Onésime, père, whom the Vermilionville priest recording his burial called Marcellin, died in Lafayette Parish in January 1879, age 68. 

Oldest son Onésime, fils married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Babineaux and his Anglo-American wife Hortense Perry, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in August 1850.  Their son Pierre was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1856.  They also had a son named Osémé.  

Louis's fourth son Jean Baptiste, by first wife Thècla Meaux, born on the upper Vermilion in February 1814, died at age 8 in October 1822. 

Louis's fifth son Michel le jeune, by first wife Thècla Meaux, born on the upper Vermilion in May 1819, died at age 2 in October 1822.

Louis's sixth son, by second wife Marie Ledoux, the boy's name unrecorded, died within hours of his birth at their home on the upper Vermilion in October 1825.  

Louis's seventh son Joseph, by second wife Marie Ledoux, a twin, born on the upper Vermilion in November 1826, married Marie Mélanie or Mélasie, daughter of French Canadian Auguste Royer and his Acadian wife Caroline Bourque, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in July 1849.  They settled near Carencro before moving to the Church Point area.  Their son Louis le jeune was born in August 1852; Joseph, fils in December 1855; Aurelien in January 1859; Jean Lasty in July 1861; another Joseph, fils in December 1866; and Luma, probably Numa, in December 1869.  They also had a son named Auguste.  Their daughters married into the Caruthers and Lantier families.  By the early 1870s, Joseph had moved his family to the Rayne area.  He died near Rayne in March 1893.  The priest who recorded his burial said Joseph was age 69 when he died, but he was 66. 

Louis's eighth and youngest son Don or Jean Louis, called Louis, fils, by second wife Marie Ledoux, born on the upper Vermilion in c1831, married Élisabeth Lock, Rauche, Roche, Rodge, Ross, or Rotche in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in 1855, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church in February 1858.  They settled near Carencro.  Their son Joseph Octave, called Octave, was born in October 1857; Don Louis, fils in March 1859; William in December 1863; Célestin le jeune in July 1869; Joseph Atherol in May 1872; and Adrien in May 1874.  His daughters married into the Lavergne, LeBoeuf, and Soileau families.  

Michel, père's fifth and youngest son François, by second wife Catherine Stelly, was baptized at Opelousas at age 8 1/2 months in August 1783.  François followed his older brother Louis to the upper Vermilion and married Scholastique, called Colastie, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon dit Agros LeBlanc and Anne dit Manon Hébert, at Attakapas in December 1806.  François and Scholastique remained on the upper Vermilion.   Francois died at his home along the upper Vermilion in February 1835, age 53. His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following April.  His daughter married into the Duhon family.  All four of his sons created families of their own.

Oldest son François, fils, born on the upper Vermilion in December 1812, married married Émilie, also called Émilite, Melite, Carmelite, and Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Benjamin Broussard and Madeleine Hébert, at the Vermilionville church in August 1830.  Their son Benjamin was born near Vermilionville in September 1833, François Dolzé in February 1837, and Jean Bénoni, called Bénoni or Béloni, in March 1841.  François, fils and Émilie's daughters married into the Broussard, Hébert, and Trahan families.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted two slaves--both females, both black, ages 50 and 11--on François Cormier's farm in the parish's western district.  François, fils, at age 40, remarried to Eugènie Simon in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1855.  She gave him more children but no more sons.  Their daughter married into the Duhon family.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted the same two black female slaves on Francois Cormier's farm that had been counted in 1850.  

Oldest son Benjamin, by first wife Émilie Broussard, married Marie Belzire, called Belzire, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Denis Trahan and Marguerite Hébert, at the Vermilionville church in April 1860.  During the War of 1861-65, Benjamin may have served as a conscript in Company I of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  His daughters married into the LeBlanc and Morvant families. 

During the War of 1861-65, François, fils's third and youngest son Jean Bénoni served in Company E of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Jean Bénoni married Louise, daughter of Hilaire Simon and his Acadian wife Aspasie Hébert, at the Vermilionville church in January 1867.  Jean Bénonie may have been the Jean Cormier whose succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in August 1872.  He would have been age 31 that year.  

François, père's second son Pierre le jeune, born on the upper Vermilion in March 1815, married Marie Sidalise, called Sidalise, daughter of Louis Simon and his Acadian wife Marie Louise Trahan, at the Vermilionville church in June 1834.  Their son Siméon or Simon Duplessis was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 months, in April 1838.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted three slaves--a male and two females, all black, ages 23, 15, and 15--on Pierre Cormier's farm.  During the War of 1861-65, Pierre le jeune, along with younger brother Onésime, served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought against area Jayhawkers.  Pierre le jeune died in Lafayette Parish in December 1876, age 61.  His daughter married into the Duhon family.

Only son Siméon Duplessis married first cousin Azelima, Azelime, or Azelina, also called Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Maxille Cormier and Azélie Léger, his uncle and aunt, at the Vermilionville church in April 1855.  Their son Jules was born in Lafayette Parish in March 1857; Siméon Duplessis, fils in December 1858; Dolzin in April 1860; and François Adam in September 1866.  They also had a son named Ludovic.  Their daughter married into the Simon family.  Siméon Duplessis remarried to fellow Acadian Octavie Guillot at the Vermilionville church in December 1877.  Their son Ernest had been born in Lafayette Parish two months before the marriage, so they probably had married civilly; and Pierre was born in November 1882.  Siméon Duplessis and Octavie's daughters married into the Trahan family. 

François, père's third son Maximilien, called Maxile, born on the upper Vermilion in August 1817, married Azélie, also called Zélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Julien Léger and Marie Duhon, at the Vermilionville church in July 1836.  Their son Neuville was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1837, Joseph in October 1842, Vital in 1846, and Oculi in March 1852.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted seven slaves--four males and three females, all black, ranging in age from 30 to 3--on Maxile Cormier's farm in the parish's western district.  Maxille must have owned land in St. Martin Parish as well; in November, the federal census taker in St. Martin counted 20 slaves--11 males and nine females, all black, ages 40 to 3--on his plantation in that parish.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted only three slaves--two males and a female, all black, ages 14, 11, and 50--on Maxile Cormier's farm.  Maxille died in Lafayette Parish in August 1877.  The priest who recorded his burial said Maxille was age 58 when he died, but he was 60.  His succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following January.  His daughters married into the Cormier, Hanks, and Manceau families.  At least three of his four sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Neuville married Marguerite Azéma, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Hébert and Marie Carmezile Landry, at the Vermilionville church in July 1855.  They settled probably near Youngsville.  Their son Olise was born in December 1857; Joseph in December 1859; Léoscar, also called Joseph, in December 1866; Augustin in August 1873; and Cleopha in October 1875.  Neuville's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in September 1878.  He would have been age 41 that year; the succession was not post-mortem.  Neuville, at age 43, remarried to French Creole Eulalie Gaspard in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in November 1880.  Their son Maxille le jeune was born in Lafayette Parish in September 1881; and Neuville, fils near Rayne, Acadia Parish, in October 1895. 

Maxille's second son Joseph married Mélanie, daughter of Ralph R. Hanks and Arthémise Abshire, at the Abbeville church, Vermilion Parish, in February 1867.  They settled near Rayne.  Their son Joseph, fils was born in August 1874; Zelmire in August 1876; Adam in October 1883; and Lucius in January 1887.  

Maxille's third son Vital married Edmire or Elmire, daughter of Lessin Simon and his Acadian wife Claire Landry, at the Vermilionville church in August 1866.  They settled at Pointe Émile Mouton near Church Point.  Their son François le jeune was born in October 1871, Maxille le jeune in September 1873, Lessin in March 1875, and Norbert in January 1877.  Vital's daughters married into the Breaux and Ewens families.  

François, père's fourth and youngest son Onésime, also called Onésime F., Onésime François, and Lésime, born on the upper Vermilion in August 1820, married Eugénie, another daughter of Louis Simon and Marie Louise Trahan, at the Vermilionville church in August 1841.  Their son Désiré was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1842; François le jeune in February 1850 but died at age 7 in March 1858; Jean Baptiste was born in January 1852; Nicaise or Niguez in December 1855; Pierre Onésime, called Onésime, in November 1858; Eugènat, called Eugène, in December 1860; Rupert, also called Dupré, in March 1865; and Joseph Alcide on Bayou Queue de Tortue in August 1868.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--a black female, age 6--on Onésime Cormier's farm in the parish's western district.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted only a single slave--a single black female, now age 15--on Onésime Cormier's farm.  During the War of 1861-65, Onésime, along with older brother Pierre le jeune, served in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought against local Jayhawkers.  Onésime's daughters married into the Broussard, Hébert, and Leleux families. 

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Relatives of the three Cormier cousins came to Louisiana from exile in Cuba during the early 1800s, among the last Acadian Cormiers to emigrate to Louisiana.  They settled at New Orleans, where most of the Haitian exiles who came to Louisiana via Cuba remained.  One of them, however, moved on to the western prairies in the 1810s: 

Nicolas (1779-1821) à ? à Thomas à Robert Cormier

Nicolas, son of Amand Cormier and Anastasie LeBlanc probably of Chignecto, was born at Môle St.-Nicolas, French St.-Domingue, in September 1779.  His parents evidently were Acadians who had come to the French naval base on the north shore of the sugar colony from one of the British Atlantic colonies in the early 1760s.  They married there by the early 1770s.  Nicolas evidently was their second son.  He married Marie Soltero perhaps in Cuba in the early 1800s after escaping the bloody Haitian rebellion in the late 1790s or early 1800s, or he may have married her at New Orleans soon after his arrival there.  One wonders if they had any children.  Nicolas died at New Orleans in October 1821, age 42.

Jean-Baptiste (1784-1831) à Jean à Alexis à ? à Thomas à Robert Cormier

Jean Baptiste, also called Eugène Baptiste, son of Jean Cormier and Élisabeth Morel of Jean-Rabel, French St.-Dominguie, started a fourth line of Acadian Cormiers in the Bayou State during the early 1800s.  This Jean Baptiste, like his Louisiana relatives, also had roots at Chignecto, but his family's experience during Le Grand Dérangement was different from his cousins'.  Alexis Cormier of Pointe-Beauséjour, his wife Madeleine de Liglen, and their infant son Jean were deported to South Carolina in the fall of 1755 with hundreds of other Chignecto Acadians.  In 1763, the war with Britain finally over, French authorities encouraged the Acadians still languishing in the seaboard colonies to emigrate to St.-Domingue, where they could provide cheap labor for the new French naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas on the north shore of the island.  Alexis and Jean Cormier were among the South Carolina Acadians who went to the sugar island and remained there.  Jean married Élisabeth Morel of Pointe-de-Paix at Jean-Rabel, northeast of Môle St.-Nicolas, in February 1783.  Their son Jean-Baptiste was born at Jean-Rabel in March 1784.  Jean died at his father's home at Caracol, east of Cap-Français, in April 1785, age 30.  His father Alexis died probably at Caracol not long afterwards.  Jean Baptiste, called Eugene Baptiste in some Louisiana records, may have been among the St.-Domingue French who fled to Cuba in late 1803; he would have been age 19 that year.  He evidently came to Louisiana with the flood of Haitian refugees from Cuba a few years later.  His sisters Marie-Renée, Marie-Victoire, and Rose probably came with him.  New Orleans church records show a baptism for Anne-Joséphine, daughter of Jean Cornier of Jean-Rabel, Santo Domingo, and Marie-Françoise-Virginie Cazejus of Jeremie, Santo Domingo, dated 15 October 1813, so Jean-Baptiste may have been married when he came to Louisiana, or he may have married a fellow Haitian exile soon after he arrived.  Most of the Haitian/Cuban exiles, including Jean-Baptiste's sisters, remained at New Orleans.  Not Jean Baptiste.  Perhaps now a widower, he moved on to St. Landry Parish and, at age 34, remarried to Marie Louise or Éloise, called Lise, 15-year-old daughter of Louis DeVille II of Poste Rapides and his Acadian wife Marie Jeansonne, at the Opelousas church in June 1818; the Opelousas priest who recorded the marriage said nothing of a previous wife.  Jean-Baptist died in St. Landry Parish in January 1831, age 46.  The Opelousas priest who recorded his burial called him "a Frenchman," but he was as much an Acadian as the other Cormiers of South Louisiana.  His descendants, all from his only son, settled on the Opelousas prairie near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish.  Meanwhile, at least one of Jean Baptiste's nephews, Pierre Mouillé, fils, son of sister Marie Victoire, settled in St. Landry Parish not far from his uncle and cousins. 

Only son Jean Baptiste, fils, by second wife Lise DeVille, born in St. Landry Parish in August 1828, married Cléonise Louise, also called Clonise C., Louise Charles, Eléonore, and Léonise, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Charles Pitre and his Creole wife Phelonise Joubert, at the Opelousas church in January 1850.  In the summer of 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted five slaves--three males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 26 to 2--on Jean Bte Cormier's farm.  Jean Baptiste, fils died by March 1864, when his wife Cléonise remarried at Opelousas.  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in November 1869.  His daughters married into the De Ville and Fontenot families. 

Only son Louis Arthur was born near Ville Platte in March 1857. 

Crochet

Yves Crochet of Megrit, Brittany, married Pélagie Benoit, probably an Acadian, at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in February 1758.  Later that year, after the fall of Louisbourg in July, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île Royale and deported them to France.  Yves Crochet and his new wife survived the crossing.  They landed at Rochefort in early 1759 then sailed around to St.-Malo, which they reached at the beginning of October.  From St.-Malo, they made the short trip to Yves's hometown area in northern Brittany, where, between 1760 and 1772, Pélagie gave Yves eight children, five sons and three daughters.  Yves died at Quesny near St.-Malo in November 1773, age 41, and was buried at nearby Megrit, his birthplace.

Soon after Yves died, Pélagie Benoit and her children were among the Acadians who attempted to settle on a nobleman's land in the Poitou region near the city of Châtellerault.  Pélagie was pregnant when she left Quesny for Poitou.  Her ninth and final child, another son, was born posthumously in early May 1774, six months after her husband died, and was baptized at Châtellerault.  Youngest daughter Pélagie, only two years old, died a few weeks after her brother was born.  After the Poitou venture failed, Pélagie and most of her children, along with her recently married sister, Marguerite Benoit, retreated with dozens of other Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where they subsisted on government hand outs as best they could.  

Pélagie's oldest son, Jean-Guillaume Crochet, who would have been 15 in November 1775, was not on the convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes with the rest of the family.  He had become a sailor and probably went to sea.  Daughter Marguerite, who would have been only 9 in 1775, also was not on the convoy list; for what reason is anyone's guess.  

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  Pélagie Benoit and her Crochet children agreed to take it.  Youngest son Jean-Marin, born in Poitou in May 1774, evidently died at Nantes at age 10 or 11 sometime between September 1784, when he was counted with his family there, and August 1785, when they left for Louisiana.

Pélagie Benoit and five of her children--Jean-Guillaume, now age 25, Françoise-Pélagie, age 21, Marguerite-Perrine, age 19, Yves-Jean, age 18, and Julien, age 15--sailed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in early November.  Two weeks after they reached the city, in late November 1785, daughters Françoise-Pélagie and Marguerite-Perrine married fellow passengers Tourchet dit Leonard De La Garde of Surget, France, and Joseph-Agustin Adam of La Rochelle, France.  In mid-December, son Jean-Guillaume married a fellow passenger at New Orleans.  After a period of recuperation from the long voyage, Pélagie and her expanded family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.

Pélagie did not remarry.  She lived long enough to witness the birth of grandchildren and even great-grandchildren.  She died in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1824, age 83.  Older daughter Françoise-Pélagie and husband Léonard De La Garde lived for a time in New Orleans and then joined her family on the upper bayou.  By January 1791, Françoise-Pélagie had become a widow with three young sons.  She remarried to Philippe Bruze of Genoa, Italy, at Lafourche in June 1792 and had more children by him.  They settled in what became Lafourche Interior Parish, where she died in February 1836, age 72.  Younger daughter Marguerite-Perrine died in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1830, age 64. 

During the early antebellum period, Pélagie Benoit's Crochet sons and their descendants spread up and down the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley, from Pierre Part north of Lake Verret in northern Assumption Parish to Montegut in lower Terrebonne Parish.  A small branch of the family also settled on the river in West Baton Rouge Parish but soon died out.  In 1860, only two Crochets--one in Assumption, the other in Terrebonne--owned a single slave apiece, so the Crochets participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  

Acadian Crochets lived in a part of Louisiana hit hard by the War of 1861-65.  Successive Federal incursions devastated the Lafourche and Terrebonne valleys.  At least one member of the family, Prudent Crochet of West Baton Rouge Parish, died in Confederate service.  He was mortally wounded in action during the Atlanta, Georgia, campaign in the summer of 1864; sadly, his line of the family died with him on that distant battlefield.  A handful of his Terrebonne Parish cousins also served Louisiana in uniform, and all of them survived the conflict. 

After the war, at least five families of Acadian Crochets moved from the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley to lower Bayou Teche and then out to the prairies of St. Landry Parish, creating a western branch of the family.  Today, dozens of Crochet families, most of them descendants of Yves Crochet, can still be found in the towns and cities of southeast Louisiana.  Despite its late start, members of the western branch of the family became as numerous as their eastern cousins.  Western Crochets, most of them Acadians, can be found today across the southwest prairies as far as east Texas.  They are especially numerous in Jefferson Davis and Acadia parishes, near the city of Jennings.  

The family's name also is spelled Chrochet, Crochait, Crochaix, Croche, Crochiet, Croge, Crouchet.05

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All three of Pélagie Benoit's Crochet sons created their own families on Bayou Lafourche:

Jean-Guillaume (1760-1810s) Crochet

Jean-Guillaume, oldest son of Yves Crochet and Pélagie Benoit, born at Quesny, France, in September 1760, came to Louisiana with his widowed mother and siblings and married Marie-Marthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Boudrot and Marguerite Richard, at New Orleans in December 1785, soon after reaching the colony.  Marie-Marthe was a native of St.-Servan, near St.-Malo, and also had crossed on L'Amitié.  They followed his widowed mother to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jean-Guillaume died before July 1821 probably in Assumption Parish, when he would have been in his early 60s.  Compared to his younger brothers, Jean-Guillaume's family was a small one--he had only one son, and only one of his two grandsons survived childhood, but that grandson married and had several sons of his own, perpetuating this line of the family.  Jean-Guillaume's son and grandson remained in Assumption Parish until after the War of 1861-65, when the grandson moved to the Bayou Teche valley around New Iberia.  By the early 1890s, two of Jean-Guillaume's great-grandsons had moved out into the open prairies of eastern Calcasieu, now Jefferson Davis, Parish.  

Only son Joseph-Emérant, called Emérant, born probably at Assumption in c1800, married Eugènie Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Marin Gautreaux and Marie Madeleine Theriot, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1821.  The priest who recorded the marriage noted that the groom's father was deceased at the time of the marriage. Their daughter married into the Mire family.  Emérant remarried to Adèle Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Martin Thibodeaux and Marguerite Dugas, at the Plattenville church in May 1827.  Their daughters married into the Cedotal, Dupas, Gautreaux, and Mazerolle families.  Emérant died in Assumption Parish in April 1845, age 45.  His surviving son created a family of his own in the Bayou Lafourche valley.

Older son Magloire Sivilien, by second wife Adèle Thibodeaux, born in Assumption Parish in October 1827, Magloire, by his father's second wife, married Honorine, daughter of Valery Cedotal and his Acadin wife Henriette Dugas, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1851; Magloire's sister Pamela married Honorine's brother Augustin.  Magloire and Honorine's son Emérant le jeune was born in Assumption Parish in April 1852; Émile Homer in May 1854; Joseph Camille in March 1856; Joachim near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret, Assumption Parish, in January 1861; Augustin Joseph near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, in March 1868; and Odressi Joseph near Lydia, Iberia Parish, in September 1870.  As the birth records of his younger sons reveal, after the War of 1861-65, Magloire moved his family from Assumption Parish to the Bayou Teche valley, where some of his cousins had settled.  Two of his sons then moved out into the Calcasieur prairies west of the Mermentau. 

Second son Émile married fellow Acadian Domitille Broussard probably at Lydia in the mid-1870s.  They moved to the Calcasieu prairies.  

Magloire's fifth or sixth son Augustin, called Adrecy by the priest who recorded his wedding, married Merilia, daughter of fellow Acadian Camille Landry, at the Jennings church, then in Calcasieu but now in Jefferson Davis Parish, in September 1892.  By the early 1900s, he and brother Émile had established a branch of the family along Bayou Nezpique north of Jennings (the author's hometown).   

Emérant's younger son Désiré Treville, called Treville, from second wife Adèle Thibodeaux, born in Assumption Parish in May 1838, died at age 6 in September 1843. 

Yves-Jean-Guillaume (1767-?) Crochet

Yves-Jean, second son of Yves Crochet and Pélagie Benoit, born at Quesny, France, in December 1767, came to Louisiana with his widowed mother and siblings and followed them to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Yves-Jean married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Dugas and his third wife Anne Bourg, at Lafourche in the early 1790s.  Anne had come to Louisiana from France aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships.  Yves-Jean died in Assumption Parish in the early 1810s, in his mid-40s.  His daughter married into the Templet family.  His two married sons remained in Assumption Parish.  One grandson moved to West Baton Rouge Parish in 1830s, where he started a small branch of the family on the river, but it did not survive.  Another grandson moved down bayou to Terrebonne Parish in the 1840s.  After 1865, a few of his descendants moved down into Terrebonne Parish and others to the lower Bayou Teche valley, but most of his descendants remained on upper Bayou Lafourche.

Oldest son François-Marie, born at Assumption in January 1796, married Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Landry and Marie Madeleine Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1817.  François died in Assumption Parish in July 1844.  The Paincourtville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that François died at "age 59 years"; François Marie would have been age 48 at the time, but who else would it have been?  His daughters married into the Arceneaux, Hébert, Landry, Leze, and Trahan families.  Four of his sons also created families of their own. 

Oldest son Séverin François, born in Assumption Parish in June 1821, married cousin Euphrosine, daughter of Romain Freoux and his Acadian wife Pélagie Dugas, at the Paincourtville church in January 1842; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Séraphin Arsène was born in Assumption Parish in December 1842, Joseph Romain in March 1847, Joseph in October 1849, Pierre Aurelien in July 1851, Paul Oleus near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret in February 1859, and Justilien Séverin in September 1862.  In late July 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted a single slave--a 55-year-old black male--on Séverin Crochet's farm near Pierre Part in the parish's 14th Ward (Bayou Louis).  Severin died in Assumption Parish in November 1863.  The Paincourtville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Séverin died at "age 44 years," but he was 42.  His daughters married into the Ducasse or Ducas, Hopwood, and Tureyra families.  His oldest son moved to the lower Bayou Teche valley after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Séraphin married cousin Zelanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Leufroi Guidry and Eléonore Landry, at the Paincourtville church in November 1863; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Séraphin moved to St. Martin Parish after the War of 1861-65 and remarried to Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Hébert and Madeleine Babin, at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in December 1869.  They settled near Loreauville.  Their son Paul was born in November 1870, and Octave in March 1872. 

François Marie's second son François Arsène, called Arsène, born in Assumption Parish in August 1823, married Justine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Dupuis and Françoise Daigle, at the Paincourtville church in February 1849, and remarried to Eurasie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Aucoin and Scholastique Hébert, at the Paincourtville church in April 1853.  Their son Joseph François, a twin, was born in Assumption Parish in January 1855; Pierre Jean Baptiste in September 1856; François Pierre near Pierre Part in December 1858; and Paul in March 1864 but died at age 4 months the following June.  Arsène died near Pierre Part in March 1865, age 41.  

François Marie's third son Louis, born in Assumption Parish in January 1828, died less than a day old.

François Marie's fourth son Joseph, born in Assumption Parish in February 1829, married Aureline or Ameline, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Aucoin and Marie Trahan, at the Paincourtville church in April 1850.  Their son François Justinien or Justilien, called Justilien, was born in Assumption Parish in November 1852; Joseph Enoch, called Enoch and Eno, in May 1856; and Joseph Sarazin or Victorin, called Victorin and sometimes Gustave, near Pierre Part in March 1859.  After the War of 1861-65, Joseph moved his family to the Bayou Teche valley.  By the 1870s, they were living near Loreauville, Iberia Parish.  Their daughter married a Crochet cousin.  Their sons married fellow Acadians and remained in Iberia Parish.

François Marie's fifth son Vileor Lucien, also called William, born in Assumption Parish in January 1834, married Clarisse, another daughter of Romain Freoux and Pélagie Dugas, at the Paincourtville church in August 1854.  Their son Nicolas Séverin was born near Pierre Part in November 1859, and Pierre in January 1862.  Vileor also moved his family to St. Martin Parish after the War of 1861-65.  

François Marie's sixth and youngest son Docilis Sylvain, called Sylvain, born in Assumption Parish in June 1842, died near Pierre Part in January 1865, age 23.  He did not marry.  

Yves's second Amand-Bernard, also called Emérant, baptized at Assumption in September 1796, married Marie Hortense, called Hortense, daughter of François Freoux and his Acadian wife Marguerite Adélaïde Gautreaux, at the Plattenville church in February 1813.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard and Simoneaux families.  Six of their nine sons also created their own families on the river and on upper Lafourche.

Oldest son Francois Eugène or Hermogène, called Hermogène, born in Assumption Parish in April 1816, married fellow Acadian Marie Carmelite Daigre, widow of Hippolyte Le Tullier of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in June 1836 and settled near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, where they established a small branch of the family along the river.  Their son Prudent was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in March 1839, and Félix Cleopha Isidore near Brusly in September 1841.  One wonders if the family line endured beyond the second generation. 

Older son Prudent married Adolphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Adolphe Dupuy and Eléonore Babin, at the Brusly church in January 1861.  During the War of 1861-65, Prudent enlisted in the West Baton Rouge Tirailleurs at Camp Moore in Tangipahoa Parish in May 1861.  The Tirailleurs became Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, which fought in Mississippi, Tennessee, Louisiana, Georgia, and Alabama.  Prudent must have secured leave from his unit at least twice--two daughters were born to him during the war--Olymphe in c1862, and Ouida in 1864--but he never saw his second daughter.  During the Atlanta Campaign, Prudent fell mortally wounded at Ezra Church on 28 July 1864.  His comrades were forced to leave him on the field.  He either died on the field or in a Federal hospital and was buried by the enemy.  He was age 25.  His line of the family, except for its blood, died with him on that distant battlefield.  

Hermogène's younger son Félix Cleopha Isdiore, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.

Amand Bernard's second son Symphorien Tresime or Trasimond, called Trasimond, born in Assumption Parish in October 1817, married fellow Acadian Eléonore Dupuis probably in Assumption Parish in the early 1840s, and remarried to Rose Aimée, daughter of fellow Acadians Zéphirin Melançon and Marie Faralie Bourgeois, at the Paincourtville church in March 1848.  

Amand Bernard's third son Romain Arsène, called Arsène and also Désiré, born in Assumption Parish in January 1819, married Bathilde, daughter of fellow Acadian Baptiste Landry and his Creole wife Roseline Simoneaux, at the Paincourtville church in May 1845.  Their son Jean Baptiste Jérôme, called John, was born in Assumption Parish in January 1848; Joseph Osémé Blanchard in March 1850; and Romain Arsène, fils near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret in January 1859.  After the War of 1861-65, Arsène crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Bayou Teche valley and settled among his kinsmen near Loreauville, Iberia Parish.  Their daughters married Landry cousins.  One of their sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Jean Baptiste Jérôme married Camilla, daughter of fellow Acadians Désiré A. LeBlanc and Domitille Dugas, at the Paincourtville church in July 1867.  Their son Pierre Léon was born near Paincourtville in June 1870. 

After 1865, Arsène's second son Romain followed his father and some of his kinsmen to the Bayou Teche valley, where he married cousin Zélanie, daughter of Joseph Crochet and Aureline Aucoin, at the Loreauville church, Iberia Parish, in January 1881.  

Amand Bernard's fourth son Narcisse Evremont, born in Assumption Parish in October 1820, died a few days after his birth.

Amand Bernard's fifth son Telesphore Valéry, born in Assumption Parish January 1823, married fellow Acadian Céleste Boudreaux at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in January 1843.  Their son Louis Daunis, called Daunis, was born in either Terrebonne or Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1848.  Their daughter married into the Baudoin family.  Their son also created his own family in Terrebonne. 

Only son Louis Daunis married Eveline, daughter of fellow Acadian Cyrus Hébert and his Creole wife Emérante Malbrough, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in January 1868.  Their son Joseph W. was born near Chacahoula, Terrebonne Parish, in June 1870.  

Amand Bernard's sixth son Onésime Denis, called Denis and Adonis, born in Assumption Parish in November 1824, married Clementine or Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Aucoin and Rosalie Theriot, at the Paincourtville church in January 1846.  Their son Joseph Valéry was born in Assumption Parish in February 1847; Nicephore in April 1849; Jean Baptiste Alexi, called Alexi, in Jan 1852 but died at age 3 months the following April; Léonard was born in October 1853; and Drosin Jean Baptiste in January 1857 but died at age 7 in February 1864.  Their oldest son married by 1870.

Oldest son Joseph Valéry married Clementine, daughter of fellow Acadians Sylvanie Templet and Melissa Theriot, at the Pierre Part church, Assumption Parish, in August 1869. 

Amand Bernard's seventh son Joseph Carville, born in Assumption Parish in March 1826, died at age 2 years, 2 months in May 1828.

Amand Bernard's eighth son Clermont Marcillien, called Marcillien, born in Assumption Parish in February 1828, died at age 14 1/2 in November 1842.

Amand Bernard's ninth and youngest son François Florentin, called Florentin, born in Assumption Parish in March 1830, married Amaselie, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Comeaux and Azélie Hébert, at the Paincourtville church in August 1853.  Their son Joseph Meridier was born in Assumption Parish in January 1858.  

Yves's third son Magloire, baptized at Assumption in December 1797, died in Assumption Parish in August 1834.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Magloire was age 31 years old when he died, but he was at least 36.  He evidently never married.  

Yves's fourth and youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Assumption in October 1799, married Marine, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Landry and Rosalie Hébert, at the Plattenville church in April 1817.  The priest who recorded the marriage noted that the groom's father was deceased.  Jean Baptiste died in Assumption Parish in November 1822, age 23.  His daughter married into the Simoneaux family.  He fathered no sons, so his line of the family, except for its blood, died with him.  

Julien (1770-c1820) Crochet

Julien, third and youngest surviving son of Yves Crochet and Pélagie Benoit, born at Quesny, France, in March 1770, came to Louisiana with his widowed mother and siblings and followed them to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Julien married Marguerite, daughter of French Creole Nicolas Bélanger and Marguerite Lejeune of False River, Pointe-Coupée, at Baton Rouge in 1798 but settled on the upper bayou with his older brothers.  Julien died in either Lafourche Interior or Terrebonne Parish in c1820, in his late 40s or early 50s.  His daughters married into the Bonvillain, Comeaux, and Gauthier families.  During the antebellum period, his sons and grandsons moved down bayou into Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes.  After the War of 1861-65, one grandson moved to the Brashear City, now Morgan City/Berwick area, on the lower Atchafalaya, but most of Julien's descendants remained in Terrebonne Parish.  

Oldest son Nicolas Léandre, called Léandre, born at Baton Rouge in December 1800, married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Bergeron and Victoire Benoit, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in October 1822.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage noted that the groom's father was deceased.  They remained in Terrebonne Parish.  In 1860, the federal census taker in Terrebonne Parish counted a single slave--a 12-year-old female mulatto--on Léandre Crochet's farm in the parish's Ward 8.  His daughters married into the Bergeron, Chiasson, Mazeirac, Neal, Robertson, and Robichaux families.  Five of their seven sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Julien Romain le jeune, born in Terrebonne Parish in June 1823, married a young widow, Rebecca, daughter of Abel Cooper, also called Burket, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in August 1856.  Their son Auguste was born near Montegut the following October, and Désiré Léandre in August 1862.  

Léandre's second son Jules Léandre, born in Terrebonne Parish in August 1826, married Louisiane Elisa, also called Elisa, daughter of Aaron King and Mélasie Bergeron, perhaps an Acadian, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1856.  Their son Jean Baptiste had been born in Terrebonne Parish in January 1854.  Jules remarried to Clémence, daughter of Francois Lecompte and Adèle Gisclard and widow of E. Bélanger, at the Montegut church in May 1867.  

Léandre's third son Hippolyte Nicolas, born in Terrebonne Parish in January 1835, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Léandre's fourth son Jean Charles, born in Terrebonne Parish in May 1837, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Léandre's fifth son Henri, born in Terrebonne Parish probably in the 1840s, married Augustine or Justine, daughter of fellow Acadian Auguste Robichaux and his Creole wife Célestine Gisclard, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in January 1859, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church in March 1865.  Their son Adam Justilien was born in Terrebonne Parish in June 1859, Alexandre Alfred in April 1861, and Omer Franklin Clémile in November 1870.  

Léandre's sixth son Théophile, born in Terrebonne Parish probably in the 1840s, married Rosina, daughter of Anaclet Labit and Céleste Pichoff, at the Houma church in December 1869.  Their son Joseph Numa was born near Montegut in October 1870. 

Léandre's seventh and youngest son Thomas Robert or Albert, called Albert, born in Terrebonne Parish in October 1849, married Marie, another daughter of Auguste Robichaux and Célestine Gisclard, at the Montegut church in June 1867.  Their son Joseph Adam was born near Montegut in October 1868.   

Julien's second son Eléonore or Léonore, born probably in the late 1800s or early 1810s, married Élise, daughter of Laurent Pichoff and his Acadian wife Claire Trahan, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in July 1828.  Their daughters married into the Arcement, Babin, Bergeron, and Boudreaux families.  Two of Léonore's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Jules, born in either Terrebonne or Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1829, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Léonore's second son Amédée Franklin, called Franklin, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in March 1834, married Madeleine Lorenza, daughter of fellow Acadians François Babin and Marie Clouâtre, probably in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in the 1850s, and sanctified their marriage at the Houma church in April 1862.  Their son Franklin Édouard was born in Terrebonne Parish in May 1858, and Jules Amédée in June 1861.  

Léonore's third son Édouard or Edward Joseph, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in February 1838, married Eveline, daughter of Adelin Bergeron, perhaps a fellow Acadian, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in June 1854, and sanctified their marriage at the Houma church in November 1866.  Their son Joseph Aristide was born in Terrebonne Parish in September 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Edward served in Company H of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Terrebonne Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

Léonore's fourth and youngest son Clet Émile, born in Terrebonne Parish in March 1852, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Julien's third son Julien Romain, born in Assumption Parish in August 1815, died in September 1829, age 14.

Julien's fourth son Paulin, also called Magloire, born probably in Assumption Parish in the late 1810s, married Clementine, also called Thérèse, Bonvillain probably in Terrebonne Parish in the mid- or late 1830s.  Their daughters married into the Labit and Legrand families.  Paulin died in Terrebonne Parish in May 1847, probably in his late 30s.  His succession record, filed at the Houma courthouse in October 1849.    

Older son Hubert Prosper, called Prosper, was born in either Terrebonne or Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1842.  During the War of 1861-65, Prosper served in Company K of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Terrebonne Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He married Susanne, daughter of Jacques Labit and his Acadian wife Henriette Roger, at the Houma church in May 1865.  

Paulin's younger son Joseph Henry, born probably in Terrebonne Parish in August 1844, married Marie, daughter of Narcisse Marcel and Céleste Rhodes, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in June 1867, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church in March 1869.  Their son Joseph Norbert was born in Terrebonne Parish in April 1868.  

Julien's fifth and youngest son Henri or Henry, born probably in the late 1810s, married Marie Thérèse, also called Myrthe, daughter of William C. Watkins and Uranie Bonvillain, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in December 1839.  Henry died in Terrebonne Parish in December 1850, probably in his early 30s.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Older son Henry Désiré, born in either Terrebonne or Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1840, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Henri's younger son Pierre Adam, called Adam, born in Terrebonne Parish in August 1848, married Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Guidry and Marie Pauline Henry, at the Brashear, now Morgan, City church, St. Mary Parish, in June 1870.  By the early 1870s, Adam had moved his family to Berwick, across the Atchafalaya River from Brashear.  Adam remarried to Gracieuse Pennison at the Morgan City church in May 1880, and remarried again--his third marriage--to Mary, daughter of Jean La Cossette, and his Acadian wife, a Gautreaux, at the Morgan City church in December 1888.   

Daigre/Daigle

Olivier Daigre, born in France in c1643, reached Acadia by c1666, the year he married Marie, daughter of Denis Gaudet and Martine Gauthier.  Between 1667 and 1681, Marie gave Olivier 10 children, seven sons and three daughters.  Olivier died at Port-Royal before c1686, in his early 40s, and Marie remarried to a Fardel or Fredelle.  Two of Olivier's daughters married into the Sibilau, Gouzil, Poitevin dit Parisien, and Tennier or Thénière families.  Second daughter Marie bore two "natural" children, both daughters, by Gabriel Moulaison dit Recontre and Louis Blin evidently between her two marriages to Pierre Sibilau and Jacques Gouzil.  She had legitimate children--a son and three daughters--only by her second husband, Jacques Gouzil.  Olivier's youngest daughter and her family perished aboard the British transport Violet in a North Atlantic storm during the deportation of the island Acadians to France in late 1758.  Only two of Olivier's seven sons, the third and fifth, created their own families by marrying into the Bourg and Blanchard families.  The third son's line was especially vigorous.  In 1755, Olivier's descendants could be found at Annapolis Royal; Grand-Pré and Piguiguit in the Minas Basin; Chignecto; the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto; and on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale in the French Maritimes.  By then, the family's name had evolved from Daigre to Daigle, though some members of the family retained the original spelling.  

 Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this large family even farther.  The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  In the early 1750s, Canadian soldiers, assisted by Mi'kmaq warriors led by Abbé Le Loutre, burned Acadian homesteads in the British-controlled area east of Rivière Missaguash, forcing the habitants to move to the French-controlled area west of the river.  Daigres may have been among the refugees.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Daigres may have been among the 300 Chignecto Acadians serving in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  A Daigre family was transported to South Carolina aboard the transport Edward Cornwallis, which reached Charles Town on November 19.  Also aboard one of the south-bound transports was a Daigre widow and three of her sons.  The following August, the Daigres, including the widow and he sons, were sent with two dozen other Acadians from Charles Town to Prince Frederick Winyaw, a rural Anglican parish farther up the coast at present-day Plantersville. 

Daigres from Minas were deported to Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Massachusetts in the fall of 1755.  The many Daigres sent to Virginia suffered the indignity of being turned away by the colony's authorities.  They languished in the lower James River aboard disease-infested ships until Governor Dinwiddie ordered them dispersed to Hampton, Norfolk, and Richmond, while he and the colony's political leaders pondered their fate.  The following spring, the Virginians sent them on to England, where they were packed into warehouses in several English ports and treated like common criminals.  At least one Daigre died during the crossing to England.  Most of the many Daigres in England were held at Falmouth in Cornwall, but others were held at Southampton and up in Liverpool.  The death toll among members of the family was especially pronounced at Falmouth, where the exiles were struck by a smallpox epidemic soon after reaching the Cornish port.  Others died at Liverpool and Southampton during their first year in England, but life went on, even amidst the squalor of the prison compounds.  Many Daigres married fellow Acadians, and more children were born.  Unlike in Virginia, colonial authorities in Maryland held the Acadians until the end of the war with France.  At least one Daigre family was sent to Pennsylvania.  Several Daigre families were deported to Massachusetts, where they lived at Milton and Boston.  

Daigres who escaped the British roundups in 1755 took refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore or moved on to Canada.  At least two married brothers and members of their families were likely victims of a smallpox epidemic that struck Acadian refugees in and around Québec in the fall and winter of 1757-58.  Daigres also married in the Canadian capital and bore more children there. 

Living in territory controlled by France, none of the Daigres in the Maritimes were touched by the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the British captured the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, they gathered up most of the Acadians on the islands, many Daigres among them, and deported them to St.-Malo and other French ports.  One Daigre family, with many of their neighbors at Malpèque, escaped the British roundup and sought refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  In October 1760, after the British attacked Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs that July, a Daigre from Chignecto and Île St.-Jean and his family of 10 were counted at the French stronghold, having escaped the British again.  A few years later, however, members of the family were being held in British prisoner-of-war compounds in Nova Scotia.  But most of the Daigres on Île Royale and Île St.-Jean were not so lucky.  The 1758 crossing to France devastated entire families.  Daigres, including an entire family, perished aboard the British transport Violet, which sank in a mid-Atlantic storm on November 25.  Other Daigre families were devastated in the crossing of the British transport Duke William, which suffered a mishap, likely an explosion, in mid-ocean before limpint into St.-Malo the first of November.  Most of the island Daigres crossed on one of the five British transports that left the Gut of Canso in late November and reached St.-Malo in late January 1759.  The death toll among the 1,033 passengers aboard those vessels reached nearly 50 percent, many of them Daigres.  Another Daigre died in the crossing to St.-Malo aboard an unnamed vessel.  Island Daigres who survived the terrible crossing did their best to make a life for themselves in the teeming suburbs of St.-Malo.  They settled at St.-Servan, Trigavou, Pleudihen, Pleslin, Mordreuc, Les Villes Morvues, La Gravelle, Le Coquenais, Lysnais, Gallienne, Crehen, Pleurtuit, and Plouër.  Island Daigres ended up in other French ports, including Rochefort, Boulogne-sur-Mer, Cherbourg, and Le Havre.  Some joined their kinsmen in the St.-Malo suburbs at the first opportunity.  In the spring of 1763, after prolonged negotiations between the French and British governments, the Acadians in England who had gone there from Virginia were repatriated to France, many Daigres among them.  They landed at St.-Malo, Morlaix, and other ports.  They were especially plentiful aboard the transports L'Ambition and La Dorothée, which took them to St.-Malo. 

In late autumn 1765, Daigres repatriated from England to Morlaix, many of them brothers, along with a Daigre cousin deported to St.-Malo from the French Maritimes, agreed to become part of a new agricultural settlement on Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany.  They settled on the island at Chubiguer and Kerbellec near Le Palais, Kervellent and Kerson near Sauzon, Les Cosquet near Locmaria, and at Tynever near Bangor.  In the early 1770s, Daigres in several port cities chose to take part in another settlement venture, this one in Poitou.  French authorities were tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on land he owned near the city of Châtellerault.  After two years of effort, however, most of the Daigres abandoned the Poitou venture and retreated to the port city of Nantes, where they lived as best they could on government handouts and what work they could find.  Some families grew larger, some became smaller, while others were created in the Breton port.  They lived in the parishes of St.-Similien, St.-Nicolas, and St.-Jacques, at Paimboeuf, and at nearby Chantenay.  Some of the Daigres who settled at Nantes did not come there from Poitou.  Two of the Daigre brothers who had gone to Belle-Île-en-Mer moved to the Breton port in the early 1780s, perhaps lured there by promises of a new life in Spanish Louisiana.

According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, one Daigre family, instead of going to Poitou from St.-Servan with dozens of their fellow Acadians, joined, instead, an expedition of other exiles led by ship captain Charles Robin to the British-controlled Channel island of Jersey in 1774.  From Jersey, they recrossed the North Atlantic and settled at the fishery on the Baie des Chaleurs, where, Arsenault insists, members of the family were counted in 1791 and 1792.  They also settled at St.-Basile-de-Madawaska on upper Rivière St.-Jean, and at Richibouctou on the eastern shore of New Brunswick.  Albert J. Robichaux, Jr.'s study of the Acadians in France, however, shows that the father of the family died at St.-Servan in July 1774 and that at least his oldest son remained in France.  The death of a young Daigre daughter at St.-Servan in August 1779, hints that he widow also remained in France with her younger children.  If any of her Daigre children "returned" to North America, they likely did not do it in the 1770s. 

During their two and a half decades in the mother country, Acadian Daigres proliferated, even prospered, despite the frustrations of living there.  Yet, in the early 1780s, when the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, at least 58 Daigres from the St.-Malo area, Belle-Île-en-Mer, and especially from Nantes, agreed to take it.  But many other Daigres, including the majority of them on Belle-Île-en-Mer,  chose to remain in the mother country. 

In North America, following the war with Britain, Acadians being held in the seaboard colonies were allowed to leave, but not until British officials counted them and discerned their intentions.  In June 1763, Pennsylvania authorities counted a Daigre family in that colony.  In July, colonial officials in Maryland counted Daigres at Newtown on the colony's Eastern Shore.  In August, colonial officials in Massachusetts noted that at least two Daigre famililes were still in the colony.   Most of the Acadians in the northern seaboard colonies chose to go to Canada, Daigres among them.  Though now also a British possession, the northern province was populated largely by fellow French Catholics, many of them Acadian exiles.  So, in a colony nearly as old as Acadia, descendants of Olivier Daigre began the slow, inexorable process of becoming Canadiennes.  Especially after 1766, Daigres could be found in present-day Québec Province at Québec City, especially at St.-Ambroise, today's Loretteville; St.-Jacques-l'Achigan north of Montréal; St.-Ours on the lower Richelieu, where they were especially plentiful; Charlesbourg and Montmagny on the St.-Lawrence below Québec City; and Bonaventure and Carleton in Gaspésie on the north shore of the Baie des Chaleurs.  They also settled at Richibouctou and Nipisiguit, today's Bathhurst, in present-day northeastern New Brunswick; and at St.-Basile-de-Madawaska on upper Rivière St.-Jean in northwestern New Brunswick.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, the Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

The few Daigres remaining in South Carolina and a Daigre family from Pennsylvania chose to emigrate to French St.-Domingue, where they could live not only among fellow Roman Catholics, but also in territory controlled by France.  French officials encouraged Acadians to go to the sugar island to work a huge naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas.  Although driven from North America by the Seven Years' War, the French were determined to hang on to what was left of their western empire.  The new naval base on the north shore of St.-Domingue would protect the approaches to their remaining possessions in the Caribbean Basin.  The Acadians could provide a source of cheap labor.  To entice them to the tropical island, the French promised the Acadians land of their own.  It must have worked out for members of this family.  When fellow Acadians released from Nova Scotia and Maryland came through Cap-Français in the 1760s on their way to Louisiana, none of the Daigres in St.-Domingue chose to join them.  A Daigre also ended up at Champflore, Martinique. 

A hand full of Daigres also ended up in the prison compound at Halifax, Nova Scotia.  After the war with Britain, some of them chose to settle on the French-controlled island of Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  At least one of them joined hundreds of other Acadians in their search for a new home in the Mississippi River valley.  The refugees in Maryland endured life among English colonists who did not care much for the French "papists" who had been thrust upon them.  When word reached the Acadians there that they would be welcome in Spanish Louisiana, they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them to New Orleans.  A Daigre and his family, however, were among the minority of Acadians in the Cheaspeake colony who chose to remain there before moving on to Canada.  One of their sons evidently did not join them in their journey to the Montréal area.  An historian of the Acadians in Maryland notes that this Daigle became "the captain of the Baltimore-Norfolk packet line who figures so prominently in city records."

Daigres were among the early settlers of Acadia, but most of them came "late" to Louisiana.  In fact, if the Spanish government had not coaxed over 1,500 Acadians in France to emigrate to the colony, the Acadian branch of the Daigre/Daigle family would be a small one in the Bayou State today, if it existed there at all.  The first member of the family to emigrate to Louisiana--a teenage orphan from Minas--came from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in 1765 and settled at the established Acadian settled of Cabahannocer before moving up to Baton Rouge.  Not until nearly two decades later, in 1785, did more Acadian Daigre/Daigles reach the colony--58 of them, including nearly a dozen families, aboard six of the Seven Ships from France.  They settled on the river above and below New Orleans, most of them at Manchac at the southern edge of the Baton Rouge District; and some in the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge, which they abandoned in the early 1790s.  During the following decades, these river families settled along the entire length of the old Acadian Coast in what became East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, Iberville, Ascension, and St. James parishes.  They were especially numerous in the Baton Rouge/Manchac area. 

Acadian Daigles from France also settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, which became a second important center of family settlement that eventually stretched all the way down into the Terrebonne country.  (The town of Daigle north of Houma attests to the family's settlement there.)  Most of the Lafourche valley Daigles, however, remained in Assumption Parish, especially around Paincourtville.  During the late antebellum and immediate post-war periods, some of them left the bayou and settled near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret.  Meanwhile, in the late 1790s, a Daigle from the river crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled in the Attakapas District, but his line did not survive.  During the antebellum period, Daigles from Assumption and the Baton Rouge area settled on Bayou Teche and created a small western branch of the family.  Late in the period, a few of their cousins from Assumption moved to the Brashear, now Morgan, City area, on the lower Atchafalaya, but the number of Acadian Daigles west of the Basin remained small in comparison to their cousins on the river and in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley. 

(Not all of the Daigles of South Louisiana are descendants of Olivier Daigre of Port-Royal.  Étienne dit Marlborough d'Aigle, a French-Canadian with German-Austrian roots, came to the colony in the 1720s, decades before his Acadian namesakes, and settled across from Chapitoulas just upriver from New Orleans before moving to St.-Charles des Allemands on the Lower German Coast.  By the early 1800s, some of his great-grandsons had crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Opelousas prairies and settled along upper Bayou Plaquemine Brûlé near present-day Church Point.  Most of the Daigles of southwest Louisiana are descended from these French Canadians, some of whom took Acadian wives soon after they reached the prairies.  Other non-Acadian Daigles may have lived on the river and in the Bayou Lafourche valley during the antebellum period, further complicating the family's genealogy.)

Dozens of Daigres and Daigles, both Acadian and French Canadian, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  At least two of them died in Confederate service, both from disease. ...

In Acadia and during Le Grand Dérangement, the family's surname evolved from Daigre to Daigle, though many members of the family, especially in the Baton Rouge area, retained the original spelling.  In Louisiana, the family's name also is spelled Aigle, D'aigle, D'aigre, D'aigrin, Daigue, Daygle, Deagle, Degg, Degle, D'egle, Deglet, Degre, Degue, Degues, Deigue, Desgre, Deygle, Diegle, Digue.06

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The first Acadian Daigre in Louisiana was a 14-year-old orphan who reached the colony in 1765 from Halifax.  Agnès-Marie, a native of Malpèque, Île St.-Jean, married into the Thériot family at Cabahannocer on the Acadian Coast in April 1771 and died at Baton Rouge four decades later.

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The first Acadian Daigre "family"--a childless elderly couple--came to Louisiana from France aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in July 1785, but no family line came of it:

Charles (1731-?) à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

Charles, fils, second son of Charles Daigre and Françoise Doucet, born at Pigiguit in August 1731, evidently moved to the French Maritimes after 1752 and before 1755, when the British deported his family to Massachusetts.  Charles, fils married Anne-Marie, daughter of Joseph Vincent and ____, probably on Île St.-Jean in c1758.  The British deported them to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  They settled in St.-Malo suburb of Trigavou, where Charles worked as a ploughman and a pulley maker.  They were that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  They likely were among the hundred of Acadians in the port cities who went to Poitou in the early 1770s and retreated to the Breton port of Nantes in 1775 and 1776.  A Spanish official counted them at Nantes in September 1784.  They emigrated to Louisiana the following year and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac south of Baton Rouge.  At age 54, Charles remarried to Marie-Françoise or Françoise-Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Boudrot and Madeleine- or Marie-Josèphe Doiron and widow of Joseph Clossinet and Marin Dugas, at Manchac in February 1786.  She gave him no children.  During the late 1780s, they followed other river Acadians to upper Bayou Lafourche, where they appeared in Spanish census records as late as January 1798.  Charles died probably on the upper bayou not long after the census.  His line of the family died with him. 

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Eleven more Daigres--a bachelor, two female orphans, three wives, a widow, and a small family--came to Louisiana from France aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in mid-August.  They followed their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, which became the first center of Daigre family settlement in the colony: 

Eustache (1728-1790s) à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

Eustache, fourth son of Bernard Daigre, fils and Angélique Richard, born at Grand-Pré in May 1728, was deported to Virginia in 1755 and to England in the spring of 1756.  At age 31, he married Madeleine, daughter of Charles Dupuis and Marie-Madeleine Trahan of Rivière-aux-Canards, at Southampton, England, in 1759.  Between 1760 and 1784, Madeleine gave Eustache 10 children, seven sons and three daughters, in England and France.  The family repatriated to France in May 1763 aboard L'Ambition and settled at Plouër near St.-Malo, where Eustache worked as a day laborer and carpenter.  Two of his daughters born at Plouèr died young.  The family did not follow other Acadians from England to Belle-Île-en-Mer in November 1765.  In the early 1770s, the family went, instead, to Poitou with hundreds of other Acadians in the St.-Malo area and retreated to Nantes in March 1776.   Three of their sons, born at Nantes, died there in infancy.  Oldest daughter Marie-Marguerite married into the Hébert family at Nantes.  One wonders what happened to Eustache's oldest son Pierre, born in England in c1760, who did not go with them to Louisiana.  Eustache, Madeleine, and three of their younger sons, one of them an infant, along with their married daughter and her family, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785 and followed their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Eustache died there in the early 1790s, in his early 60s.  Madeleine did not remarry.  She died in Assumption Parish in September 1816, in her mid-70s.  Two of their three sons created their own families in Assumption Parish, but only one of the lines endured. 

Second son Jean-Joseph, born at Plouër, France, in January 1770, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana and settled with them on upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Anne-Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Mazerolle and his first wife Marguerite Trahan, in April 1792.  Anne-Françoise also had come to Louisiana aboard La Bergère.  Jean died in Assumption Parish in December 1829, age 60.  He and his wife may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  

Eustache's third son Charles-Marc, born at Plouër in February 1772, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana and settled with them on upper Bayou Lafourche.  He died at nearby Ascension in December 1799, age 27.  He did not marry.  

Eustache's seventh and youngest son Étienne, baptized at St.-Nicolas, Nantes, age unrecorded, in December 1784, followed his family to Louisiana and settled with them on upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie-Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Landry and Osite Landry, at Assumption in February 1804.  Étienne died in Assumption Parish in July 1819, age 35.  One of his daughters married into the Trahan family.  His daughter Constance drowned in Bayou Lafourche in July 1824, age 15.  Only half of his six sons created families of their own.  They remained in Assumption Parish.  Some of his descendants settled at Pierre Part north of Lake Verret in the northwest corner of the parish. 

Oldest son Joseph Étienne, born at Assumption in November 1804, married cousin Céleste or Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Daigle and Marguerite Simoneaux, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1823.  Their son Vincent de Paul Valsin, called Valsin, was born in Assumption Parish in July 1824 but died at age 9 in June 1833; Blaise Sylvain was born in February 1826; and Urbin Amédée in July 1828 but died at age 2 1/2 in March 1831.  They also had a son named Marcellin.  Their daughter married into the Foret family.  Céleste died in Assumption Parish in June 1834, age 27.  Joseph remarried to Eugènie, also called Virginie, daughter of André Kent, Carle, Karne, Kerne, or Querne and Madeleine Burt and widow of ____, at the Plattenville church in August 1841.  Their twin sons Félix and Joseph Romain were born near Plattenville in May 1842 but Joseph Romain may have died at age 3 in August 1845; Joseph Victor was baptized at the Paincourtville church, age unrecorded, in May 1844; Sead Gilbert was born in July 1847; and Étienne Alze in August 1849.  Their daughter married a Daigle cousin and settled near Brashear, now Morgan, City on the lower Atchafalaya.  A son settled near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret.  At least two of Étienne's sons married by 1870.

Older son Marcellin, by first wife Céleste Simoneaux, married Joséphine, daughter of Hursin, probably Ursin, Querne or Kerne and his Acadian wife Adèle Boudreaux, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1858.

Joseph Étienne's fifth son Félix, by second wife Virginie Kerne, married cousin Celina, daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry Blanchard and Augustine Thériot, at the Pierre Part church, Assumption Parish, in April 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.

Étienne's second son Elias Joseph, born in Assumption Parish in February 1810, died there at age 3 1/2 in August 1814.  

Étienne's third son Ursin Raymond, born in Assumption Parish in April 1811, married Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Chrysostôme Trahan and Madeleine Guidry of Assumption Parish, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1830.  Their son Charles Firmin was born in Assumption Parish in September 1832 but died at age 2 in November 1834.  Ursin remarried to Mathilde or Bathilde, daughter of fellow Acadians François Theriot and Marie Bourg, at the Plattenville church in January 1834.  Their son Eusilien François was born in Assumption Parish in September 1834; Joseph Étienne died at age 6 weeks in October 1836; Étienne Désiré, perhaps called Désiré, was born in February 1838; Ursin Crepin, called Crepin, near Plattenville in July 1841; Victor near Paincourtville in September 1844; Joseph Uzere in November 1849; Étienne Diogène in September 1852; and Joseph Elphége in October 1860.  Their daughters married into the Dugas and Maroir families.  Ursin died near Pierre Part in February 1864, age 52.  Four of his sons married by 1870.

Second son Eusilien, by second wife Mathilde Theriot, married Augustine, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Dugas and Adeline Babin, at the Paincourtville church in January 1856.  Their son Israël Eusilien was born near Paincourtville in May 1863, and Augustin in January 1869. 

Ursin Raymond's fourth son Désiré, by second wife Mathilde Theriot, may have married cousin Fideline or Fidelia Daigle.  Their son Joseph Alcée was born near Attakapas Canal, Assumption Parish, in October 1861. 

Ursin Raymond's fifth son Crepin, by second wife Mathilde Theriot, married Clementine, daughter of Romain Friou and his Acadian wife Adeline Dupuis, at the Plattenville church in April 1861.  Crepin died near Paincourtville in October 1869; the priest who recorded his burial said that Crepin died at "age ca. 25 years," but he was 28.  Did he father any sons? 

Ursin Raymond's sixth son Victor, by second wife Mathilde Theriot, married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadian Sylvain Hébert and his Creole wife Marie Juno, at the Paincourtville church in January 1869.  Their son Joseph Crepin was born near Paincourtville in October 1870. 

Étienne's fourth son Valéry Tibodau, called Tibodau, born in Assumption Parish in July 1813, died there in June 1833, age 20, evidently before he could marry.  

Étienne's fifth son Marcellin Auguste, born in Assumption Parish in April 1817, died there in August 1834.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Marcellin was age 20 when he died, but he was 17.  He did not marry.  

Étienne's sixth and youngest son Romain Emerant, born posthumously in Assumption Parish in February 1820, married Marie Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and Marie Landry, at the Plattenville church in May 1839.  Their son Joseph Gervais was born near Paincourtville in June 1846.  Romain remarried to Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian Étienne Giroir, at the Plattenville church in May 1852.  Their son Joseph Alcide was born near Plattenville in August 1856.

Alexis-Jean-Mathurin (1763-1815) à Pierre à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

Alexis-Jean-Mathurin, third son of Alexandre Daigre and Élisabeth Granger, born at Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in January 1763, became an engraver in France.  He came to Louisiana in 1785 as a young bachelor and followed the majority of his fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie-Josèphe-Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Levron and Marguerite Trahan, in January 1788.  Marie also was a native of Boulogne-sur-Mer and had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships.  In the baptismal record of daughter Marie-Claire, born in January 1797 and baptized at New Orleans the following March, Alexis and his wife are described as "residents of this parish," so they must have lived in the city before returning to the upper bayou, where they were counted again in April 1797.  Mathurin died in Assumption Parish in October 1815.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Mathurin was age 50 when he died, but he was 52.  His daughters married into the Malbrough family.  Four of his six sons created families of their own.  Unlike their cousins, the great majority of whom remained in Assumption Parish, Mathurin's many sons and grandsons moved down bayou into Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes. 

Oldest son Joseph-Alex, born at Lafourche in November 1788, married Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Richard and Marie Trahan of Lafourche, at the Plattenville church in March 1818.  Their daughters married into the Deoux and Lamoureaux families.  Four of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Alexandre Joseph or Joseph Alexandre, called Alexandre, born in Assumption Parish in February 1819, married Odile Victorine, called Victorine, daughter of Auguste Bernon, Berland, Bernar, or Bernou and his French-Canadian wife Anne Arcenot of Terrebonne Parish, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1841.  Their son Joseph Alcée, called Alcée, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1845; and Augustin, also called Sylvain, in June 1847.  Alexandre died in Lafourche Parish in November 1855, age 36.  A petition for succession inventory in his name was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse on Christmas Eve.  His daughters married into the Daigle and Ribbeck families.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Older son Joseph Alcée, Joseph Alcée married Evelina, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Boudreaux and his Creole wife Rosalie Malbrough, at the Thibodaux church in March 1864.  Their son Alcée, fils died in Lafourche Parish, age 4 months, in March 1865. 

Joseph Alex's second son Matherne or Mathurin Magloire, born in Assumption Parish, in October 1825, married Marie Elesida, Elizida, or Lesida, daughter of fellow Acadians Ambroise Dugas and Marcellite Bourgeois, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in July 1847.  Their son Mathurin Octave was born in Lafourche Parish in March 1857; Joseph Augustin Paulin near Chacahoula, Terrebonne Parish, in May 1859; and Pierre Edgard in October 1861.  Their daughter married into the Breaux family. 

Joseph Alex's third son Joseph Joachim, called Joachim, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1830, married Joséphine, also called Delphine, daughter of Aubin Bénoni Thibodaux, a son of the governor, and his Acadian wife Eugènie Hébert, at the Thibodaux church in December 1849.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1850, Edgar in died 4 days after his birth in October 1854, Louis Alfred was born in October 1859 but died at age 9 months in August 1860, and Adam was born in May 1863.  Joachim remarried to Marie, also called Uranie and Ulalie, daughter of Creoles Zéphirin Olivier and Delphine Chichenouch and widow of Louis Pontiff, at the Thibodaux church in May 1867.  They moved to the Abbeville area, Vermilion Parish.  Their son Dominique was born there in July 1870. 

Joseph Alex's fourth son Charles Henri, called Henri, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1832, married Ophelia, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Noël Boudreaux and his Creole wife Aimée Caroline Olivier, at the Thibodaux church in August 1855; the marriage also was registered in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Joseph Pierre was born in Lafourche Parish in June 1856, Henri Edgard in January 1858 but may have died the day of his birth, and twins Joseph and Pierre were born in October 1865. 

Joseph Alex's fifth and youngest son Joseph Émile, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1842, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Alexis-Jean-Mathurin's second son Charles-Marie, born at Lafourche in March 1790, probably died young.

Alexis-Jean-Mathurin's third son Jean-Baptiste, born at Lafourche in April 1792, married Marie Carmelite, also called Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Lejeune and Marie Bonne Adélaïde Landry, at the Plattenville church in June 1816.  Their daughters married into the Leonard and Richoux families. 

Oldest son Joseph, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1821, may have died young. 

Jean Baptiste's second son Jean Baptiste Onésime or Olésime, called Olésime, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1824, married Angelle Modeste, called Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadian Eugène Bourgeois and his Creole wife Angélique Barrios, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1850.  Their son Emmanuel Eugène was born near Lockport in December 1851, Charles Désiré near Raceland in October 1857, and Adam in January 1860. 

Jean Baptiste's third son Séraphin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1826, also may have died young. 

Jean Baptiste's fourth and youngest son Barthélemy Adam, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1831, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Alexis-Jean-Mathurin's fourth son Sylvestre-Joseph, born at Lafourche in September 1794, probably died young.  

Alexis-Jean-Mathurin's fifth son Mathurin, fils, born at Lafourche in March 1799, married Eméranthe, daughter of fellow Acadians François Marie Gautreaux and Félicité Hébert, at the Plattenville church in January 1822.  Their daughters married into the Adoue or Adoux, Delaune, Dugas, Labie or Labit, Lapeyrouse, Louviere, and Navarre families.  Mathurin, fils remarried to Marie Elise, called Elise or Lise, 15-year-old daughter of Nicolas Lirette and Marie Josèphe Malbrough, at the Thibodauxville church in April 1826; the marriage also was registered in Terrebonne Parish.  According to Terrebonne Parish court records, in June 1842, Mathurin, fils assumed tutelage of his niece Emérente Malbrough, daughter of his sister Marie Scholastique, called Colastie, who had married Joseph Guillaume Malbrough.  Three of his seven sons married by 1870. 

His oldest son, name and age unrecorded, by first wife Eméranth Gautreaux, died in Assumption Parish in October 1822. 

Mathurin, fils's second son Lessin, by second wife Lise Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1827, married Marie Pamela, called Pamela, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Valéry Gautreaux and Théotiste Louvière, at the Thibodaux church in February 1849.  Their son Treville Noël was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1849, and Orvile in November 1856.

Mathurin, fils's third son Leufroi, by second wife Lise Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1831, married Rosalie or Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Eugène Thibodeaux and Rosalie Henry, at the Thibodaux church in June 1854; the marriage also was registered in Terrebonne Parish.  Their son Alae Calix was born in Lafourche Parish in October 1856, Joseph Ellis in Terrebonne Parish in February 1859, Alfred Camille in Lafourche Parish in May 1860, and Joseph Elphége in June 1862.  Leufroi remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Augustin Babin and , at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in February 1865.

Mathurin, fils's fourth son Octave, by second wife Lise Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1841, married Marie Zulema or Zulma, daughter of fellow Acadian Forestal Dugas and his Creole wife Marie Adèle Bernon, at the Thibodaux church in September 1861.  Octave remarried to cousin Marie Evelina, Eveline, or Alexina, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Joseph Daigle, his first cousin, and his Creole wife Victorine Bernon, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in February 1865, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church in April 1866.  Their son Joseph Camille was born in Lafourche Parish in September 1867.

Mathurin, fils's fifth son Joseph A., by second wife Lise Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1843, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Mathurin, fils's sixth son Mathurin Ferdinand, by second wife Lise Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1851, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.

Mathurin, fils's seventh and youngest son Joseph, by second wife Lise Lirette, born in Lafourche Parish in July 1854, died there at age 3 1/2 in May 1858. 

Alexis-Jean-Mathurin's sixth and youngest son Pierre-Michel or Michel-Pierre, born at Lafourche in November 1800, married Marie Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Benoît Gautreaux and Élisabeth Bergeron, at the Plattenville church in February 1821, and remarried to Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, another daughter of Nicolas Lirette and Marie Josèphe Malbrough, at the Thibodauxville church in October 1823; the marriage was registered in Terrebonne Parish also.  They were living at Bayou Cannes, Terrebonne Parish, by 1851.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron, Boudreaux, Gautreaux, Levron, and Porche or Poché families.  Their sons and grandsons, unlike their daughters, favored non-Acadian wives. 

Oldest son Joseph Michel, by second wife Carmelite Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1825, married Marcelline Delphine, called Delphine, daughter of François Michel Bouquet and his Acadian wife Marie Anne Henry, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in June 1848, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church in June 1849.  Their son Edmond Uter was born at Bayou Cannes, Terrebonne Parish, in November 1849; Adam Thalma in April 1852; and Frank in December 1854.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Edmond married Émelie or Émilia, daughter of Jean Marie LeBoeuf and his Acadian wife Joséphine Babin, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in August 1867.

Pierre Michel's second son Césaire Odile, by second wife Carmelite Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1830, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.

Pierre Michel's third son Marcel Gervais, by second wife Carmelite Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1836, married Ada, daughter of Philippe Darce and Marie Emelina Dupré of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church in June 1856.  Their son William Wiley was born in Terrebonne Parish in April 1857, and Clovis Ulysse near Montegut in November 1868.

Pierre Michel's fourth son Marcellin Théodule, by second wife Carmelite Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1839, married Edmire or Elmire, daughter of Urbain Picou and his Acadian wife Marguerite Babin, at the Montegut church, Terrebonne Parish, in October 1866.  Marcellin died in Terrebonne Parish in November 1870.  The Houma priest who recorded his burial said that Marcellin died "at age 35 yrs.," but he was 31.  Did he father any sons? 

Pierre Michel's fifth son Émile Auguste, by second wife Carmelite Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1842, married Cécilia Antonita, Antoniata, or Autin, daughter of Fursi Porché and his Acadian wife Justine Aucoin, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in May 1865.  Their son Pierre Furri was born in Terrebonne Parish in August 1869. 

Pierre Michel's sixth and youngest son Joseph Artur, by second wife Carmelite Lirette, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1845, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.   

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Thirty-one more Daigres--six families, one led by a widow, another by a widower; an orphan; and a wife; one of the largest single Acadian family groups to reach the colony--came to Louisiana from France aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in late August 1785.  They followed their fellow passengers to Manchac in the Baton Rouge District and created another center of Daigre family settlement.  Some of their descendants moved out to the western prairies during the early antebellum period and founded a third center of family settlement there: 

Olivier IV (1732-1787) à Olivier, fils à Olivier Daigre

Olivier IV, second son of Olivier III and Françoise Granger, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in  September 1732, married Marie, daughter of Pierre Landry and Marie-Josèphe LeBlanc, at Rivière-aux-Canards in August 1755, on the eve of their deportation to Virginia that fall.  Virginia officials sent them on to Falmouth, England, in the spring of 1756.  Marie died soon after their arrival, a victim, perhaps, of smallpox.  Olivier IV remarried to Marie-Blanche, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles LeBlanc and Élisabeth Thibodeau of Rivière-aux-Canards, at Falmouth in November 1758.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1761 and 1782, Marie-Blanche gave Olivier IV nine children, six sons and three daughters.  Other records give them another daughter.  Olivier IV, his wife, and son were repatriated to Morlaix, France, in the spring of 1763.  In November 1765, they followed his family to Belle-Île-en-Mer, where they settled at Chubiguer near Le Palais.  Their son Michel, born probably at Morlaix in c1764, died on the island, age 30 months, in May 1766.  Marie-Blanche gave him many more children on the island.  In 1776, Olivier IV bought his younger brother Jean-Charles's land concession at Le Palais.  In the early 1780s, Olivier sold his concessions to older brother Honoré and took his family to Paimboeuf, the port for Nantes, where his youngest son was baptized in November 1783, age unrecorded.  A Spanish official counted Olivier and 10 children, six sons and four daughters, at Paimboeur in September 1784; Olivier was a widower by then.  He did not remarry.  In 1785, he and eight of his children, five sons and three daughters, emigrated to Louisiana.  (Son Jean-Pierre-Toussaint, who had been baptized at Paimboeuf two years earlier, did not sail with them, so he likely had died soon after his baptism.)  From New Orleans, Olivier and his children followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac in the Baton Rouge District.  Olivier died at Manchac in August 1787, age 55.  His daughters married into the Breaux, Aucoin, Landry, and Aid families at Baton Rouge and San Gabriel on the river.  His five sons married into the Doiron, Landry, Trahan, and Hébert families, including two Landry sisters, at Manchac, Baton Rouge, and San Gabriel.  Youngest surviving son Honoré le jeune died in Iberville Parish in December 1752, among the last of the Acadian exiles in Louisiana to join his ancestors.

Oldest son Victor, by second wife Marie-Blanche LeBlanc, born probably at Falmouth, England, in December 1761, was repatriated with his family to Morlaix, France, in May 1763 and followed them to Belle-Île-en-Mer, where they were counted in 1765.  He became a carpenter when he came of age, followed his widowed father and siblings to Louisiana and settled at Fort Bute, Manchac, south of Baton Rouge, where he married Marguerite-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Doiron and Anne Thibodeau, in May 1786.  Marguerite-Josèphe also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont.  Victor died probably at Manchac in December 1788, age 27.  His two sons created their own families in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.

Older son Joseph, born at Manchac in May 1787, married Marie, daughter of Andrés Lopes de Acuna and his Acadian wife Catherine Broussard, probably at Manchac.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Jean Thomas was born at Manchac in December 1810, and Pierre Joseph Thomas December 1812.  Their daughters married into the Breaux and Tullier families. 

Victor's younger son Jean-Béloni, called Béloni, born at Manchac in October 1788, married cousin Anne Marie or Marie Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Trahan and Anne Geneviève Daigle, probably at Manchac.  Their son Pierre Aristide was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in December 1829, and Jean Deossilys in June 1832.  Their daughters married into the Aillet, Crochet, Doiron, Hébert, Labauve, LeBlanc, and Tullier families.  Béloni remarried to Modeste Prospere and settled near Baton Rouge by the early 1840s.  Their son Jean Ulysse was born in January 1845.  Their daughter married into the Francis family.  Béloni died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1853.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Béloni died at "age 58 yrs.," but he was 65. 

Olivier IV's second son François, by second wife Marie-Blanche LeBlanc, born at Le Palais, Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, in December 1765, also became a carpenter when he came of age, followed his widowed father and siblings to Louisiana, and settled with them at Manchac, where he married Servanne-Laurence, also called Honorienne and Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians René Landry and Marguerite Babin, in June 1793.  Servanne, sister of François's brother Simon-François's wife, had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships.  François died near Baton Rouge in January 1839, age 73.  Only two of his five sons survived childhood and married, and only one of them fathered sons of his own. 

Oldest son Olivier-François, born at Manchac in October 1793, married cousin Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Olivier Daigre and Marie Richard, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1816.  One wonders if he was the Olivier Daigre "from the highlands" who died near Baton Rouge, age unrecorded, in July 1843.  If so, he would have been age 49 at the time of his death.  Carmelite, called "Mrs. Olivier Daigre," died near Baton Rouge in September 1855, age 59.  Did she and Olivier François have any children? 

François's second son Jean-Baptiste, born at Manchac in January 1795, died at age 6 months the following July.  

François's third son Joseph, born at Manchac in November 1796, died probably at Manchac in October 1809, age 13.  

François's fourth son Laurent or Laurence, born at Manchac in May 1798, married Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Trahan and Marguerite Doiron, at the Baton Rouge church in April 1821.  Their son Laurence Turiaf was born in July 1826 but died at age 11 in August 1837; Alphonse Forester, called Forester, was born in January 1829; Ernest Nicolas in December 1833; and Octave in May 1839.  Laurent died by October 1850, when he was listed as deceased in a daughter's marriage record.  His daughters married into the Cointment, Estevan, Hébert, Henry, and Testard families.  One of his three surviving sons married by 1870.

Second son Forester married Marie Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadian Janvier Allain and his Creole wife Marie Élise Bush, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in October 1850.  Their son Alphonse Désiré was born near St. Gabriel in May 1852.  Forester died near St. Gabriel in January 1868.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Florestan, as he called him, died at "age 37 years"; Forester would have been age 39. 

François's fifth and youngest son Angèl died at Manchac 8 days after his birth in May 1803.  

Olivier IV's third son Simon-François, by second wife Marie-Blanche LeBlanc, born at Le Palais, Belle-Île-en-Mer, in December 1767, became a wet cooper when he came of age, followed his widowed father and siblings to Louisiana, and settled Manchac, where he married Anne-Marie-Jeanne, called Marie, another daughter of René Landry and Marguerite Babin, in November 1794; Anne-Marie was sister of Simon's older brother Francois's wife Servanne.  Like her sister Servanne, Anne-Marie had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  She and Simon-François settled at Manchac, where Simon died probably in October 1795, age 28.  His son settled in Iberville Parish, married twice, and had sons by his second wife.  

Only son Simon-Baptiste, born at Manchac in October 1794, married cousin Constance, daughter of Isidore Tullier and his Acadian wife Marie Daigre, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1822.  Simon, living in East Baton Rouge Parish, remarried to Marie Élisabeth, called Élisabeth, daughter of Michel Gareuil and Hélène Lopez and widow of Pierre Aucoin, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1833.  Their son Félix was born near St. Gabriel in October 1833, and Ernest in October 1838.  Their daughter married into the Gomes family.  One of Simon-Baptiste's sons married by 1870. 

Older son Félix, by second wife Élisabeth Gareuil, married Théotiste or Théodice, daughter of Rosémond Capdevielle and Arthémise Hernandez, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1864.  Their son Joseph Ernest was born near St. Gabriel in December 1864, and Jean Baptiste Nepler in December 1866. 

Olivier IV's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, by second wife Marie-Blanche LeBlanc, born at Le Palais, Belle-Île-en-Mer, in February 1770, came to Louisiana with his widowed father and siblings, and followed them to Manchac, where he married Marie-Julie, called Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Trahan and Anne Granger, in June 1783.  Julie also was a native of Belle-Île-en-Mer and also had come to Louisiana on Le Beaumont.  Their daughters married into the Arbour, Souchon dit Aubin, Ledoux, and Theriot families.  All three of Jean-Baptiste's sons created families of their own and settled in West Baton Rouge and Iberville parishes, but one of the lines may have died out early. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste-Barbier, -Beauvier, -Beauviere, -Beauville, -Bouvier, or -Bouviere, born at Manchac in January 1795, married Marie Marthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac Landry and Anne Aucoin, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1817.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their son Jean Baptiste, fils was born in October 1826.  Bouvier died probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1830, age 35.  A daughter was born posthumously in May 1831.  His daughters married into the Lejeune, Lemoine, Richard, Thibodeaux, and Trahan families.  Did his son ever marry?  If not, this line of the family, except for its blood, did not endure. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Joseph Léger or Lezin, baptized at Baton Rouge, age 1 1/2 years, in August 1801, married cousin Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Paul Trahan and Marie Josèphe Lejeune, at the Baton Rouge church in April 1826.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their daughter married a Lejeune cousin.  Did Joseph Léger father any sons? 

Jean-Baptiste's third and youngest son Jean Zenon, called Zenon, born probably at Manchac in September 1805, married cousin Eloise or Heloise, daughter of Joseph Martinez and Marguerite Lopez, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1827; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Saturnin or Saturin Zenon, perhaps also called Zenon D., was born near Baton Rouge in November 1827; Jean Sosthène, called Sosthène, in November 1829; Joseph Alfred, called Alfred, in November 1830; François Aristides, called Aristides, in January 1833; and Simon Diogène, called Diogène, in February 1836.  Zenon died "suddenly" near Baton Rouge in January 1842.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Zemand, as he called him, died at "age 35 yrs.," but he was 36.  His daughters married into the Heude and Persac families.  His sons settled in Iberville Parish, some near Plaquemine on the west side of the river, others near St. Gabriel east of the river, and also near Baton Rouge. 

Oldest son Saturin Zenon married Marie Emma, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Blanchard and Delphine LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1853, and may have remarried to Elise, perhaps a daughter of W. F. C. Duplessis and Célestine Vives, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1859.  Their son Joseph was born near Baton Rouge in August 1866, and Jean Alphonse near St. Gabriel in August 1870.

Zenon's second son Sosthène married Caecilia or Cécile, another daughter of W. F. C. Duplessis and Célestine Vives, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1854.  Their son Joseph Jean was born near Baton Rouge in February 1855, and William Charles Barromee in October 1856.  Sosthène remarried to cousin Odilia, daughter of Éloi Martinez and Victoire Heude, at the Baton Rouge church in June 1869.

Zenon's third son Alfred married Céleste Mary or Marie, daughter of Jean Baptiste, called J. B., Rils and his Acadian wife Emelite Dupuy, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in October 1857.  Their son Jean Alfred was born near Baton Rouge in August 1858, and Joseph Aristide near Plaquemine in February 1862.

Zenon's fourth son Aristides married Mary Mathilda, another daughter of Jean Baptiste Rils and Emelite Dupuy, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in October 1856.  Aristides died near Baton Rouge in January 1858, age 25.  Did he father any sons? 

Zenon's fifth and youngest son Diogène married Marie, perhaps yet another daughter of W. F. C. Duplessis and Célestine Vives, in the late 1850s.  Their son Charles Auguste was born near St. Gabriel in May 1860.

Olivier IV's fifth and youngest son Honoré, by second wife Marie-Blanche LeBlanc, born at Le Palais, Belle-Île-en-Mer, in August 1781, came to Louisiana with his widowed father and siblings and settled at Manchac, where he married Adélaïde, also called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Hébert and Marguerite Breaux, in January 1802.  Honoré died near St. Gabriel in December 1852, age 71.  His daughters married into the Capdevielle, Comeaux, Landry, and Martinez families.   Three of his five sons created families of their own and settled in Iberville Parish, one of them west of the river near Plaquemine. 

Oldest son Joseph-Hélebert, born at Manchac in January 1803, may have died young. 

Honoré's second son Joseph Ursin, called Ursin, born at Manchac in September 1806, married Marie Adeline, called Adeline, daughter of Edmond Capdeville and his Acadian wife Marie Madeleine Brasset, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1832; Ursin's sister Marie Domitille married Adeline's brother M. Lasain.  Ursin and Adeline's son Joseph Adrien was born near St. Gabriel in March 1837, Honoré Roman in March 1839, and Jean Baptiste Émile in May 1844.  Their daughter married into the Simmons family. 

Honoré's third son Julien or Joseph Édouard, called Édouard, born at Manchac in June 1812, married Marie Annette, Fanette, Finette, or Ginette, also called Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jérôme LeBlanc and Clémence Comeaux, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1839.  Their son Omer Honoré was born near St. Gabriel in January 1843, Joseph Octave in December 1847, and Simon Honoré in November 1849 but died at age 1 in December 1850.  They also had a son named Joseph Omer, called Omer, who may have been Omer Honoré. Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Two of Édouard's sons married by 1870.

Second son Joseph Octave married Lidoria, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Renard dit Enos Rivet and Lidoria Comeaux, at the St. Gabriel church in November 1866.

Édouard's third son Joseph Omer married Sidonia, daughter of Paul Napoléon Danos and his Acadian wife Marie Eugènie Comeaux of Iberville, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in February 1867.  They remained near Plaquemine. 

Honoré's fourth son Pierre Honoré, born at Manchac in December 1814, may have been the Pierre Daigre who died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1855.  The priest who recorded the burial said that Pierre died at "age 43 years," but this Pierre would have been only a month shy of age 41.  Did Pierre Honoré ever marry?  The recording priest did not give Pierre Daigre's parents' names, nor did he mention a wife. 

Honoré's fifth and youngest son Paul Olivier, called Olivier, born at Manchac in January 1826, married Marie Véronique, called Véronique, daughter of Alexandre Hotard and Euphémie Lorio, at the St. Gabriel church in June 1849.  Their son Joseph Delma was born near Plaquemine in October 1854; and Paul Olivier, fils in August 1859.  Olivier remarried to Mary Delia, daughter of Thomas Brown and his Acadian wife Constance Landry, at the St. Gabriel church in October 1869. 

Simon-Pierre (1735-1792) à Olivier, fils à Olivier Daigre

Simon-Pierre, third son of Olivier III and Françoise Granger and brother of Olivier IV, born at Rivière-aux-Canards in August 1735, followed his family to Virginia in 1755 and to Falmouth, England, in the spring of 1756.  He married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Thériot and Marie Landry, at Falmouth in c1758.  Between 1759 and 1779, Marie-Madeleine gave Simon-Pierre nine children, five daughters and four sons.  The family was repatriated to Morlaix, France, in the spring of 1763, followed his family to Belle-Île-en-Mer in November 1765, and settled at Kervellant near Sauzon.  French officials counted them at Bortemont near Bangor on the island in 1776.  Two years later, Simon-Pierre sold his land to a local sieur named Perron and moved to Paimboeuf, where Simon-Pierre worked as an inkeeper and a ship's carpenter and where two of his sons died in 1779 and 1783, one an infant, the other age 13 1/2.  Wife Marie-Madeleine died at Paimboeuf in January 1784, age 45.  A Spanish official counted Simon-Pierre and his remaining children, three sons and four daughters, at the port in September 1784.  At age 49, Simon-Pierre remarried to Anne, 50-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Michel and Marguerite Forest of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, and widow of Joseph-Ange Dubois, Félix Landry, and Jean Landry, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay near Nantes in February 1785.  She gave Simon-Pierre no more children.  Later that year, Simon-Pierre, Anne, and his seven children followed his older brother Olivier to Louisiana and to Manchac south of Baton Rouge.  At age 52, Simon-Pierre remarried again--his third marriage--to Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Thériot and Françoise Landry and widow of Alexandre Aucoin, at Manchac in January 1788.  She gave him no more children.  He died at Manchac in October 1792, age 57.  Three of his four daughters, all by first wife Marie-Madeleine, married into the Lemire dit Mire, Provenché, and Trahan families, including two Trahan brothers, at Manchac and Baton Rouge.  His three sons, also by first wife Marie-Madeleine, settled at Baton Rouge and Cabahannocer on the river and out on the prairies, but the western line did not endure.

Oldest son Édouard, born at Morlaix, France, in January 1764, came to Louisiana with his father, stepmother, and siblings and followed them to Manchac, where he married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Henry and Marguerite-Josèphe Trahan, in October 1786.  Marie-Josèphe had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships from France.  They were counted at Baton Rouge in 1792.  In the baptismal record of daughter Marie, born in October 1793 but not baptized until November 1795, Édouard and his wife are described as "residents of this parish," so they must have lived at New Orleans in the mid-1790s before returning to Manchac.  They may also have lived for a time at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Édouard died probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in June 1823, age 59.  His daughters married into the Allain, Babin, Hébert, and Martin families.  Two of his three sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Édouard, fils, born at Manchac in August 1787, married Agathe, daughter of Michel Betancourt and his Acadian wife Victoire Lavergne, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1816.  Their son Jean Treville, called Treville, was born probably at Manchac in March 1819.  Their daughters married into the Labauve family.  Their son also created a family of his own. 

Only son Treville married Marie or Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Evan D. Yates and Frances Roach, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1851.  Treville Daigle died near Baton Rouge in February 1867.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Treville's parents' names, mention a wife, or give his age at the time of his death.  This Treville would have been age 47.

Édouard, père's second son Zéphirin, born at Manchac in April 1789, married Marguerite, another daughter of Michel Betancourt and Victoire Lavergne, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1810.  Their son Zéphirin, fils was born posthumously probably at Manchac in May 1825.  Zéphirin, père died probably at Manchac in November 1824, age 35.  His daughters married into the Deslors, Dupuy, Hébert, and Landry families.  His son also created his own family.

Only son Zéphirin, fils, at age 41, married Azema, daughter of Édouard Bossier and Joséphine Hotard, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in November 1866.

Édouard, père's third and youngest son Florentin, born at Manchac in June 1791, probably died young.

Simon-Pierre's second son Simon-Pierre, fils, born at Sauzon, Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, in June 1766, came to Louisiana with his father, stepmother, and siblings to Louisiana and followed them to Manchac, but did not settle there.  In the 1790s, he crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Trahan and Anne-Euphrosine Vincent and widow of Jacques Fostin, at Attakapas in February 1798.  A Simon Daigle, "instituteur [a teacher] at Benjamin Broussard's, inhabitant on the Lake at Baigneux," died at Agricole Landry's home on the Vermilion River in January 1816.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Simon's parents' names, his age at the time of his death, or mention a wife.  One wonders if this was Simon Pierre Daigle, fils. If it was, he would have died at age 50.  He and his wife, who died in the late 1820s, seem to have had no children, so this line of the family did not endure.  

Simon-Pierre, père's third and youngest son Joseph-Michel, born at Bangor, Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, in April 1776, came to Louisiana with his father, stepmother, and siblings and followed them to Manchac, where he married Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Marguerite LeBlanc, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, farther downriver on the Acadian Coast, in November 1800.  Madeleine was a native of Louisiana.  They settled at Ascension on the Acadian Coast just above Cabahannocer and lived for a time at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Joseph died in Ascension Parish in August 1833, age 57.  His daughters married into the Allemand, LeBlanc, Melançon, and Savoie families.  One of them settled near Raceland in Lafourche Parish.  Only half of Joseph-Michel's four sons seem to have married, and the one who may have had sons of his own settled on Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Leufroi, born at Ascension in September 1801, married cousin Emeranthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Paul Melançon and Osite Barbe LeBlanc, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in May 1821; they had to secure dispensation for fourth degree of relationship in order to marry.  Leufroi died in Ascension Parish in September 1832, age 31.  Did he father any children?

Joseph-Michel's second son Lucien, born at Ascension in March 1803, may have died young. 

Joseph Michel's third son Duval, born in Assumption Parish in October 1811, died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in August 1843.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Duval, a native of "one of the parishes along Bayou Lafourche," died at "age 30 yrs."  One wonders if Duval ever married. 

Joseph Michel's fourth and youngest son Marcel, born in January 1815, place unrecorded, and baptized at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in October 1817, may have been the Marcellus or Marcelle Daigle, also called Degro and Degre, who married Marie or Maria Hernandez and settled near Plattenville, Assumption Parish, by the late 1840s.  They settled farther down Bayou Lafourche.  Their son Joseph was born near Lockport, Lafourche Parish, in November 1853; Nazaire Ozémé near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in July 1855; and Prudent Foedora near Lockport in May 1858.  

Jean-Baptiste, fils (c1740-1790s) à Olivier, fils à Olivier Daigre

Jean-Baptiste, fils, third son of Jean-Baptiste Daigre and Marguerite Thériot and first cousin of Olivier IV and Simon-Pierre, born probably at Rivière-aux-Canards in c1740, evidently followed his family to Virginia in 1755, to England in the spring of 1756, and to Morlaix, France, in 1763.  He may have been the Jean-Baptiste Daigle, ploughman, who, at age 43, married Marie-Claudine, daughter of French locals Guillaume Valet and Ursule-Perrine Catot of Quimperlé, France, probably at Nantes, France, in c1783.  Marie-Claudine gave Jean-Baptiste a son in St.-Jacques Parish, Nantes, in April 1784.  Jean-Baptiste and Marie-Claudine emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  However, their year-old son Jean-René died at sea.  The now childless couple followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Baton Rouge, where they had no more children.  Jean-Baptiste died at Baton Rouge by March 1795, in his mid-50s, when his wife remarried there.  His line of the family died with him. 

François-Marie (c1740-1780s) à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

François-Marie, fourth son of Abraham Daigre and Anne-Marie Boudrot, born probably at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1740, followed his family to Île St.-Jean and was counted with them at Havre-de-la-Fortune in August 1752.  The British deported him to Cherbourg in late 1758.  In January 1761, he married Jeanne, daughter of French locals Thomas Holley and Scholastique Le Gentilhomme, at Très-Ste.-Trinité in the city.  Between 1763 and 1775, at Cherbourg and Le Havre, Jeanne gave François-Marie at least five children, two sons and three daughters.  His oldest son married in c1782.  By September 1784, François-Marie and his family had moved to Nantes in southern Britanny.  François-Marie, Jeanne, and their four unmarried children, a son and three daughters, along with their married son and his family, emigrated to Louisiana the following year and followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac below Baton Rouge.  François-Marie died probably at Manchac by September 1790, in his mid- or late 40s, when he was listed as deceased in a daughter's marriage record.  His daughters married into the Arbour and LeTullier families at Baton Rouge.  His two sons created vigorous lines in the Baton Rouge area. 

Older son François-Alexandre, called Alexandre, born at Cherbourg, France, in February 1763, married Rose-Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Bourg and Rose Doiron, in France in c1782.  He was a plowman in the mother country.  He and his wife and two of their very young children came to Louisiana in 1785 and followed his parents to Manchac.  François-Alexandre and Rose-Adélaïde had more children in Louisiana.  Their daughters married into the Bossel, Hébert, and Henry families.  Three of their six sons created families of their own near Baton Rouge.  One of them lived in St. Martin Parish for a while before rejoining his brothers on the river, and a grandson moved to lower Bayou Teche in the 1840s.  Two other grandsons settled in Ascension Parish. 

Oldest son François-Joseph, called Joseph, born at Chantenay, France, in April 1785, married Brigitte, daughter of Thomas Courtin and Geneviève Bonvillain, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1814.  Their son Treville was born at Manchac in July 1816, and Valentin in November 1817.  Their daughter married into the Munios family.  Joseph remarried to Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Magloire Babin and his second wife Anne Louise Quimine, at the Baton Rouge church in June 1824.  Their son François Augustin was born probably at Manchac in August 1826.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard, Delaune, and Lerey families.  Joseph died by April 1852, when he was listed as deceased in a daughter's marriage record.  Two of his sons settled in Ascension Parish, among the few member of the family to do so. 

Older son Treville, by first wife Brigitte Courtin, married Marthe Delaune and settled near Baton Rouge by the early 1840s.  One wonders if Marthe was a sister of Edward Delaune, who married Treville's sister Arthémise.  If so, Marthe was daughter of Louis Nicolas Delaune of Baton Rouge, a French Creole, not an Acadian.  Treville and Marthe's son Joseph Nicolas was baptized at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, age 2, in October 1848l Treville Lonzo was born near Baton Rouge in January 1849; Augustin Buchannon in October 1856; Charles Forest Lee near Gonzales, Ascension Parish, in December 1864; and Joseph Edgard in August 1870. 

Joseph's younger son François Augustin, by second wife Modeste Babin, married cousin Marie Amelia or Eurelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Landry and Anne Velerente Babin, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1848.  Their son François Leufroi was born in Ascension Parish in June 1853, Simon Ernest near Baton Rouge in August 1856, Isidore Adélard in Ascension Parish probably near Gonzales in April 1858, Amédée René in March 1860, and Silvere Olivier in January 1869.  Their daughter married into the Decoteau family. 

Alexandre's second son André-Joseph or Joseph-André, also called Béloni, born at Cabahannocer in November 1791, married Adélaïde, daughter of Isleño André Martin of Tenerife and his Acadian wife Marie Anne Landry, at the Baton Rouge church in May 1816.  Their son Lucien was born at Manchac in May 1818.  They also had a son named Joseph Maximilien, called Maxille, who moved to Bayou Teche in the 1840s. 

Older son Joseph Maximilien married cousin Marie Aurore, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Henry and Marie Daigle, at the Baton Rouge church in May 1837.  Their son Jean Baptiste, called Baptiste and Ldomenie, was born at either Baton Rouge or New Iberia in the late 1830s or early 1840s.  Joseph Maximilien remarried to Marcellite Ida, daughter of fellow Acadians Anaclet Melançon and Anne Doralise Thibodeaux, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in May 1845.  From New Iberia, they moved up the Teche to the Breaux Bridge area of St. Martin Parish later in the decade.  Their son Joseph, fils was born near New Iberia in March 1846; François Numa near Breaux Bridge in March 1849; and Ovide near St. Martinville in September 1851.  Probably in his late 40s, Maximilien remarried again--his third marriage, to Oliva, daughter of Jean Caillier or Cayet and Marie Picou and widow of Ursin Bijeaux, fils, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1857.  Their son Maximilien, fils was born near Breaux Bridge in November 1859; St. Cyr in January 1860; Henry in July 1861; and Luc in March 1863.  Joseph Maximilien's oldest son married by 1870.  Most of the Acadian Daigles west of the Atchafalaya Basin descend from Joseph Maximilien and his sons. 

Oldest son Jean Baptiste, by first wife Marie Aurore Henry, married Émelie or Amelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Léonard Thibodeaux and Ordalie Cormier, at the Breaux Bridge church in April 1868. 

Alexandre's third son Daniel, born at Manchac in January 1795, may have died young.  

Alexandre's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, called John B., baptized at Baton Rouge, age 2 1/2, in November 1801, crossed the Atchafalaya Basin when he came of age and married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Haché and Geneviève LeBlanc of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1823.  They lived in Lafayette Parish before returning to the river.  Their son Jean Baptiste, fils, was born in Lafayette Parish in October 1825; Treville le jeune was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 27 days, in November 1829; Enoch was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in July 1832 but died at age 1 in September 1833; and Joseph Jean Baptiste was born near Baton Rouge in June 1840.  Their daughter married into the Horsler and Sovano families. 

Second son Treville le jeune may have married Mary Cull or Mary Jane Roddy and settled near Baton Rouge by 1860.  Treville Daigle died near Baton Rouge in February 1867.  The priest who recorded his burial did not give Treville's parents' names, mention a wife, or give his age at the time of his death.

Alexandre's fifth son Thomas, baptized at Baton Rouge, age 5 weeks, in October 1802, may have died young. 

Alexandre's sixth and youngest son, a second Thomas, died at Manchac, age 11 months, in March 1815.  

François-Marie's younger son Louis-Françoise, born at Cherbourg, France, in August 1766, became a calker in France.  He came to Louisiana with his parents and sisters in 1785 and followed them to Manchac, where he married Marie-Rose, called Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Molaison, père and Marie-Blanche Doiron, in July 1790.  Marie-Rose also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their daughters married into the Demonceaux, Dupuis, Esnard, Hébert, Landry, Rappelet, and Thomas families.  Two of their sons created families of their own and settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their third son's line was especially robust.

Oldest son Jacques-Louis, born at Manchac in October 1797, died there at age 11 months in October 179[8].  

Louis-Françoise's second son Louis-Isidore, called Isidore, born at Manchac in September 1802, married cousin Delphine Céleste or Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jacques Molaison, fils and his Creole wife Céleste Bernard du Montier, at the Baton Rouge church  in February 1831; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Isidore, fils was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in February 1846.  Their daughters married into the Aillet, Blanchard, Grass, and Woodruff families.

Louis Françoise's third son François Joachim, called Joachim, born at Manchac in January 1804, married Dortille, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcel Dupuis and Marie Josèphe LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in May 1823.  Their son Théodore was born probably at Manchac in February 1830; Joachim, fils in January 1833; Amédée Ferdinand in October 1834; Louis, a twin, in November 1836; Prudent in September 1839; and Joseph Isidore near Brusly in February 1844.  Joachim died near Brusly in April 1855, age 51.  His daughters married into the Blanchard, Hébert, and Landry families.  Four of his six sons served honorably in the same company, which saw much action during the War of 1861-65, but two of them did not survive the war.  One, perhaps two, of them married by 1870. 

A "Mrs. Théodore Daigle" died "at Natchez" in June 1855; she was only "ca. 19 years" old.  The Brusly priest who recorded her burial did not give her name, so one wonders if her husband was Théodore, oldest son of Joachim, and if Théodore and his wife settled at Natchez, Mississippi, which was a good distance from West Baton Rouge Parish.  Perhaps "Natchez" was the name of a community near Brusly. 

During the War of 1861-65, Joachim's second son Joachim, fils served in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Tennessee, Louisiana, Georgia, and Alabama.  In May 1861, at age 28, Joachim enlisted with younger brother Prudent at Camp Moore, Tangipahoa Parish (brothers Louis and Joseph Isidore joined the company later, Louis as an officer).  Joachim's Confederate service did not last long.  He fell sick at New Orleans the month of his enlistment but returned to his unit.  The following winter, he contracted pneumonia at Berwick City on the lower Atchafalaya and was sent to a hospital in New Orleans.  Evidently he did not recuperate.  He was sent home, where he died in 1862, age 29.  He did not marry. 

During the War of 1861-65, Joachim, père's fourth son Louis served in two companies that fought in different theatres of operations.  He enlisted first as a private in Company F of the 1st (Dreux's/Rightor's) Battalion Louisiana Infantry, raised at New Orleans, which fought in Florida and Virginia.  Louis's Confederate service record says he was age 23 when he enlisted in the company at New Orleans in April 1861, but he was 24.  The record also says he was a resident of Brusly Landing, West Baton Rouge Parish, had a dark complexion, dark hair, hazel eyes, and stood five feet, eight inches tall.  He followed his unit to Pensacola and then to Richmond that spring and summer.  He probably fought in the Battle of Big Bethel near Newport News, Virginia, in early July 1861, one of the first battles of the war.  Louis's longest service was in another outfit, however.  After his battalion was incorporated into another unit, he returned to Louisiana.  In August 1862, at Port Hudson, he enlisted in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Tennessee, Louisiana, Georgia, and Alabama.  Also in the company were his younger brothers Prudent and Joseph Isidore; older brother Joachim, fils also had served in the company but had died at home, probably of pneumonia, earlier in the year.  Louis, perhaps because of his combat experience, was elected junior second lieutenant of his company three months after his enlistment.  He remained with his regiment until he was captured at Nashville, Tennessee, in December 1864.  The Federals sent him to the military prison at Louisville, Kentucky, and from there to the notorious prison compound on Johnson's Island, Ohio, where Confederate officers were held.  Louis remained at Johnson's Island until June 1865, when the Federals released him.  He made his way home via Sandusky and Cincinnati, Ohio.  If he married, he did so after 1870. 

During the War of 1861-65, Joachim, père's fifth son Prudent served in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry with older brother Joachim, fils.  Prudent enlisted at Camp Moore in May 1861, age 21.  (Other brothers Louis and Joseph Isidore also served in the company.)  Prudent remained with his company until July 1864, when he was wounded at Ezra Church, Georgia.  He remained in the Confederate hospital at Forsyth, Georgia, probably until the Confederates evacuated the area the following autumn.  Prudent's Confederate service record then falls silent.  Federal forces paroled him as an end-of-the-war prisoner at Baton Rouge in June 1865, so he survived the war.  If he married, he did so after 1870. 

During the War of 1861-65, Joachim, père's sixth and youngest son Joseph Isidore served in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry.  His older brothers Joachim, fils, Louis, and Prudent also served in the company.  Joseph Isidore did not enlist in the company until August 1862, after he turned 18.  He signed up at Baton Rouge only a few weeks after the battle there.  He was present with his company until he went on sick furlough at Calhoun Station, Lownes County, Alabama, in late spring of 1864.  He returned to his unit in August and surrendered with it at Meridian, Mississippi, in May 1865.  None of his brothers were still with the unit when it surrendered at Meridian; Joachim, fils had died, Prudent had been wounded in Georgia and spent months in a hospital there, and Louis had been captured at Nashville and spent the rest of the war in a prisoner-of-war camp on an island in Lake Erie.  Joseph Isidore married Marie Adonia, called Adonia, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Doiron and Rosalie Lejeune, at the Brusly church in June 1867.

Louis, perhaps a younger son of Louis François, married Marie Seguin at the Baton Rouge church in February 1832.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  One of the witnesses to the marriage was Isidore Daigle, perhaps Joseph Isidore Daigre, the groom's brother. 

Paul-Olivier (1767-1833) à Olivier le jeune à Pierre à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

Paul-Olivier, oldest son of Miniac dit Olivier Daigre and his first wife Marie Melanson, born at Locmaria, Belle-Île-en-Mer, in May 1767, followed his father and stepmother to coastal Brittany, but he did not remain there.  By 1785, he was working as a laborer probably at Nantes in southeast Brittany.  Called a "minor" and an orphan on the ship's passenger list, Paul-Olivier emigrated to Louisiana with widower Jean Doiron and his kinsman's unmarried daughter and followed them and their fellow passengers to Manchac south of Baton Rouge.  Paul-Olivier married cousin Marie-Jeanne, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Richard and his second wife Françoise Daigre, probably at Manchac in September 1788.  Marie-Jeanne also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont.  Paul-Olivier died at Baton Rouge in November 1833, age 66.  His daughters married into the Babin, Brown, Daigre, Kleinpeter, and Templet families.  Three of his five sons also created their own families at Manchac, Baton Rouge, and across the river in Pointe Coupee Parish. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Manchac in December 1790, died probably at Manchac in February 1814.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was age 21 when he died, but he was 23.  He did not marry.  

Paul-Olivier's second son Joseph, born at Manchac in September 1798, may have died young. 

Paul-Olivier's third son Gilbert, baptized at Baton Rouge, age 1 1/2, in August 1801, married, in his late 30s, Marie Caroline, called Caroline, daughter of Abrah, probably Abraham, Bird, a major planter in the area, and Marie Bowie, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1838.  Gilbert, père died near Baton Rouge in August 1859, age 59.  His daughter married into the Von Phul family.  His son also seems to have created his own family.

Only son Abraham Lucien Gilbert, perhaps called Gilbert, fils, born near Baton Rouge in October 1841, may have married Louise Galveston.  Their son Georges Frank was born near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in January 1870.

Paul-Olivier's fourth son Paul, fils, born at Manchac in February 1802, may have married Ann Thompson, also called Gomes, at Manchac in the 1820s.  Paul, fils died near Baton Rouge in December 1856.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Paul died at "age ca. 50 years," but he was 54. 

Oldest son Paul Dava, born in c1829 and baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age 11, in April 1840, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.

Paul, fils's second son William, born in c1831, died near St. Gabriel at age 9 in August 1839. 

Paul-Olivier's fifth and youngest son Louis, born at Manchac in November 1804, married Isabelle, daughter of Benjamin Jewell and Sara Prevot, at the Pointe Coupee church, Pointe Coupee Parish, in May 1832.  Louis's son created his own family.

Only son Benjamin M., born in c1836 and baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age 17, in July 1853, married cousin Pauline, daughter of Dennis Daigre and Geneviève Buckner, at the Baton Rouge church in June 1859; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Charles Allain was born near Baton Rouge in January 1868, and David in February 1870.

Joseph dit Joson (1770-1836) à Pierre à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

Joseph dit Joson, a twin, fifth son of Alexandre Daigle and Élisabeth Granger and younger brother of Alexis-Jean-Mathurin of La Bergère, born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in March 1770, came to Louisiana not with his older brother but with his uncle Charles Granger.  He followed his uncle to the Baton Rouge area but did not remain there.  In the late 1780s and early 1790s, he was living with his married sister Isabelle-Luce and her husband René Simoneaux at Lafourche, where his two older brothers also had settled.  In 1795, Joseph was living on the upper bayou with the family of Lucas Landry probably as an engagé.  He married cousin Marie-Marthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Chrysostôme Trahan and Anne-Françoise Granger, at Assumption in October 1800.  She was literally the girl next door.  Joseph died in Assumption Parish in July 1836, age 66, a widower.  His daughter married into the Breaux family.  Three of his five sons created families of their own in Assumption Parish. 

Oldest son Joseph-Clet, born at Assumption in April 1802, married Hortense or Octavie Mélanie, called Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Duhon and Adélïde Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1827, and remarried to Bathilde or Mathilde, daughter of Maurice Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Geneviève Landry, at the Plattenville church in January 1834.  Joseph Clet died in Lafourche Parish in December 1862, age 60  Was his death war-related?  His daughters married into the Dugas, LeBlanc, and Vegas families.  Two of his sons married by 1870. 

Désiré, by second wife Bathilde Simoneaux, married Flavie, also called Claire, daughter of fellow Acadians Cyrille Landry and Marie Marcellite Gravois, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1858.  They settled near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes.  Their son Denas Désiré, called Désiré, was born in October 1859 but died at age 7 months in May 1860; Lubin Evariste was born in March 1863 but died at age 14 month in early 1864; Désiré Anatole was born in July 1866; and Joseph Jules in March 1869.

Ozémé, by second wife Bathilde Simoneaux, married Virginie, daughter of fellow Acadians Narcisse Guidry and Virginie Savoie, at the Paincourtville church in June 1868.

Jean Baptiste Basile, by second wife Bathilde Simoneaux, born in Assumption Parish in March 1836, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Louis, by second wife Bathilde Simoneaux, born in Assumption Parish in August 1837, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Joson's second son Baptiste, born probably at Assumption in c1803, died at age 10 in October 1813.  

Joson's third son Jean Baptiste Léon, born at Assumption in April 1804, may have died young. 

Joson's fourth son Alexandre Simon, born in Assumption Parish in December 1807, married Justine, another daughter of Maurice Simoneaux and Geneviève Landry, at the Plattenville church in January 1835.  Alexandre died near Paincourtville in October 1850, age 42.  His daughters married into the Berthelot and Verret families.  Two of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Alexandre Cyriague, born in Assumption Parish in August 1838, married Carmelite, daughter of Antoine Sanchez and Henriette Sauvain, at the Paincourtville church in September 1862.  They settled near Pierre Part.  Their son Désiré Alexandre was born in February 1865.  An Alexandre Daigle died near Paincourtville in January 1867.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Alexandre died at "age 27 years," but the priest did not give Alexandre's parents' names or mention a wife.  This Alexandre would have been age 28 at the time, so it probably was him. 

Alexandre Simon's second son Aristide Joseph, born near Plattenville in February 1843, married cousin Armentine, daughter of Honoré Simoneaux and Arselie Simoneaux, at the Paincourtville church in February 1867.

Alexandre Simon's third son Eugène or Ulgère Raymond, born near Plattenville in November 1847, died in Assumption Parish, age 5 in December 1852. 

Alexandre Simon's fourth and youngest son Joseph Laurent, born near Paincourtville in February 1850, died in Assumption Parish, age 2 1/2, in December 1852. 

Joson's fifth and youngest son Pierre Clovis, also called Henri, born in Ascension Parish in January 1812, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Simonet Boudreaux and Céleste Babin, at the Plattenville church in January 1834.  Their daughter married into the Bourgeois family.  Two of Pierre Clovis's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Pierre Camille, called Camille, born in Assumption Parish in October 1835, married Adorestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Bourgeois and Léonise Breaux, at the Plattenville church in February 1857; Adorestine's brother Simon, fils married Camille's sister Adelina.  Camille and Adorestine's son Donis Camille was born near Plattenville in July 1866.

Pierre Clovis's second son Simon Oleus, called Oleus, born near Plattenville in November 1844, married Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadians Onésime LeBlanc and Eulalie LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church in November 1869.

Pierre Clovis's third and youngest son Édouard Calix, called Calix, born near Plattenville in October 1842, died in Assumption Parish, age 5 in October 1847. 

Jean-Louis (1774-1811) à Pierre le jeune à Bernard, fils à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

Jean-Louis, son of Jean-Baptiste-Amand Daigle and Marguerite-Ange Dubois, born at Pouthume, Châtellerault, Poitou, France, in October 1774, came to Louisiana with his widowed mother and followed her and the majority of their passengers to Manchac.  His mother remarried twice.  Jean-Marie followed her to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie-Isabelle, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Richard and his French wife Marie-Jeanne Daniel of Roscoff, Brittany, at Assumption in August 1799.  Marie had come to Louisiana on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships.  They may have lived at New Orleans in the early 1800s.  Jean-Louis remarried to Marie Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph François Michel and Geneviève LeBlanc, at Assumption in January 1804.  Marie Josèphe was a native of Louisiana.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Faits, and Gros families.  Jean Louis died in Assumption Parish in November 1811, age 37.  His son from second wife Marie-Josèphe created a family of his own in Assumption Parish. 

Oldest son Louis, by first wife Marie-Isabelle Richard, born in September 1800 and baptized at New Orleans in March 1801, died at Assumption, age 1 1/2, in February 1802.

Jean-Louis's second son Urbain, by second wife Marie Josèphe Michel, born in Assumption Parish in May 1809, married Doralise, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Boudreaux and Marie Duhon, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1832.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin, Bergeron, and Bonnamour families.  One of Ursin's sons married by 1870. 

Older son Pierre Rosémond, called Rosémond, born in Assumption Parish in March 1833, married Zulma, also called Rosema, daughter of Rosémond Fremin and his Acadian wife Aglée Thibodeaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in October 1866.  Their son Abel Augustin was baptized at the Labadieville church, age unrecorded, in August 1867. 

Urbin's younger son Ursin, born near Plattenville in September 1839, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

.

Seven more Daigres--a small family, a bachelor, two wives, and a widow--came to Louisiana from France aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early September 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where two new family lines emerged:

Jean-Baptiste (1733-1780s) à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

Jean-Baptiste, fifth and youngest son of Bernard Daigre, fils and Angélique Richard and younger brother of Eustache of La Bergère, born at Grand-Pré in January 1733, was deported to Virginia in 1755 and to England in the spring of 1756.  He married Marie-Flavie, daughter of Jean dit Lami Boudrot and Agathe Thibodeau, at Southampton in c1758.  Between 1763 and 1781, Marie-Flavie gave Jean-Baptiste eight children, at least two daughters and five sons, in England and France.  The family was repatriated to France in May 1763 aboard L'Ambition and settled at Plouër near St.-Malo.  Four of their children, a daughter, two sons, and an unidentified child, died young.  Jean-Baptiste, Marie-Flavie, and their two surviving children went to Poitou in the early 1770s and retreated with other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to the Breton port of Nantes in March 1776.  Two more of their young sons died at Nantes.  When the family emigrated to Louisiana in 1785, Jean-Baptiste and Marie-Flavie tookwith them only two of their children, a daughter and a son, ages 15 and 11.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Jean-Baptiste died there by January 1788, in his early 50s, when his children were listed without parents in the Valenzuéla census.  His daughter married into the LeBlanc and Landry families.  His son created a vigorous line on the upper bayou.  

Only surviving son Joseph-Marc, called Joson, born at Plouër, France, in January 1773, came to Louisiana with his parents and a sister and followed them to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Georgine-Victoire, called Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Bourg and Anne-Marie Naquin, in January 1794.  Victoire also had come to Louisiana on Le St.-Rémi.  Joseph died in Assumption Parish in January 1829, age 56.  His daughter married into the Simoneaux family.  Most of his eight sons created their own families in Assumption Parish, though one of the lines may have died out early.  

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born at Assumption in August 1795, married cousin Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Dugas and Marie Geneviève Bourg, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1821.  Their son Joseph Trasimond, called Trasimond, was born in Assumption Parish in December 1822; Simonet Sylvain, a twin, in September 1824 but died 16 days after his birth; Simonet Henri, also called Henri Joseph and Henri J., was born in January 1828; and Emerant Lubin in Ascension Parish in March 1830.  Joseph, fils died in Assumption Parish in April 1835, age 39.  His daughter married into the Cedotal family.  His three surviving sons created families of their own in Assumption Parish, and two of them settled near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret. 

Oldest son Trasimond married Rufine, Rufina, or Angeline Marthe, daughter of Antoine Rivero or Rivera and Constance Dominguez, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1847.  Their son Trasimond Martin was born near Paincourtville posthumously in November 1860.  Trasimond died near Paincourtville in August 1860, age 38.  His daughters married into the Landry and St. Germain families.   

Joseph, fils's third son Henri Joseph married cousin Christine, daughter of fellow Acadian Hilaire Bourg and his Creole wife Zepheline Simoneaux, at the Paincourtville church in January 1853.  Their son Joseph Hilaire was born near Paincourtville in February 1854, Luc Clebert in April 1855, Louis Joseph in August 1857, Augustin Léon near Pierre Part in May 1860, and Clenie Pierre in November 1861.  Henri Joseph remarried to Lodoiska, daughter of fellow Acadians Treville Landry and Clarisse Blanchard, at the Pierre Part church, Assumption Parish, in September 1866. 

Joseph, fils's fourth and youngest son Emerant married Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Mazerolle and Élisabeth Gautreaux, at the Paincourtville church in May 1857.  They settled near Pierre Part. 

Joseph-Marc's second son Victor-Maxille, called Maxille, born at Assumption in December 1798, married cousin Jeanne dite Jeanette, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Daigle and his Creole wife Marguerite Simoneaux, at the Plattenville church in October 1821.  Their son Jean Baptiste died in Assumption Parish, age 18 months, in May 1824; Arsène Valère, called Valère, was born in October 1824 but died at age 3 1/2 in July 1828; and Jean Baptiste Gervais, called Gervais, was born in June 1829.  Jeanne died in Assumption Parish in July 1834, age 30.  Their daughter married a Daigle first cousin.  Maxille remarried to Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Aucoin and Marguerite Noël and widow of Simon Landry, at the Plattenville church in November 1834.  One of his sons created his own family on the upper bayou. 

Third and youngest son Gervais, by first wife Jeanette Daigle, married Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin LeBlanc and Arthemise Dugas, at the Paincourtville church in February 1853.  Their son Joseph Oscar was born near Paincourtville in August 1855. 

Joseph-Marc's third son Hubert-Pierre, born at Assumption in November 1801, married cousin Marie, another daughter of Simon Dugas and Marie Geneviève Bourg, at the Plattenville church in January 1827; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Victorin Sosthène was born in Assumption Parish in November 1827; Sylvestre, also called Sylvain, in December 1828; and Joseph E. died at age 1 in October 1834.  Hubert died near Plattenville in October 1853.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Hubert died at "age 50 years," but he was a month shy of 52.  His daughter married into the Blanchard family.  Did any of his sons marry and create families of their own? 

Second son Sylvain died near Plattenville in September 1862.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Sylvain died at "age 36 years," but he was 33.  Did he marry?

Joseph-Marc's fourth son Timothée, also called Mathé, born at Assumption in July 1803, married Marcellite, daughter of Simon Simoneaux and his second wife, Acadian Rosalie Hébert, at the Plattenville church in February 1826.  Their son Léon Dorville, called Dorville, was born in Assumption Parish in February 1827; Lucien Timothée in July 1828; Édouard in October 1829; Paul Gervais, called Gervais, in June 1831 but died at age 8 months in February 1832; and Constant Auguste was born in November 1832.  Timothée died in Assumption Parish in July 1836, a widower.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Timothée was age 30 when he died, but he was 33.  Three of his five sons married, and one of them settled near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret. 

Oldest son Dorville married first cousin Egladie, daughter of fellow Acadians Maxille Daigle and Jeanne dite Jeanette Daigle, his uncle and aunt, at the Paincourtville church in September 1852; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Édouard was born near Plattenville in November 1852, Jean Baptiste Wilfride in May 1855, and Joseph Paul near Paincourtville in March 1870. 

Timothée's second son Lucien married cousin Iréné, daughter of Jean Baptiste Cedotal and his Acadian wife Constance Daigle, at the Paincourtville church in April 1853.  Their son Lucien, fils was born near Paincourtville in March 1854; Anatole in February 1856; Valère Camille in March 1859; and Oleus Aurelien in September 1862.  Lucien died near Paincourtville in March 1870.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Lucien died at "age ca. 38 years," but he was 41. 

Timothée's third son Édouard may have died near Plattenville in March 1859.  The priest who recorded the burial said that Édouard Daigle died at "age 27 years" but did not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  Édouard, son of Timothée, would have been age 30 at the time. 

Timothée's fifth and youngest son Constant married Eglantine, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Charles Gautreaux and his Creole wife Élisabeth Coupelle, at the Pierre Part church, Assumption Parish, in May 1860.  Their son Jean Baptiste Maurice Optime was born near Pierre Part in April 1866, Jean Baptiste Ebrard near Paincourtville in June 1868, and Fortune Saturnin in November 1870. 

Joseph-Marc's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, born in Assumption Parish in January 1808, died there in November 1832, age 25.  He did not marry.  

Joseph-Marc's sixth son Henri Landry, born in Assumption Parish in November 1808, married Emeranthe Eléonore, also called Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Dugas and his Creole wife Constance Simoneaux, at the Plattenville church in November 1831.  Their son Joseph le jeune, also called Joseph S., was born in Assumption Parish in August 1835; Ponati Léonard, called Léonard, near Plattenville in March 1840; Jean Baptiste Honoré in June 1843; Charles Théogène near Paincourtville in November 1845; and Joseph Hilaire died 3 days after his birth in February 1854.  Henri died near Paincourtville in March 1865, age 56.  His daughters married into the Blanchard, Landry, and Simoneaux families.  Two of his sons married by 1870. 

  Oldest son Joseph S. married Delphine, daughter of Firmin Friou and his Acadian wife Marine Landry, at the Paincourtville church in April 1857.  Their son Nazere Léo was born near Paincourtville in July 1858, and Joseph Adam Hébert in September 1862. 

Henri Landry's fourth son Charles Théogène, called C. Théogène by the recording priest, married Noemie M., daughter of fellow Acadians Valéry LeBlanc and Clémence Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in August 1869.

Joseph-Marc's seventh son Lubin, born in Assumption Parish in January 1810, died there, age 10 months, the following November.  

Joseph-Marc's eighth and youngest son Napoléon, also called Hippolyte, born in Assumption Parish in November 1816, married Zéolide, daughter of Pierre Cedotal and his Acadian wife Marie Hébert, at the Paincourtville church in February 1847.  Hippolyte died near Paincourtville in July 1848.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Hippolyte died at "age 33 years," but he was 31.  Their daughter married into the Solard family.  Did Hippolyte father any sons?   

Jean-Baptiste-Alexandre (1765-1805) à Pierre à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

Jean-Baptiste-Alexandre, fourth son of Alexandre Daigle and Élisabeth Granger, younger brother of Alexis-Jean-Mathurin of La Bergère, and older brother of Joson of Le Beaumont, born at Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, in May 1765, came to Louisiana as a young bachelor and followed the majority of his fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and his first wife Anastasie Henry, in June 1786.  Marie also had come to Louisiana aboard Le St.-Rémi.  Jean Baptiste died at Assumption in October 1805, age 40.  His daughters married into the Aucoin, Breaux, Doiron, and Theriot families, and one of them settled on lower Bayou Teche.  All four of his sons created families of their own in Assumption Parish.  A grandson settled down bayou in Terrebonne Parish before returning to Assumption Parish, and two other grandsons moved to the Brashear City, now Morgan City, area on the lower Atchafalaya on the eve of the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, born at Lafourche in February 1789, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Suliac Blanchard and Marie Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1812.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin and Delaune families.  Both of Baptiste's sons created their own families on the bayou.

Older son Jean Baptiste Urbin, born in Assumption Parish in April 1818, married Michelle Léonise, called Léonie, 21-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Lambert III and his second wife, Creole Marie Daunis, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in July 1851.  Their son Jean Baptiste Olissippe was born in Terrebonne Parish in January 1853; Jean Baptiste Pierre Leufroi near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in September 1855; Joseph Alfred in February 1857; and Mathurin died a day after his birth in February 1859.

Baptiste's younger son Joseph Arvillien, Aurelien, or Eusilien, born in Assumption Parish in October 1819, married Théotiste Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians François Trahan and Josette Aimée Thibodeaux, at the Plattenville church in October 1849.  Their son Clovis was born near Plattenville in July 1850, Joseph Aristide in July 1852, August Léopolde in March 1854, and Léo Cletus near Labadieville in December 1856.

Jean-Baptiste-Alexandre's second son Jean-Pierre, baptized at Assumption, age unrecorded, in August 1796, married Marie Modeste, also called Mathe, daughter of fellow Acadians Eusèbe Arceneaux and Rosalie Bergeron, at the Plattenville church in May 1816.  Their daughters married into the Albert, Aucoin, Boudreaux, Bourg, Caps, and Simoneaux families.  Three of them settled in St. Mary Parish on lower Bayou Teche, and two of them married the same man.  Their son also created his own family on the Lafourche and the lower Teche. 

Only son Pierre Eusèbe, born in Assumption Parish in February 1820, married Rosalie, daughter of Auguste Verret and his Acadian wife Marie Rose Bourg, at the Plattenville church in September 1841, and remarried to cousin Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Narcisse Trahan and Marcellite Daigle, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1845.  Their son Joseph Trasimond, called Trasimond, was born near Paincourtville in June 1846; Joseph Désiré in September 1848; and Joseph Ozémé in October 1852.  Pierre took his family to the Brashear, now Morgan, City, area on the lower Atchafalaya during the late 1850s.  They were still there a decade later, though they may have returned to Assumption Parish briefly during the mid-1860s.  One of Pierre's sons married by 1870 and settled on the lower Atchafalaya.

Oldest son Trasimond, from second wife Euphémie Trahan, married cousin Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Daigle and his Creole wife Virginie Kerne, at the Plattenville church in February 1867; they had to secure a dispensation for third or fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They did not remain on the upper Lafourche.  Their son Joseph Alcée was born near Brashear City in February 1868.

Jean-Baptiste-Alexandre's third son Joseph, born at Assumption in September 1798, married Éloise or Louise Ursule Élisabeth, called Louise or Louise Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Giroir and Isabelle Landry, at the Plattenville church in March 1821.  Only one of their four sons created his own family on the upper Lafourche and the lower Teche. 

Oldest son Joseph Théodule, called Théodule, born in Assumption Parish in December 1821, died there at age 4 1/2 in July 1826.

Joseph's second son Alexandre le jeune, born in Assumption Parish in February 1823, married cousin Phelisene or Félicie Anazade, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Doiron and Marianne Daigle, at the Plattenville church in June 1844.  The marriage was registered in St. Mary Parish also, so they may have lived for a while on lower Bayou Teche.  If so, they did not remain there.  Their son Edmond was born near Plattenville in November 1848.  A daughter was born near Brashear City, now Morgan City, St. Mary Parish, in January 1864, so they must have returned to that area during the 1850s or early 1860s. 

Joseph's third son Pierre Sylvain, called Sylvanie, born in Assumption Parish in November 1824, died there at age 2 1/2 in April 1827.

Joseph's fourth and youngest son Joseph Victor, called Victor, born in Assumption Parish in November 1828, died there at age 11 months in October 1829. 

Jean-Baptiste-Alexandre's fourth and youngest son Alexandre, a twin, born at Assumption in September 1803, married Marie Elise or Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Hébert and Élisabeth Mazerolle, at the Plattenville church in February 1824.  Alexandre died near Plattenville in April 1841.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Alexandre died at "age ca. 39 yrs.," but he was 37.  His daughters married into the Aucoin, Campeaux, and Guillot families.  All three of his sons created families of their own, and one of them settled near Pierre Part north of Lake Verret. 

Oldest son Louis, born in Assumption Parish, married first cousin Émelie, daughter of Auguste Campeaux and his Acadian wife Émelie Hébert, at the Plattenville church in July 1854; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry; Louis's sister Antoinette married Émelie's brother Merville.  Louis and Émelie's son Camille Paul was born near Plattenville in April 1855, and Joseph Léonard in November 1870. 

Alexandre's second son Edmond Augustin, called Augustin, born in Assumption Parish in July 1837, married cousin Élisabeth, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Hébert and Françoise Landry, at the Paincourtville church in January 1858.  They settled near Pierre Part.  Their son Joseph Eusilien was born in December 1858; Joseph Justilien, called Justilien, in January 1861 but died at age 3 in May 1864; Joseph Élie was born in May 1863; and Joseph Oreste was baptized at the Pierre Part church, age unrecorded, in March 1865. 

Alexandre's third and youngest son Adrien Alexandre, born near Plattenville in January 1841, married Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Moïse and Eurasie Comeaux, at the Plattenville church in January 1866.  Their son Étienne Wichless was born near Plattenville in August 1866.

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Three more Daigres--another small family--came to Louisiana from France aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early November 1785.  They joined their many kinsmen on upper Bayou Lafourche:

Jean-Baptiste (1759-1829) à Abraham à Bernard à Olivier Daigre

Jean-Baptiste, oldest son of Jean Daigle and Marie-Judith Lacroix dit Durel, born at Cherbourg, France, in December 1759, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre LeBlanc and Marie Landry, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, near Nantes, in March 1783.  Marie was a native of Bristol, England, and had come to France with her family in 1763.  She and Jean-Baptiste had two daughters at Chantenay, and they emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  (His name does not appear on L'Amitié's embarkation roll, but he does appear on its debarkation roll, which lists the implements he received from the Spanish after his arrival).  His daughters survived the crossing, but Marie may not have, or she may have died soon after reaching the colony.  Jean-Baptiste took his daughters to upper Bayou Lafourche, where he remarried to Marguerite, daughter of François Simoneau of Lorraine, France, and his Acadian wife Marie-Osite-Anne Corporon of Annapolis Royal, in April 1786.  Marguerite had come to Louisiana from Maryland with her parents in 1766, when she was very young.  She and Jean-Baptiste remained on the upper bayou, where they were counted with his daughters by Marie and a daughter by Marguerite in January 1788.  His daughters by Marie died young, but his daughters by Marguerite married into the Bourque, Cedotal, Daigle, Dupuis, and Trahan families.  Jean Baptiste died in Assumption Parish in March 1829.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Jean, "husband of Marguerite Samoneau," died at "age 76 yrs.", but he was 70.  Three of his five sons, all from second wife Marguerite, created families of their own.  The oldest son moved to lower Bayou Teche in the 1810s, creating a western branch of the family, but the other married sons remained on the Lafourche.  

Oldest son Louis-Maurice, by second wife Marguerite Simoneaux, born at Lafourche in April 1790, married Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Breaux and Marie Madeleine Bourg of St. James Parish, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in November 1812.  In the late 1810s, they moved from the Lafourche to lower Bayou Teche, where they helped establish a western branch of the family in St. Mary Parish.  Louis's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in January 1861.  He would have been age 71 that year.  His daughters married into the Broussard and Richard families.  Only one of his three sons' lines seems to have endured. 

Oldest son Louis, fils, born in St. Mary Parish in February 1821, may have died young, unless it was his succession record that was filed at the Franklin courthouse in January 1861.  He would have been age 40 year.  If this was him, did he ever marry? 

Louis, père's second son Jean Onésime, called Onésime, born in St. Mary Parish in September 1823, married Pamela, daughter of fellow Acadian Nicolas Broussard and his Creole wife Marie Élisabeth Bertrand, at the Pattersonville church, St. Mary Parish, in August 1853.  Onésime's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse in November 1853, a few months after his marriage.  He would have been age 30 that year.  Did he father any children? 

Louis, père's third and youngest son Marcellin, born in St. Mary Parish in December 1828, married Adelina Palaskki or Polowski, perhaps a Polish immigrant, at the Pattersonville church in July 1852.  Their son Cleopha was born near Pattersonville in August 1853. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Joseph, by second wife Marguerite Simoneaux, born at Lafourche in March 1792, died at Assumption, age 1 1/2, in November 1793.  

Jean-Baptiste's third son Joseph-Paul-Hippolyte, called Hippolyte, by second wife Marguerite Simoneaux, born at Assumption in September 1801, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Dupuis and Marie Osite Dugas, at the Plattenville church in November 1820.   Hippolyte died in Assumption Parish in November 1837, age 36.  His daughter married into the LeBoeuf family.  Only one of his sons created a family of his own. 

Oldest son Louis Basile, born in Assumption Parish in June 1825, married Doralise, daughter of Norbert LeBoeuf and Ursule Rodriguez, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1846; Louis's sister Léonore was Doralise's brother Louis's wife.  Louis and Doralise's son Joseph Lusignon was born near Paincourtville in December 1849, and Norbert Hippolyte near Plattenville in March 1852. 

Hippolyte's second son Jean Baptiste, born in Assumption Parish in February 1828, died there at age 10 months the following December. 

Hippolyte's third and youngest son Eugène Edmond, born in Assumption Parish in December 1829, also may have died young. 

Jean-Baptiste's fourth son Eugène, by second wife Marguerite Simoneaux, born probably in Assumption Parish in the 1800s, married Rose or Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Templet and Mélanie Hébert, at the Plattenville church in May 1825.  Their daughters married into the Breaux and Landry families.  Eugène remarried to fellow Acadian Carmelite Blanchard probably in Assumption Parish in the early 1830s.  Both of Eugène's sons created their own families on the upper bayou. 

Older son Jean Baptiste Dorville, called Dorville, by first wife Rosalie Templet, born in Assumption Parish in June 1829, married Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Émile LeBlanc and Arthémise Gravois, at the Paincourtville church in February 1852.  Their son Joseph Émile was born near Paincourtville in October 1856, Joseph Eugène died at age 6 months in May 1859, and a second Joseph Eugène was born posthumously in January 1862 but died at age 1 1/2 in July 1863.  Dorville died near Paincourtville in November 1861, age 32. 

Eugène's younger son Drosin, by second wife Carmelite Blanchard, born in Assumption Parish in January 1834, married Amelia, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Landry and Iréné Landry, at the Paincourtville church in January 1859.  Their son Jean Baptiste Adrien, called Adrien, was born near Paincourtville in October 1861 but died at age 13 months in November 1862; Gervais, called Gegi, was born in September 1863 but died at age 1 1/2 in March 1865; and Amilton Wilfrede or Milton, called Milton, was born in October 1865 but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1867.

Jean-Baptiste's fifth and youngest son Baptiste Drosin, by second wife Marguerite Simoneaux, born probably in Assumption Parish in c1810, died there at age 3 in August 1813.  

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Six more Daigres--all wives--came to Louisiana from France aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early December 1785.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge, but they did not remain there.  Two hurricanes devastated the settlement in the early 1790s.  Most of the Acadians there moved elsewhere, including the Daigres, who joined their kinsmen on upper Bayou Lafourche.  No new Daigre family lines came of it.

Dantin

Louis Dantin dit La Joye, born in Paris in c1702, married Marguerite, 25-year-old daughter of surgeon Bernard Marres dit La Sonde of Bordeaux and Judith Petitpas of Port-Royal, probably at Port-Toulouse on Île Royale in c1741.  Marguerite's parents were long-time residents of Port-Toulouse, and she and Louis settled there.  She gave him at least 10 children, all born probably at Port-Toulouse.  In February 1752, a French official counted Louis, Marguerite, and five of their children--Gabriel, born in c1742; Jeanne in c1743; Louis, fils in c1745; Barthélemy in c1748; and Joseph in c1750--at Port-Toulouse.  Between 1752 and 1758, five more children were born to them on the island--Marguerite, Michel, Jean, Anne, and Agathe.  Louis dit La Joye died probably at Port-Toulouse by late 1758.  He would have been 56 years old that year. 

Living in territory controlled by France, Marguerite Marres dit La Sonde, widow Dantin, and her many children escaped the roundup of Acadians in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at nearby Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île Royale and deported them to France.  The crossing was a disaster for the Dantin family.  Marguerite and nine of her children crossed on the British transport Queen of Spain, which left Île Royale probably in August.  When the ship reached St.-Malo in late November, only sons Louis, fils, age 13, and Barthélemy, age 10, were still alive.  Marguerite and her seven other children had died at sea!   

Louis, fils and Barthélemy settled first at St.-Tual near St.-Malo then in St.-Malo itself.  In early 1766, Barthélemy, now age 18 and still unmarried, agreed to go to Guinea in west Africa, perhaps as a sailor.  Older brother Louis, fils, who was age 21 and also unmarried, did not go with him.  Barthélemy went from St.-Malo to Le Havre, from which he departed in May 1766 aboard the ship La Tamire.   Remaining in France proved to be a wise choice for Louis, fils, and going to Guinea a fatal one for his younger brother.  According to Captain Thomas Domet of La Tamire, Barthélemy died in Guinea.  

Louis, fils became a house carpenter in France and moved to Bécherel near St.-Malo, where he lived in 1766-67.  He married a Frenchwoman, Jeanne, daughter of Gilles Gesmier and Maurille Beaupied, at St.-André-des-Eaux south of St.-Malo in January 1767.  Between 1768 and 1172, hey had four children at St.-André-des-Eaux:  three sons and a daughter, including a set of twins.  Two of the sons did not survive infancy.  In the early 1770s, Louis, fils was among the hundreds of Acadians from the crowded port cities who ventured to the Poitou region to settle on land belonging to an influential nobleman near the city of Châtellerault.  Another daughter was born to them there in 1774.  In December 1775, Louis, fils, Jeanne, and their three remaining children, a son and two daughters, retreated with other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where, between 1776 and 1781, Jeannne gave Louis, fils three more daughters.  Jeanne died at Nantes in the early 1780s, not quite age 40.  One of their daughters born at Nantes also died there.  In November 1784, Louis, fils remarried to Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Aucoin, and Élisabeth Amireau and widow of Alexis-Gégoire Doiron, at Nantes.  The marriage brought two more children into the family: stepdaughters Françoise-Josèphe andMarie-Victoire Doiron.  When, in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Louis, fils and his new wife agreed to take it.

When he came to Louisiana from France in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, Louis Dantin, fils was middle-aged, married to a middle-aged widow, and had buried his three sons back in France.  The Acadian branch of this family, then, except for its blood, could have died with him on the upper bayou, but that did not happen.  Less than two years after coming to Louisiana, Louis, fils married a third time, to a woman half his age, who gave him six more sons, every one of whom created families of their own.  During the early antebellum period, Louis, fils and his descendants moved down bayou into what became Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes.

When federal census takers counted slaves in Lafourche Interior and Terrebonne parishes in 1850 and 1860, no Dantin appeared on the lists of slaveholders.  Louis Dantin, fils's descendants, then, participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  At least three members of the family, two grandsons and a great-grandson of Louis Dantin, fils, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  All three of them survived the war.  Nevertheless, they and their kinsmen lived in a part of the state that was especially hard hit by the conflict.  Successive Federal invasions devastated the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley early in the war, and the Yankees occupied most of the region after 1862.  Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around. ...

Thanks to Louis, fils's fecund sons and grandsons, Dantin is a common surname in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes today.  It is rare, however, in other parts of Acadiana. 

The family's name also is spelled Dantein, D'Antin, Dautin, Dentin, Denton.07

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A Dantin family, which included no sons, came to Louisiana from France in 1785 aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early November.  They followed their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where the father of the family remarried again after his second wife died.  His new wife gave him six more sons, who established their own lines in the Spanish colony.  All of the Acadian Dantins of South Louisiana are descended from this prolific line:

Louis, fils (c1745-1826) Dantin

Louis, fils, second son of Louis Dantin dit La Joye and Marguerite LaSonde, was born at St.-Pierre, Port-Toulouse, Île Royale in c1745.  In late 1758, when he was barely in his teens, Louis, fils was deported with his family to St.-Malo, France, where he worked as a house carpenter.  He married twice in France, first to Jeanne, daughter of French locals Gilles Gesmier and Maurille Beaupied, at St.-André-des-Eaux near St.-Malo in January 1767.  She gave him eight children, three sons and five daughters, including a set of twins.  Louis, fils remarried to Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Aucoin and Élisabeth Amireau and widow of Alexis-Grégoire Doiron, at St.-Similien, Nantes, in November 1784.  She gave him no more children.  Louis, fils took his wife, four unmarried daughters, and two unmarried stepdaughters to Louisiana in 1785 and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  His three sons by his first wife had died in France.  His daughters by his first wife married into Achée, Hébert, Levron, and Pitre families on the upper Lafourche.  Second wife Hélène died at Lafourche in August 1786, age 38, less than a year after reaching the colony.  Louis, fils, now in his early 40s, remarried again, to Marguerite-Blanche, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexis Breaux and Marie-Josèphe Guillot, at Lafourche in July 1787.  Marguerite-Blanche was half his age, had been born in France in May 1765, and had come to Louisiana also aboard L'Amitié, so he may have known her from the voyage over.  Louis, fils's daughters by his third wife married into the Boye or Boyer, Este, Leonard, Maronges, and Sanchez families.  Marguerite-Blanche bore him six more sons, all of whom settled in the Bayou Lafourche valley.  Louis, fils lived to a ripe old age, surrounded by many children and grandchildren.  He died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1826, age 81.

Oldest son Louis III, a twin, by first wife Jeanne Gesmier, born at St.-André-des-Eaux, France, in August 1768, died 12 days after his birth.

Louis, fils's second son Louis III, the second with the name, by first wife Jeanne Gesmier, born at La Ville de la Deavrie near St.-André-des-Eaux in December 1770, died at age 3 months in March 1771.

Louis, fils's third son Florian-Gille, by first wife Jeanne Gesmier, born at La Ville de la Deavrie in May 1772, died probably at Nantes, France, in the late 1770s or early 1780s.

Louis, fils's fourth son Louis-François, by third wife Marguerite-Blanche Breaux, baptized at Lafourche, age unrecorded, in December 1788, married Anne or Jeanne Rosalie, called Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Hébert and Anne Comeaux, at the home of Rosalie's uncle Joseph Ignace Hébert in Ascension Parish in October 1808.  They settled on Bayou Lafourche.  Louis François died in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1840.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial said that Louis François died at age 54, but he was 51.  Their daughters married into the Boutary, Lana, and Legendre families.  Louis Francois's daughter Marie Rosalie Emesida, called Marie Emesida or Emesida, lost her husband, Antoine Boutary, in June 1847, when he was age 31.  She gave birth to a son in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1851 and named him Cleopha Dantin, so she probably had not remarried before the boy's birth.  Two of Louis François's sons created their own families. 

Oldest son Léandre, born in Assumption Parish in March 1811, married Rosalie, 25-year-old daughter of Balthasar Triche and Susanne Helfer of St. John the Baptist Parish, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1839.  Léandre died in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1841, age 30.  He fathered no sons, so his line of the family died with him.  

Louis François's second son Louis Leufroi, born in Assumption Parish in June 1819, married Marie Solidele, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Clouâtre and Marie Molaison, at the Thibodaux church in May 1840.  Their son Adam André was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1847, and Justin Gustave in April 1853.  Their daughter married into the Pichoff family.  One of Louis Leufroi's sons married by 1870. 

Older son Adam married Creole Virginia Deroche in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in March 1869.   

Louis François's third and youngest son Jean Charles, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1822, died there at age 2 in March 1824. 

Louis, fils's fifth son Joseph, by third wife Marguerite-Blanche Breaux, born at Lafourche in September 1791, married Marie Clothilde, called Clothilde, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Janvier Guidry and Marie Josèphe Lebert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1811.  Joseph died in a yellow fever epidemic in Lafourche Parish in October 1853.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial called him "J." and said he was age 66 when he died, but he was age 62.  His wife Clothilde and their son David also died in the same yellow fever epidemic.  Joseph's daughters married into the Bourg, Boutary, and Guillot families.  Four of his five sons also created families of their own in the Lafourche valley. 

Oldest son Joseph Firmin, born in Assumption Parish in January 1818, married Carmelite, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Valery Bourgeois and Rosalie Marguerite Richard, at the Thibodaux church in March 1840.  Their son Magloire Alfred was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1843, Joseph Augustin in August 1858, and Henry Valéry in January 1864 but died the following July.  Their daughters married into the Chappuis and Rossignol families.  Joseph Firmin, at age 48, remarried to Marie, another daughter of Valery Bourgeois and Rosalie Marguerite Richard and widow of Joseph Molaison, at the Thibodaux church in April 1866.  

During the War of 1861-65, Joseph Firmin's oldest son Magloire served in Company G of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana.  

Joseph's second son Leufroi, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1820, married Théotilde, daughter of Jean Louis Daunis and his Acadian wife Célesie Carret, at the Thibodaux church in November 1849.  Leufroi remarried to Creole Marie Thérèse Caillouet probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in the 1850s.  

Joseph's third son Charles Omer, also called C. Omer and Omer, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1824, married Marcelline, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Bergeron and Marie Rassicot, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1845 or 1846.  Their son Joseph Théophile was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1848; Gustave Aubin in January 1851; Charles Omer, fils in July 1856; Albert Beauregard in April 1861; and Joseph Édouard in January 1865.  Their daughter married a Bergeron cousin.  

Joseph's fourth son Jean David, called David, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in late 1828, died in the same yellow fever epidemic in October 1853 that killed his father and mother.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial said that David was age 22 when he died, but he was 25.  He did not marry.  

Joseph's fifth and youngest son Joseph Livodé, called Livodé, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1833, married Élisabeth, daughter of Célestin Guyot and Marie Elizabeth Ferguson, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1852, and sanctified the marriage at the Thibodaux church in September 1854.  Their son Joseph was born in Lafourche Parish in October 1855, Philippe Anatole was born in November 1861, and Joseph Léon in November 1864.  During the War of 1861-65, Livodé served in Company D of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  

Louis, fils's sixth son Fabien-Sébastien, by third wife Marguerite-Blanche Breaux, born at Assumption in December 1793, married Marie Eugènie or Virginie, called Virginie, 16-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians François Régis Part and Constance Bourgeois, at the Thibodauxville church in January 1822.  Their daughters married into the Adam, Hébert, Ledet, Lirette, and Putman families.  Fabien, père remarried to fellow Acadian Marguerite Breaux.  Fabien, père died in Lafourche Parish in September 1869.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial said that Fabien was age 84 when he died, but he was 75.  

Oldest son Fabien D., by first wife Virginie Part, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1824, died at age 2 in February 1826.

Fabien Sébastien's second son Louis Sosthène, called Sosthène, by first wife Virginie Part, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1828, married Louisa, daughter of Jean Baptiste Rodrigue and Françoise Arabie, at the Thibodaux church in February 1852.  

Fabien Sébastien's third son Charles Bienvenu, by first wife Virginie Part, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1837, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Fabien Sébastien's fourth and youngest son Forestide Schuyler, by first wife Virginie Part, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1840, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.  

Louis, fils's seventh son Charles, by third wife Marguerite-Blanche Breaux, born at Assumption in c1797, married Claire, 15-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Simon François Guillot and his second wife Rose Comeaux, at the Thibodauxville church in June 1820.  Charles died in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1851, in her early 50s.  His daughters married into the Benoit and Farez or Savez families.  Both of his sons also created their own families on the bayou. 

Older son Jean Charles Louis, called Louis, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1824, married Aurelia, daughter of John Newell or Noel and Marie Denise Morvant, at the Thibodaux church in March 1851.  Their daughter married into the Boudreaux family.  

Charles's younger son Joseph Leclaire, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1828, married Azema Pamela, called Zema, daughter of Cadet Sevin and his Acadian wife Marie Hébert, at the Thibodaux church in June 1851.  Their son Joseph Théophile or Théophile Hippolyte was born in Lafourche Parish in February 1854 but died at age 3 in May 1857, Alcide Arthur was born in July 1857, Joachim Aristide in March 1859, Joseph in February 1863, and Félicien Nicolas in July 1865. 

Louis, fils's eighth son Jean-Baptiste, by third wife Marguerite-Blanche Breaux, born at Assumption in February 1799, married Marie Ange, Angele, or Angélique, daughter of Urbin Achete, Chete, Eschete, or Este and Anne Madeleine Aman of Lafourche, at the Plattenville church in April 1819.  Their daughter married into the Plaisance family.  

Oldest son Jean Baptiste, fils, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1820, died there at age 9 in March 1829. 

Jean-Baptiste, père's second son Jean Octave, called Octave, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1828, married Eugenia or Eugénie Darbonne or Terrebonne, probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in the early 1850s.  Their son Osessy was born near Raceland in December 1853, and Octave Grégoire near Lockport in February 1868.  

Jean-Baptiste, père's third and youngest son Elia Gerasime, called Gerasime, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1833, married Joséphine Moran probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in the early 1850s.  Their son Georges Louis was born near Lockport in July 1863.  

Louis, fils's ninth and youngest son Paul, by third wife Marguerite Blanche Breaux, born at Ascension in June 1806, married Azelie or Eliza Isabelle, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Benoît Richard and , at the Thibodauxville church in October 1833.  Paul died in Lafourche Parish in December 1856.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Paul was age 46 when he died, but he was 50.  His daughter married into the Baye family.  Three of his six sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Joseph Paul, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1836, married cousin Justine, daughter of Étienne Bénoni Boutary and his Acadian wife Scholastique Dantin, at the Thibodaux church in January 1864.  Justine's mother was a daughter of Joseph Paul's uncle Joseph Dantin and Joseph Paul's first cousin.  Joseph Paul and Justine's son Joseph died in Lafourche Parish 3 days after his birth in November 1864.  

During the War of 1861-65, Paul's second son Louis Jules, called Jules, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1842, served in Company I of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Jules married Rosema, daughter of John Brown and Justine Pontiff, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in May 1867.  Their son Joseph Edgard was born near Raceland in February 1868. 

Paul's third son Joseph Alfred, called Alfred, Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1844, married Euphrasie Webre in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in December 1866.  

Paul's fourth son Alsace or Alces Valery, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1846, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.

Paul's fifth son Evariste Ernest, called Ernest, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1848, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.

Paul's sixth and youngest son Léo, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1855, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.

David

Jean-Pierre David dit Saint-Michel, born in the parish of St.-Nazaire, Nantes, France, in c1699 or 1700, probably no kin to the other Davids of greater Acadia, became a master blacksmith.  He married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Monmellian dit Saint-Germain and Hélène Juineau of Haute-Ville, Québec, probably at Québec in c1717, and settled at Louisbourg, Île Royale, where he worked his trade.  There, he was addressed as Sr. David.  According to Bona Arsenault, between 1718 and 1743, Marie-Madeleine gave the blacksmith 13 children, nine sons and four daughters, most, if not all of them, born at Louisbourg.  After the British seized Louisbourg in June 1745, Jean-Pierre and his family, along with 1,900 other inhabitants of the French citadel and the surrounding area, were deported to Rochefort, France.  Second son Étienne-Michel, called Michel, having married and settled in peninsula Nova Scotia, was not among the members of his family deported to France.  He remained in greater Acadia.  Jean-Pierre and his family returned to Louisbourg in 1749 after the French resumed control of Île Royale.  Marie-Madeleine died at the fortress in the spring of 1755. 

Living in a territory controlled by France, the blacksmith's family escaped the fate of their fellow Acadians, including son Michel, on peninsula Nova Scotia.  The island family's respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  In late 1758, after the fortress of Louisbourg fell again to British forces, Jean-Pierre, now a widower, two of his daughters, and their families were deported to La Rochelle, France.  Jean-Pierre, in his late 50s, died at the local hospital soon after they reached the port and was buried in the hospital cemetery.  Daughter Jeanne did not remain in France.  In December 1764, at St.-Sauveur Parish, Cayenne, in French Guyane, she married Sr. Pierre Le Clerc, "major, master wheelwright, living in this city for several years...," son of Sr. Théodore Le Clerc and Marguerite Duquesnois of Armoy, Diocese of Senlis, France.  Three and a half years later, in May 1768, Jeanne remarried to M. Guillaume Paquenault, "habitant of the coastal district, parish of Remiré, native of Virelade, diocese of Bordeau," son of M. Arnauld Paquenault and Pétronille Blaugan.  The marriage record did not reveal Guillaume's profession.  Jeanne's younger brother Louis, born at Louisbourg in c1732, married fellow Acadian Anna, also called Jeanne, Trahan in c1762 probably at La Rochelle.  Louis also left France, but he did not follow his sister to South America.  In 1765, he and his family returned to North America and settled on the French-controlled island of Miquelon off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  During the American Revolution, after France became an ally of the United States in 1778, the British captured Miquelon and nearby Île St.-Pierre, rounded up the French habitants there, including the Davids, and deported them to La Rochelle, where Louis's father lay buried for 20 years.  One wonders if Louis and his family remained in France.  They did not join his older brother Michel in Louisiana. 

Meanwhile, brother Michel, born at Louisbourg in c1720, married Geneviève, 18-year-old daughter of Michel Hébert and Marguerite Gautrot, at Grand-Pré in January 1744; the recording priest described him as "age ca 20[sic], resident of Louisbourg."  How a young man from the island citadel hooked up with a girl from the Minas Basin is anyone's guess.  Between 1744 and 1754, Geneviève gave Michel four children, a daughter and three sons, at Grand-Pré.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported them to Maryland.  Between 1756 and 1761, four more children had been born to them, two daughters and two sons.  Colonial officials counted them with other Acadian exiles at Snow Hill on Maryland's Eastern Shore in July 1763.  By then, for eight long years, Michel and his family had endured life among Englishmen who, despite their colony's Catholic roots, did not care much for the French "papists" who had been thrust upon them.  When word reached the Acadians in Maryland that they would be welcome in Louisiana, they pooled their resources to charter ships that would take them to New Orleans via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue.  Michel had no David relatives in the colony, but his wife Geneviève Hébert, a member of one of the largest Acadian families, probably had many kinsmen there.  In the early summer of 1766, the first contingent of Acadians from Maryland left for Louisiana, where many of their relatives from the prisons at Halifax had settled the year before.  Michel, a master blacksmith like his father, in spite of being an Acadian exile, must have been a man of means even during the Great Upheaval.  He booked passage for New Orleans on his own sometime that summer, and he and his family got there by early October, a week behind the others.

Another David family from greater Acadia suffered a similar fate.  Jean-Baptiste, son of Jean David and Jeanne Bell, born at Château-Richer, Québec in c1693 and probably no kin to the other Acadian Davids, married Marguerite, daughter of Acadians François Lapierre and Jeanne Rimbault, at Grand-Pré in March 1715.  They lived at Annapolis Royal in 1716-17 but settled at Minas in 1718.  Jean-Baptiste and Marguerite had 10 children, seven daughters and three sons, all born at Grand-Pré.  Two of their daughters married into the Richard and Dugas families at Minas.  All three of their sons married, into the Landry, Thériot, and Belliveau families at Minas.  In the fall of 1755, the British deported the family to Pennsylvania.  Jean-Baptiste, fils died in that colony before June 1763, when colonial authorities counted his widow and four children there.  Marguerite Landry did not remain in Pennsylvania.  In August 1763, she was counted in Massachusetts, probably at Boston, with the family of cousin Paul Landry with only two persons in her household, so not all of her children followed her there.  Son Jean-Baptiste III evidently was among the Acadians in Pennsylvania who moved south to Maryland in the 1760s.  He married Marie Ritter or Kidder of Germany, in c1770.  (One wonders who was the Jean David, with wife Marie-Josette ____, son Joseph-Marie, and orphan Marie-Rose ____, counted at Lower Marlborough, Maryland, in July 1763; Jean-Baptiste III would have been only age 15 at the time, too young to have a wife and child.  Perhaps the Jean at Lower Marlborough was a kinsman of the blacksmith Michel or from an entirely different branch of Davids.  They did not go to Louisiana.)  Jean-Baptiste III's son Jean-Baptiste IV, also called Baptiste, fils, was born in c1774.  Bona Arsenault does not say if the boy was born in Maryland or Louisiana, but the baptismal record of one of Jean-Baptiste IV's daughters calls him "native of Maryland."  The last contingent of Maryland Acadians departed for Louisiana from Port Tobacco in January 1769.  Evidently Jean-Baptiste David III, like Michel David, went to Louisiana on his own, taking his family there sometime after 1774. 

Davids settled in every part of South Louisiana.  The presence of French Creoles, Acadians, Foreign French, Anglo Americans, and even an Irishman bearing this surname created a complex and often confusing pattern of settlement in what became the Bayou State.  Non-Acadian Davids probably outnumbered their Acadian namesakes there, but the latter nevertheless created lasting lines in South Louisiana.  Master blacksmith Michel David from Louisbourg and Grand-Pré, brought his family to the colony in the late 1760s.  He came not with an expedition of extended families, as did most of his fellow Louisiana-bound Acadian exiles, but sailed to New Orleans at his own expense.  He and his family lingered in the city for a few years before moving upriver to Cabahannocer on the Lower Acadian Coast, where Michel became a farmer as well as a blacksmith.  Only two of his six sons created families of their own.  One son's descendants remained in St. James Parish, but the line died out during the antebellum period.  Meanwhile, two of Étienne's grandsons moved to St. Martin Parish in the Bayou Teche valley, where their lines flourished.  During the 1770s or 1780s (the records are unclear), Jean-Baptiste David III of Grand-Pré, with his German wife, came to Louisiana from Maryland with only one child, son Jean-Baptiste IV, called Baptiste, fils.  They settled in the Opelousas District, where Baptiste, fils married a fellow Acadian in May 1798 and created a vigorous line on the western prairies.

Judging by the number of slaves they owned, some Davids, both Acadian and non-Acadian, lived well on their farms and plantations during the antebellum period.  However, none of them rose to the ranks of great planters.  In 1850, an Acadian David onPrairie Mamou, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, held 18 slaves; his older brother owned eight in another part of St. Landry.  In 1860, the widow of Acadian David held 12 slaves on her farm in St. Martin Parish.  Her David brother-in-law held 10 slaves on his farm in St. Landry Parish, not far from his 26-year-old David nephew, who also owned 10 slaves. 

Dozens of Davids, Acadians and non-Acadians, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  Over a dozen of them served in a single unit--Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Pointe Coupee Parish.  Two sets of brothers, one Acadian, the other French Creole, served with General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.  Confederate service records show that the great majority of the Davids who wore the gray and butternut survived the experience. 

The family's name also is spelled Devid, Devis, St. Michel.08

.

Two Acadian David families, probably not kin to one another, came to Louisiana from exile in Maryland years, perhaps decades, apart: 

Étienne-Michel dit Saint-Michel (c1720-?) David

Étienne-Michel, called Michel, dit Saint-Michel, second son of master blacksmith Jean-Pierre David dit Saint-Michel and his wife Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, Monmellian dit Saint-Germain, of Louisbourg, Île Royale, was born probably at Louisbourg in c1720.  He married Geneviève, daughter of Michel Hébert and Marguerite Gautrot, at Grand-Pré in January 1744 and became a master blacksmith like his father.  Michel took his family from Snow Hill, Maryland, to Louisiana on their own hook in October 1766.  Interestingly, the family was still at New Orleans in July 1767, receiving food supplies from the Spanish, but Michel moved his family to the Acadian Coast settlement of Cabahannocer in the early 1770s.  Spanish officials counted him, Geneviève, and their unmarried children on the left, or east, bank of the river at Cabahannocer in January 1777 and again in March 1779.  The latter census reveals that, although Michel may have been a blacksmith like his father, he also had become a successful farmer; in 1779, he owned 10 quarts of rice and four quarts of corn (a quart of that day weighed 160 pounds).  His daughters married into the Chauffe, Jousson, and Oubre families.  Only half of his six sons created families of their own, and two of those lines died out early.  In the 1820s, one of Michel's grandsons moved to the old Attakapas District and settled near St. Martinville.  A decade later, a second grandson followed.  This western branch of the family thrived, but the one that remained in St. James Parish did not.  By 1840, no male descendants of Étienne-Michel David remained on the river.  

Oldest son Michel-Luc or -Lin, born at Grand-Pré in September 1746, probably died young either at Grand-Pré or in Maryland before July 1763.  

Michel's second son Joseph, born at Grand-Pré in November1748, followed his family to Maryland, Louisiana, and Cabahannocer.  He was living at 3 Ste.-Anne Street in the city in 1770, employed as a blacksmith.  He married Agathe Pens probably in New Orleans in the early 1770s.  Joseph, described as a "native of Acadia" and "master blacksmith," died at New Orleans in January 1773.  The priest who recorded Joseph's burial said that he died at age "26 yr.," but he was 24.  A daughter was born posthumously in April 1773.  Joseph and Agathe may have had no sons, so this line of the family, except perhaps for its blood, died with him.  

Michel's third son Paul, born at Grand-Pré in c1754, followed his family to Maryland, Louisiana, and Cabahannocer.  He married Marie-Pélagie, called Pélagie, daughter of André Oubre and Marie-Élisabeth Bonvillain of St.-Charles des Allemands on the Upper German Coast, at Cabahannocer in February 1775; Pélagie's brother was Paul's sister's husband.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux, Clairaut, LeRoy, and Rome families.  Paul remarried to Marguerite, daughter of David Rome and Marie Barbe of St.-Jean-Baptiste on the Lower German Coast, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in July 1794.  Their daughter married into the Rodrigue family.  Paul, père died in St. James Parish in October 1815.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Paul was "age about 58 yrs." when he died.  Only two of his 10 sons married, and both of them settled on the western prairies.  

Oldest son Henri, by first wife Pélagie Oubre, baptized at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer, age unrecorded, in June 1780, probably died young. 

Paul's second son Paul, fils, by first wife Pélagie Oubre, born at Cabahannocer in June 1793, also died young.  

Paul, père's third son David, by second wife Marguerite Rome, born at Cabahannocer in April 1795, likely died young. 

Paul, père's fourth son Alexis, by second wife Marguerite Rome, born at Cabahannocer in October 1798, died in St. James Parish at age 13 in March 1812.

Paul, père's fifth son Paul, fils, the second with the name, by second wife Marguerite Rome, born at Cabahannocer in c1799, married Renée or Iréné Marcelline, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Vincent and Céleste Labauve, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in February 1821.  They moved to St. Martin Parish later in the decade.  Their son Paul III was born near Convent, St. James Parish, in December 1821; Théodule in March 1823; Paul Hilaire, called Hilaire, in June 1824; Raphaël Lucien or Lucien Raphaël in St. Martin Parish in December 1833 but died at age 11 in September 1845; and Charles Ovide was born in December 1839.  Paul, fils died in St. Martin Parish in March 1849, age 50.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in May.  His daughters married into the Labauve, LeBlanc, Leming, and Louvière families.  Three of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Paul III married Zulma or Zulmée, daughter of fellow Acadians Nicolas Broussard and Céleste Comeaux, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in November 1845, and sanctified the marriage at the St. Martinville church the following January.  Their son Jules was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1846, Louis Hippolyte Duclise in May 1850, Simon in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1852, Pierre in Lafayette Parish in September 1855, Pierre D. in c1857 but died at age 2 in February 1859, Ignace was born in September 1859, and Gustave T. Beauregard in March 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Paul may have served as a sergeant in Company K of the 2nd Regiment Louisiana Reserve Corps, a local-defense unit raised in Lafayette Parish that fought local Jayhawkers.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Jules married Arcade, daughter of Louis Albert Aube or Aulie and his Acadian wife Julienne Trahan, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1869.  Their son Alcibiade was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1870. 

Paul III's second son Louis Hippolyte Duclise married Félicia, daughter of Manuel Domingue and Armeline Plaisance, at the Vermilionville church in April 1869; the marriage was not recorded civilly until April 1870. 

Paul, fils's second son Théodule may have married Marie Schexnayder in the early 1850s.  Their son Charles was born near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in October 1856 but died at age 4 1/2 in June 1861; and Célestin was born in October 1858. 

Paul, fils's third son Hilaire married Joséphine, 20-year-old daughter of Louis Langlinais and his Acadian wife Aspasie Boudreaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1844.  Their son Julien Hilaire was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but not in Iberia Parish, in March 1845; Louis Hilaire in February 1849; Jean Baptiste near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in August 1858; and Victor in July 1860.  At least one of Hilaire's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Julien Hilaire married Eugénie, daughter of fellow Acadians Aurelien Hébert and Azema Boudreaux, at the Youngsville church in March 1869.  Their son Hilaire le jeune was born near Youngsville in January 1870. 

Paul, fils's fifth and youngest son Charles, if he survived childhood, did not marry before 1870. 

Paul, père's sixth son Eugène, by second wife Marguerite Rome, born at Cabahannocer in February 1800, in his late 30s, married Marie Caroline, daughter of André Oubre and his Acadian wife Rosalie Vincent of St. James Parish, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1839.  They settled in St. Martin Parish near his older brother Paul, fils.  Their son Calixte was born in St. Martin Parish in June 1841; Alexandre Clebert near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in September 1843; Louis in St. Martin Parish in c1851 but died at age 8 in February 1859; Eugène Omer was born in August 1855; and Joseph Albert, called Albert, in March 1858 but died at age 4 1/2 in August 1862.  None of Eugène's three surviving sons married by 1870. 

Paul, père's seventh son Paul, fils, the third with the name, by second wife Marguerite Rome, born at Cabhannocer in June 1802, died in St. James Parish, at age 13 1/2 in January 1816.

Paul, père's eighth son, name unrecorded, from second wife Marguerite Rome, died at St. Jacques, age unrecorded, in December 1805.

Paul, père's ninth son Ulgère, by second wife Marguerite Rome, born at St. Jacques in November 1806, probably died young. 

Paul, père's tenth and youngest son Jean Baptiste, by second wife Marguerite Rome, born in St. James Parish in October 1809, died there at age 2 in September 1811. 

Michel's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, born in Maryland in c1759, followed his family to Louisiana and Cabahannocer.  He married Hélène, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Haché and Marie Dumont of Île St.-Jean, at St.-Jacques de Cabahannocer in October 1788.  Jean Baptiste died near Convent, St. James Parish, in June 1810.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean, as he called him, was age 45 when he died, but he was closer to 51.  Only one of Jean's five sons seems to have married, and he fathered no sons of his own, so this family line probably did not endure. 

Oldest son Jean-Louis, born at Cabahannocer in August 1790, probably died young. 

Jean-Baptiste's second son Michel, born at Cabahannocer in January 1791, married Marie Louise, daughter of Louis Denis and Marie Boucher and widow of Joseph LaRose, at the Convent church in January 1816.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux family.  Michel remarried to Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Joseph Wikiam of Baltimore, Maryland, and his Acadian wife Rosalie Hébert, at the Convent church in Marcy 1821.  Michel died near Convent in August 1823, age 32.  He evidently fathered no sons, so this family line, except for its blood, may have died with him. 

Jean-Baptiste's third son, name unrecorded, "recently born," died at Cabahannocer in October 1799,

Jean-Baptiste's fourth son Jean-Baptiste-Claude, called Claude, born at Cabahannocer in March 1802, died at age 1 in March 1803.

Jean Baptiste's fifth and youngest son Joseph, born at St. Jacques in October 1804, died there at age 2 in November 1806. 

Michel's fifth son Claude, born probably at Snow Hill, Maryland, in c1761, followed his family to Louisiana and Cabahannocer.  He was still alive in January 1777 but probably died young.  

Michel's sixth and youngest son Pierre, born at New Orleans in March 1770, was still alive in January 1777 but also probably died young.  

Jean-Baptiste III (1748-?) à Jean-Baptiste David

Jean-Baptiste III, son of Jean-Baptiste, fils and Marguerite Landry, born at Grand-Pré in May 1748, followed his family to Pennsylvania in 1755.  In the late 1760s, after his came of age, he moved south to Maryland, where he married Marie Kidder, a German.  The year of their arrival in Spanish Louisiana is anyone's guess.  They brought only one child with them, a son, and chose to settle on the western prairies.  The son married a fellow Acadian and created a vigorous line.

Only son Jean-Baptiste IV, born in Maryland in c1774, followed his parents to Louisiana and the Opelousas District, where he married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Savoie and Louise Bourg, in May 1798--the first appearance of Baptiste's family in South Louisiana church records.  Baptiste, fils served as treasurer of the Opelousas church in the 1810s.  His estate record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in February 1823, and his first succession record was filed there the following August.  He would have been in his late 40s that year. Another succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in July 1833.  His daughters married into the Chachere, Dupré, Foux or Fux, and Rulong families.  All of his five sons created families of their own.  Most of them remained in St. Landry Parish, but a younger one settled in Lafayette and St. Martin parishes.  

Oldest son Gilbert, born at Opelousas in April 1799, married Caroline, daughter of Jean Taylor or Teller and Marie Ritter and widow of Lasty Lagrand and Éloi Andrus, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1839.  Their son Michel Théojeune was baptized at the Opelousas church, age 4 months, in May 1843.  Their daughter married into the Ledoux family.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted eight slaves--five males and three females, all black, ranging in age from 40 to 2--on Gilbert David's farm.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 10 slaves--four males and six females, all blacks except for one mulatto, ages 62 years to 5 months, living in two houses--on Gilbert David's farm not far from his nephew Eugène.  His only son evidently did not marry, so this line of the family did not endure. 

Théogène David's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in December 1862.  If this was Michel Théojeune, Gilbert David's only son, he would have been age 19 year that year.  One wonders if Théogène's death was war-related.  

Jean-Baptiste IV's second son Hippolyte, born at Opelousas in March 1803, married Céleste or Célestine Josèphe, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Victor Richard and Marie Louise Richard, at the Opelousas church in June 1833.  Their son Eugène was born in St. Landry Parish in November 1834; Hippolyte, fils in October 1836; Joseph in February 1844; Baptiste, Jr. in July 1849; Rodolphe in May 1857; and Numa near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in May 1860.  Their daughter married into the Daigle family.  Hippolyte's two older sons married by 1870.

In July 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 10 slaves--six males and four females, seven blacks and three  mulattoes, ranging in age from 24 years to four months, living in two houses--on Eugène David's farm not far from his uncle Gilbert.  Eugène married Octavie, 20-year-old daughter of Alexandre Baptiste Fontenot and Hyacinthe Joubert, at the Opelousas church in April 1861.  Their son Joseph Eugène was born in St. Landry Parish in July 1862.  During the War of 1861-65, Eugène served as a second lieutenant in Company B of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  He survived the war. 

Hippolyte, père's second son Hippolyte, fils married Virginie Segura at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1856, and remarried to Elisa, daughter of Théophile Landvalo and Élise Gameter, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1867.

Jean-Baptiste IV's third son Jean-Baptiste V, born in St. Landry Parish in May 1807, married Marguerite Elmire, called Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadian Agricole Breaux and his Creole wife Scholastique Picou, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1832.  They settled probably near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish.   Their daughters married into the McCormick and Richard families.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted 18 slaves--eight males and 10 females, 13 blacks and five mulattoes, ranging in age from 50 to 2--on Baptiste David's farm.  Jean Baptiste died at Prairie Mamou, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in November 1855, age 48.  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse later that month.  In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted two slaves--a 33-year-old black female, and an 18-year-old black female --on Marguerite David's farm; this probably was Baptiste's widow Marguerite Breaux's slaves.  Jean Baptiste V's older sons married by 1870. 

During the War of 1861-65, oldest son Jules, born in St. Landry Parish in March 1840, along with younger brother Lucius B., served in Company F of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania--one of General R. E. Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Jules did not join the company until March 1862; his enlistment papers said he was a clerk.  Soon after he joined the regiment in Virginia, he fell ill and reported to a general hospital.  He rejoined his regiment in time for the Maryland campaign of September 1862 and was wounded and captured at Sharpsburg on September 17.  The federals sent him to a general hospital at nearby Frederick until he was well enough to travel to Fort McHenry, near Baltimore, where he also spent time in a general hospital.  He was exchanged at Aikens Landing, Virginia, on the James River, in November, furloughded, and returned to Louisiana, too disabled to return to his unit.  He signed his end-of-war parole at Washington, Louisiana, in June 1865.  Jules "of CP, Plaquemine Brûlé," married cousin Marie Laperle, called Laperle, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Breaux and Madeleine Guidry, at the Grand Coteau church in April 1869.  They settled near Church Point, where he died in September 1892, age 52. 

During the War of 1861-65, Jean Baptiste V's second Lucius B., born in St. Landry Parish in July 1844, along with older brother Jules, served in Company F of the 8th Regiment Louisiana Infantry--another of Lee's Louisiana Tigers.  Lucius, who also was a clerk, enlisted in June 1861, nine months before his brother did.  He served continuously with his regiment through its many marches, campaigns, and battles from 1861 to the fall of 1864.  He was wounded in action at Cedar Creek, Virginia, in October 1864 but did not fall into enemy hands.  Evidently he, too, was too disabled to remain with his unit and was sent back home to recuperate.  He signed his end-of-war parole at Washington, Louisiana, in June 1865.  A notation in a record kept at Confederate Memorial Hall in New Orleans declares that Lucius was a "Good soldier."  Lucius married Agnès, daughter of Jean Barousse and Caroline Fontenot, at the Church Point church in July 1869. 

Jean Baptiste V's third Joseph Amer, born in St. Landry Parish in October 1848, if he survived childhood did not marry before 1870. 

Jean Baptiste V's fourth and youngest son Octave, born in St. Landry Parish in October 1850, if he survived childhood did not marry before 1870. 

Jean-Baptiste IV's fourth son Arvillien, also called Arville, Ervillien, Hervillien, Ives, and Ive, born in St. Landry Parish in February 1813, married Elisa, Elise, or Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Olivier Guidry and Victoire Semere, at the St. Martinville church in June 1834.  Arvillien died in St. Martin Parish in December 1847.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that "Ervillien" died "at age 36 yrs.," but he was 34.  A daughter was born posthumously near Breaux Bridge the following February.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted two slaves--a 50-year-old black males, and a 32-year-old black male--on Zelie David's farm; one wonders if these were Arvillien's widow Lise Guidry's slaves.  In June 1860, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted 12 slaves--four males and eight females, all black, ages 63 to 2, living in two houses--on Widow David's farm, between Lullin Guidry and the Widow Louis Guidry; these probably were Lise Guidry's slaves.  Her and Arvillien's daughters married into the Champagne, Durio, and Gillard families.  Evidently none of his sons married by 1870. 

In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted three slaves--two males and a female, all black, ages 42, 16, and 10--on Ives David's farm.  In 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted six slaves--one male and five females, all black, ages 60 to 3--on Ive David's farm.  Was this a son of Arvillien and Lise?  If so, was he married?

During the War of 1861-65, Arvillien's son Homere, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 8 months, in December 1839, served in Company B of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana.  Homere enlisted at Camp Moore in October 1861 and served with his unit through late February 1862, when his Confederate service record ends.  Did he survive the war? 

Arvillien's son Treville, born in Lafayette Parish c1845, died near Breaux Bridge, age 4, in March 1849. 

Jean-Baptiste IV's fifth and youngest son François or Françisque, married fe;;pw Acadian Selima Pierre Comeaux in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1842.  One wonders if this family line survived. 

Delaune

Christophe Delaune, born at Periers, Avranches, Normandy, France, in c1705, probably no kin to Jean of Brittany, came to French Maritime islands by c1729.  He married Marguerite, daughter of Acadians Jean Caissie and his second wife Cécile Hébert of Chignecto, on Île St.-Jean in c1738.  Between 1740 and1757, Marguerite gave Christophe 10 children, seven sons and three daughters, all born on the island.  In August 1752, a French official counted Christophe, Marguerite, and five of their children at Havre-de-la-Fortune on the east coast of Île St.-Jean.  Christophe, père died on the island by 1758, in his early 50s. 

In the autumn of 1755, the Delaunes, still on Île St.-Jean, escaped the roundup of their fellow Acdians in Nova Scotia, but their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean, including Marguerite Caissie and her Delaune children, and deported them to France.  They ended up at Cherbourg, where Marguerite remarried to fellow Acadian Joseph Le Prieur dit Dubois of Annapolis Royal in c1759.  Marguerite's son Jean Delaune married Marie-Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Eustache Part and Anastasie Godin dit Bellefontaine, at Cherbourg in February 1773 and became a sailor and a carpenter.  Jean's brother Christophe, fils became a navigator and a ship's carpenter.  

In 1773, the year of his marriage, Jean Delaune and younger brother Christophe, fils became part of a settlement scheme in Poitou.  Christophe, fils, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Boudrot and Cécile Vécot, at Archigny, near Châtellerault, in June 1774.  Each of the brothers fathered a son in Poitou, before the venture failed.  In October 1775, after two years of effort, Jean, Christophe, fils, and their families, along with dozens of other disgruntled Poitou Acadians, retreated from Châtellerault to the port city of Nantes, where they lived as best they could on government hand outs and what work they could find.  Both families expanded dramatically in the suburb of Chantenay, now a part of the city of Nantes.  Four more children were born to Jean and Marie-Anne there, and four more to Christophe, fils and Marie, all baptized at St.-Martin de Chantenay, but most of the children died young.  In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  The Delaune brothers and their families were among the hundreds of Acadians who agreed to take up the Spanish offer and crossed to Louisiana aboard the last of the Seven Ships in late 1785.

If the Spanish government had not coaxed over 1,500 Acadians in France to emigrate to Louisiana, there probably would be no Acadian Delaunes in the Bayou State today.  But after enduring life in the mother country for a quarter century, the Delaune brothers chose to go to the Spanish colony.  One brother remained on the river where they settled, but the other moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche.  During the early antebellum period, the oldest son of the brother who stayed on the river joined his cousins on the upper Lafourche.  He fathered an astonishing 12 sons by his two wives:  all of the Acadian Delaunes in Louisiana spring from these sons.  No Acadian Delaune settled west of the Atchafalaya Basin before the War of 1861-65, only along the river and on the upper Lafourche, with the largest center of settlement on the upper bayou in Assumption Parish.  After the war, at least one Acadian Delaune appeared in St. Mary Parish on lower Bayou Teche. 

Judging from the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, the Delaunes, both Acadian and French Creole, participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  The largest slave holder in the family was Acadian Christophe Delaune of Assumption Parish, who owned seven slaves in 1860.  

Nearly a dozen Delaunes, Acadian as well as French Creole, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  At least three of them, all non-Acadians from East Baton Rouge Parish, died in Confederate service.  The Acadians survived.  The war hit hard those areas where Delaunes lived.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands along the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every farm and plantation their forces could reach.  Meanwhile, Union navy gunboats shelled and burned dozens of houses along the river.  Successive Federal incursions devastated the Bayou Lafourche valley, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around. ...

In Louisiana, the family's name also is spelled Delaney, Delanne, Delannois, Delanue, Delaunais, De Launay, De Laune, De L'Aune, Delauny, Delone, Delonne, Delhonde, Desaunay, Launay.11

.

Six Delaunes in two families led by brothers came to Louisiana from France in 1785 aboard La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in late December.  The brothers and their families were among the few Acadians from France who chose to settle at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans, but few of their descendants remained there: 

Jean (1743-?) Delaune

Jean, older son of Christophe Delaune of Normandy, France, and Marguerite Caissie dit Roger of Chignecto, was born on Île St.-Jean in November 1743.  In August 1752, a French official counted Jean with his family at Havre-de-la-Fortune on the east coast of the island.  In late 1758, still in his teens, he followed his widowed mother and siblings to Cherbourg, France, and became a sailor and a carpenter in the mother country.  At age 30, he married Marie-Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Eustache Part and Anastasie Godin dit Bellefontaine, at Cherbourg in February 1773.  Soon after their marriage, they ventured to Poitou as part of an Acadian settlement scheme and retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes in October 1775.  Jean, Marie-Anne, and their two surviving children, a son and a daughter, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  They settled in the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river, where they had more children, including another son.  In the late 1780s or early 1790s, they moved from the river to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin and Rousseau families.  Only one of Jean's six sons, the youngest, born in Louisiana, survived childhood and created a family of his own, in Lafourche Interior Parish.  Except for its blood, however, this line of the family did not survive in the Bayou State.

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, baptized at La Chapelle-Roux, Poitou, France, in June 1774, died young.

Jean's second son Christophe le jeune, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, in September 1776, also died young.

Jean's third son Pierre-Basile, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, in December 1779, died at Chantenay, age 2, in February 1782.  

Jean's fourth son Louis-Auguste, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, in October 1782, died at Chantenay, age 10 months, in August 1783.

Jean's fifth son Pierre, born probably at Chantenay, France, in c1784, probably did not survive the voyage to Louisiana in late 1785.

Jean's sixth and youngest son Jean Alexandre, called Alexandre, born at either Ascension or Cabahannocer in the late 1780s, married Marie Julie, called Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Hébert and Marie Thibodeaux, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1820.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Chouabe, and Peltier families.  Alexandre remarried to Rosalie, daughter of Jean Olivier and Dorothée Lagrange of St. John the Baptiste Parish and widow of Dominique Boudreaux, at the Thibodauxville church in May 1837.  This family line, except for its blood, did not endure.  

The oldest son, name unrecorded, from first wife Julie Hébert, died in Lafourche Interior Parish four hours after his birth in November 1827. 

 Alexandre's second son Jean Augustin, by second wife Rosalie Olivier, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1838, died there at age 7 1/2 in November 1845. 

Christophe, fils (1750-1780s or 1790s) Delaune

Christophe, fils, younger son of Christophe Delaune and Marguerite Caissie dit Roger, was born on Île St.-Jean in June 1750.  In August 1752, a French official counted Christophe, fils with his family at Havre-de-la-Fortune on the east coast of the island.  In late 1758, he followed his widowed mother and siblings to Cherbourg, France.  After he came of age, he became a navigator and ship's carpenter in the mother country and married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Boudrot and his first wife Cécile Vecot, at Archigny, Poitou, France, in June 1774.  They, too, were part of the settlement scheme in that region.  In October 1775, Christophe, fils and his family retreated with his older brother and other digruntled Poitou Acadians to Nantes, where they, too, had more children.  Christophe, fils, Marie, and their two surviving children, both sons, followed his older brother to Louisiana in 1785 and settled with them at Cabahannocer, where Marie gave Christophe, fils another daughter but no more sons.  Christophe, fils died probably at Cabahannocer by June 1794, when he was listed as deceased in a son's marriage record.  His daughter married into the Aucoin family and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  His oldest son also settled on the upper Lafourche, but his youngest son remained on the river, where his line died out.  All of the Acadian Delaunes of Louisiana are descended from Christophe, fils's oldest son.  

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste, baptized at La Chapelle-Roux, Poitou, France, in June 1775, followed his family to Nantes and Louisiana.  He married Marie-Hyacinthe, called Hyacinthe and Jacinthe, daughter of Joseph Michel and Marie Falgout of St.-Jean-Baptiste des Allemands, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in June 1794.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche by the early 1810s.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron and Boudreaux families.  Jean Baptiste remarried to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Hébert and Nathalie Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1816.  Jean Baptiste died in Assumption Parish in August 1855, age 80, and was one of the last of the Acadian immigrants to Louisiana to join his Acadian ancestors.  He fathered a dozen sons by his two wives, most of whom married and settled on the upper Lafourche, but not all of the lines survived.  The Acadian Delaunes of Louisiana are descended Jean Baptiste's sons, especially the eldest.  

Oldest son Christophe le jeune, by first wife Hyacinthe Michel, born at Cabahannocer in December 1796, married Marie Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians François Marie Gautreaux and Félicité Hébert, at the Plattenville church in September 1817.  Their son Jean Baptiste le jeune was born in Assumption Parish in December 1818, François Onésime in October 1820, Joseph le jeune in September 1827, and Mathurin Sylvain in November 1830.  Their daughter married into the Daigle family.  Christophe le jeune remarried to Léocadie Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Aucoin and Rosalie Gautreaux, at the Plattenville church in October 1834.  Their son Eugène Christophe Eusilien, called Eusilien, was born in Assumption Parish in July 1836; Alexis Sosthène in December 1837; Maxilien or Marcellin Jean Baptiste, also called Jean Baptiste, in January 1840; and Désiré Aristide Théodule, called Aristide, in December 1845.  Their daughter married into the Lerille family.  In July 1850, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted seven slaves--five males and two females, all black, ranging in age from 32 years to 1 month--on Christophe Delonde's farm in the parish's Second Congressional District.  In July 1860, the census taker in Assumption Parish counted nine slaves--seven males and two females, all black, ages 57 years to 4 months, living in two houses--on Christophe Delaune's farm between Arsène Delaune and Widow Azélie Delaune in the parish's Ward 6.  Seven of Christophe le jeune's eight sons by both wives created their own families in the Bayou Lafourche valley. 

Oldest son Jean Baptiste le jeune, by first wife Marie Madeleine Gautreaux, married cousin Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Daigle and Rosalie Blanchard, at the Plattenville church in February 1842; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  

Christophe le jeune's second son François Onésime, by first wife Marie Madeleine Gautreaux, married Azélie, daughter of Jean Baptiste Colonne and his Acadian wife Marie Blanchard, at the the Plattenville church in October 1842.  Their son Apollinaire François was born in Assumption Parish in August 1843, Sylvestre Donable Ariele in September 1844, Ulysse in June 1852, and Octave Numa in March 1859.  Their daughter married a Bergeron cousin.  One of François's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Apollinaire François married cousin Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadians Simon Ursin Delaune and Mathilde Boudreaux, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in March 1868; they had to secure a dispensation for consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Auber Savigne was born near Labadieville in September 1868. 

Christophe le jeune's third son Joseph le jeune, by first wife Marie Madeleine Gautreaux, married Marie Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Rosémond Hébert and Marie Templet, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1848.  Their son André Étienne Philoclet was born near Labadieville in October 1860, and Alcée Amoleo in February 1863.   

Christophe le jeune's fourth son Mathurin, by first wife Marie Madeleine Gautreaux, married fellow Acadian Aureline Daigle.  Their son Alfred was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1851.  Mathurin died in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1852, age 22.   

Christophe le jeune's fifth son Eusilien, by second wife Léocadie Aucoin, died in Assumption Parish in June 1854.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Eusilien was age 15 when he died, but he was just shy of 18.  He probably did not marry.  

Christophe le jeune's sixth son Alexis, by second wife Léocadie Aucoin, married Louise, daughter of Louis Lerille and his Acadian wife Célestine Poirier and sister of his sister Victorine's future husband Louis, at the Labadieville church in February 1858. 

Christophe le jeune's seventh son Marcellin, by second wife Léocadie Aucoin, married Armentine or Émelie, daughter of fellow Acadian Rosémond Bergeron and his Creole wife Augustine Barras, at the Labadieville church in April 1866.  They moved down bayou to Lockport, Lafourche Parish, later in the decade.  

Christophe le jeune's eighth and youngest son Aristide, by second wife Léocadie Aucoin, married Amanda, daughter of fellow Acadians Homer C. Savoie and Honorine Guidry, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in April 1869; the marriage also was recorded at the Lockport church the following month.  Their son Homer Félicien was born near Lockport in September 1870.  

Jean-Baptiste's second son Jean-Pierre, by first wife Hyacinthe Michel, baptized at New Orleans, age 18 months, in June 1800, probably died young.  

Jean-Baptiste's third son Louis-Auguste le jeune, called Auguste and Augustin, by first wife Hyacinthe Michel, born at Cabahannocer in March 1802, married Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jacques Theriot and Françoise Guérin, at the Plattenville church in June 1825.  Their son Auguste Carville or Clairville, called Clairville, had been born in Assumption Parish in September 1822; Auguste, fils in March 1829; Basile Théodule, called Théodule le jeune, in January 1831; Amédée Séraphin in September 1835; Joseph Justinien in July 1838; and Désiré Octave in December 1846.  Auguste, père died near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in October 1858, age 56.  His daughters married into the Bolotte, Bourg, and Perque families.  Four of his six sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Clairville married Azema or Irma Arceneaux, perhaps a fellow Acadian, probably in Assumption Parish in the late 1840s  Their son François Numa was born in Assumption Parish in October 1850; Gustave Joseph in October 1852; Clément Octave, a twin, in December 1854; and Victor died near Labadieville a day after his birth in December 1861.  During the War of 1861-65, despite his age, Clairville served in Company A of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. James Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  He enlisted at Camp Pratt near New Iberia in October 1862, age 40, and was captured on Bayou Teche in April 1863.  His Confederate record then falls silent.  One wonders if he survived the war. 

Second son Gustave Joseph may have died near Labadieville in December 1870.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names, said that Gustave died at "age 16 years."  Gustave Joseph would have been age 18.  He probably did not marry. 

Auguste's third son Théodule le jeune married Rosema, daughter of Olivier Cancienne and his Acadian wife Felonise Landry, at the Labadieville church in May 1856.  Their son Xavier Pierre was born near Labadieville in June 1858.  

During the War of 1861-65, Auguste's fourth son Amédée served in Company C of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Assumption Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  His first cousins Clodimir and François Delaune served in the same unit.  

Auguste's fifth son Joseph Justinien married Eliska, daughter of fellow Acadians Vincent Landry and Élise Arceneaux, at the Paincourtville church in April 1861.  Their son Félix Octave was born near Paincourtville in January 1869. 

Jean-Baptiste's fourth son Ursin, by first wife Hyacinthe Michel, born at New Orleans in April 1803, married Clarisse Melisaire, called Melisaire, another daughter of Jacques Theriot and Françoise Guérin, at the Plattenville church in May 1826.  Their son Théophile was born in Assumption Parish in February 1830; François Clodimir, called Clodimir, in October 1833; and François Léon, called Léonie, in April 1843.  Their daughter married into the Landry family on the lower Atchafalaya River.  Ursin's three sons married by 1870.  The oldest son moved to lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Théophile married Caroline, daughter of Jean Laulan, Lollan, or Lovland and Iréné Falteman, at the Plattenville church in January 1853.  Their son Théophile Eugène was born in Assumption Parish in November 1853; and Joseph died near Labadieville, age 7 months, in April 1856.  They were living near Franklin, St. Mary Parish, on lower Bayou Teche, in the late 1860s. 

Ursin's second son Clodimir married cousin Zulma, daughter of Pierre Cancienne and his Acadian wife Rosalie Thériot, at the Labadieville church in February 1858.  During the War of 1861-65, Clodimir served in Company C of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Assumption Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  His first cousins Amédée and François Delaune served in the same unit.  Clodimir remarried to Clementine, daughter of Charles Bolotte and his Acadian wife Marie Landry, at the Labadieville church in April 1864.  Their son Victor Clebert Charles was born in Assumption Parish in March 1865.  

Ursin's third and youngest son Léonie married Odile, daughter of Olivier Cancienne and Marie Louise Hunot, at the Labadieville church in January 1867. 

Jean Baptiste's fifth son Jean-Baptiste, fils, by first wife Hyacinthe Michel, born at St. Jacques in April 1805, died in Assumption Parish, age 10, in July 1815.  

Jean Baptiste's sixth son Sosthène or Faustin, by first wife Hyacinthe Michel, born in St. James Parish in May 1807, married Marie Marguerite, called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Michels Aucoin and Marguerite Bourque, at the Plattenville church in June 1828.  Faustin died in Assumption Parish in July 1834.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Faustin was age 24 when he died, but he was 27.  His daughters married into the Blanchard and Boudreaux families.  He evidently fathered no sons. 

Jean Baptiste's seventh son Théodule, by first wife Hyacinthe Michel, born in Assumption Parish in February 1815, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Arceneaux and Mélanie Gautreaux, at the Plattenville church in February 1841.  Their son Jean François, called François, was born in Assumption Parish in January 1842; Eusilien in March 1846; Cyprien in January 1850; Placide Patrice near Labadieville in February 1857; Étienne Octave in November 1859; Appolone Oleus Octave in April 1862; and Norbert Justilien in November 1864.  One of his sons married by 1870.

During the War of 1861-65, oldest son François served in Company C of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Assumption Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  His first cousins Amédée and Clodimir Delaune served in the same unit.  François married Noemie, daughter of Jean Baptiste Gebelin and Julie Sibille, at the Labadieville church in September 1866. 

Jean Baptiste's eighth son Joseph, by second wife Marie Hébert, born in Assumption Parish in December 1818, married Marie Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of fellow Acadians Basile Boudreaux and Clémence Dugas, at the Plattenville church in January 1842.  Their son Simon Joseph Oville, called Oville and Onil, was born in Assumption Parish in October 1845; Alcide Ferdinand in June 1848; Théodore Joseph in December 1850; Victor Augustin in July 1854; Pierre Camille near Labadieville in April 1856; and a newborn son, name unrecorded, was buried in October 1858.  Joseph died near Labadieville in November 1858, age 40.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted two slaves--a 19-year-old black male, and a 17-year-old black female, living in one house--on Widow Azélie Delaune's farm in the parish's Ward 6 next to Christophe Delaune and near Arsène Delaune; these were the slaves of Joseph's widow Azélie Boudreaux.  Joseph's daughters married into the Arceneaux and Venissat families.  One of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Oville married Léontine, daughter of fellow Acadian Magloire Bourgeois and his Creole wife Azélie Himel, at the Labadieville church in October 1867.   Their son Arthur Joseph was born near Labadieville in September 1868. 

Jean Baptiste's ninth son Simon Ursin, by second wife Marie Hébert, born in Assumption Parish in February 1821, married fellow Acadian Mathilde Boudreaux probably in Assumption Parish in the late 1840s.  Their son Joseph Émile was born in Assumption Parish in October 1849; Léon was baptized at the Plattenville church, age unrecorded, in March 1853; and Amand Octave, called Octave, was born in February 1855 but died at age 1 1/2 in November 1856.  Their daughter married a Delaune cousin. 

Jean Baptiste's tenth son Ferdinand, by second wife Marie Hébert, born in Assumption Parish in March 1823, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.  

Jean Baptiste's eleventh son Arsène, by second wife Marie Hébert, born in Assumption Parish in November 1826, married Marie or Marine, daughter of fellow Acadians Florentin Blanchard and Marie Émilie Arceneaux, at the Plattenville church in January 1851.  Their son Anatole was born near Plattenville in July 1852, Augustin in October 1854, Oleu Félix in September 1863, Charles Oscar Octave near Labadieville in December 1864, and Sylvestre Joseph in December 1868.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Assumption Parish counted two slaves--a 26-year-old black female and a 2-month-old black male, living in one house--on Arsène Delaune's farm in the parish's Ward 6 next to Christophe Delaune and near Widow Azélie Delaune.  

Jean Baptiste's twelfth and youngest son Jean Baptiste, fils, the second with the name, from second wife Marie Hébert, born in Assumption Parish in September 1829, may have married fellow Acadian Denise Daigle in Assumption Parish, date unrecorded. 

Christophe, fils's second son Michel, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, in January 1777, died at Chantenay the following December.  

Christophe, fils's third son Christophe III, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, in October 1782, also died young.  

Christophe, fils's fourth and youngest son Louis-Auguste or Augustin, called Auguste, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, in June 1784, married Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Simon Dupuis and Ludivine Landry, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in October 1809.  Their daughter married into the Viel family.  Auguste remarried to Clotilde, also called Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac LeBlanc and Félicité Melançon and widow of Alexis LeBlanc, at the St. Gabriel church in April 1827.  Auguste died near St. Gabriel in March 1851, age 68.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted seven slaves--four males and three females, all black, ranging in age from 90 to 5, living in one house--on Widow Au. Delaune's farm; this was Auguste's second wife, Clotilde LeBlanc.  One wonders if Auguste's line survived. 

Oldest son Auguste, fils, by first wife Geneviève Dupuis, born near St. Gabriel in August 1815, died near St. Gabriel in November 1839, age 24.  He did not marry.  

Auguste, père's second son Jean Théodule, by first wife Geneviève Dupuis, born near St. Gabriel in June 1821, married Armelise Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Sylvain Landry and Bathilde Babin of Ascension Parish, at the St. Gabriel church in February 1844.  Jean Théodule died near St. Gabriel in April 1858, age 36.  His line of the family, except for its blood, may have died with him.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Iberville Parish counted eight slaves--two males and six females, all black, ranging in age from 21 years to 3 months, living in one house--on Widow T. Delaune's farm; this was Armelise Rose Landry.  

Auguste, père's third and youngest son Louis Alexandre, by second wife Clotilde LeBlanc, baptized at the St. Gabriel church, age unrecorded, in April 1829, married Malvina, daughter of fellow Acadians Narcisse Bujole and Adeleine Orillion, at the St. Gabriel church in December 1850.

Deroche

Louis, Julien, and Herbe Des Roches of Carolle, Avranches, Normandy, probably not kin to the other Des Rochess in the region, came to the French Maritimes in c1730 when they were still in their teens.  (Herbe may have been a cousin, not a brother.)  Louis and Julien settled on Île St.-Jean, and Herbe on Île Royale.  Louis married Marguerite, daughter of Pierre Arseneau and Marie-Anne Boudrot, in c1731 and worked as a fisherman/habitant at Malpèque, on the northwest shore of the island.  Marguerite gave him at least eight children, including three sons, born probably at Malpèque:  Eustache in c1736, Alexandre in c1740; and Joseph in c1743.  Julien, a farmer, married another Arseneau, Marie, daughter of Jacques Arseneau and Marie Poirier, in c1743 probably at Malpèque. They had at least six children, born probably at the isolated settlement:  Julien, fils in c1745, Félix in c1747, Joseph in c1750, Jean in c1754, Basile in c1755, and Mathurin in c1756.  Meanwhile, Herbe married Marie, daughter of surgeon Georges Barbudeau or Berbudeau of Île d'Oléon, France, and Françoise Vrigneau of Plaisance, Newfoundland, probably at Louisbourg, Île Royale, in November 1742.  They settled at St.-Esprit, a fishing village down the coast from Louisbourg, where Herbe worked as a fisherman.  Marie gave him at least five children, all born probably at St.-Esprit:  Marguerite, born in c1743; François in c1744; Hervé in c1745; Jean in c1749; and Pierre in c1752.  In February 1752, a French official counted the family, sans Hervé, still at St.-Esprit.  In the household was a 14-year-old female servant from Louisbourg, as well as three hired fishermen.  Herbe and Marie were living next to her parents, who evidently were dependent on them.  The following August, the same official, now on Île St.-Jean, counted Julien, Louis, and their families at Malpèque.  Julien and wife Marie died of disease in c1757, on the eve of the island's dérangement, and their children were raised by family members. 

Living on islands controlled by France, the DesRoches of Île St.-Jean and Île Royale escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia, but their respite from British oppression was short-lived.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British swooped down on Île St.-Jean and deported most of the Acadians there to France.  However, the DesRochess of Malpèque were among the relative handful of island Acadians who slipped through the British dragnet.  Louis, Marguerite, and their children, as well as Julien and Marie's orphaned children, escaped from the island's north shore to Restigouche, at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  In the summer of 1760, the British captured Restigouche but, again, the DesRochess, at least most of them, eluded capture.  After the war with Britain finally ended in 1763, members of the family returned to Île St.-Jean, where they became one of the largest families on St. John Island, now Prince Edward Island, especially at Miscouche on the western side of the province, not far from the family's original settlement at Malpèque.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and until the Acadian reunions of the twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

Julien DesRoches and his wife Marie Arseneau having died on the eve of Île St.-Jean's fall, their children were scattered among relatives.  One of the younger ones, Basile, was only three years old when the British came in 1758.  He was raised by his maternal aunt Judith Arseneau, who was only 19 years older than Basile and was still unmarried when she took him into her care.  She married Charles dit Jean-Charles, son of fellow Acadians François Savoie and Marie-Josèphe Richard of Annapolis Royal and widower of _____ and Marie-Madeleine Richard, at Restigouche in January 1761 after the British had attacked the place the previous summer.  They evidently were not among the 300 Acadians the British had packed off to prisoner-of-war compounds in Nova Scotia after the attack, but sometime in the early 1760s they either surrendered to, or were captured, by British forces and joined their fellow Acadians in Nova Scotia.  In August 1763, British officials counted Basile, along with the Savoies, at Halifax, probably in the prison compound on Georges Island.  

The war with Britain now over, the Acadians being held in Nova Scotia faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-controlled island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, one was a eight-year-old DesRoches.

Basile DesRoches came to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, in 1765 as a 10-year-old orphan.  He followed relatives to Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans, where he married twice, both times to German-Creole widows.  During the early antebellum period, he took his family to Bayou Lafourche, where the family who raised him had settled.  Basile's only son created a family of his own.  The son's six married sons moved down bayou to Terrebonne Parish, some of them settling in the Montegut area at the edge of the coastal marshes, where they probably worked as trappers and fishermen.  In South Louisiana, the family's name evolved from DesRoches to Deroche.  n Louisiana, the Acadian family's name evolved from DesRoches to Deroche.  The family's name also is spelled De Roche, Des Roches, Duracheor, Duroche, Durocher, and Durochet in the Bayou State. 

No Deroche appears as an owner on the slave schedules compiled by the federal census bureau in 1850 and 1860, so these families participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.   Moreover, no descendant of Basile DesRoches appears in Louisiana or Confederate service records during the War of 1861-65.  ...12

Basile (c1755-?) Deroche

Basile, fifth son of Julien DesRoches and Marie Arseneau, born probably at Malpèque, Île St.-Jean, in c1755, was orphaned at a very young age and raised by a maternal aunt, Judith Arseneau, who, during exile, married Charles Savoie of Annapolis Royal.  Still a boy, Basile ended up in the prisoner-of-war compound on Georges Island, Halifax harbor, during the early 1760s.  He came to Louisiana with the Savoies in 1765 and followed them to Cabahannocer, where he married Marie Edelmayre, widow of Louis ____lante, in September 1778.  Their daughters married into the Barbier and Boudreaux families.  Basile, in his mid-40s, remarried to Marguerite, daughter of Mathurin Legant or Legau and Marguerite Clairaut of St.-Jean-Baptiste des Allemands on the upper German Coast, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in November 1801.  She gave him no more children.  During the early antebellum period, Basile settled in Lafourche Interior Parish, down bayou from where his aunt and uncle had resettled in the early 1790s, perhaps after his uncle died.  All of the Acadian Deroches of South Louisiana, many of them still living in Terrebonne Parish, are descended from Basile's son and his many grandsons. 

Only son Pierre, by first wife Marie Edelmayre, born probably at Cabahannocer in the 1790s, married Pélagie, daughter of Joseph Baye and his Acadian wife Jeanne Marguerite Vincent, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1821.  Their daughter married into the Aucoin family.  Six of Pierre's seven sons married by 1870 and settled in Terrebonne Parish.  

Oldest son Pierre Antoine, called Antoine, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in January 1823, married French Creole Marie Eve Trosclair in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in September 1848.  Their daughters married into the Bourg and Dantin families.  

Pierre's second son Joseph, born probably in Lafourche Interior Parish, married Marie Adeline, called Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadian Stanislas Boudreaux and his Creole wife Mélanie Fortunée Dupré, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in August 1854.  Their son Joseph Onésime was born in Terrebonne Parish in February 1858, Pierre Théodule in February 1860, and Jean Joseph Prosper near Montegut in January 1870. 

Pierre's third son Florian, born probably in Lafourche Interior Parish, married Spanish Creole Joséphine Rivas.  Their son Amédée Antoine, called Antoine, was born near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in March 1855 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1856.  

Pierre's fourth son François, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1830, married fellow Acadian Rosalie Boudreaux in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in June 1862.  Their son Jean Baptiste Osémé had been born in Terrebonne Parish in November 1861, Jean Olesipe was born in February 1864, and Victorin Pierre Joseph near Montegut in March 1869.  

Pierre's fifth son Eusilien Omere, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1835, married Scholastique Victoire Victorine, daughter of Jérôme Dupré and his Acadian wife Victoire Aucoin of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church in June 1862. 

Pierre's sixth son Émile Théodule, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1840, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Pierre's seventh and younges on Léonard Banon or Banon Léonard, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1845, married Armelise, daughter of fellow Acadians Leufroi Thibodeaux and Thersile Gautreaux, at the Montegut church, Terrebonne Parish, in February 1866.  

Doiron

Jean Doiron or Douaron, native of perhaps St.-Martin, Île de Ré, near La Rochelle, France, reached Acadia with his wife Marie-Anne Canol perhaps aboard L'Oranger in 1671.  They moved from Port-Royal to the Minas Basin in the early 1680s and were counted on Rivière-de-l'Ascension there in 1701.  By 1714, they had moved up the basin to Pigiguit.  Jean and Marie-Anne had 11 children, eight sons and three daughters.  Their three daughters married into the Hébert, Testard dit Paris, Boisseau, and Vincent families.  Middle daughter Marie settled at Louisbourg on Île Royale by the 1720s.  Seven of their eight sons married into the Babin, Gaudet, LeBlanc, Doucet, Guédry, Henry, and Barrieau families.  After his wife Marie-Anne died, Jean remarried to Marie, daughter of Guillaume Trahan and Madeleine Brun, probably at Minas in c1693.  She was 23 years younger than Jean and gave him eight more children, all of whom created families of their own.  Jean and Marie's four daughters married into the Girouard, Guillot dit L'Angevin, Nogues, and Turcot families.  His sons by second wife Marie married into the Girouard, Doucet, Vincent, and Breau families.  Jean died at Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, between April 1735 and June 1736, in his late 80s.  By 1755, his descendants could be found in the Minas Bastin at Pigiguit and Cobeguit, at Chignecto, and in the French Maritimes on Île Royale and especially on Île St.-Jean.  

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered the family even farther.  The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  In the early 1750s, Canadian soldiers, assisted by Mi'kmaq warriors led by Abbé Le Loutre, burned Acadian homesteads in the British-controlled area east of Rivière Missaguash, forcing the habitants to move to the French-controlled area west of the river.  Doirons may have been among the refugees.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Doirons may have been among the 300 Chignecto Acadians serving in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Lieutenant Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  Doirons were among the locals the British deported to South Carolina in the fall of 1755.  The following spring, the governors of Georgia and South Carolina allowed the Acadians in their colonies who were not under arrest to return to their homeland as best they could.  After purchasing or building small vessels, hundreds of them headed up the coast.  Some made it all the way back to the Bay of Fundy and found refuge on lower Rivière St.-Jean.  Most did not.  In late August, after weeks of effort, 78 exiles came ashore on Long Island, New York, and were detained by colonial officials.  On a list of "names of the heads of the French Neutral families, number of their Children returned from Georgia and distributed through the counties of Westchester and Orange," dated 26 August 1756, were two families of Doirons.  One family moved on to Pennsylvania in c1760 before moving on to Maryland in the early 1760s. 

Living in territory controlled by France, the many Doirons on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British swooped down upon the Maritime islands, rounded up most of the Acadian habitants there, and deported them to France.  The crossing devastated the Doiron family, ending a number of lines.  The worst loss of life, not only for the Doirons but for any other Acadian family during the Great Upheaval, occurred aboard the British transport named Duke William, which left Pointe-Prime on Île St.-Jean for St.-Malo in late November and sank in a North Atlantic storm during the second week of December.  Dozens of members of Noël Doiron's extended family--five of his children and their families, even some of the patriach's great-grandchildren--went down the ship.  Other Doirons died aboard an earlier Duke William which left the Maritimes in late summer and limped into St.-Malo the first of November; on one or more of the five British transports that left the Maritimes with the second Duke William and reached St.-Malo in late January; and aboard the Supply, which survived the storm that sunk the second Duke William but did not arrive at St.-Malo until early March.  Island Doirons also crossed to France aboard other vessels destined to Le Havre, Cherbourg, and Boulogne-sur-Mer.  They also lived at La Rochelle and Rochefort.  However, most of them settled in the suburbs of St.-Malo, including St.-Servan, St.-Suliac, St.-Énogat, Pleslin, and Plouër, where they subsisted on government subsidies and what work they could find there.  In November 1765, two Doiron brothers living at St.-Énogat followed dozens of fellow Acadian exiles to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany and remained there until the 1770s.  One brother took his family back to greater Acadia via the Channel Islands and England.  The other moved on to Nantes later in the decade.  In 1773, most of the Doirons in the St.-Malo suburbs and their cousins in the other coastal cities became part of the settlement venture in Poitou.  After two years of effort, most of them retreated to the port city of Nantes.  When, in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, 30 Doirons--nearly all of the ones still remaining in the mother country--agreed to take it. 

In North America, following the war with Britain, Acadians held in the seaboard colonies were allowed to leave, but not until British officials counted them and discerned their intentions.  In June 1763, Pennsylvania officials a Doiron family still in the colony.  They soon moved on to Maryland.  In July 1763, Maryland officials counted a Doiron family at Oxford on the colony's Eastern Shore.  Colonial officials also counted a Doiron at Baltimore.  In August 1763, South Carolina officials counted four Doiron families still in the colony.  Urged on by French officials, they emigrated to French St.-Domingue, where they could live not only among fellow Roman Catholics, but also in territory controlled by France.  Although driven from North America by the Seven Years' War, the French were determined to hang on to what was left of their western empire.  Their new naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas on the northwest shore of the island would protect the approaches to their remaining possessions in the Caribbean Basin.  The Acadians could provide a source of cheap labor at Môle St.-Nicolas.  To entice them to the sugar colony, the French promised the Acadians land of their own there.  The promises did not work for at least one member of the family.  When fellow Acadians recently released from Nova Scotia and Maryland came through Cap-Français in the mid- and late 1760s on their way to Louisiana, a Doiron and her family followed one of the parties to New Orleans.  The other Doirons were among the majority of Acadians who remained in the sugar colony. 

Some of the Doirons who had escaped the deportations of 1755 and 1758 had moved on to Canada.  Doirons from Île Madame off the southern coast of Île Royale left the island before the fall of Louisbourg in July 1758, but their decision to move to Québec proved to be a fatal one.  The head of the family died there in early January 1758, probably in a smallpox epidemic that killed 300 of his fellow refugees.  His wife also died in the Canadian city in late February.  Though the British gained Canada in the Treaty of Paris of February 1763, the northern province was populated largely by French Catholics, many of them Acadian exiles.  So, in a colony nearly as old as Acadia, descendants of Jean Doiron began the slow, inexorable process of becoming Canadiennes.  By the early 1770s, Doirons from greater Acadia and exile in France could be found on the upper St. Lawrence at Nicolet; at St.-Ours on Rivière Richelieu; at Napanne in present-day Ontario; on the lower St. Lawrence at Beaumont, St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse, and St.-Michel-de-Bellechasse; at Richibouctou in present-day eastern New Brunswick; at Rustico on the north shore of Prince Edward Island; and on Baie Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay, on the western coast of Nova Scotia.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, the Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the mid-twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed. 

The hand full of Doirons being held at forts Edward and Cumberland in Nova Scotia at war's end faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  In the case of the Acadians, however, this meant that they could return only to French soil.  Where the Doirons had lived in Acadia was no longer French territory.  British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in Nova Scotia, they could live only in the interior of the peninsula in small family groups and work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New Englander "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the hated oath if they joined their cousins in the St. Lawrence valley.  After all that they had suffered on the question of the oath, no self-respecting Acadian would consent to take it if it could be avoided.   Some Halifax exiles chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they would not remain in old Acadia.  So a small family of Doirons languishing at Fort Edward, Pigiguit, gathered up their belongings and prepared to leave their homeland--the first members of the family to settle in Louisiana.

For a dozen years, the Doirons in Maryland endured life among English colonists who, despite their Catholic roots, did not care much for the French "papists" who had been thrust upon them.  When word reached the Maryland Acadians that they would be welcomed in Louisiana, they pooled their meager resources to charter ships that would take them to New Orleans.  The Doirons had few relatives in the Spanish colony, but that was of little consequence.  One family led by a widow followed a party of 150 exiles who left Port Tobacco in late December 1767 and reached New Orleans via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, the following February.  At least one Doiron family--the one that had ventured from South Carolina to New York to Pennsylvania and finally to Maryland--chose to remain in the Chesapeake colony when their cousins moved on to Spanish Louisiana.  In 1773, these stay-behinds were among the first Acadians at Baltimore to secure a lot in the city's French Town Quarter.  Within a generation or two, they were using the surname Gold, an English iteration of Doiron.

Descendants of Jean Doiron came early to Louisiana--in 1765 and 1768--but if the Spanish government had not coaxed over 1,500 Acadians in France to emigrate to Louisiana in 1785, there probably would be no Acadian Doirons in the Bayou State today.  The one male Doiron who came to the colony from Halifax in 1765 had only one son, who died young.  The three Doirons who came from Maryland in early 1768 were three sisters who married on the river, but, again, no Doiron family lines came of it.  Not until the late 1780s were Doiron family lines established in Louisiana that survived beyond the second generation.  By the mid-1790s, three centers of family settlement had emerged:  the first and largest along the river around Baton Rouge, especially in West Baton Rouge Parish; a second one along upper Bayou Teche; and a third one on upper Bayou Lafourche that eventually spread south to the Terrebonne country.  During the antebellum and post-war periods, several families moved from the Lafourche valley and the river to lower Bayou Teche, while others from the Teche valley moved out into the open prairies and marshes of Vermilion, Calcasieu, and Cameron parishes.  However, the largest center of family settlement remained in the Baton Rouge area.  

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, the Doirons participated only peripherally in the South's plantation-based economy.  One Doiron in West Baton Rouge Parish owned 10 slaves in 1850, and several of his kinsmen who lived nearby owned a few, but none of them appear as slave holders in the 1860 federal slave census.  None of the Doirons in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley appear to have been slave owners.  Only one of their cousins on the western prairies held bondsmen during the period.  

Nearly a dozen Doirons served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65, and four of their cousins, probably brothers from Calcasieu Parish, served in a Texas cavalry unit.  At least two Doirons, one from the upper Lafourche and the other from the river, lost their lives in Confederate service.  Édouard Doiron, probably from Assumption Parish, was conscripted into Company C of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery in October 1862.  When his unit surrendered at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in July 1863, Édouard, along with most of the other conscripts in the regiment, refused parole.  The Federals sent them to St. Louis, Missouri, and then on to confinement at Camp Morton, Indiana.  Édouard died at the prison in St. Louis in late July and was buried at nearby Jefferson Barracks Cemetery.  Meanwhile, Louis Oscar Doiron of West Baton Rouge Parish was serving in the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry when he died of disease in the hospital at Lauderdale Springs, Mississippi, in July 1863.  Several Doirons from the river and the Lafourche valley survived their time in Federal prisoner-of war-camps after being captured in Mississippi, Georgia, Louisiana, and Tennessee.

The war took a heavy toll on the Doirons' economic status, no matter where they settled.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every plantation their forces could reach.  Union gunboats shelled and burned dozens of plantations houses along the lower Mississippi.  Successive Federal incursions in the Bayou Lafourche valley devastated that region, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  On the western prairies, Federal armies marched three times through the Teche region and burned and pillaged many farms and plantations, some of them no doubt owned by Doirons.  Thanks to these Federal incursions, emancipation came early to the area, with its resulting economic and social turmoil.  Confederate foraging parties and cutthroat Jayhawkers also plagued the area where Doirons lived, adding to the family's misery.  ...

In Louisiana, the family's name also is spelled Darzoin, Deuaron, Doiran, Doirant, D'Oiron, Douairon, Douaison, Douaron, Douerand, Doyron, Duaron, Duarron, Duron, Louaron.13

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A small Doiron family came to Louisiana from Halifax via French St.-Domingue in 1765 and settled on the river above New Orleans on what came to be known as the Acadian Coast.  No family line came of it: 

Pierre (c1733-?) à ? à Jean Doiron

Pierre Doiron, born in Acadia in c1733, married Marie Bourgeois.  The couple came to Louisiana from Halifax in 1765 with a daughter and a son and settled at Cabahannocer on the river.  In April 1766, a Spanish official counted Pierre in Verret's Company of Cabahannocer militia.  Three years later, he, wife Marie, and only one of their children, the son, were occupying lot number 93 on the left, or east, bank of the river there.  They had no more children in Louisiana. 

Only son Olivier, born in Halifax or aboard ship in c1764, appears with the family at Cabahannocer in September 1769, age 5, but he probably died young.  

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Perhaps also in 1765, Marie, daughter of Jean Doiron and Anne LeBlanc of Chignecto, her second husband Pierre Lambert, a daughter from her first marriage to Pierre Boucher, and a stepson, came to Louisiana directly from French St.-Domingue.  They also settled at Cabahannocer on the river. 

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In February 1768, the widow of Alexandre Doiron and her three daughters reached New Orleans from Port Tobacco, Maryland.  The daughters married into the Amache, St. Pierre, and Rodriguez families at Fort San Luìs de Natchez, where the family had been forced to settle, and one of them remarried into the LeBlanc family at Cabahannocer, where they resettled. 

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In 1785, two decades after the first of their cousins reached the colony, Doirons came to Louisiana from France on five of the Seven Ships.  Only then did Doiron family lines take root in the Spanish colony.  The first of the exiles from France--seven Doirons in one family, and a Doiron wife married to a Lejeune--arrived aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in July.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac on the river below Baton Rouge: 

Auguste (c1739-1793?) à Jean Doiron

Alexandre le jeune, fourth son of Thomas Doiron and Anne Girouard, born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1738 or 1739, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in c1750 and was counted with them at Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Scie in the interior of the island in August 1752.  In his late teens, he was deported with them to France aboard the British transport Duke William, which reached St.-Malo the first of November.  Alexandre's father and five of his siblings did not survive the crossing.  Alexandre lived with his widowed mother and his remaining siblings at St.-Servan near St.-Malo in 1758 and 1759 and at nearby St.-Suliac from 1759 to 1763, where he worked as a laborer and a carpenter.  He married Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadians Francois Hébert and Isabelle Bourg of Cobeguit, at nearby Pleslin in January 1763.  They remained at Pleslin until 1773, when they became part of the settlement scheme in Poitou  After two years of effort, they retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes in March 1776 and chose to accompany hundreds of their fellow Acadians to Spanish Louisiana in 1785.  Ursule bore another son at Manchac.  An Alexandre Doiron died at Manchac in October 1793.  The San Gabriel priest who recorded the burial did not give any parents' names, mention a wife, or give the age of the deceased, so one wonders if this was him.  If it was, Alexandre would have died in his mid-50s.  His daughters married into the Benoit and Templet families and remained on the river.  Most of his sons also settled in the Baton Rouge area.  His oldest son joined his cousins on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Most of the Doirons of Louisiana are descended from Alexandre and five of his sons.

Oldest son Isaac-Alexandre, born at Pleslin in October 1767, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, New Orleans, and Manchac.  At age 44, he married Renée Eulalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Isaac Hébert and Marie Daigre, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in May 1812.  Renée was a native of Nantes and had come to Louisiana aboard La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships.  They moved on to upper Bayou Lafourche, returned to the Baton Rouge area in the late 1810s, and then moved back to the bayou by the early 1820s.  Isaac-Aleandre died by January 1827, when Renée remarried at Plattenville.  His daughter married into the Trahan family.  One of his sons also created a family of his own.

Older son Auguste, born in Assumption Parish in May 1816, married Céleste, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Joseph Marie Trahan and Anne Adélaïde Lejeune of Lafourche Interior Parish, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1841.  Their son Cleopha was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1841; Auguste Clédomire, called Clédomire, in February 1842[sic]; and Jean in January 1846.  Two of Auguste's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Cleopha married Maltese Creole Elvire Lancon in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in February 1870.  

During the War of 1861-65, Auguste's second son Clédomire served in Company K of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Terrebonne Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  After the war, Clédomire married Eveline, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Giroir and Rosalie Comeaux, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in February 1866.  Their son Adam was born in Terrebonne Parish in February 1869.  Their daughter married into the Leany family.  A son and a daughter settled on lower Bayou Teche.  

Isaac Alexandre's younger son Ursin Isaac, born in Assumption Parish in January 1822, probably died young.  

Alexandre's second son Charles-Adrien, born at Pleslin in April 1770, died at Pleslin, age 3,  in October 1773.  

Alexandre's third son Mathurin-Luc, born at Pleslin in October 1772, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, New Orleans, and Manchac.  He married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean-Baptiste Hébert and Marguerite Richard, probably at Manchac in June 1800.  Mathurin died probably at Manchac in November 1824, age 52.  His daughter married into the Morgan family.  His sons also married on the river. 

Oldest son Rémi-Valéry, called Volney, born probably at Manchac in January 1802, married Marcelline Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Dupuis and Marguerite Bourg, at the Baton Rouge church in March 1825.  One wonders what became of them. 

Maturin Luc's second son Valentin Onésime, called Onésime, born probably at Manchac in August 1806, married, at age 30, Marguerite Séraphine, called Séraphine, daughter of fellow Acadian Grégoire Alexis Lejeune and his Creole wife Marie Tardit of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in April 1837.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted three slaves--a 34-year-old black female, a 12-year-old black female, and a 10-year-old black male--on O. Doirron's farm next to Mathurin Lejeune; this probably was Onésime.  Onésime died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1855.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Onésime was age 38  when he died, but he was 48.  His daughter married into the Sarradet family.  His two sons also created their own families. 

Older son Mathurin Oscar, called Oscar, was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in September 1843.  During the War of 1861-65, Oscar served in Company F of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia.  He was captured near Franklin, Tennessee, in December 1864 and spent the rest of the war at Camp Douglas, Illinois, as a prisoner of the Federals.  In the late 1860s, Oscar married fellow Acadian Marie Anna Cécile Bujole and settled in West Baton Rouge Parish. 

Onésime's younger son Joseph Joinville, called Joinville, was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in January 1846.  During the War of 1861-65, Joinville served as a third corporal in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia.  Joinville was captured at Jonesboro, Georgia, in August 1864 and ended up in Camp Chase, Ohio, as a prisoner of war.  After the war, he married Zenobie, daughter of Jules Trichard and Hermance Revault, at the Brusly church, West Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1866. 

Maturin Luc's third and youngest son Fergus, perhaps also called Valmon, born probably at Manchac in January 1811, married Mathilde, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Ephrèm Babin and Anne Marine Hébert of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1829.  What became of them?

Alexandre's fourth son Marin, baptized at Bonneuil-Matours, Poitou, France, age unrecorded, in February 1775, died at Chantenay, France, age 2 1/2, in November 1777.  

Alexandre's fifth son Joseph, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, age unrecorded, in November 1777, married Marie-Modeste, called Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Labauve and Anne Vincent, probably at Manchac in the late 1790s.  They settled in West Baton Rouge Parish.  In August 1850, the federal census taker counted three slaves--all females, all black, ages 60, 38, and 35--on Joseph Doirron's farm.  This was either Joseph, père or Joseph, fils.  His daughters married into the Clément and Hébert families.  Five of his six sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Joseph, fils, born probably at Manchac in November 1800, married Julie Émelie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Marie Lejeune and Marguerite Marie Lebert, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1827.  Their son Joseph III was born probably at Manchac in December 1827.  Joseph, fils remarried to Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Bourg and Théotiste Templet of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in May 1843.  Their son Joseph Albert, called Albert, was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in March 1844; Louis Oscar in April 1848; Pierre Armand in October 1850; and Alexandre Prudent in November 1852.  Their daughter married into the Babin family.  

During the War of 1861-65, second son Albert, by second wife Rosalie Bourg, served in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia.  He was wounded at Shiloh, Tennessee, in April 1862 and was sent home.  The Federals captured him there in December 1864 and sent him to New Orleans and then to the prisoner-of-war compound at Ship Island, Mississippi, where he spent the last days of the war.   

During the War of 1861-65, Joseph, fils's third son Louis Oscar, by second wife Rosalie Bourg, served in Company F of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, the same regiment in which his older brother Albert served.  Louis must have lied about his age when he enlisted at Baton Rouge in September 1862; he was age 14.  His service was cut short when he died of disease at Lauderdale Springs, Mississippi, in July 1863, age 15.   

Joseph, père's second son Joseph-Élie, called Élien, born probably at Manchac in June 1802, married Hélène, also called Clarisse, daughter of fellow Acadian Julien Lejeune and his Anglo wife Elizabeth Gibson of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church in October 1833.  Their son Joseph Lami was born near Baton Rouge in April 1844; Eugène near Brusly in April 1847; and Victorin François in October 1854.  Their daughters married into the Gaille, Lejeune, and Paul families. 

Joseph, père's third son Augustin, born probably at Manchac in January 1804, may have died young.

Joseph, père's fourth son Alexandre le jeune, born probably at Manchac in July 1805, married Adélaïde, another daughter of Grégoire Alexis Lejeune and Marie Tardit, at the Brusly church in January 1848. 

Joseph, père's fifth son Célestin, born probably at Manchac in January 1808, also may have died young. 

Joseph, père's sixth son Marcellin, born probably at Manchac in February 1814, married Caroline, daughter of fellow Acadians Étienne Hébert and Ermeline Daigre, at the Baton Rouge church in November 1836.  Their son Marcellin, fils was born near Baton Rouge in October 1837; Gédéon Balthazar, called Balthazar, in June 1839; Théodore near Brusly in July 1846; and René Philippe in May 1850.  One of their sons married by 1870.

Second son Balthazar married Lozama, daughter of fellow Acadian Zéphirin LeBlanc and his Creole wife Gertrude Voisin, at the Plaquemine church, Iberville Parish, in June 1862.

During the War of 1861-65, Marcellin's third son Théodore served as a fourth sergeant in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia.  

Joseph, père's seventh and youngest son Gédéon, born probably at Manchac in September 1815, living in West Baton Rouge Parish, married Marie Alzire, called Alzire, daughter of fellow Acadians Placide Babin and Arthémise Templet, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1846.  Their son Joseph Jules, called Jules, was born near Brusly in August 1848; Jean Roman in June 1855; and Placide Émile in February 1861.  

During the War of 1861-65, oldest son Jules served in Company H of the 4th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in West Baton Rouge Parish, which fought in Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia.  He was captured near Franklin, Tennessee, in December 1864 and spent the rest of the war at Camp Douglas, Illinois, as a prisoner of the Federals.   

Alexandre's sixth son Jean-Baptiste, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, age unrecorded, in May 1783, married Angélique, called Angelina, another daughter of Jean-Baptiste Hébert and Marguerite Richard, probably at Manchac in August 1804.  They moved to West Baton Rouge Parish by the 1830s.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 10 slaves--four males and six females, all black, ranging in age from 60 to 15--on John Doirron's farm next to Armejean Doirron and near John B. Doirron, so this was probably Jean-Baptiste, père.  Jean Baptiste, père died near Brusly in July 1851.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was age 66 when he died, but he was 68; he was among the last of the Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join his ancestors.  His daughters married into the Aillet and Hébert families.  Two of his four sons also created their own families in West Baton Rouge Parish.

Oldest son Jean Baptiste, fils, born probably at Manchac in June 1805, died at age 2 in October 1807. 

Jean Baptiste's second son, also named Jean Baptiste, fils, born born probably at Manchac in October 1813, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Mathurin Lejeune and Amelite Trahan, at the Baton Rouge church in February 1836.  Their son Jean Baptiste III was born near Baton Rouge in December 1836; Jules was baptized at the Baton Rouge church, age 5 months, in December 1838; Théodore was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in September 1842; and another Jean Baptiste III in March 1852.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted a single slave--a 34-year-old black male--on John B. Doirron's farm next to Armejean Doirron and near John Doirron, so this was probably Jean Baptiste, fils.  Jean Baptiste, fils died near Brusly in April 1855.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was age 43 when he died, but he was 41.  His daughter married into the Daigre and Tullier families. 

Jean Baptiste, père's third son Alexandre Hermogène, called Hermogène or Armogène, born probably at Manchac in August 1817, married Marie Aureline or Auralise, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Béloni Daigre and Marie Trahan, at the Brusly church in October 1847.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted a single slave--an 8-year-old black male--on Armejean Doirron's farm between John Doirron and John B. Doirron.  Hermogène died near Brusly in September 1852.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Hermogène was age 29 when he died, but he was 35.  

Jean Baptiste, père's fourth and youngest son Octave, born probably at Manchac in September 1823, probably died young.   

Alexandre's seventh and youngest son Rémi, born at Manchac in May 1789, married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Richard and Perpétué Aucoin, at the Baton Rouge church in November 1810.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in East Baton Rouge Parish counted seven slaves--two males and 5 females, all black, ranging in age from 56 years to 1 month--on Remé Doiron's farm in the parish's Ward 10.  Rémi died near Baton Rouge in December 1856.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Rémi was "age ca. 60 years" when he died, but he probably was in his late 50s.  His daughters married into the Aucoin, Babin, Comeaux, and Rivas families.  Two of his three sons also created families of their own in East Baton Rouge Parish. 

Oldest son Fergus le jeune, born probably near Manchac in October 1819, probably died young. 

Rémi's second son Jean or Vijean Villeneuve, born probably near Manchac in February 1821, married Émelie Octavine, called Octavine, daughter of François Souchon dit Aubin and his Acadian wife Mélanie Daigre, at the Baton Rouge church in January 1846.  Their son Joseph Amédée was born near Baton Rouge in January 1854, and Francis George Villeneuve in April 1869.

Rémi's third and youngest son Eugène, a twin, born probably near Manchac in November 1824, married, at age 31, Marie Delphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Comeaux and Carmelite Hébert, at the Baton Rouge church in April 1855.  Their son Nager Josiah was born near Baton Rouge in February 1856, and Talbert Eugène in September 1863. 

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Five more Doirons--a single family--crossed on La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in mid-August.  Although the head of this family was a younger brother of the Doiron who had gone to Manchac, this family followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where they created a second center of Doiron family settlement: 

Jacques dit Jacob (c1742-1810) à Jean Doiron

Jacques dit Jacob, fifth and youngest son of Thomas Doiron and Anne Girouard and brother of Alexandre, was born at L'Assomption, Pigiguit, in c1742. He followed his family to Île St.-Jean in c1750 and was counted with them at Rivière-du-Moulin-à-Scie in the interior of the island in August 1752.  In his early teens, he was deported with them to France aboard the British transport Duke William, which reached St.-Malo the first of November.  He lived with his widowed mother and his remaining siblings at St.-Servan near St.-Malo from 1758-59 and at nearby St.-Suliac, where he married Anne-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Breau and Ursule Bourg of Cobeguit, in July 1765.  They lived at St.-Suliac until 1766, at St.-Servan from 1766-72, and returned to St.-Suliac.  He and his family went to Poitou in the early 1770s as part of the settlement venture and retreated with other Poitou Acadians to Nantes in October 1775.  Jacques and Anne-Josèphe buried five children in France.  They and their three remaining children, two sons and a daughter, sailed to Louisiana.  Anne-Josèphe was pregnant when they left Paimboeuf in May 1785, and a daughter was born on the voyage over (named Martine in honor of the Spanish intendente, Martin Navarro, who did so much for the new arrivals, the girl did not survive infancy).  Jacques and Anne-Josèphe chose to settle not on the river near his brother but on upper Bayou Lafourche.  They had more children in Louisiana, including another son.  Jacques died in Assumption Parish in October 1810.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Jacques was age 68 when he died.  His daughters married into the Boudreaux and Bergeron families.  Only two of his seven sons created families of their own, and one of them, the youngest, moved to lower Bayou Teche by the 1840s. 

Oldest son Jean-Jacques, born at St.-Servan, France, in August 1768, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, Louisiana, and upper Bayou Laforuche.  He married Marguerite-Josèphe, daughter of fellow Acadians Ambroise Dugas and Marie-Victoire Pitre, at Lafourche in April 1792.  Marguerite-Josèphe was a native of Nantes and also had come to Louisiana aboard the La Bergère, so they may have known one another for years.  Their daughters married into the Aucoin, Gros, Mars, and Moresco families.  Three of Jean Jacques's four sons also created their own families in the Bayou Lafourche valley. 

Oldest son Jean-Louis, called Louis, born at Assumption in July 1802, married Marie, daughter of Antoine Cuvillier and Jositte Gaspard, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in January 1827.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born in Assumption Parish in November 1828[sic]; and Louis Carvil or Clairville, called Clairville, in December 1828[sic].  One of their sons married by 1870. 

Second son Clairville married Aurelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Barrilleaux and Marcelline Foret, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in July 1856.  

Jean Jacques's second son Germain, born at Assumption in April 1806, married Marguerite Basilise, daughter of Laurent Élie Fremin and his Acadian wife Marguerite Céleste Bourg, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1829.  Their son Maurice was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1830; Joseph Sylvère, called Sylvère, in March 1836 but died in Assumption Parish, age 7, in September 1843; Justin died at age 8 days in October 1839; Germain Edmond was born in May 1841; and Émile Trasimond in November 1843.  Germain died near Labadieville, Assumption Parish, in August 1856, age 50.  His daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  Two of his sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Maurice married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Narcisse Thibodeaux and his Creole wife Angélique Malbrough, at the Labadieville church in July 1855.  Their son Anatole Audressy was born near Labadieville in August 1861, Joseph Augustin in January 1867, and Joseph Camille Aléo in November 1868.  During the War of 1861-65, Maurice, with younger brother Émile and other men from Assumption Parish, served as a conscript in Company C of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  When his unit surrendered at Vicksburg in July 1863, Maurice, along with his brother and most of the conscripts in the regiment, refused parole.  Maurice spent most of the rest of the war at Camp Morton, Indiana, as a prisoner of the Federals. 

During the War of 1861-65, Germain's fifth and youngest son Émile, with older brother Maurice, served as a conscript in Company C of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  When his unit surrendered at Vicksburg in July 1863, Émile, along with his brother and most of the conscripts in the regiment, refused parole.  Émile spent most of the rest of the war at Camp Morton, Indiana, as a prisoner of the Federals.  Émile married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Drausin Naquin and his Creole wife Artémise Gros, at the Labadieville church in February 1870. 

Jean Jacques's third son Étienne, a twin, born in Assumption Parish in April 1810, married Marie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadians François Trahan and Josette Aimée Thibodeaux, at the Thibodauxville church in September 1832.  Their son Joseph Jean Baptiste, called Jean Baptiste, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1833; Étienne Amédée in July 1836 but died at age 3 in October 1839; Joseph died in Assumption Parish, age 4 months, in November 1847; and Louis Lusinien was born near Labadieville in January 1856.  Étienne's daughters married into the Duval, LeBlanc, and Pensano families.  One of them settled at Brashear, now Morgan, City, St. Mary Parish, on the lower Atchafalaya.  One of Étienne's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son Jean Baptiste married Marie, another daughter of Pierre Barrilleaux and Marcelline Foret, at the Labadieville church in May 1859.  Their son Adrien Jean Baptiste was born near Labadieville in December 1862, and Léo Auguste Valère in December 1864. 

Jean Jacques's fourth and youngest son Angel, born in Assumption Parish, died there 15 days after his birth in November 1812. 

Jacques's second son Simon-Joseph, called Joseph, born at St.-Servan, France, in April 1770, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana.  He died in Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche in December 1824.  The Plattenville priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 56 when he died, but he was 54.  He did not marry.   

Jacques's third son Jacques-François, born at St.-Suliac, France, in April 1774, died at Archigny, Poitou, age 11 months, in March 1775.

Jacques's fourth son Jean-Baptiste, baptized at St.-Nicolas, Nantes, France, in January 1776, age unrecorded, died at Nantes, age 20 months, in September 1777.  

Jacques's fifth son Benjamin, baptized at St.-Nicolas, Nantes, in April 1780, age unrecorded, died at Nantes, age 2 1/2, in January 1783.

Jacques's sixth son, a second Jean-Baptiste, baptized at St.-Nicolas, Nantes, in November 1783, age unrecorded, died at Nantes, age 1 month, the following December.  

Jacques's seventh and youngest son Auguste or Augustin, born probably at Lafourche in c1790, married Anne Marie dite Nanette, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Daigle and Marie Dugas, at the Plattenville church in January 1812.  They moved from the upper Lafourche to lower Bayou Teche by the 1840s.  Auguste's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in January 1845.  He would have been in his mid-50s that year.  His daughters married into the Aucoin, Bertrand, Comeaux, and Daigle families, and at least one of them settled on lower Bayou Teche.  One of sons also settled there. 

Older son Jean Baptiste Auguste, born in Assumption Parish in December 1812, married Basilise, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Aucoin and Victoire Arcement, at the Plattenville church in April 1834.  Their son Désiré Ulgère was born in Assumption Parish in March 1836, and Augustave in April 1839.  They evidently followed his father to lower Bayou Teche in the 1840s.  Jean Baptiste Auguste died near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, in January 1868.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jean Baptiste died "at age 53 yrs."  Jean Baptiste Auguste would have been age 55.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, later that month. 

Augustin's younger son Augustin Pierre, born in Assumption Parish in March 1826, may have died young. 

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Fourteen more Doirons--a widower with his two daughters, one married, one not; three wives married to a La Garenne, a Moulaison, and Loiseleur, one of them without her husband; two widows of a Dugas and a Lalande; and a good-sized family--including four siblings, crossed on Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in the third week of August.  The widower (whose only surviving son joined him later), the wives, and the widows followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac on the river, but the head of the good-sized family chose to settle in the Attakapas District, where he created a western branch of the family.  Two Doiron sisters accompanying their mother, stepfather, and four stepsisters, crossed to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early November.  They followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where they married into the Baudoin and Hébert families, but one of them moved on to Attakapas in the 1790s: 

Jean (1730-1786) à Jean Doiron

Jean, younger son of Louis Doiron and Marguerite Barrieau, born at L'Assomption in March 1730, followed his family to Grande-Anse, Île St.-Jean, and married Anne, daughter of Alexandre Thibodeau and François Benoit, on the island in January 1752.  A French official counted the newlyweds living next to his older brother Alexis and widowed mother Anne at Grande-Anse in August 1752.  Between 1754 and 1758, Anne gave Jean four children, two sons and two daughters.  The British deported Jean, Anne, and their children to St.-Malo, France, in late 1758.  Jean and Anne survived the crossing, but all four of their children died at sea.  Jean and Anne settled first at St.-Suliac near St.-Malo and then at nearby St.-Énogat, close to his older brother.  Between 1760 and 1764, Anne gave Jean four more children, two sons and two daughters.  In November 1765, they were among the few island Acadians who chose to go to Belle-Île-en-Mer with other Acadian exiles.  They settled near his older brother at Bortereau near Locmaria.  Jean sold his concession at Bortereau to Luc Bédex in 1777 and, like his brother had done earlier in decade, left the island.  They moved to Paimbouef, the port of Nantes, where wife Anne died in December 1783, age 53, and a daughter married in March 1784.  Jean, along with his two daughters, one of them married, the other still single, and a teenage orphan, emigrated to Louisiana in 1785.  Jean's surviving son, now age 25 and still unmarried, also went to the colony that year on a later vessel.  If his younger surviving son, who would have been age 23 in 1785, was still alive, he chose to remain in the mother country.  Jean and his daughters followed the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac, and his son joined them there.  Jean did not remarry.  He died at Manchac in July 1786, age 56, less than a year after he reached Louisiana.  His daughters married into the Hébert, Daigle, and Trahan families in France and Louisiana.  His son also created a family of his own at Baton Rouge.

Third son Jean-Baptiste, born at St.-Énogat, France, near St.-Malo, in April 1760, followed his family to Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, in 1765 and became a sailor.  His widowed father and two sisters sailed to Louisiana aboard the third of the Seven Ships from France, but, still a bachelor, he crossed on the last of the Seven Ships, La Caroline, which reached New Orleans in the third week of December.  He joined his family at Manchac, where he married Anne-Laurence, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Guédry and his first wife Adélaïde Hébert, in December 1787.  Anne-Laurence had been born aboard the transport her family had taken from Île St.-Jean to St.-Malo in 1758-59 and came to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the same ship on which Jean-Baptiste's family had crossed.  Only one of their three sons married and carried on the line, and some of his descendants joined their cousins in the Bayou Teche valley after the War of 1861-65.  

Oldest son Alex, born at Manchac in November 1788, probably died young.  

Jean-Baptiste's second son Joseph Hippolyte, born at Manchac in December 1789, married Catherine, daughter of Jean Paye and Jeanne Morale, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in April 1815.  Their son Joseph Hippolyte Merol, called Hippolyte, was born near St. Gabriel in February 1818.  His son created a vigorous line on the river.  After the War of 1861-65, most, if not all, of his descendants moved from the river to the Bayou Teche valley. 

Only son Hippolyte married fellow Acadian Marie Domitille, called Domitille, Dupuy probably at St. Gabriel in the 1830s.  Their son Adolphe was born near St. Gabriel in January 184[3] but died at age 1 1/2 in August 1844; Hippolyte, fils was born in April 1844 but died at age 3 in July 1847; Hermogène was born in April 1846; Augustave in September 1847; Félix Dewint in July 1849; Louis Cass in October 1851; and John, called Johny, in January 1854.  Their daughters married into the Gueho and Suarez families, one of them on Bayou Teche.  After the War of 1861-65, three of Hippolyte's sons also settled on Bayou Teche.  

Third son Hermogène married Marguerite Alzina, called Alzina, daughter of Clairville Lasseigne and Joséphine Allegre and widow of Ernest Cormier, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in July 1867.  They settled on Bayou Teche.  Their son Paul Hippolyte was born in St. Martin Parish in September 1870. 

Hippolyte's sixth son Louis Cass married Angèle or Angelina Roy, perhaps a fellow Acadian, at the St. Martinville church in January 1873.  They also settled on Bayou Teche.  

Hippolyte's seventh and youngest son Johny Johny married Clothilde Fels.  They settled on lower Bayou Teche. 

Jean-Baptiste's third and youngest son Théodore, born at Manchac in August 1792, died at age 1 in November 1793.  

Jean's fourth and youngest son Pierre, born at St.-Énogat in August 1762, followed his family to Belle-Île-en-Mer and perhaps to Nantes.  If he was still alive in 1785, when his widowed father, sisters, and older brother emigrated to Louisiana, Pierre chose to remain in the mother country, unless he was employed as a seaman.  If so, there is no record of him joining them in the Spanish colony. 

Jean-Baptiste (c1743-1809) à Jean Doiron

Jean-Baptiste, second son of Paul dit Grand Paul Doiron and Marguerite Michel, born probably at Pigiguit in c1744 or 1745, followed his family to Île St.-Jean in c1750, was counted with them at Rivière du Nord-est in the interior of the island in August 1752, and was deported with them to Le Havre, France, in late 1758.  Jean-Baptiste became a carpenter in the mother country and married Marie-Blanche, called Blanche, daughter of fellow Acadians René Bernard and Marguerite Hébert of Chignecto, at Le Havre in January 1766.  In 1733, he took his family went to Poitou as part of the settlement venture there and, after two years of effort, retreated with other Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes in October 1775.  They settled at nearby Chantenay.  When they arrived at New Orleans in 1785, instead of following the majority of their fellow passengers to Manchac and Baton Rouge on the river, they chose to go to the Attakapas District, where Blanche had family.  They settled at La Pointe on upper Bayou Teche and had more children there.  Jean Baptiste died at his home on Bayou Teche in March 1809.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was age 66 when he died.  His daughters married into the Begnaud, Bonin, Durio, Landry, and Melançon families.  Only two of his five sons created families of their own on the upper Teche and out on the southwestern prairies.  

Oldest son Jean-Baptiste-Cesar, baptized at Cenan, Poitou, France, age unrecorded, in May 1775, evidently died young in France.  

Jean-Baptiste's second son Jean-Louis, baptized at St.-Nicolas, Nantes, age unrecorded, in March 1777, died at Nantes, age 9 months, in December 1777.

Jean-Baptiste's third son Louis-Toussaint, called Toussaint, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France, age unrecorded, in November 1781, followed his family to Louisiana and Bayou Teche.  He died probably at La Pointe on the upper Teche in August 1800, age 19, before he could marry.

Jean-Baptiste's fourth son Jean-Charles, baptized at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, age unrecorded, in July 1784, married Louise, called Lise, daughter of fellow Acadians Claude Broussard dit Beauseoleil and his first wife Louise Hébert of lower Vermilion, at Attakapas in May 1806.  They settled at La Pointe.  Jean Charles's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in January 1845.  He would have been age 61 that year.  His daughter married into the Bergeron family.  Two of his three sons also created their own families and settled on the southwestern prairies and in the nearby coastal marshes. 

Oldest son Edmond, born at La Pointe in March 1807  married Marie Arsène, called Arsène, Bennet, Bonner, or Bonnet.  They settled in Calcasieu Parish and had sons named Cyprien le jeune, Michel, and Valéry.  They may also have had sons named Charles, Edward, and Valmond.  

During the War of 1861-65, Valéry served as a cook in Company A(1st) of Daly's/Ragsdale's Battalion Texas Cavalry, recruited heavily in Calcasieu Parish, where it was stationed in 1863 and 1864.  Valéry married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Troisville Breaux, at the Carencro church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1875.  

During the War of 1861-65, Valmond served as a cook in Company A(1st) of Daly's/Ragsdale's Battalion Texas Cavalry.  Valmond married Marie Catherine, called Catherine, Verdin.  Their son Arthur was born near Creole, Cameron Parish, in January 1891.   

During the War of 1861-65, Edward served as a cook in Company A(1st) of Daly's/Ragsdale's Battalion Texas Cavalry.  Edward married fellow Acadian Marie Aucoin.  Their son Paul was born near Creole in May 1892, Jacques in November 1894, and Julien in October 1899.  Their daughter married into the Brown family.   

Michel married Émelie, daughter of fellow Acadian Clerville Breaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in May 1874.  Their son Izaac was born near Creole in May 1890, and Michel Abraham in August 1899.   

Cyprien le jeune married Marcellite, daughter of Jean Baptiste Gatt, at the Vermilionville church in February 1884.  Their son Ambroise was born in Lafayette Parish in January 1885; Joseph Cadet in September 1886; Louis Adam near Creole in September 1890 but died at age 2 1/2 in January 1893; Ambrose was born near Hackberry, Cameron Parish, in January 1895; and Madison Simon in February 1897.   

Jean Charles's second son Édouard, born probably at La Pointe in January 1816, died in St. Martin Parish in November 1836, age 20.  He probably did not marry.  

Jean Charles's third and youngest son Rosémond, born probably at La Pointe in July 1811, married fellow Acadian Louisa Dugas by the 1850s.  They were living near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in the late 1860s.  Their son Edmond was born "more or less in Lafayette" Parish between 1890 and 1895.  

Jean-Baptiste's fifth and youngest son Cyprien, born probably at La Pointe in August 1789, "married" Annette _____.  Cyprien also "married" Marie Rose, called Rose, Landry.  They had a son named Victor.  Their daughter married into the Roy family.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted four slaves--four males and a female, all black, ranging in age from 35 to 12--on Cyprien Doyron's farm.  In June 1860, when Cyprien would have been in his early 70s, the federal census taker in St. Martin Parish counted three slaves--two males and a female, all black, ages 50, 23, and 20--on his farm.  Cyprien's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in July 1876.  He would have been age 87 that year.  

Older son Gérard or Girard, by first wife Annette, born probably in St. Martin Parish in c1848, married Angélique, also called Célestine Louise, Pierre at the Breaux Bridge church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1868.  Gérard died near Breaux Bridge in July 1878, age 30; he was only 30.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse that month. 

Cyprien's younger son Victor, by second "wife" Rose Landry, married Marie Céleste, called Céleste, daughter of Edward St. Julien and his Acadian wife, a Breaux, at the Breaux Bridge church in February 1882.  Their son Victor William, called William, was born near Breaux Bridge in January 1885 but died at age 9 in May 1894, Francis Walter was born in December 1886, James in March 1894, and Joseph in January 1896.  

Doucet

Germain Doucet, sieur de La Verdure, of Couperans or Conflans en Brie, France, a minor nobleman and "captain at arms," born in the mid-1590s, came to Acadia with Isaac de Razilly and the sieur d'Aulnay in 1632, four years before French families first arrived in the colony.  Germain was master at arms at Pentagouët, present-day Maine, in 1640 and testified in an inquiry against former governor Charles La Tour that year.  Germain was mentioned in the will of Governor d'Aulnay, written in 1649, the year before the governor died.  In 1654, when the English seized Port-Royal, Germain commanded the post and was a guardian of d'Aulnay's children.  Germain is not listed in the first Acadian census of 1671 because he likely returned to France after the English seized the colony.  According to Acadian genealogist Bona Arsenault, if Germain had been listed in the first census, he would have been age 76 that year.  Germain married twice, but the names of both of his wives have been lost to history.  According to Acadian genealogist Stephen A. White, Germain married his first wife in c1620, probably in France, a dozen years before he came to Acadia, probably without her.  According to White, Germain and his first wife had four children, two sons and two daughters, all of whom created families of their own.  Their daughters married into the Dugas and Lejeune dit Briard families.  The capitulation papers Germain presented to English officer Robert Sedgwick in 1654 said Germain left his "brother-in-law" and lieutenant, Jacques Bourgeois, as hostage with the English to insure that the commandant fulfilled the terms of surrender, so Germain's second wife, who, according to White, he married in c1654, may have been a younger sister of Jacques Bourgeois's wife Jeanne, daughter of Guillaume Trahan and his first wife Françoise Corbineau, but her name also has been lost to history.  According to White, no children by his second wife can be traced.  Sieur Germain's older son Pierre, by his first wife, was born in France in c1621.  He came to Acadia probably in the 1630s with his mother and sisters and settled at Port-Royal, where he worked as a mason.  According to White, he did not marry until c1660, when he was nearly 40.  His wife Henriette, daughter of Simon Pelletret and Perrine Bourg, was 20 years his junior and gave him 10 children.  Pierre died at Port-Royal in June 1713, age 92.  His four daughters married into the Hébert, Bernard, Doiron, Chênet Dubreuil, and Comeau families.  Five of his six sons, all born at Port-Royal, married into the Caissie dit Roger, Blanchard, Bourgeois, Broussard, and Lord families.  Sieur Germain's younger son, Germain, fils, born in c1641, was, according to Stephen A. White, from Sieur Germain's first wife.  However, according to recent yDNA evidence garnered from nearly a dozen Doucet descendants, Germain, fils may not have been a son of Sieur Germain at all but rather a Mi'kmaq who the captain at arms adopted, perhaps when he married the boy's mother in c1654.  Germain, fils married Marie, daughter of René Landry l'aîné and Perrine Bourg, at Port-Royal in c1664.  They had nine children, seven sons and two daughters.  Germain, fils died at Port-Royal in the late 1690s, in his late 50s.  One of their daughters married into the Loppinot family.  Five of his seven sons, all born at Port-Royal, married into the Guérin, Corporon, Babin, Pellerin, and Comeau families.  By 1755, descendants of Germain Doucet de La Verdure and his two wives could be found at Annapolis Royal, Minas, Chignecto, and Chepoudy in the trois-rivières area west of Chignecto.  They also could be found in the French Maritimes on Île Royale and Île St.-Jean, and in Canada.  Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this large family even farther. 

The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  In the early 1750s, the fanatical French priest Abbé Jean-Louis Le Loutre and his Mi'kmaq Indians burned a number of Acadian settlements at Chignecto, forcing the settlers to move from the British-controlled area east of the Missaguash River to the Aulac area west of Fort Beauséjour, still controlled by the French.  Doucets may have been among the refugees.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto Acadians, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Lieutenant Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  Doucets were among them.  

At least one Doucet family from Grand-Pré was transported to Maryland in the fall of 1755.  The Doucets who were shipped to Virginia endured a fate worse than most of the other refugees deported from the Minas basin.  In mid-November, when five transports appeared unexpectedly at Hampton Roads, the Virginia governor, Robert Dinwiddie, protested their deportation to his colony without his consent.  The following spring, the Virginia Assembly shipped the Acadians to England.  The Doucets who survived the Virginia debacle ended up at Southampton.  Their ordeal only worsened in the English ports, where they were treated like common criminals.  By 1763, more than half of them were dead. 

At Annapolis Royal, where most of the Doucets still lived in 1755, several hundred haute-rivière Acadians, including Doucets, escaped deportation by hiding in the hills above the Fundy shore.  Nevertheless, the British were able to send off half a dozen transports filled with Annapolis Acadians to Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina in mid-October and early December.  The ship bound for North Carolina--the Pembroke--fell into the hands of its Acadian "passengers," who took it to the mouth of Rivière St.-Jean and escaped into the wilds of today's New Brunswick, but the five New England- and New York-bound ships reached their destinations.  Many Annapolis Doucets were on these ships.  

Doucets who escaped the roundup at Chignecto and Annapolis Royal sought refuge at Shediac and Miramichi on the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  By 1756, as many as 4,000 exiles had made their way to Miramichit, which had boasted only a hand full of Acadians before Le Grand Dérangement.  Food, clothing, and shelter were in short supply, and hundreds of refugees perished during the first winter of exile.  When spring finally came, some survivors moved on to Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs and even to the St. Lawrence valley, where the Canadiennes treated them badly.  But the majority of the exiles, including Doucets, remained at Miramichi and tried desperately to create a permanent settlement despite thin soil and a short growing season.  In 1758, after the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July, the British sent search and destroy missions to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore to protect their lines of communication in the Gulf.  Unable to tend their fields or maintain their pitiful shelters, the Acadians at Miramichi faced another starving winter.  Doucets were at Restigouche when the British attacked the French stronghold in July 1760.  The British rounded up 300 Acadians, perhaps including Doucets, during their withdrawal and held them in prison compounds in Nova Scotia.  Doucets appear on a list of 1,003 Acadians still at Restigouche in late October 1760, but most of them did not remain.  During the next few years, they either were captured by, or surrendered to, British forces in the area and joined their cousins in the Nova Scotia prisons. 

Living in territory controlled by France, none of the Doucets on the French Maritime islands were touched by the British roundup of their cousins in Nova Scotia during the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the British captured the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, they swooped down on the rest of Île Royale and on Île St.-Jean and rounded up most of the Acadians there, Doucets among them.  Later that year, the British packed hundreds of island Acadians into hired merchant vessels and deported them to St.-Malo and other French ports.  Not all of them survived the crossing to St.-Malo, Le Havre, La Rochelle, and Rochefort.  Doucets who survived the crossing to St.-Malo settled at nearby St.-Énogat and St.-Servan.  In the spring of 1763, after prolonged negotiations between the French and British governments, the Acadians in England were repatriated to France.  In May, the Doucets at Southampton sailed to St.-Malo aboard the ship L'Ambition and settled at St.-Servan near their cousins from Île St.-Jean.  In November 1765, they followed other Acadians from England to Belle-Île-en-Mer off the southern coast of Brittany.  In 1773, several Doucet families became part of a settlement venture in Poitpou.  Augustin dit Justice Doucet, in fact, was one of the Acadian leaders in St.-Malo invited by the Marquis de Pérusse to inspect his lands near Châtellerault and then to coax his fellow Acadians to join the venture.  Augustin reported favorably on what he saw.  He, in fact, depite his dit, may have been paid to exaggerate the quality of the soil on the marquis's estate.  After two years of effort, several Doucet families retreated with 900 of the Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where they subsisted as best they could on government handouts or on what work they could find.  Other Doucets who had gone to Poitou, including Augustin dit Justice, were among the 300 Acadians who remained in the area, but by September 1784, Justicr's widow and the other Doucets had remained in Poitou joined their fellow Acadians at Nantes.  Although Le Grand Dérangement ended for most Acadians in North America by the late 1760s, this was not the case for those who took refuge on St.-Pierre and Miquelon, French-controlled islands off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  In 1778, during the American Revolution, soon after France joined the American struggle against their old red-coated enemies, the British rounded up the Acadians on the Newfounland island and deported them to La Rochelle, France.  Doucets were among the unfortunates who endured the crossing on hired British transports.  When, in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, 13 of the Doucets still in the mother country agreed to take it.  Other Doucets chose to remain.  

In North America, Doucets who had escaped the British on the Gulf of St. Lawrence or who had been exiled to New England, perhaps the majority of the family's survivors, moved on to Canada.  Though now also a British possession, the northern province was populated largely by fellow French Catholics, many of them Acadian exiles.  So, in a colony nearly as old as Acadia, descendants of Sr. Germain Doucet began the slow, inexorable process of becoming Canadiennes.   Especially after 1766, Doucets could be found in present-day Québec Province at Trois-Rivières, Bécancour, Pointe-du-Lac, St.-Ours, La-Prairie-de-la-Magdeleine, Ste.-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, St.-Pierre-du-Sorel, Île Dupas, Batiscan, Pointe-aux-Écureuils, St.-Pierre-les-Becquets, St.-Grégoire, Nicolet, Maskinongé, Rivière-du-Loup now Louiseville, Deschambault, L'Assomption, Cap-Santé, and Yamachiche on the St. Lawrence above Québec City; at Québec City; at Charlesbourg, Beauport, Rivière Ouelle, St.-Francois-de-la-Rivière-du-Sud, St.-Pierre-de-la-Rivière-du-Sud, and Kamouraska on the St. Lawrence below the city; at Bonaventure in Gaspésie; and on îles-de-la-Madeleine in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.  In present-day New Brunswick, they settled at Nipisiguit, now Bathurst; and Île Miscou on the northeastern shore.  In Nova Scotia, they could be found on Baie Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay, not far from their old home at Annapolis Royal; at Yarmouth south of Baie Ste.-Marie; and at Windsor in the Minas Basin, once the Acadian settlement of Pigiguit.  They also settled on Île Miquelon before moving on to Rustico on the north shore of Prince Edward Island, formerly Île St.-Jean.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the mid-twentieth century, may even have forgotten that the others existed.  

After the war with Britain ended in 1763, Acadians exiled in the seaboard colonies were encouraged by French officials to go to French St.-Dominique to work on a new naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas.  Although driven from North America, the French were determined to hang on to what was left of their shrinking empire.  The new naval base on the north shore of the sugar island would protect the approaches to what was left of their possessions in the Caribbean basin.  French officials saw the Acadian exiles as a ready source of cheap labor and promised them land of their own if they came to help build the naval base.  And so dozens of Acadians, including Doucets from South Carolina, came to the island.  A number of Doucets survived the ordeal and remained at Môle St.-Nicolas.  Beginning in the summer of 1765, after several years of what they saw as fruitless effort, Acadians sought permission to leave the naval base, but French officials refused to let them go.  Some Acadians, including Doucets, left the project anyway and settled on the northern coast at Jean-Rabel.  Another settled at nearby Port-de-Paix.  At least two Doucets ended up at Port-Royal on the island of Guadeloupe in the French Antilles. 

Doucets being held in Nova Scotia at war's end faced a hard dilemma.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  However, British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in, or return to, Nova Scotia, they could live only in small family groups in previous unsettled areas or work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all they had suffered on the question of the oath, few self-respecting Acadians would consent to take it if it could be avoided.  Some Halifax exiles, including Doucets, chose to relocate to Île Miquelon.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies, including Doucets, already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to French Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they refused to remain in L'Acadie.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, nine were Doucets. 

Compared to the number of Doucets who remained in Canada and greater Acadia, relatively few descendants of Sieur Germain Doucet emigrated to Louisiana.  But those who did were among the earliest Acadians to seek refuge in the colony.  The first of them came to Louisiana with the Broussards in early 1765 and followed them to lower Bayou Teche.  Later that year, more Doucets, one of them a young bachelor, arrived from Halifax and settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  In the late 1760s, an Acadian Doucet probably from French St.-Domingue settled at San Gabriel on the river, but his only surviving son moved to the western prairies during the 1810s.  Several more Doucet families came to Louisiana from France in 1785.  Most of them settled on upper Bayou Lafourche, creating a third center of family settlement.  By the antebellum period, Acadian Doucets had disappeared from the river parishes, but they could still be found on Bayou Lafourche as far down as Lockport, and they were especially numerous on the western prairies.  

Doucets from Alabama--Allibamonts, their fellow colonists called them--left Mobile after the British took over the area and settled in the Opelousas District about the time that the first Acadians arrived there.  By the 1780s, Acadian as well as Allibamont Doucets were living on the Opelousas prairies, somewhat complicating the family's genealogical picture there.  Many of the Acadian Doucets at Opelousas took Creole brides, but their Creole namesakes tended to marry their own kind, especially fellow Allibamonts.  During the antebellum period, the Creole Doucets lived mainly in St. Landry Parish and in the Ville Platte area of what is now Evangeline Parish.  The Acadian Doucets on the prairies, more numerous and more scattered, could be found around Church Point in present-day Acadia Parish, near Grand Coteau in St. Landry and Lafayette parishes, in the Bois Mallet area of St. Landry Parish, along upper Bayou Teche in St. Martin Parish, and farther down the Teche in St. Mary Parish. 

Judging from the slave schedules compiled by federal census takers in 1850 and 1860, the great majority of the Doucets of South Louisiana participated only peripherally in the South's plantation economy.  Two of them, however, one a Creole, the other an Acadian, owned enough slaves by 1860 to qualify as planters.  Creole François Doucet of St. Landry Parish owned 11 slaves in 1850 and 20 in 1860.  In 1850, his older brother Hubert, who lived next to François, owned 15 slaves.  Acadian Pierre Zéphirin Doucet of Lafayette Parish owned the most bondsmen.  In 1850, Pierre Z., as he was called, held 19 slaves on his farm in the parish's western district.  A decade later, he held 36 slaves on his Lafayette Parish plantation.  In contrast, only a few of his cousins in the prairies parishes owned more than one or two slaves, and no Doucet who lived on Bayou Lafourche appeared on either of the federal slave schedules.  As a result of the family's participation in the South's peculiar institution, Afro-Creole Doucets could be found on the western prairies during the late antebellum and immediate post-war periods. 

Dozens of Doucets, both Acadian and Creole, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  At least two of them died in Confederate service, one an Acadian, the other a Creole.  Ursin, son of Acadian Anselme Doucet, was age 30 and married when he joined a local militia unit, the Prairie Rangers Company, also called Todd's Prairie Rangers, raised in St. Landry Parish early in the war.  With him were two of his brothers, Paulin and Narcisse.  Ursin died probably of disease at Opelousas in December 1862, four months after his unit was transferred to Confederate service.  François, fils, a Creole, also from St. Landry Parish, was among the dozens of men from South Louisiana who were conscripted into the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery and ended up in the trenches at Vicksburg.  Although his Confederate service record says he survived the siege as well as the war, an Opelousas church record shows that he died in June 1863 during the siege, age 18

During the war, successive Federal offensives devastated the regions where Doucets lived.  The Lafourche valley suffered early in the war and remained under the hard hand of Federal occupation for most of the conflict.  Federal armies marched three times through the Teche and upper Vermilion valleys in 1863 and 1864, burning and pillaging many farms and plantations, some of them no doubt owned by Doucets.  Thanks to these Federal incursions, emancipation came early to the area, with its resulting economic and social turmoil.  Confederate foraging parties and cutthroat Jayhawkers also plagued the area where Doucets lived, adding to the family's misery. ...

 In Louisiana, he family's name also is spelled Doucé, Douchet, Dousait, Doussé, Dousset, Duchet, Dusé, Dusset.14

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The first Acadian Doucets--six in a family and a young female orphan, seven Doucets in all--came to Louisiana in February 1765 from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue.  They followed the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche: 

Michel-Laurent (1722-1805) à Laurent à Germain, fils à Germain Doucet

Michel-Laurent, older son of Laurent Doucet, fils and Marie-Anne Pellerin, born at Annapolis Royal in November1722, married Marguerite, daughter of Charles Martin and Jeanne Comeau, at Annapolis Royal in January 1749.  They escaped the British in 1755 and fled to the Gulf of St. Lawrence shore.  They escaped the British again in the summer of 1760 when the Royal Navy attacked the French stronghold at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  Sometime in the early 1760s, they either were captured by, or were surrendered to, British forces and were held in a prison compound in Nova Scotia.  British officials counted Michel-Laurent, called Michelle Dousain, Marguerite, and eight children on Georges Island in Halifax harbor in August 1763.  Michel, Marguerite, and five of their childern, four sons and a daughter, emigrated to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, in 1764-65, the first members of the family to go there.  They followed the Broussards to lower Bayou Teche in the spring of 1765.  Their daughter Marie-Marthe, age 1, died in the epidemic that struck the Teche valley Acadians that summer and fall.  They settled first at La Manque on the lower Teche before moving to the Opelousas District in the 1780s or 1790s.  Michel Laurent died at Opelousas in October 1805.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Michel was 105 years old when he died, but he probably was in his early 80s.  All four of their sons created their own families on the prairies, but not all of the lines endured.  Most of the Acadian Doucets of Louisiana, in fact, are descended from Michel-Laurent and three of his sons, especially the oldest. 

Oldest son Joseph dit Hilaire, born at Annapolis Royal in c1752, followed his parents into exile, to imprisonment at Halifax, and to Louisiana.  He married Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Landry and Madeleine Broussard, at Attakapas in July 1772.  In the late 1770s or early 1780s, they followed his parents to the Opelousas District.  Joseph died at Opelousas in December 1803, in his early 50s.  His daughter married into the Leger family.  Four of his five sons created their own families on the Opelousas prairies.

Oldest son Joseph, fils, baptized at Attakapas, age unrecorded, in May 1776, married Céleste, daughter of Antoine Bellard and his Acadian wife Marie Trahan, at Opelousas in May 1805.  Their son Joseph III was born in September 1809; Maximilien in February 1813; Joachim in May 1814; Jean in March 1815; and Joseph Julien, called Julien, was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, age "about 4 years," in October 1821.  They may also may have had a son named Alexandre.  Joseph, fils died near Grand Coteau in November 1840.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was age 70 when he died, but he probably was in his 60s.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted three slaves--a 24-year-old black female, a 22-year-old mulatto male, and a 5-year-old black female--on Céleste Doucet's farm; this may have been Joseph, fils's widow, Céleste Bellard.  Her and Joseph, fils's daughter married into the Comeaux family.  All six of their sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph III married Marie Carmelite, called Carmelite, "natural" daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Richard and Spanish Creole Clothilde Quintero, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1828.  Their son Joseph IV was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1836; Martin in August 1838; Émile in April 1843; Charles in July 1845; Alfred near Grand Coteau in November 1847; Hippolyte in October 1849; Léon O'Neil near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in September 1854; and Narcisse in December 1857.  They also had a son named Zéphirin.  Their daughters married into the Comeaux, Cormier, Figurant, Frugé, Matte, and Sonnier families.  Four of their sons married by 1870. 

Second son Martin married Irma, daughter of Simon Matte and his Acadian wife Célestine Chiasson, at the Church Point church in May 1858.  Their son Martin, fils was born near Church Point in April 1870.  During the War of 1861-65, Martin served probably as a conscript in Company B of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which included many Acadian draftees and which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Martin was captured at Vicksburg in July 1863 with the rest of his unit, but, unlike most of his fellow conscripts, who refused parole and went to Federal prisoner-of-war camps, Martin accepted a parole of honor, was exchanged, returned to his regiment, and surrendered with his unit at Meridian, Mississippi, in May 1865.  He was a farmer after the war and was living near Crowley, Acadia Parish, in 1891.  

Joseph III"s third son Émile married Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Lejeune and his Creole wife Phelonise Hall, at the Church Point church in December 1863.  Their son Joseph le jeune was born near Church Point in November 1864.  Émile remarried to cousin Julie or Julia, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Thibodeaux and Zelima Richard, at the Church Point church in December 1866. 

During the War of 1861-65, Joseph III's fourth son Charles served in Company D of the 7th Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, raised in Lafayette and St. Landry parishes, which fought in Louisiana, especially against prairie Jayhawkers.  Charles married Caroline Lebleu, widow of Charles Bellard, at the Church Point church in November 1866.  Their son Grégoire was born near Church Point in November 1870.  Charles died near Church Point in December 1931, age 86.   

Joseph III's fifth son Zéphirin married Alida or Hida, daughter of French Canadian Joseph Lavergne, fils and his Acadian wife Emeline Jeansonne, at the Grand Coteau church in May 1867.  Their son Philogène was born near Church Point in May 1870. 

Joseph, fils's second son Maximilien married Marie Anne, daughter of Hippolyte Marcantel and Marguerite Olivier, at the Opelousas church in July 1834.  Maximilien died in St. Landry Parish in October 1841, age 28.  His family line probably died with him.  

Joseph, fils's third son Joachim may have married Carmelite Braysand.  

Joseph, fils's fourth son Jean may have married Adeline Dufrene and settled near Church Point by the early 1850s.  

Joseph, fils's fifth son Joseph Julien married Joséphine, daughter of Joseph Fontenot and Céleste Jacques Fontenot, at the Grand Coteau church in April 1839.  Their son Joseph Julien, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1840; Julien near Grand Coteau in December 1843; Jules in December 1849; Onésime near Church Point in February 1853; Célestin in March 1863; Félicien near Grand Coteau in July 1865; and Pierre Arvillien near Church Point in March 1867.  Joseph Julien's daughter married into the Lejeune family.  One, perhaps two, of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Joseph Julien, fils married Mélaïde, daughter of Creoles Louis Valéry LeBlanc and Marie Caroline Racca, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1861.  Their son Joseph Edmond, called Edmond, was born near Church Point in July 1862; and Joseph Lastie in March 1864.  During the War of 1861-65, Joseph Julien, fils served in Company D of the 7th Louisiana Regiment Cavalry, raised in Lafayette and St. Landry parishes, which fought in Louisiana.  Joseph Julien, fils remarried to fellow Acadian Hyacinthe Richard, widow of Numa Leger, at Church Point in March 1879.  Joseph Julien, fils died at Palmetto, St. Landry Parish, in February 1924, just shy of his 83rd birthday, and was buried in Immaculate Conception Catholic Cemetery, Lebeau. 

Joseph Julien, père's second son Jules may have married Anastasie Villeneuve in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1870. 

Joseph, fils's sixth son Alexandre married fellow Acadian Céleste Comeaux in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1850.  Their son Joseph was born near Church Point in March 1851, Jean Dupré in March 1853, Jules le jeune in July 1859, Gerasin in July 1861, and Mirza in November 1863.  

Joseph dit Hilaire's second son Anselme, born at Attakapas in October 1777, married Marie-Angèle, called Angèle, daughter of fellow Acadians Blaise Lejeune and Marie-Josèphe Breaux, at Opelousas in November 1802.  Their son Anselme, fils, also called Anse, was baptized at Opelousas, age 6 weeks, in January 1807; Achille was born in St. Landry Parish in December 1809; Mélon, also called Menton or Mouton; in December 1811; Orien in February 1814 but died at age 16 months in June 1815; and Hilaire le jeune was born in September 1819.  Their daughters married into the Venable and Young families.  Four of Anselme's sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Anselme, fils, married Pauline, 15-year-old daughter of Joseph Bergeau and Marie Miller, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1828.  They settled at Pointe-aux-Loups, now Iota, Acadia Parish.  Their son Paulin was born in December 1830, and Ursin in December 1831.  Anselme, fils remarried to Adélaïde, daughter of Joseph Venable and his Acadian wife Anastasie Savoie and widow of André Meche, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1836, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1847.  Their son Simon was born near Grand Coteau in July 1839, Narcisse in Lafayette Parish in January 1841, Onésime near Grand Coteau in November 1842, Joseph in November 1844, and Mélon le jeune in February 1851.  Their daughters married into the Gay family, and perhaps into the Caruthers and Leger families as well.  Anselme, fils's estate record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in September 1838, years before he died.  Anselme, fils died by May 1853, when a second succession record, probably post-mortem, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse.  He would have been 46 years old that year.  Four of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Paulin, by first wife Pauline Bergeau, married Celima or Selina, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Trahan and his Creole wife Celina Fontenot, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1860.  During the War of 1861-65, Paulin served in the Prairie Rangers Company Cavalry or Todd's Prairie Rangers when it was part of the state militia.  The company transferred to Confederate service in August 1862, but Paulin was discharged on a surgeon's certificate in October 1862 and went home before the company became part of the 3rd (Harrison's) Regiment Louisiana Cavalry.  Paulin's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in July 1867.  He would have been 37 years old that year.  Was the succession filed post-mortem? 

Anselme, fils's second son Ursin, by first wife Pauline Bergeau, married cousin Eudalie Miller in the mid- or late 1850s and settled near Grand Coteau.  During the War of 1861-65, Ursin served with two of his brothers in the Prairie Rangers Company Cavalry or Todd's Prairie Rangers when it was part of the state militia.  The company transferred to Confederate service in August 1862.  Ursin died at Opelousas in December 1862, age 31, no cause of death given, before the company became part of the 3rd (Harrison's) Regiment Louisiana Cavalry.  Ursin's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in April 1863.  

Anselme, fils's third son Simon, by second wife Adélaïde Venable, married Marguerite or Marie Cora, called Cora, daughter of fellow Acadians Dositée Leger and Marcellite Semer, at the Grand Coteau church in December 1859.  Their son Simon, fils was born near Grand Coteau in September 1862 but died at age 4 in August 1866; Trasimond was born in July 1864; and Joseph Adam in January 1870.  During the War of 1861-65, Simon served in Company A of the 29th (Thomas's) Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Landry Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  

Anselme, fils's fourth son Narcisse, by second wife Adélaïde Venable, married Angelina Gatte in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1859.  During the War of 1861-65, Narcisse served with his two older half-brothers in the Prairie Rangers Company Cavalry or Todd's Prairie Rangers when it was part of the state militia.  The company transferred to Confederate service in August 1862.  Narcisse may have served in the unit when it was Company K of the 3rd (Harrison's) Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, which fought in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi.  Like his half-brother Paulin, he survived the war.  Narcisse died near Iota in June 1914, age 73. 

Anselme, père's second son Achille married Mélanie, daughter of Joseph Matte and Esther Bellard, at the Opelousas church in August 1828.  One wonders if Achille fathered any sons. 

Anselme, père's third son Mélon married Hélène, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians François Richard and Hélène Brasseaux, at the Opelousas church in June 1831.  They settled at Iota, Acadia Parish.  Their son Mélon, fils was born in March 1835; Théodule in February 1836; Joseph Portalis, called Portalis, in December 1847; and André Duprélon, called Duprélon, in November 1848.  Melon, père died probably at Iota in April 1859.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Melon was age 49 when he died, but he was 47.  His daughters married into the Doucet, Lavergne, Miller, Richard, and Veroni families.  His four sons also created their own families.

Oldest son Mélon, fils married cousin Marie Irma, called Irma, daughter of Alfred Reed and his Acadian wife Marie Hermance Lejeune, at the Opelousas church in March 1859.  Their son Clémile was born near Grand Coteau in December 1861.  During the War of 1861-65, Mélon, fils served the Prairie Rangers Company Cavalry or Todd's Prairie Rangers when it was part of the state militia.  The company transferred to Confederate service in August 1862.  Mélon, fils may have served in the unit when it was Company K of the 3rd (Harrison's) Regiment Louisiana Cavalry, which fought in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Mississippi.  After the war, he was a farmer and stock raiser.  He died near Iota in March 1916, age 81.  

Mélon, père's second son Théodule married Marie Azéma or Zulma, daughter of Joseph Lavergne and his Acadian wife Émelie Jeansonne, at the Opelousas church in January 1856, and recorded the marriage at the Opelousas courthouse the following April.  Their son Joseph Théodule was born in St. Landry Parish and baptized the day of his birth at the Bois Mallet chapel, St. Landry Parish, in July 1857; Pierre O'Neil was born near Grand Coteau in July 1862; Erase, probably Eraste, near Church Point in July 1867; and Christophe in Lafayette Parish in September 1870.  During the War of 1861-65, Théodule may have served in Company F of the 29th (Thomas's) Regiment Louisiana Infantry, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

Mélon, père's third son Joseph Portalis married Eugénie, daughter of Eugène Vallet and Marguerite Quebedeaux, at the Church Point church in December 1869. 

Mélon, père's fourth and youngest son André Duprélon married Octalie or Ortalie, daughter of Denis Quebedeaux and his Acadian wife Louise Trahan, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1868, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church in August.  Their son André, fils was born near Church Point in April 1869. 

Anselme, père's fifth and youngest son Hilaire le jeune married Azélie or Émelie, 14-year-old daughter of Julien Lasage and Marguerite Bock, at the Opelousas church in January 1839.  Their son Joseph Duprélon, called Duprélon, was born near Grand Coteau in December 1843.  They also had a son named Achille le jeune.  Hilaire le jeune remarried to cousin Marie Hermance, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Lejeune and his second wife Marie Josette Bellard and widow of Alfred Reed, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1859, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church in May 1861.  At age 47, Hilaire le jeune remarried again--his third marriage--to Célestine, daughter of Jean Simon and his Acadian wife  and widow of Antoine LeBlanc and David Potier (so this was her third marriage also), in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1867, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church in August 1868.  Hilaire le jeune's two sons created their own families. 

During the War of 1861-65, older son Joseph Duprélon, by first wife Azélie Lasage, served in Company D of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in St. Mary Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Joseph Duprélon married cousin Virginie, daughter of fellow Acadians Mélon Doucet, père and Hélène Richard, at the Church Point church in May 1867, and may have remarried to fellow Acadian Eugénie Leger in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1868.  Joseph Duprélon died near Iota in January 1913, age 69.  

Hilaire le jeune's younger son Achille le jeune, by first wife Azélie Lasage, married stepsister and cousin Azélime or Selima, daughter of Alfred Reed and his Acadian wife Marie Hermance Lejeune, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1867, and sanctified the marriage at the Church Point church in October. 

Joseph dit Hilaire's third son Hilaire, baptized at Opelousas, age 2 1/2 months, in April 1780, married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Granger and Anne Babin, at the Opelousas church in January 1805.  Their son Hilaire, fils was baptized at Opelousas, age 6 weeks, on New Years Day 1806; and Dosité was baptized at the Opelousas church, age 9 months, in July 1812.  Hilaire, père died in St. Landry Parish in April 1813, a widower.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Hilaire was "about 30 yrs." when he died.  He was 33.  Hs will was dated the day before his death.  Both of his sons married cousins.

Older son Hilaire, fils married cousin Marie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Lejeune and his Creole wife Marie Louise Lacase, at the Opelousas church in February 1828.  Their son Hilaire III was born in St. Landry Parish in October 1829; Onésime in November 1834; Joseph le jeune was baptized at the Grand Coteau church, age 5 months, in May 1838; and Jean was baptized at the Opelousas church, age 2 months, in March 1843. 

Hilaire, père's younger son Dosité married cousin Caroline Lejeune, probably a fellow Acadian, in St. Landry Parish during the early or mid-1830s.  Their son Onésime was born near Grand Coteau in March 1837; Dosité, fils in October 1847; Hilaire le jeune in February 1850; Émile in October 1852; and Hippolyte in April 1855.  Their daughter married into the LeBoeuf family.  Dosité may have remarried to Marie Courtine in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1869; he would have been age 56 at the time of the wedding. 

Joseph dit Hilaire's fourth son Valéry, born at Attakapas in February 1783, died at Opelousas in June 1806, age 23.  He probably did not marry.  

Joseph dit Hilaire's fifth and youngest son Jean-Louis, born probably at Attakapas in c1786, married Susanne, also calledJulie, daughter of fellow Acadians Basile Chiasson and Anne Marie Thibodeaux of Opelousas, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1812.  Jean Louis was a resident of La Butte, then in St. Martin but now in Lafayette Parish, when he died at Prairie Sorel, St. Martin Parish, in December 1812, age 26, less than a year after his marriage.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in March 1813.  He and his wife probably had no children.  

Michel-Laurent's second son Michel, fils, born at Annapolis Royal in c1753, followed his family into exile, to imprisonment at Halifax, and to Louisiana.  At age 40, he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians René Landry and Marguerite Babin, at Attakapas in January 1793.  They settled on upper Bayou Teche at La Pointe near present-day Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish.  Unlike his brothers, who followed their parents to Opelousas, Michel, fils remained in the Attakapas District, where he died at La Pointe in November 1804.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Michel was age 45 when he died, but he probably was in his early 50s.  His succession record was not filed at the St. Martinville courthouse until May 1817.  His daughter married into the Foreman family.  Only one of his three sons created his own family. 

Their oldest son, name and age unrecorded, died of "liver illness" at Attakapas in 1793.   

Michel, fils's second son Jean-Ursin, called Ursin, baptized at Attakapas, age 8 months, in November 1795, married Marie Apollonie, called Pauline, daughter of Philippe Doré and Marie Grolot of Île des Cypres or Cypress Island, today's Lake Martin, at the St. Martinville Church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1816.  Their son Ursin, fils, also called Fondalise, was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1816.  Their son created his own family.

Only son Ursin, fils married Irma, also called Emma, daughter of François Champagne and Lise Champagne, at the St. Martinville church in February 1838.  Their son Ursin III was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1844 but died the following October, and Aurelien Ursin was born in September 1845.  Their daughters married into the Bertrand, Delahoussaye, and Doré families.  Ursin, fils remarried to Amelina, daughter of Balthazar Delahoussaye and Modeste Champagne, at the St. Martinville church in September 1850.  Their son Alexandre was born in St. Martin Parish in October 1851, and François Balthazar in March 1856.  Their daughter married into the Lopez family.  Ursin, fils died in St. Martin Parish in August 1858.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Ursin was age 40 when he died, but he was 42.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse a few days after his death.  His oldest surviving son married by 1870. 

Second son Aurelien Ursin, by first wife Irma Champagne, married Louisa Delahoussaye and died in St. Martin Parish in January 1868.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Aurelien died "at age 22 yrs."  His succession record, naming his wife, was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse two days after his death. 

Michel, fils's third and youngest son, name unrecorded, died at Attakapas, age 1 month, in July 1799.  

Michel-Laurent's third son Pierre, born probably at Miramichi in c1756, followed his family into imprisonment at Halifax and to Louisiana..  He married Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Comeaux and Marie-Madeleine Girouard, at Attakapas in August 1782.  During the 1780s or early 1790s, they followed his family north to the Opelousas District.  Pierre died at Opelousas in February 1807.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Pierre was age 55 when he died, but he probably was in his early 50s.  His succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse the following July and again in October 1817.  Strangely, a civil record from St. Landry Parish states that Pierre Doucet died in February 1840.  He would have been in his early 80s then.  His daughters married into the Carrière, Daigle, and Thibodeaux families.  His three sons created their own families.  The oldest son returned to his native Attakapas, while the younger sons remained in St. Landry Parish.  

Oldest son Jean-Pierre dit Fifi, baptized at Attakapas, age 4 months, in November 1783, married Marie Louise, called Louise, daughter of Charles Lacase and Félicité Langlois, at Opelousas in January 1802.  Their son Pierre Zéphirin was baptized at the Opelousas church, age 5 months, in May 1805; and David was baptized at the Opelousas church, age 6 months, in July 1807.  Jean-Pierre's succession record, probably following Louise's death, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in September 1812.  Jean Pierre remarried to cousin Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Martin and Isabelle Thibodeaux of La Pointe and widow of François Melançon, at the St. Martinville church in February 1813.  They settled at La Pointe on upper Bayou Teche.  She gave him no more sons.  Jean Pierre died at La Pointe in June 1823, age 40.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in June 1824.  One of his two sons created his own family.

Oldest son Pierre Zéphirin, by first wife Louise Lacase, married Adeline, also called Azéline, daughter of fellow Acadians François Breaux and Silesie Dugas of La Pointe, at the St. Martinville church in July 1822.  Their son Pierre Zéphirin, fils was born in Lafayette Parish in September 1829; Valsin in April 1833; Théodule in July 1841; and François Dassas in January 1854.  They also had sons named Gerasin; Cléobule; and Joseph Adolphe, called Adolphe, though Gerasin may have been Valsin, and Cléobule may have been Théodule.  In September 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 19 slaves--10 males and nine females, all black, ranging in age from 40 years to 6 months--on Pierre Z. Doucet's farm in the parish's western district.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 36 slaves--24 males and 12 females, all black, ranging in age from 58 years to 2 months, living in 11 houses--on Pierre Doucet's plantation next to Gerassin Doucet.  Pierre Zéphirin's daughters married into the Breaux, Broussard, Judice, and Landry families.  Four of his sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Pierre Zéphirin, fils married Anaïs, daughter of fellow Acadian Valéry Boudreaux and his Creole wife Celphanie Patin, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in January 1856. Their son Léo was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1856, Pierre Léopold in December 1860 but died at age 6 1/2 in August 1867, Valéry was born in August 1866 but died at age 1 in September 1867, and Albert was born in July 1868. 

Gerasin married Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Treville Broussard and Sidalise Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in September 1855.  Their son Valsin le jeune was born in Lafayette Parish in November 1861.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--a 23-year-old black female, living in her own slave house--on Gerassin Doucet's farm next to Pierre Doucet.  During the War of 1861-65, Gerasin served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, the "Lafayette Prairie Boys," raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.   

During the War of 1861-65, Cléobule served in Company F of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Cléobule married Émilie, daughter of fellow Acadians Alexandre Guidry and Carmelite Broussard, at the Vermilionville church in September 1865.  Their son Luc was born in Lafayette Parish in July 1866. 

Adolphe married Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Émilien Landry and Uranie Prejean, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in September 1866. 

Pierre's second son Joseph Éloi, called Éloi, born at Opelousas in May 1792, married Modeste Divine, daughter of Michel Carrière of Mobile and St. Charles Parish and Julienne Marcantel, at the Opelousas church in February 1811.  Their son Louis, also called Don or Jean Louis, was born in St. Landry Parish in May 1813; Éloi, fils, called Éloisin, in April 1816; and Joseph Valsin, called Valsin, in January 1824.  They also had a son named Jean Pierre, called Pierre.  Éloi, père died in St. Landry Parish in March 1842.  The Opelousas priest who record his burial said that Eloi was age 45 when he died, but he was 49.  His daughters married into the Bellard, Leger, Lejeune, and Miller families and perhaps into the Richard family as well.  His three sons also created his own families. 

Oldest son Don Louis married cousin Sidalise, daughter of Jean Carrière and Marie Stouts, at the Opelousas church in January 1834.  Their daughter married into the Darbonne family.  Don Louis may have remarried to fellow Acadian Adeline Chiasson.  Their son Joseph was born in St. Landry Parish in July 1841.  

Éloi's third son Joseph Valsin married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Chiasson and Marie Tarsille Dugas, at the Opelousas church in April 1840.  Their son Onésime was born in St. Landry Parish in March 1841; Joseph, fils in October 1842; David in December 1847; and Pierre in July 1852.  

Éloi's fourth and youngest son Jean Pierre married Caroline, daughter of Jean Baptiste Teller or Taylor and Céleste Moore, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1847, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in March 1848.  Their son Jean Pierre, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in June 1848; Joseph near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in August 1856; Zéphirin in February 1858; and Éloi le jeune in January 1860.  They were living near Arnaudville, St. Landry Parish, in the late 1860s.  Jean Pierre may have died near Breaux Bridge, St. Martin Parish, in September 1869.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Pierre died "at age 52 yrs."   Evidently none of his sons married by 1870. 

Pierre's third and youngest son Jacques dit Jean le jeune, born at Opelousas in April 1796, married Marie Éloise, Héloise, or Louise, daughter of Jean Baptiste Duplechin and his Acadian wife Marie Rose Trahan, at the Opelousas church in May 1818.  Their son Cyril was born in St. Landry Parish in December 1821, and Louis le jeune in May 1824.  Their two sons created their own families. 

Older son Cyril married Émeline, called Meline, daughter of fellow Acadian Hilaire Leger and his Creole wife Émilie Pariseau, at the Opelousas church in March 1842.  Their son Zéphirin was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1845; and Philemon in June 1847.  In November 1850, the federal census taker in St. Landry Parish counted a single slave--a 1-year-old black female--in the household of Ww., perhaps Widow, Meline Doucet, so Cyril may have died in the late 1840s, still a young man.  Or perhaps he was the Cyrille Doucet who married--in this case, remarried to--Nancy Rosberry.  Their son Thomas was born near Church Point in April 1866 but died "in Opel.," that is, Opelousas, at age 2 in August 1868.  And he may have been the Cyril Doucet who died near Church Point in May 1870.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Cyril died "at age 53 yrs.," but this Cyril, son of Jacques dit Jean, would have been age 48.  Evidently neither of his sons married by 1870. 

Jacques dit Jean le jeune's younger son Louis le jeune, at age 35, married Marie Bellard in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in September 1859.  Their son Eugène was born near Grand Coteau in January 1862 but died at age 3 in June 1865; Adam was born near Church Point in October 1863; and Louis, fils in February 1866.   

Michel-Laurent's fourth and youngst son Jean, born probably at Halifax in c1762, followed his family to Louisiana.  After living with them at Attakapas, he followed them to Opelousas, where, in his late 30s, he married Céleste, daughter of Guillaume Voorhies and Marie Samson, in 1801 or 1802.  Jean may have died at Opelousas in September 1803, age 41.  His succession records were filed at the Opelousas courthouse in October 1803 and July 1804.  His line of the family likely died with him. 

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Two more Doucets--a wife and a young bachelor--also came to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français in 1765.  They did not follow the Broussards to Bayou Teche but settled, instead, in the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  No new Doucet family line came of it:

Paul (c1744-?) à ? à Germain Doucet

Paul Doucet, age 21, was listed as part of Verret's Company of the Cabahannocer militia in April 1766.  The Spanish official making the report noted that Paul had no one else in his household.  Eleven years later, in January 1777, Spanish authorities counted him still at Cahahannocer.  According to the census taker, Paul was age 33 at the time and working as an engagé with the family of fellow Acadian Joseph Thériot.  The census taker said nothing about a wife for Paul, so he may not have married.  One wonders who his parents may have been.

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Another young bachelor came to Louisiana from Maryland, or perhaps from French St.-Domingue, in 1766 or 1767.  Unlike Paul from Halifax, this Doucet married in the Spanish colony, but his line of the family did not endure beyond the second generation: 

Jean-Baptiste (1743-1814) à Jean à Pierre à Germain Doucet

Jean-Baptiste, also called Jean-Baptiste-Maurice, older son of Jean Doucet, fils and Élisabeth or Isabelle Hébert, born at Grand-Pré in August 1743, followed his family into exile in Pennsylvania in 1755 and moved from that colony either to Maryland or to French St.-Domingue after August 1763.  He came to Louisiana by July 1767, when Spanish officials counted him at New Orleans with other Acadian exiles.  No other member of his family was with him.  (One wonders if he was one of the relatively few Acadian exiles who came to Louisiana directly from the French Antille.)  He married Marianne, called Anne, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Comeaux and Madeleine Henry, at San Gabriel on the river above New Orleans in January 1773.  His daughter Adélaïde, born in October 1777, was baptized at New Orleans in September 1778, so the family evidently returned for a time to the city.  Jean-Baptiste died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in May 1814, age 70.  His daughter married into the Dupuis and Wells families and moved to the western prairies.  His only married son also settled west of the Atchafalaya Basin, so Acadian Doucets did not permanently settle on what became known as the Acadian Coast. 

Older son Pierre-Edmond, born at San Gabriel in November 1774, died there in April 1803, age 28.  He probably did not marry.   

Jean-Baptiste's younger son Firmin-Maurice, called Maurice, baptized at San Gabriel, age unrecorded, in November 1779, married Marie, daughter of Thomas Reel, Rill, Rille, Rils, Ritter, Vils, or Wiltz and Teresa Hamiliton, at St. Gabriel in January 1804.  After his father died in 1814, Maurice and his family crossed the Atchafalaya Basin and settled at Grand Pointe on upper Bayou Teche near present-day Cecilia, St. Martin Parish.  Maurice's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in February 1840, two years before he died in April 1842 at age 62.  A post-mortem succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the month he died.  His daughters married into the Guidry, Latiolais, Melançon, Patin, and Villier families.  Amazingly, none of his four sons seems to have created a family of his own, so this line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him.  

Oldest son Eugène, born near St. Gabriel in December 1805, was age 36 and unmarried in April 1842 when his father died.  He probably did not marry.   

Maurice's second son Jean Baptiste, born at St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in November 1807, died in St. Martin Parish in May 1835.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was age 25 when he died, but he was 27.  He probably did not marry.  

Maurice's third son Léonard, born near St.-Gabriel in March 1813, died 6 days after his birth.  

Maurice's fourth and youngest son Firmin Bélisaire was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1823.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in July 1857.  He would have been age 34 that year.  Like his older brothers, he probably did not marry.  

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In 1785, two decades after the first of their cousins reached the colony, 13 more Doucets came to Louisiana, on two of the Seven Ships from France.  The first of them--a 40-year-old bachelor, two wives, and a widow with her two Doucet sons--arrived aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early November.  The bachelor chose to settle on the river below New Orleans, and the widow and her sons followed the majority of their fellow passengers to upper Bayou Lafourche, where the sons created a third center of family settlement in the colony: 

Charles (c1745-?) à ? à Germain Doucet

Charles Doucet was a 40-year-old carpenter when he reached New Orleans from France.  He crossed alone.  He chose to settle at Nueva Gálvez, also called San Bernardo, an Isleño community along the river south of New Orleans in present-day St. Bernard Parish.  He probably did not marriage.

Jean-Baptiste (1766-1825) à Jean à Bernard dit Laverdure à Germain, fils à Germain Doucet

Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, second surviving son of Augustin Doucet dit Justice and his second wife Marie-Anne Précieux, born at St.-Servan near St.-Malo, France, in September 1766, crossed to Louisiana with his widowed mother and younger brother and followed them to upper Bayou Lafourche.  He married Anne- or Marianne-Barbe, called Barbe, daughter of Nicolas Daublin and Catherine, a "free Indian," at Ascension in June 1789.  They settled on Bayou Lafourche.  In March 1813, an estimation of Baptiste's property was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse, Lafourche Interior Parish.  According to the record, Baptiste "apparently ... was still alive."  Baptiste died in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1825, age 60.  His daughters married into the Hébert, Lenée, and Martin families.  His son also created his own family on the Lafourche.

Only son François-Nicolas, born at Assumption in April 1793, married Marie Cécile, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Louis Hébert and Marie Doiron, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1816.  François Nicolas died in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1833, age 40.  His succession inventory was filed at the Thibodauxville courthouse that month.  His daughter married into the Bossnet or Roussuet family.  His son also created a family of his own on Bayou Lafourche. 

Only son Joseph Célestin, called Célestin, born in Assumption Parish in September 1817, married Rosalie Catherine, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Olivier Bourg and Rosalie Eléonore Benoit and widow of Drosin Gaspard, in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1843.  Their son François Octave was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1846, and Octave Adam near Raceland, Lafourche Parish, in June 1854.  Their daughter married into the Guidry family.  Joseph Célestin, at age 50, remarried to Madeleine Fabre or Folse in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in August 1867.   Their son Augustin was born near Lockport, Lafourche Parish, in March 1870.  One of Célestin's sons married by 1870.

Oldest son François Octave, by first wife Rosalie Catherine Bourg, married Marguerite Geneviève Mertilia, 17-year-old daughter of Charles Augeron and his Acadian wife Reine Eugènie Benoit, at the Lockport church in July 1866.  Their son François Lessin was born near Lockport in February 1870.  

François (1770-1834) à Jean à Bernard dit Laverdure à Germain, fils à Germain Doucet

François, third and youngest surviving son of Augustin Doucet dit Justice and his second wife Marie-Anne Précieux, born at St.-Servan, France, in September 1766, followed his widowed mother and older brother to Louisiana and upper Bayou Lafourche.  He married Marie-Adélaïde, daughter of Étienne-Joseph Angilbert or Engilbert and his Acadian wife Félicité Hébert, at Assumption on the upper bayou in May 1802.  Marie-Adélaïde was a native of Nantes, France, and as an infant had come to Louisiana aboard La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships.  They settled in what became Lafourche Parish.  Franéois died in Lafourche Interior Parish in March 1834, age 64.  His daughters married into the Barrios, Bernard, Lejeune, Molaison, Parks, and Scanlen families.  Two, perhaps three, of his sons created their own families on the Lafourche.  One of them moved on to lower Bayou Teche.  

Oldest son Jean Pierre Vinceslas, also called J. Pierre, born in Assumption Parish in September 1807, married Marie Rosalie, called Rosalie, 21-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Firmin Guidry and Marie Josèphe Carret, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in February 1829.  Jean Pierre died in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1851, age 44.  His daughters married into the Estivennes and Legendre families.  All three of his sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Jacques Aurelien, called Aurelien, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1835, married Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Maxile LeBlanc and Marie LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in August 1858.  Their son Jacques Philippe was born in Lafourche Parish in August 1868.  During the War of 1861-65, Aurelien served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment of Militia.  In late October 1862, he fought in the Battle of Labadieville in Assumption Parish, fell into Federal hands, was paroled, and sent home. 

J. Pierre's second son Pierre Émile, called Émile, born in Lafourche Inteiror Parish in January 1838, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin Breaux and Athanaise Broussard, at the Thibodaux church in July 1858.  Their son Pierre Aurestile was born in Lafourche Parish in October 1861, Joseph Adreci in February 1864, and Joseph Émile in February 1866.  During the War of 1861-65, Émile also served in the Lafourche Parish Regiment of Militia, was captured at Labadieville, paroled, and sent home.  

J. Pierre's third and youngest son Édouard Sylvère, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1839, married Augustine or Justine, daughter of Étienne Lusignan and Modeste Clairteau, at the Thibodaux church in June 1854.  Their son Léon Xavier was born in Lafourche Parish in December 1855 and died at age 25 days.  Édouard died in Lafourche Parish in November 1866.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Édouard was age 33 when he died, but he was 27.  His line of the family probably died with him. 

François's second son Hippolyte Mederio, born in Assumption Parish in August 1809, married fellow Acadian Célestine or Clementine Bourg.  By the early 1840s, they had moved to St. Mary Parish on lower Bayou Teche.  Their daughters returned to the Lafourche valley and married into the Foret and Trosclair families in Terrebonne Parish.  Hippolyte Mederio's sons did not marry by 1870.

Only son William Osémé was born in St. Mary Parish in August 1846.

François's third and youngest son Antoine Léandre, called Léandre was born in Assumption Parish in March 1812.  His succession inventory was filed at the Thibodaux courthouse, Lafourche Parish, in April 1858.  He would have been age 46 that year.  Evidently he never married, unless he was the Léandre Doucet who married Mélanie Baudin, was living in St. Landry Parish in the early 1850s, and returned to the Lafourche valley later in the decade.  

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Eight more Doucets--two families--crossed on La Caroline, the last of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in the third week of December.  One family settled on the river below New Orleans, and the other settled at Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  No new family lines seem to have come of it:

Joseph, fils (c1730-1797) à Charles à Germain Doucet

Joseph, fils, older son of Joseph Doucet and Marie-Madeleine Robichaud, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1730, married Marguerite, daughter of Gabriel Moulaison and Marie Aubois of Pobomcoup, at Annapolis Royal in July 1753 and settled at Cap-Sable.  Marguerite gave Joseph, fils a daughter in c1756.  In the fall of 1758, the British captured them and other Acadians at Cap-Sable, hold them briefly at Halifax, and then deported them to Le Havre, France, late that year.  In February 1759, soon after they reached the Norman port, their daughter died at age 2 1/2 probably from the rigors of the crossing.  From 1759 to 1770, at Le Havre, Marguerite gave Joseph, fils five more children, four daughters and a son.  In 1773, Joseph and Marguerite, with hundreds of other Acadians languishing in the coastal cities, became part of the settlement venture in Poitou.  They settled near Cenan.  When, after two years of effort, most of the Poitou Acadians retreated to the port city of Nantes, Joseph and his family remained at Cenan.  Oldest surviving daughter Emmanuelle-Victoire married into the Jaunon family at Cenan in September 1778, and daughter Adélaïde-Véronique married into the Arnaud family there in January 1781.  Wife Marguerite died at Cenan in April 1784, age 57.  The following year, Joseph, fils, having joined his fellow Acadians at Nantes, took his three youngest children, two daughters and a son, to Louisiana aboard the last of the Seven Ships from France.  Joseph, fils and the two younger children chose to settle at the established Acadian community of Cabahannocer on the river above New Orleans.  Joseph, fils died at New Orleans in April 1797.  The St.-Louis Parish priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph, fils died at age 75, but he was in his late 60s.  His daughter Marie-Marguerite remained at New Orleans, where she married into the Arnaud family; her husband seems to have been a half-brother of older sister Adélaïde-Véronique's husband back in Poitou, France.  The younger children, including son Ange, evidently did not marry, so this line of the family, except perhaps for its blood, did not survive in the Bayou State. 

Only surviving son Ange, born at Le Havre, France, in c1770, followed his family to Poitou, Nantes, and Louisiana.  Spanish officials counted him with his family at Cabahannaocer in August 1788.  He evidently did not marry. 

Michel, fils (c1744-1792) à Charles à Germain Doucet

Michel, fils, second son of Michel Doucet and Angélique Pitre, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1744, followed his family to the French Maritimes and to Le Havre, France, where he worked as a carpenter.  He married Marie-Blanche, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Cousin and Judith Guédry of Ministigueshe, Cap-Sable, at Le Havre in c1766.  Between 1768 and 1773, Marie-Blanche gave Michel, fils two children, a daughter and a son.  In 1773, they became a part of the settlement scheme in Poitou.  Another daughter was born to them at Cenan in March 1775.  Later that year, in November, with hundreds of other disgruntled Poitou Acadians, Michel, fils and his family retreated to the port city of Nantes.  Another son was born to them there in February 1777, but he died the following April.  In 1785, Michel, fils, Marie-Blanche, and their three remaining children, a son and two daughters, emigrated to Louisiana aboard the last of the Seven Ships.  They were among the hand full of Acadians who chose to settle at San Bernardo, also called Nueva Gálvez, an Isleño community below New Orleans.  Michel, fils died at Charity Hospital, New Orleans, in September 1792.  The St.-Louis Parish priest who recorded Michel, fils's burial said he died at age 54, but he was in his late 40s.  One wonders if any of his children married in the Spanish colony. 

Only surviving son Jean-Baptiste-Michel, born at either Le Havre or in Poitou in c1773, followed his family to Nantes and Louisiana.  One wonders if he created a family of his own. 

Dubois

Dubois is a common surname in France, so it is no surprise that a number of Dubois families lived in greater Acadia before 1755.  Among them was a French fisherman, Joseph Dubois, not kin to the other Duboiss in the region, who married an Acadian in the early months of Le Grand Dérangement.  Joseph married Anne, daughter of Louis Michel and Marguerite Forest of La Famille, Pigiguit, probably at Cap-Sable in c1756.  Their daughter Marguerite-Ange was born the following year.  Although the British had rounded up Acadians in the Cap-Sable/Pobomcoup area in the spring of 1756, Joseph and Anne evidently eluded them.  A second British force descended on the area in the fall of 1758, and this time they fell into enemy hands.  The British transported them to the prison compound at Halifax, where they were held for a year (unless they were among the Cap-Sable Acadians who escaped the British again but turned themselves in the following year).  In late 1759, the British deported them aboard the transport Mary to France via England.  Anne was pregnant when the family left Halifax, and another daughter was born to them aboard ship in mid-December.  They reached Cherbourg, France, in the middle of January 1760.  Anne gave Joseph two more daughters in the Norman port.  One of them probably died young.  They moved on to Le Havre in the mid-1760s, and in July 1768, Joseph, Anne, and three of their daughters landed at St.-Malo in Brittany.  They settled at nearby St.-Servan and Pleurtuit.  Joseph died by November 1773, when Anne remarried to an Acadian LeBlanc at St.-Servan.  Meanwhile, daughter Marguerite-Anne, still in her teens, married Jean-Baptiste-Amand, son of fellow Acadians Pierre Daigre and Madeleine Gautrot, at St.-Servan in November 1770.  She gave him a son at St.-Servan, but the boy died in infancy.  In 1773, Marguerite-Ange and her husband were part of the settlement scheme in Poitou.  She gave him another son there.  After two years of effort, in December 1775 they followed other disgruntled Poitou Acadians to the port city of Nantes, where Marguerite-Ange gave Jean another son, who also died in infancy.  When, in the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, Jean and Marguerite-Anne agreed to take it.  Jean died at Nantes in late 1784 or early 1785, so when Marguerite-Ange left Paimboeuf, the port of Nantes, for New Orleans in June 1785, she was a widow with a child, son Jean-Louis Daigre, age 10 1/2.  Her mother, meanwhile, remarried twice in France, to a Landry at Nantes in October 1777, and to a Daigre at nearby Chantenay in February 1785--four marriages in all.  Marguerite-Ange sailed to Louisiana on the same vessel as her mother, her new stepfather, and seven Daigre step siblings. 

The Duboiss of South Louisiana who are possibly Acadian are descended from a member of the family not kin to Joseph Dubois of Cap-Sable and his daughter Marguerite-Ange.  But, like Marguerite-Ange, her Dubois namesake came to Louisiana aboard one of the Seven Ships from France.  After marrying at New Orleans soon after his arrival, he settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  His many sons either remained on the Lafourche or moved to the western prairies during the 1820s.  By the late antebellum period, his descendants on the western parishes rivaled in numbers their cousins in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley.  None of his descendants appear to have settled on the river before the War of 1861-65.

Most of the Duboiss of Louisiana, however, are French Creole or Foreign French, not "Acadian."  Many settled at New Orleans.  One family settled along the Cane and Red rivers near Natchitoches early in the colonial period.  Others settled in predominantly-Acadian communities around Baton Rouge, along the Acadian Coast, in the Lafourche/Terrebonne valley, and on the western prairies.  Many of these French-Creole Duboiss, especially on the prairies, married Acadians.  

Judging by the number of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, the Duboiss of Louisiana, both "Acadian" and Creole, with one exception, participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  No "Acadian" Dubois appears on the federal slave schedules of 1850 and 1860.  The family's only substantial slaveholder in Louisiana was Creole Valentine Dubois, who held 13 slaves in Rapides Parish in 1850 and 17 slaves in Winn Parish a decade later.  

Dozens of Duboiss, both "Acadian" and Creole, served Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  At least five of them died in Confederate service. ...

The war took a heavy toll on the Dubois' economic status, no matter where they settled.  Union gunboats shelled and burned dozens of houses along the lower Mississippi.  Successive Federal incursions in the Bayou Lafourche valley devastated that region, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  On the western prairies, Federal armies marched three times through the Teche/Vermilion country and burned and pillaged many farms, some of them no doubt owned by Duboiss.  Confederate foraging parties and cutthroat Jayhawkers also plagued the area, adding to the family's misery. ...

In Louisiana, the family's name also is spelled Dobois, Duboid, Duvois.15

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Jacques-Olivier, fils (c1766-?) à ? Dubois

Jacques-Olivier, called Jaco or Jacos and Olivier, son of Olivier Dubois and Marguerite Vallois, was born at Très-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, France, in January 1766.  His mother may have been a Frenchwoman who was married to Pierre Dubois before she married Jacques's father Olivier, a sailor.  (One wonders if Olivier was an Acadian or a native of France like Marguerite.)  When Jacques-Olivier was in his early teens, his mother remarried again, to Acadian Étienne Térriot at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay near Nantes in November 1780.  She remarried yet again--her fourth marriage--to Acadian Zacharie Boudrot of Ste.-Famille, Pigiguit, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in September 1782.  By then, Jacques-Olivier was in his late teens and probably had become a sailor like his father, but he did not choose to remain in France.  He followed his mother and new stepfather, along with a younger stepbrother, to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans  on 8 November1785.  Later that month, he married Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Acadians Joseph-François Michel and Anne Daigle, in the city.  Marie was a native of St.-Servan near St.-Malo and had come to Louisiana with her widowed mother and a sister aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships.  Jacques may have known her in France, or perhaps they met in New Orleans soon after he reached the city.  They followed their families to upper Bayou Lafourche but may have lived for a time in New Orleans, where two of their children were baptized in the early 1790s.  If so, they returned to the upper Lafourche.  Their daughter married into the Pinel family.  Seven of their eight sons created their own families.  Their three youngest sons moved on to the western prairies in the 1820s, creating a new center of family settlement there, but their older sons remained on Bayou Lafourche, where only one of the lines seems to have endured.  The Duboiss of South Louisiana who are possibly Acadian are descended from some of Jaco's sons. 

Oldest son Joseph-Marcellin, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in December 1788, married Marguerite Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Boudreaux and Marie Modeste Trahan and widow of Guillaume Aucoin, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in May 1810.  Marguerite-Marie, a native of St.-Similien near St.-Malo, France, was five and a half years older than Joseph-Marcellin and had come to Louisiana in 1785 on the first of the Seven Ships.  Both of their sons did not marry, so this family line likely did not endure. 

Older son Prudent Théodule, born in Assumption Parish in April 1812, died in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1833, age 21.  He did not marry.  

Joseph Marcellin's younger son Antoine Valéry, born in Assumption Parish in October 1816, may have died young.    

Jacques-Olivier's second son Louis-André, born probably at Lafourche in c1791, married Ursule, daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Henry and his second wife Marie-Madeleine Bernard and widow of Jean Constant Boudreaux, at the Plattenville church in January 1813.  Ursule, a native of France who had come to Louisina in 1785 aboard one of the Seven Ships, was 16 years older than Louis-André and age 38 when they married.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family.  Louis-André remarried to Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Thibodeaux and Marie Dugas, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1823.  In December 1827, Louis André sold land in Terrebonne Parish to the widow of Governor Henry Schuyler Thibodaux.  Louis André died in Assumption Parish in May 1834.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Louis was age 46 when he died, but he was closer to 43.  Only one of his four sons created their own families on the Lafourche. 

Oldest son Louis Landry, by second wife Anastasie Thibodeaux, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in June 1828, may have died young. 

Louis André's second son Olivier Leufroi, by second wife Anastasie Thibodeaux, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1830, evidently died in Assumption Parish in September 1833, age 3. 

Louis-André's third son Sylvain le jeune, by second wife Anastasie Thibodeaux, born probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in c1832 died in Lafourche Parish in August 1853, age 21.  He did not marry.  

Louis-André's fourth and youngest son Zéphirin or Zéphir Théodule, by second wife Anastasie Thibodeaux, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1833, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Boudreaux and Élise Dugas, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in May 1855.  Zéphir remarried to Adeline, daughter of Édouard Pelletier and Marcelline Berthelot, at the Labadieville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1858.  During the War of 1861-65, Zéphir may have served in Company C of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Assumption Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  Zéphir remarried again--his third marriage--to Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Zéphirin Hébert and his Creole wife Baselisse Gros, at the Labadieville church in January 1865.  His only son born before 1870 died young. 

Louis Valfroi, by first wife Marie Boudreaux, born near Labadieville in July 1856, died the following November.

Jacques-Olivier's third son Joseph-Antoine, called Antoine, born perhaps at Lafourche in September 1792 and baptized at New Orleans the following November, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Aucoin and Perrine Marguerite Bourg, at the Plattenville church in February 1822.  Their daughters married into the Arceneaux and Dubois families.  Neither of Antoine's sons seems to have married. 

Older son Zenon Joseph, born in Assumption Parish in March 1826, may have died young. 

Antoine's younger son Zenon Zedéon was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1836.  During the War of 1861-65, Zenon served in Company B of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which included many conscripts from Assumption Parish, including Zenon.  The experience proved fatal.  He died at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in April 1863, age 26.  

Jacques-Olivier's fourth son Narcisse-Olivier, called Olivier, born at Assumption in February 1798, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Jean Thibodeaux and Brigide Guérin, at the Plattenville church in August 1819.  They lived for a time on the western prairies but returned to the Lafourche.  Their daughters married into the Darce, Hébert, and Trahan families.  Three of their six sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Fergus O. was born either on the upper Lafourche or in Lafayette Parish in the 1820s.  His succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse, Terrebonne Parish, in January 1846, when he would have been in his 20s.  Judging by the names of his heirs--his father and two sisters--Fergus probably did not marry.  

Olivier's second son Frédéric, baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 8 months, in August 1828, may have died young. 

Olivier's third son Aurelien Florentin, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in August 1831, married first cousin Mélasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Dubois and Marie Aucoin, his paternal aunt and uncle, at the Plattenville church in August 1853.  Their son Joseph Aurelius was born in Assumption Parish in May 1854, and Sylvère Patrice in March 1857.  During the War of 1861-65, Aurelien served in Company C of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery, which included many conscripts from Assumption Parish, including Aurelien and his first cousin Zenon Dubois.  The experience proved fatal not only for Zenon, but also for Aurelien.  He died at City Hospital, Vicksburg, Mississippi, in February 1863, age 31.  

Olivier's fourth son Ulysse Noël, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1836, married Mathilde, daughter of Romaine LeBoeuf and his Acadian wife Phelonise Hébert of Terrebonne Parish, at the Houma church in April 1861.  They settled near Chacahoula, Terrebonne Parish, after the War of 1861-65.  

Olivier's fifth son Drosin Zephyr, born in Lafourche Interior Parish in December 1840, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870.

Olivier's sixth and youngest son Jean Baptiste was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1843.  During the War of 1861-65, Jean Baptiste served in Company F of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Terrebonne Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  While waiting for his unit to be exchanged, he married Osceana or Otiana, daughter of fellow Acadian Auguste LeBlanc and  his Creole wife Adèle Peltier of Lafourche Parish, at the Houma church in October 1863.  

Jacques-Olivier's fifth son Paul was born perhaps at Assumption in February 1800 and baptized at New Orleans the following May.  His succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse in January 1846.  He would have been age 46 that year.  His succession record was filed at the Houma courthouse in May 1847.  Judging by the names of his heirs--a brother and a niece--he probably did not marry.  

Jacques-Olivier's sixth son Marcellin, born at Assumption in August 1801, followed his brothers to Lafayette Parish and married Élise, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Mire and Émilie Guilbeau, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in February 1825.  They remained in Lafayette Parish.  Their daughters married into the Babineaux, Boudreaux, and Kiggs families.  Marcellin's sons remained in Lafayette Parish.  Two of them married by 1870.

Oldest son Marcellin, fils, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 months, in March 1826, married Alzire, 17-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Don Louis Broussard and Anastasie Landry, at the Vermilionville church in February 1844.  Their son Émilien was born in Lafayette Parish in December 1844; Jean Clerville in August 1846; Louis in August 1849; Hubert in June 1858; and Marcellin III near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in February 1861.  Marcellin, fils's succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in February 1866.  He would have been age 40 that year.  His daughter married into the Lalonde family.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Third son Louis married Alida, daughter of fellow Acadians Clément Mire and Estelle Breaux, at the Youngsville church in August 1870. 

Marcellin, père's second son Clerville, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 months, in August 1827, married fellow Acadian Carmelite Hébert probably in Lafayette Parish in the late 1840s or early 1850s.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Louis O'Neil was born in May 1859.  Clerville likely remarried to fellow Acadian Marguerite Landry in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in June 1868.  They settled near Youngsville. 

Marcellin, père's third son Clémile was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 6 months, in May 1832.  During the War of 1861-65, Clémile, with younger brothers Aladin and Désiré, served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafayette Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi. 

Marcellin, père's fourth son Aladin was baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 6 months, in March 1836.  During the War of 1861-65, Aladin, with brothers Clémile and Désiré, served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry.  According to one source, Aladin "died at home, on Furlough, fall of 1862."  The same source, however, shows him wounded at Vicksburg on 27 June 1863.  Aladin married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Comeaux and Marguerite Granger and widow of John Bell, at the Youngsville church in October 1865.  Their son Lucien was born near Youngsville in January 1867.  Aladin remarried to Céleste Ozea, called Ozea, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Osémé Boudreaux and Amelina Cormier, at the Youngsville church in January 1868.  Their son Joseph Osémé was born near Youngsville in November 1869. 

Marcellin, père's fifth and youngest son Désiré was born in Lafayette Parish in March 1842.  During the War of 1861-65, Désiré, with older brothers Clémile and Aladin, served in Company A of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry. 

Jacques-Olivier's seventh son Sylvain Célestin, born at Assumption in September 1805, followed his brothers to Lafayette Parish, where he married Rose Adélaïde, called Adélaïde, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and Élisabeth Landry and widow of Jean Pierre Landry, at the Vermilionville church in October 1826.  They, too, remained in Lafayette Parish.  Their daughter married into the Broussard family.  

Only son Aurelien, born in Lafayette Parish in June 1830, if he survived childhood did not marry by 1870. 

Jacques-Olivier's eighth and youngest son Hubert Zenon, called Zenon, born in Assumption Parish in the early 1810s, followed his older brothers to Lafayette Parish, where he married Euphémie, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Pierre Landry and Adélaïde Dugas, at the Vermilionville church in March 1827.  They moved to lower Bayou Teche probably in the late 1840s.  Zenon died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in August 1856.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Hubert Zenon was age 42 when he died, but he probably was older.  His succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in May 1859.  One of this two sons married by 1870.

Older son Drosin, baptized at the Vermilionville church, age 4 1/2 months, in July 1832, married Valérie, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Boudreaux and Marie Zeline Landry, at the Vermilionville church in May 1852.  Their son Césaire was born in Lafayette Parish in February 1853.  Drosin remarried to Ophelia Dartes and settled probably in St. Mary Parish.  Their son Pierre Neuville was born in March 1861.  Drosin died in November 1866, age 34.  His succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, later in the month, so he probably had settled in that parish. 

Zenon's younger son Joseph Homere was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in October 1850.  If he surprised childhood, he did not marry before 1870. 

Dugas

Abraham Dugas, a skilled gunsmith perhaps from Chouppes, Poitiers, France, born in c1616, reached Acadia in the early 1640s.  (There is genetic evidence that Abraham may have had Jewish ancestry, which would have made him unique among his fellow Acadians.)  In October 1687, Abraham "made his mark on an attestation in favour of Governor d'Aulnay's accomplishments" in the colony, which had occured in the late 1630s and 1640s--evidence of his early presence in the colony.  Abraham was more than a gunsmith at Port-Royal.  According to French official Antoine Laumet dit Le Mothe de Cadillac, Abraham "carried out the functions of general representative of the King (in civil and criminal matters)," so Abraham may have been part an influential family in France.  Abraham married Marguerite, daughter of Germain Doucet, sieur de La Verdure and his first wife, at Port-Royal in c1647.  Between 1648 and 1667, Marguerite gave Abraham eight children, five daughters and three sons, all of whom were born at Port-Royal, and each of whom created families of their own.  Abraham died at Port-Royal by 1700, in his late 70s or early 80s.  In December 1705, in order to increase the size of the fort at Port-Royal, colonial officials appropriated two lots "adjoining and drawing towards the old fort" that belonged to Abraham's heirs.  His five daughters married into the Melanson dit La Ramée, Bourgeois, Châtillon, Arseneau, and LeBlanc families.  His three sons married into the Bourgeois, Bourg, Petitpas, and Guilbeau families.  Some of his descendants left Port-Royal/Annapolis Royal and settled at Chignecto, Cap-Sable, Minas, and Cobeguit in British Nova Scotia, and on French-controlled Île Royale and Île St.-Jean.  

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this large family even farther.  The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure the great disruption.  In the early 1750s, the fanatical French priest Abbé Jean-Louis Le Loutre and his Mi'kmaq Indians burned a number of Acadian settlements at Chignecto, forcing the settlers to move from the British-controlled area east of the Missaguash River to the Aulac area west of Fort Beauséjour, still controlled by the French.  Dugass at Cobeguit at the far end of the Minas Basin, noting the fate of their kinsmen at Chignecto, crossed the Mer Rouge to Île St.-Jean and joined their kinsmen there, but many of the Dugass remained at Cobeguit.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour at Chignecto in June 1755, Acadians, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French troupes de la marine, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Lieutenant-Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  Later that summer, when the Cobeguit Acadians learned of the British roundups at Chignecto and at nearby Grand-Pré and Pigiguit, the entire population of the settlement, including Dugass, hurried north to the Mer Rouge and joined their kinsmen on Île St.-Jean, now crowded with hundreds of other refugees from British Nova Scotia. 

In late autumn of 1755, the British shipped the Acadians in the Annapolis Basin to Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, and North Carolina.  Dugass ended up on the Helena, bound for Massachusetts.  However, the ship heading to North Carolina, the Pembroke, never got there.  Soon after the Pembroke embarked from Goat Island in the lower basin with 232 exiles aboard, the Acadians, among them Charles Dugas, seized the vessel, sailed it to Baie Ste.-Marie on the western coast of Nova Scotia and then crossed the Bay of Fundy to the lower Rivière St.-Jean, where they abandoned the ship and escaped into the wilds of present-day New Brunswick.  The rest of their Annapolis valley brethren were not so lucky.  After their ship reached Boston, Dugass deported to Massachusetts were parcelled out to other communities in the colony.  One family, led by a widow, was deported to Connecticut.  Meanwhile, the Dugass who had escaped the British roundup at Annapolis Royal crossed the Bay of Fundy the following winter and found refuge on lower Rivière St.-Jean, where Dugas cousins lived.  Some moved on to Miramichi and other places of refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence or endured the long trek up the St.-Jean portage to Canada.  

Living in territory controlled by France, the many Dugass on Île St.-Jean and Île Royale escaped the British roundup in Nova Scotia in the fall of 1755.  Their respite from British oppression was short-lived, however.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British swooped down on the rest of Île Royale and on Île St.-Jean and rounded up most of the Acadians there, Dugass among them.  Later that year, the British packed hundreds of island Acadians into hired merchant vessels and shipped them to St.-Malo and other French ports, including, in the case of the Dugass, Boulogne-sur-Mer, La Rochelle, and Rochefort.  The deportation devastated the Dugas family. 

The island Dugass who survived the crossings to France subsisted on government handouts and on what work they could find.  By the early 1770s, French authorities were tired of providing for the Acadians languishing in the port cities.  A French nobleman offered to settle them on land he owned near the city of Châtellerault.  The hundreds of Acadians who went there in 1773, Dugass among them, tried mightily to bring life to the soil around the long line of houses in the woods of Poitou.  In late 1775 and early 1776, after over two years of effort, the Dugass, with most of the other Poitou Acadians, retreated in four convoys to the port city of Nantes, where they lived once again on government hand outs and whatever work they could find.  A Dugas family from Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, came to France by a different route.  After the war with Britain ended in 1763, hundreds of Acadians from prison compounds in Nova Scotia, determined to remain under French jurisdiction, migrated to St.-Pierre and Miquelon, French-controlled islands off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Within a few years, French authorities despaired that the islands' dwindling resources would be unable to support such a large population.  Pressured by French authorities and their poor living conditions on the island, Dugass who had escaped the British deportation to France in late 1758 elected to go there.  They reached St.-Malo aboard the schooner La Creole in November 1767, where they no doubt were welcome by their many cousins in the area.  It did not take them long to see that conditions in the French port and its suburbs were no better than on the crowded French islands.  They returned to St.-Pierre and Miquelon the following March.  But another war, this one the American Revolution, forced them from the islands again.  In 1778, France joined the United States in its fight against Britain.  The islands by now, with their smaller populations, were a chief source of salted cod for the European market, and the Acadians there were thriving.  This made the islands a tempting target, and British forces from Newfoundland seized St. Pierre and Miquelon later in the year.  "In scenes reminiscent of the deportations of 1755," wrote one historian, "the inhabitants of St. Pierre and Miquelon were forced aboard vessels, without being given time 'to even save their clothes,' while soldiers went from house to house, burning the structures and their contents.  Once again, the Miquelonnais were forced to sail to France."  The Dugass made the crossing back to France aboard the brigantine La Jeannette, which reached St.-Malo in early November 1778.  Some of them died there.  In the early 1780s, when the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana, at least 55 of the Dugass still in the mother country agreed to take it.  Others chose to remain. 

Back in North America, Dugass who had found refuge on the Gulf of St. Lawrence in 1755 suffered more reverses in the final years of the war against Britain.  In July 1760, British forces attacked the French stronghold at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs, where hundreds of Acadians had found refuge from earlier roundups.  Before returning to their base, the British rounded up 300 Acadian exiles at Restigouche and held them as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia for the rest of the war.  Dugass were among the thousand or so Acadians who escaped the roundup.  On 24 October 1760, French officials noted that a Dugas still at Restigouche was serving as one of the seven capitaines in the garrison's militia.  Another Dugas family also appeared on the October list.  In the early 1760s, the Dugass at Restigouche were either captured by, or surrendered to, British forces and held as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia.  In c1761 and again in July, August, and October 1762, British officials at Fort Edward, Pigiguit, counted Dugass being held there. 

Following the war with Britain, Acadians being held in Nova Scotia and the seaboard colonies were allowed to leave, but not until British officials counted them and discerned their intentions.  In August 1763, Dugass were counted in the prison compounds on Georges Island, Halifax, and at Fort Cumberland, formerly Beauséjour, Chignecto, in Nova Scotial.  They also appeared on reports that month in Massachusetts and South Carolina, and some were still in Massachusetts in June 1766, their names appearing on a list of "The French" still in the colony "Who Wish to go to Canada." 

Dugass who had made the long trek to the St. Lawrence River valley in the late 1750s, had escaped the British roundups in greater Acadia, or had been held in New England for nearly a dozen years, chose to make new homes in Canada.  Though now also a British possession, the northern province was populated largely by fellow French Catholics, many of them Acadian exiles.  So, in a colony nearly as old as Acadia, descendants of Abraham Dugas began the slow, inexorable process of becoming Canadiennes.  Especially after 1766, they could be found in present-day Québec Province at Québec City, Ste.-Foy, Bécancour, Batiscan, Louiseville, St.-Jacques-de-l'Achigan, and St.-Paul-de-Lavaltire on the upper St. Lawrence, on the lower St. Lawrence at Rimouski, St.-Charles-de-Bellechasse, Rivière-du-Loup, and Cap-Chat; and at Carleton and Bonaventure on the northern shore of the Baie des Chaleurs.  They also settled at Caraquet in present-day northeastern New Brunswick.  In Nova Scotia they could be found at Chédabouctou on the Atlantic side of the peninsula; at Pointe-de-l'Église, now Church Point, Grosses-Coques, L'Anse-aux-Belliveau, and Meteghan on Baie Ste.-Marie, today's St. Mary's Bay, on the western side of the peninsula; at D'Escousse and Nureichak on Île Madame, and at Chéticamp on the western shore of Cape Breton Island.  They also settled in Newfoundland.  Typical of most, if not all, Acadian families, these Acadiennes of Canada lost touch with their Cadien cousins hundreds of miles away, and, until the Acadian reunions of the mid-twentieth century, may even have forgotten the others existed.  

During the early 1760s, in the final months of the war, Acadians exiled in the British colonies had been encouraged by French officials to go to St.-Dominique to work on a large French naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas.  Although driven from North America, the French were determined to hang on to what was left of their shrinking empire.  The new naval base on the north shore of St.-Domingue would protect the approaches to what was left of their possessions in the Caribbean basin.  French officials saw the Acadian exiles as a ready source of cheap labor.  They promised them land of their own if they came to St.-Domingue.  And so Acadians, including Dugass from New England and South Carolina, chose to go to the sugar island, but they found no farmland there, only empty promises, misery, and death in the jungles of northern St.-Domingue.  Beginning in the summer of 1765, after several years of what they saw as fruitless effort, Acadians sought permission to leave the naval base, but French officials refused to let them go.  Some, including Dugass, left the project anyway and moved to La Mirebalais in the island's interior in hopes of resuming their lives as farmers.  One of the Dugass in St.-Domingue moved elsewhere in 1765.  The British had deported her to South Carolina in 1755.  After being counted there in August 1763, she and her husband moved on to Môle St.-Nicolas, but they refused to remain there.  Instead of retreating to La Mirebalais, they evidently joined one of the expeditions of Acadians sailing from Halifax to Cap-Français on its way around to the Mississippi valley.  They took with them two Orillion orphans whose mother was a Dugas.

The Dugass being held in Nova Scotia had a serious dilemma on their hands.  The Treaty of Paris of February 1763 stipulated in its Article 14 that persons dispersed by the war had 18 months to return to their respective territories.  In the case of the Acadians, however, this meant that they could return only to French soil.  Rivière St.-Jean was no longer French territory, and Port-Royal had not been French for over half a century.  British authorities refused to allow any of the Acadian prisoners in the region to return to their former lands as proprietors.  If Acadians chose to remain in Nova Scotia, they could live only in the interior of the peninsula in small family groups and work for low wages on former Acadian lands now owned by New England "planters."  If they stayed, they must also take the hated oath of allegiance to the new British king, George III, without reservation.  They would also have to take the hated oath if they joined their cousins in Canada.  After all that they had suffered on the question of the oath, no self-respecting Acadian would consent to take it if it could be avoided.   Some Halifax exiles, including Dugass, chose to relocate to Miquelon, a French-owned island off the southern coast of Newfoundland.  Others considered going to French St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, where Acadian exiles in the British colonies, including Dugass, already had gone, or to the Illinois country, the west bank of which still belonged to France, or to lower Louisiana, which, thanks to British control of Canada, was the only route possible to the Illinois country for Acadian exiles.  Whatever their choice, they would not remain in old Acadia.  So they gathered up their money and their few possessions and prepared to leave their homeland.  Of the 600 who left Halifax in late 1764 bound for Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, at least 25 of them were Dugass.

Dugass settled early in Acadia and were among the earliest Acadians to find refuge in Louisiana.  The first of them arrived from Halifax in February 1765.  They followed the Broussards to Bayou Teche, but life there soon became unbearable.  An epidemic that summer and fall killed dozens of Teche Acadians.  Only one other family (the Bergerons) buried as many family members as the Dugass, and more Dugass died than Broussards!  Most of the family's survivors retreated that autumn with dozens of other Acadians to Cabahannocer on the river.  With only one exception, there they remained.  As a result, two centers of family settlement had emerged by the late 1760s.  On the western prairies, one Dugas stayed at Fausse Pointe on lower Bayou Teche, but most of his brothers and cousins moved to Anse La Butte and Grand Prairie on upper Bayou Vermilion, which, according to one authority, became "probably the most important historical center of the Dugas clan in the state."  On the river, some remained at Cabahannocer, but most moved upriver to Ascension, which was considered a part of the Acadian Coast.  In the 1770s, a Dugas came to Louisiana likely from France and joined his cousins on the upper Vermilion.  The largest contingent of  Dugass who came to Louisiana--55 individuals and a dozen families--reached the colony from France on every one of the Seven Ships of 1785.  One large family of six, some wives, a widow, and a young newlywed, chose to join their kinsmen on the western prairies, but most of the refugees from France chose settlements on the Acadian Coast or on upper Bayou Lafourche.  By the late 1790s, nearly all of the Dugass from France had moved to the Lafourche, creating a third center of family settlement that rivaled in numbers their cousins who remained on the river.  

During the antebellum period, more Dugass from the river, including four brothers from Ascension Parish and two from St. James, joined their kinsmen on Bayou Lafourche, while some Lafourche Dugass moved down to the coastal marshes east of Bayou Terrebonne.  The most dramatic migration of family members, however, occurred on the western prairies.  By the 1850s, Dugass from the Teche and Vermilion valleys had moved west of Bayou Nezpique and the Mermentau River, where they worked large herds of cattle on the Calcasieu prairies, but some did not stop there.  By 1860, four Dugas families had crossed the Sabine to southeastern Texas, where they spelled their surname Dugat.  After the War of 1861-65, at least one Dugas from the Bayou Teche valley settled in the Terrebonne marshes, and others moved from upper Bayou Lafourche to the western prairies.  ...

Dozens of Dugass and Dugats served Louisiana and Texas in uniform during the War of 1861-65. ...16

.

In February 1765, twenty-one Dugass--two wives, three brothers, several individuals, including a very young orphan, and three families, two of them fairly large--arrived at New Orleans from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue.  After a brief respite in the city, they followed the Broussards across the Atchafalaya Basin to lower Bayou Teche.  When an epidemic killed six members of the family that summer and fall, most of the surviving Dugass retreated to the Acadian settlement on the Mississippi.  One followed her husband to the Opelousas District and others remained on Bayou Teche, with the result that two centers of family settlement emerged in the colony, one on the river, the other on the prairies: 

Jean (1712-1765) à Martin à Abraham Dugas

Jean, third son of Abraham dit Grivois Dugas and Marie-Madeleine Landry, born at Annapolis Royal in June 1712, followed his family to Port-Toulouse, Île Royale, later in the decade but returned to Nova Scotia.  He married Marie-Charlotte, daughter of Gabriel Godin and Andrée-Angélique Jeanne of Rivière St.-Jean, in c1734 at either Annapolis Royal or on Rivière St.-Jean and settled at Ékoupag on the river, where French officials counted them in 1739 with three children.  They had more children on the river.  They evidently escaped the British attack up Rivière St.-Jean in 1758 and sought refuge at Restigouche at the head of the Baie des Chaleurs.  When the British attacked the French stronghold there in the summer of 1760, Jean and his family escaped another roundup.  In late October, Jean Dugas "fils de Pre.," as he was called, with eight people in his household, appears on a list of 1,003 Acadians still at Restigouche.  In the early 1760s, they either were captured by, or surrendered to, British forces and held as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia.  In August 1763, British officials counted Jean, his wife, and eight others in his family at the prison compound on Georges Island, Halifax.  In 1764-65, they emigrated with other Rivière St.-Jean Acadians to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue.  In the spring of 1765, Jean, Marie-Charlotte, and six of their children, five sons and a daughter, along with their oldest son and his family, followed the Broussards from New Orleans to lower Bayou Teche.  Marie-Charlotte died on the Teche that July, age unrecorded.  Jean died in September, age 43, in the same epidemic that killed his wife and oldest son, and was buried at "the first camp lower down."  After his death, his younger children, all of whom survived the epidemic, retreated with other Rivière St.-Jean Acadians to Cabahannocer on the river.  Jean's daughter married into the Landry family there and settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  His surviving sons and a grandson remained on the river, and most of them created vigorous lines there.  Some of his grandsons moved on to Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Joseph, born probably at Ékoupag, Rivière St.-Jean, in the mid-1730s, married cousin Cécile, daughter of Barthélemy Bergeron dit d'Ambroise and Marguerite Dugas of Ste.-Anne-du-Pays-Bas, Rivière St.-Jean, in the early 1750s probably on the river.  They evidently escaped the British in 1758 and found refuge with their families at Restigouche.  In the summer of 1760, they evidently escaped the roundup there.  In the early 1760s, however, they either were captured by, or surrenered to, British forces and were held as prisoners of war in Nova Scotia.  British officials counted them with three children in the prison compound on Georges Island, Halifax, in August 1763.  In 1764-65, they emigrated with other Rivière St.-Jean Acadians to Louisiana via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue.  Their youngest child, infant daughter Mathilde, died at New Orleans on March 11 soon after the family reached the colony--perhaps the first Acadian to die in Louisiana.  That spring, Joseph, Cécile, and their remaining children, a son and two daughters, followed the Broussards from New Orleans to lower Bayou Teche.  Joseph died either in July or October, a victim of the epidemic that struck the Teche Acadians.  After his death, Cécile and her children, all of whom survived the epidemic, retreated with other Rivière-St.-Jean Acadians to Cabahannocer on the river.  Cécile remarried twice there, to a Lahure from Lorraine and to an Acadian Bernard.  Her Dugas daughters married into the Comeau and Bernard families on the river, and the one who married a Bernard stepbrother moved on to Bayou Lafourche.  Her Dugas son also created his own family on the river.

Only son Joseph dit Cadet, born probably at Ékoupag, Rivière St.-Jean in c1754, followed his family into exile, into imprisonment at Halifax, to Louisiana, and to lower Bayou Teche.  After his father's death in a Teche valley epidemic, Cadet followed his widowerd mother to Cabahannocer on the river, where he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcel LeBlanc and Marie-Josèphe Breaux, in October 1780.  They remained there.  Their son Étienne Sylvestre was born at Cabahannocer in December 1787; Benjamin in October 1799; and Lucas, called Luc, in March 1802.  Joseph dit Cadet died near Convent, St. James Parish, in January 1833, age 80.  His daughters married into the Arceneaux, Besson, Breaux, and Dicharry families.  His three sons settled on the left, or east, bank of the river in St. James Parish, and one lived briefly on the western prairies.  Joseph dit Cadet's youngest son moved to upper Bayou Lafourche by the 1840s, but his older sons remained on the river. 

Oldest son Étienne-Sylvestre married Scholastique, daughter of fellow Acadians Bonaventure Godin and Marie Broussard, at the St. James church in August 1806.  Their son Étienne, fils was born near Convent, St. James Parish, in September 1812.  Étienne, père died near Convent in June 1854, age 66.

Only son Étienne, fils married Marie Mélisaire or Melissa, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Bourgeois and Marie Angèle Gautreaux, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in October 1834.  Their son Félicien died near Convent, St. James Parish, age 2 months, in December 1838; Joseph Ludger was born in January 1840; Simon in March 1842; Adrien in March 1843 but died the following June; Jean Baptiste was born in October 1844; and Étienne Dorsino, called Dorsino, in February 1855 but died at age 6 1/2 in August 1861.  Étienne, fils died near Convent in May 1856.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Étienne died at "age 40 yrs.," but he was 44.  His daughter married into the Jacob family.  One of his sons married by 1870. 

Fifth son Jean Baptiste married Claire Odalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Terence LeBlanc and Léocade LeBlanc, at the Convent church in April 1870. 

Cadet's second son Benjamin married Louise Marie Émelie Mélisaire, called Mélisaire or Serre, daughter of Benjamin Folcher, Folgues, Folker, Forchere, Fulcher, or Volkes and Marie Arceneaux, at the Convent church in April 1826.  Their son Joseph Norbert was born near Convent in July 1826; Benjamin, fils in Lafayette Parish in August 1832 but died near Convent at age 15 months in December 1833; and Louis was baptized at the Convent church, age 6 months, in February 1835.  (One wonders why they moved to the western prairies during the early 1830s and returned to the river so quickly.)  Benjamin died near Convent in March 1840.  The priest who recorded his burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Benjamin died at "age about 37 yrs.," but he was 40.  A daughter was born posthumously the following August.  His daughters married into the Blouin, Melançon, and Theriot families.  His two surviving sons also created their own families. 

Oldest son Joseph Norbert married Marie Elmire, called Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Clouâtre and Marcellite Bourgeois, at the Convent church in September 1846.  Their son Joseph Clairville, called Clairville, was born near Convent in October 1850 but died the following July; Joseph, fils, perhaps also called Thomassin, was born in March 1854 but may have died at age 1 in March 1855; Joseph Benjamin was born in September 1855; Michel Léoville in December 1860; and Joseph Adam Willis in October 1864.  Joseph Norbert died near Convent in January 1867.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Jos., as he called him, died at "age 40 years," so this probably was him. 

Benjamin's third and youngest son Louis married Zulma or Zulmée, daughter of Placide Hymel and Virginie Pertuit, at the Convent church in January 1857.  Their son Ignace Camille was born near Convent in July 1858, Hippolyte Florian in August 1859 but died in September, Joseph Félix was born in December 1865, and Joseph Émile in October 1869. 

Cadet's third and youngest son Lucas, called Luc, married cousin Marie Émilie, called Émelite, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Mire and Henriette Bernard, at the Convent church in February 1821; they had to secure dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Luc, fils was born near Convent in August 1824, and Michel Éloi or Éloi Michel in September 1826.  After his sons were born, Luc took his family to upper Bayou Lafourche, where, at age 53, he remarried to Marie, daughter of Jean Gross and Marie Anglade and widow of Édouard Babin, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1855.  They settled near boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes.  Their son Joseph René was born Paincourtville in June 1857; and Joseph Sosthène, called Sosthène, near Donaldsonville, Ascension Parish, in October 1858 but died near Donaldsonville in September 1765, only a few weeks shy of age 7.  Luc, père died near Paincourtville in December 1863.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Luc died at "age 62 years," but he was 61. One wonders if his death was war-related.  His two older sons married to sisters on the upper bayou before 1870.

Oldest son Luc, fils, by first wife Émelite Mire, married Aureline, daughter of fellow Acadians Apollinaire Landry and Élise Landry, at the Paincourtville church in May 1845, and remarried to Carmelite or Carmenina, daughter of Remon Bermeyo, Bermeau, Balmeo, or Bernuchot and Carmelite Marroi, at the Paincourtville church in June 1850.  They lived near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes.  Their son Joseph was born in November 1855, and Ambroise Julian in January 1861 but died at age 8 1/2 in September 1869.  Luc, fils died in October 1863.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Luc died at "age 39 years," so this was him.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

Luc, père's second son Michel Éloi, by first wife Émelite Mire, married Françoise, another daughter of Apollinaire Landry and Élise Landry, at the Paincourtville church in February 1850.  They settled near the boundary between Assumption and Ascension parishes.  Their son Joseph Amédée was born in March 1852; Joseph Louis in December 1853 but died in January; Joseph Oleus was born in January 1855; Joseph in April 1861; and Stanislas Elphége, called Elphége, in May 1865 but died the following October.  Michel Éloi died near Donaldsonville in November 1865.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Michel Éloi died at "age 38 years," but he was 39.  His daughter married into the Rome family. 

Jean's second son François, born probably at Ékoupag, Rivière St.-Jean, in c1740, followed his family into exile, into a prisoner-of-war camp in Nova Scotia, to Louisiana, and to lower Bayou Teche.  After retreating to Cabahannocer on the river with his siblings after the death of his parents, he married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Babin and Anne Thériot, at Cabahannocer in June 1768.  They moved upriver to Ascension, where colonial officials counted them on the right, or west, bank of the river in 1770 and 1777.  They also may have lived in Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche.  François died at Ascension in October 1798.  The priest who recorded his burial said that François was age 66 when he died, but he was closer to 58.  His daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  Five of his six sons also created their own families on the river, but not all of the lines endured.

Oldest son Joseph, born probably at Cabahannocer in c1770, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Honoré Braud and Madeleine Braud, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in February 1795, and remarried to Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Michels Poirier and  Marie Cormier and widow of Charles Hébert, at the St. James church, St. James Parish, in February 1809.  Their son François Camille or Cornille was born near Convent, St. James Parish, in October 1814.  Their daughters married into the Landry and Mire families.  Joseph died near Convent in July 1842.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph died at "age 75 yrs.," but he probably was in his early 70s.  His son created his own family on the river.

Only son François Camille, by second wife Marie Braud, married Marie Émelite, called Melite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Louvière and Marguerite LeBlanc, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in September 1837; they had to secure dispensation for fourth degree of relationship in order to marry.  They lived near the boundary between St. James and Ascension parishes.  Their son Joseph Ambroise, called Ambroise, was born in December 1846 but died at age 1 in November 1847.  Their daughter married into the Richard family.  François Cornille, as the recording priest called him, at age 40, remarried to Eve, daughter of fellow Acadians Narcisse Gautreaux and Mathilde LeBlanc, at the Donaldsonville church, Ascension Parish, in May 1855.  They settled near Gonzales.  Their son François Constant was born in December 1866. 

François's second son Hippolyte, born probably at Ascension in c1771, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians François Duhon and Isabelle Landry and widow of Louis Foret, at Ascension in September 1800.  Did the family line survive? 

François's third son Athanase le jeune, also called François, born at Ascension in September 1773, married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadians Firmin Broussard and Madeleine Landry, at Ascension in February 1798, the same day and at the same place where his brother Michel married.  Their son François-Larmusion or Jean-Morusian was born at Ascension in February 1802 but died at age 7 in October 1809; and Jean Vincent, a twin, was born in January 1804 but died 3 weeks after his birth.  Athanase le jeune died at Ascension in July 1807, age 33.  His daughter married into the Chiasson family.  When his older son died two years later, this family line, except for its blood, died with him.  

François's fourth son Michel-Noël, born at Ascension in December 1775, married cousin Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Babin and Anastasie Landry, at Ascension in February 1798, the same day and at the same place where his brother Athanase married.  Michel and Madeleine's son Michel-Eugène was born at Ascension in November 1801 but died age 6 months in May 1802; Louis-Ulgère, also called Michel-Ulgère, was born in February 1803; and Joseph Trasimond, called Trasimond, in October 1806.  Michel Noël died in Ascension Parish in July 1807, age 31.  His daughter married into the LeBlanc family.  His two surviving sons also created their own families on the river. 

Second son Ulgère married cousin Marie Mathilde, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Broussard and Emerite Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in December 1825; they had to secure dispensation for third degree of ____ in order to marry.  Their son Léon Mathurin, called Mathurin, was born in Ascension Parish in November 1826 but died in December.  Ulgère remarried to cousin Émilie, or Amelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Donat Landry and Lise Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1829.  Their son Léon was born in Ascension Parish in January 1831, and Joseph Goutrand or Gontran in March 1842.  Their daughters married into the Babin and Copponex families.  Ulgère died in Ascension Parish in February 1857.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Michel Ulgère, as he called him, died at "age 57 years," but he was 54.  His two son created their own families on the river. 

Second son Léon, by second wife Émilie Landry, married Rosalie Delphine, called Delphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Richard and Léonise LeBlanc and widow of Francis Guilfou, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1851.  Their son Joseph Henry Léon was born in Ascension Parish in October 1853 but died at age 8 months in June 1854.  Léon remarried to cousin Marie Gertrude, called Gertrude, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Baptiste Landry and Marie Aureline Babin, at the Donaldsonville church in December 1857.  They settled near Gonzales, Ascension Parish.  Their son Arnold Eulger was born in March 1861, and Juste Léon in November 1866. 

Ulgère's third and youngest son Joseph Goutraud, by second wife Émilie Landry, called Joseph G. by the recording priest, married cousin Hélène Elmina, daughter of fellow Acadians Omer Hébert and Jeanette Melançon, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1867; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry. 

Michel Noël's third and youngest son Trasimond married Mélanie, daughter of Pierre Denoux, also called Gaillard, and Marie Louise Legrange, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1837.  Their son Joseph Adam, called Adam, was born in Ascension Parish in December 1841; Pierre Trasimond, called Trasimond, fils, in April 1843; Joseph Noël Ozémé, called Ozémé, in April 1845; Jean Thomas, called Thomas, in December 1846; Paul Odrezie in May 1848; Éloi Prosper in December 1849; and Jérôme Florestan in September 1851.  Trasimond, père, described as a "res. of Brusly McCall's," died in Ascension Parish in July 1865/  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said Trasimond died at "age 50 years," but this Trasimond would have been 58.  Four of his sons married by 1870, two of them to Hispanic sisters. 

Oldest son Adam married Olesida, daughter of Mathias Rodriguez and Joséphine Falcon, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1869. 

Trasimond's second son Trasimond, fils married Marie Jannette, daughter of Emmanuel Ruiz and Marie Monson, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1863.  Their "2 small children," names and ages unrecorded, died in Ascension Parish in March 1864.  Trasimond, fils remarried to first cousin Félicité, daughter of Henry Denoux and Félicité Capdeville, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1866; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Vileor Justinien was born in Ascension Parish in November 1866 but died at age 1 in November 1867. 

Trasimond, père's third son Ozémé married Olivia or Oliva, daughter of fellow Acadians Valère Babin and Adeline Poirier, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1866. 

Trasimond, père's fourth son Thomas married Lucia, another daughter of Emmanuel Ruiz and Marie Monson, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1869. 

François's fifth son Jean le jeune, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in November 1783, married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Duhon and Anne LeBlanc, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in February 1805.  Their son François Rosémond, called Rosémond, was born at Ascension in January 1806; Jean Achille, called Achille, at St.-Jacques in April 180[7]; twins Jérôme le jeune and Joseph Ovide in August 1808; and Joseph Léon, called Léon, in July 1817.  They moved to Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche probably by the mid-1820s, after their children had been born on the river.  Jean le jeune died near Plattenville, Assumption Parish, in April 1855, age 72.  His daughter married into the Landry and LeBlanc families.  Four of his five sons married, all to LeBlancs and three of them to sisters, but not all of their lines endured. 

Oldest son Rosémond married Marguerite or Marie Mélanie, called Mélanie, daughter of fellow Acadians Donat LeBlanc and Marie Melançon of St. James Parish, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1827.  Their son Sosthène was born in Assumption Parish in November 1827 and died in December; Jérôme Sosthène, called Sosthène, was born in August 1829; Onésime Oscar, called Oscar, in January 1832 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1833; and Joseph Assard or Aword was baptized at the Plattenville church, age 6 months, in April 1836.  They also had a son named Joseph Kempton, called Kempton, unless he was Joseph Assard.  Their two surviving sons created their own families on the upper Lafourche. 

Older son Sosthène married Aglae Renée, daughter of René Langlois and Anne Kislon, at the Paincourtville church, Assumption Parish, in December 1845.  Their son Joseph Ernest was born near Paincourtville in June 1853; Jean René in December 1854; Ulysse in August 1862; Joseph Eno was baptized at the Paincourtville church, age unrecorded, in March 1864; and Joseph Leroi was born in January 1866.  Their daughter married into the LeBlanc and Legrand families. 

Rosémond's younger son Kempton married Adeline, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Blanchard and his Creole wife Carmelite Peltier, at the Paincourtville church in July 1854.  Their son Joseph Oscar was born near Paincourtville in January 1857, and Donat Kempton in August 1864. 

Jean le jeune's second son Achille married cousin Marie Farelise or Farelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Simonet LeBlanc and Françoise Landry, at the Plattenville church in May 1829; they likely had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Simon Aristide was born in Assumption Parish in February 1830; Joseph Félix, called Félix, in August 1831; Joseph Jules in January 1842; and Joseph Désiré, called Désiré, near Paincourtville in December 1843 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1845.  Their daughters married into the Dugas and Mollere families.  Achille, age 39, almost 40, remarried to Osite, daughter of Joseph Mollere, fils and his Acadian wife Henriette Blanchard, at the Paincourtville church in February 1847.  Their son Joseph Claiborne was baptized at the Paincourtville church, age 2 months, in June 1849 but died at age 4 1/2 in February 1854; Jean Alces was born in November 1851 but may have died at age 1 in January 1853; and François Joseph was born in October 1855 but died at age 3 1/2 in July 1859.  Only one of his sons may have created a family of his own.

Second son Félix, by first wife Farelie LeBlanc, married Helena, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Theriot and his Creole wife Marie Caillouet and widow of Telesphore Michel, at the Paincourtville church in May 1855. 

Jean le jeune's third son Jérôme le jeune married cousin Azélie Euphrosine, another daughter of Simonet LeBlanc and Françoise Landry, at the Plattenville church in September 1841; they likely had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Jérôme died near Plattenville in February 1852, age 43.  Did he father any sons? 

Jean le jeune's fourth son Joseph Ovide died in St. James Parish in September 1825, age 17.  Did he die on the eve of his family's moving to upper Bayou Lafourche? 

Jeanle jeune's fifth and youngest son Léon married cousin Elise or Elisa, called Lize, yet another daughter of Simonet LeBlanc and Françoise Landry, at the Plattenville church in November 1840; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Elphége was born near Paincourtville in April 1846, Joseph Jules in August 1853, and Antoine Ernez in January 1858.  Their daughter married into the Champeaux family on lower Bayou Teche. 

François's sixth and youngest son Jérôme, born at Ascension in April 1790, died there in April 1807, age 17.  He did not marry.  

Jean's third son Charles, born probably at Ékoupag, Rivière St.-Jean, in c1750, followed his family into exile, into a prisoner-of-war camp in Nova Scotia, to Louisiana, and to lower Bayou Teche.  After retreating to Cabahannocer on the river with his siblings after the death of his parents, he married Rose, daughter of fellow Acadians Antoine Babin and Catherine Landry, probably at nearby Ascension in c1772.  Colonial officials counted them on the right, or west, bank of the river at Ascension in 1777.  Charles may have taken his family to Attakapas during the late 1770s or early 1780s, but they returned to Ascension.  Charles died in Ascension Parish in November 1809, age 59.  His daughter married into the Breaux and Landry families.  Four of his seven sons created their own families on the river.

Oldest son Charles-Grégoire, called Grégoire, born at Cabahannocer in December 1774, married Élisabeth or Isabelle-Sophie, daughter of fellow Acadians Mathurin Landry and Anne Landry, at Ascension in January 1796.  Their son Joseph-Nicolas or -Colin, was born at Ascension in August 1798, Hippolyte-Gustave in December 1800, and Godefroi-Léopold in October 1802.  Their daughter married into the Godin family.  Grégoire remarried to Françoise Barbay probably at Ascension by 1805.  Their daughter married into the Gaudet family.  Grégoire died in Ascension Parish in May 1827, age 52.  Two of his three sons created their own families on the river. 

Oldest son Joseph Nicolas, by first wife Élisabeth Sophie Landry, married cousin Clarisse Eméranthe, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Landry and Elisa Landry, at the Donaldson church in March 1821; they had to secure dispensation for third degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Théophile died near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, age 10 months, in August 1822; Paul Edward or Édouard, called Édouard, was born in Ascension Parish in January 1826; and Joseph Grégoire in January 1834.  They also had an older son named Félix Labas.  Their daughters married into the Gaudin family and perhaps into the Hébert family as well.  Joseph Nicolas, at age 42, remarried to Marie Caroline, daughter of fellow Acadians Jean Dupuis and Marine Clouâtre and widow of Édouard Blanchard, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1841.  Joseph Nicolas died in Ascension Parish in February 1864.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph Nicolas died at "age 65 years."  One wonders if his death was war-related.   Two of his four sons created their own families on the river.

Second Félix Labas, by first wife Clarisse Landry, married cousin Marguerite Anne Eléonore, daughter of fellow Acadians Auguste Broussard and Adélaïde Landry, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1842.  Their son Ambroise died at birth in Ascension Parish in December 1843.  Félix remarried to Malvina, daughter of fellow Acadians Milien Babin and Marie Victoire Braud, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1848.  Their son Raymond Alfred A. was born in Ascension Parish in January 1864. 

Joseph Nicolas's third son Édouard, by first wife Clarisse Landry, married Marguerite Florestine, daughter of Neuville Roth and his Acadian wife Marie Angèle Breaux, at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, in October 1851.  Édouard remarried to cousin Marie Joséphine, called Joséphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Landry and Joséphine Orillion, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1860.

Joseph Grégoire, by first wife Clarisse Landry, died in Ascension Parish in May 1854, age 20.  He probably did not marry. 

Grégoire's third and youngest son Godefroi Léopold, by first wife Élisabeth Sophie Landry, married first cousin Mathilde, daughter of fellow Acadian Jérôme Dugas and his Creole wife Mathilde Arrieux, his uncle and aunt, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1827; they had to secure dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Godefroi died in Ascension Parish in September 1829.  The priest who recorded his burial said that Godefroi was "age ca. 22 yrs." when he died, but he was 26.  

Charles's second son Victor, born at Ascension in April 1779, died there the following October.  

Charles's third son Paul, called Paulin, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in November 1785, married Marie Clémence, called Clémence, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Pélagie Doiron of Ascension, at the St. James church in February 1808.  Their son Paul Rosémond was born in Ascension Parish in July 1809; Joseph Émile, called Émile, in March 1811 but, according to a church record, died at age 3 1/2 in July 1814, Jérôme Adélard was born in November 1813; Florentin Aimé, also called Émile, in April 1818; Lazare Eleuthere in September 1822; Henri died 6 days after his birth in July 1824; and Joseph Euphémon, called Euphémon, was born in March 1827 but died at age 13 in February 1840.  Paul died in Ascension Parish in November 1842, age 57.  Their daughter married into the Melançon family.  Three of his sons settled in Ascension Parish. 

Third son Jérôme Adélard married first cousin Françoise Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Dugas and his second wife Aurore Gaudin, his uncle and aunt, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1836.

Paulin's fourth son Florentin Aimé/Émile married Marie Sylveria, called Sylveria, daughter of Antoine Balderas or Baldere and Constance Mollere, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1846.  Their son Paul Wilbrod, called Wilbrod, was born in Ascension Parish in January 1848 but died at age 1 1/2 in July 1849. 

Paulin's fifth son Lazare Eleuthere married Marie Laure, called Laure, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Donat Gravois and Marie Marthe Eurasie Landry, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in January 1845.  They settled in Ascension Parish.  Their son Paul Robert was born in June 1849; George August in November 1861; Elphége Arthur, called Arthur, in October 1863 but died at 2 in November 1865; and Paul Arthur was born in September 1867. 

Oldest son Paul Robert died in Ascension Parish in June 1864, age 15.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

Charles's fourth son Laurent, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in November 1787, died there at age 1 1/2 in June 1789.  

Charles's fifth son Joseph, born at Ascension in March 1790, married Hortense, daughter of Pierre Arrieux and Eugènie dite Antoinette Barbe, at the Donaldson church in April 1810.  Their son Vernon Ignace or Ignace Vernon was born in Ascension Parish in October 1814.  Joseph remarried to Marie Aurore, called Aurore, daughter of fellow Acadians Michel Gaudin and Françoise Babin, at the Donaldson church in December 1816.  Their son Étienne Rosémond was born in Ascension Parish in December 1817.  They also had a son named Osémé, unless he was Étienne Rosémond.  Joseph died in Ascension Parish in October 1819, age 29.  His daughter married a Dugas first cousin.  Two of his sons also created their own families on the river. 

Oldest son Ignace Vernon, by first wife Hortense Arrieux, married Marguerite Coralie, called Coralie, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Landry and his Creole wife Carmelite Vives, at the Donaldsonville church in June 1833.  Their son Joseph Camille was born in Ascension Parish in July 1836 but died the following October. 

Joseph's second son Osémé, by second wife Aurore Gaudin, married first cousin Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Gaudin and Lise Gaudet, at the Donaldsonville church in August 1843; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Édouard Bonaventure was born in Ascension Parish in July 1856.  Osémé died in Ascension Parish in May 1869.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the marriage, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Ozémé, as he called him, died at "age 51 years." 

Charles's sixth son Jérôme, born at Ascension in August 1792, married Eugènie Mathilde, called Mathilde, another daughter of Pierre Arrieux and Eugènie dite Antoinette Barbe, at the Donaldson church in February 1811.  Their son Étienne Jérôme Vileor or Jérôme Étienne Vileor, called Vileor, was born in Ascension Parish in December 1819.  Jérôme died in Ascension Parish in February 1839, age 46.  His daughters married into the Arrieux, Dugas, Giraud, and Lavigne families.  His son also created his own family on the river. 

Only son Vileor married Marie Élodie, called Élodie, daughter of fellow Acadians Ferdinand Theriot and Aspasie Braud, at the Donaldsonville church in September 1843.  During the antebellum period, Vileor served in the Donaldsonville Artillery, working his way up from flag bearer to first lieutenant.  He was elected sheriff of Donaldsonville in September 1859.  In September 1861, he resigned his commission as first lieutenant in the artillery company to remain in his home town as sheriff.  As a result, he did not serve Louisiana in uniform during the War of 1861-65.  Vileor may have died in Ascension Parish in July 1865.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who called him Villeor, did not give any parents' names, mention a wife, or give the age of the deceased.  Vileor, son of Jérôme, would have been age 45.  His daughter married into the Ayraud family.  One wonders if he fathered any sons. 

Charles's seventh and youngest son Édouard-Benjamin, born at Ascension in July 1795, may have died young. 

Jean's fourth son Athanase, born probably at Ékoupag, Rivière St.-Jean, in c1753, followed his family into exile, into a prisoner-of-war camp in Nova Scotia, to Louisiana, and to lower Bayou Teche.  After retreating to Cabahannocer on the river with his siblings after the death of his parents, he married Anne-Rose, called Rose or Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre LeBlanc and Anne Landry, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in September 1777.  Athanase died at nearby Ascension in March 1791, in his late 30s.  His daughters married into the Babin, Boudreau, Foret, Gaudin, and Thibodeau families.  Only one of his two sons created a family of his own and settled upriver at St. Gabriel before returning to Ascension.  Athanase's line of the family may not have endured. 

Older son Jérôme-Athanase, also called Joseph, born at Ascension in September 1778, married Élisabeth or Isabelle Cécile, daughter of fellows Acadian Firmin Babin and his Creole wife Isabelle Brousse, at Ascension in January 1805.  Their son Marius Toussaint was born in Ascension Parish in November 1805; Jean Lesimond, called Lesimond, near St. Gabriel, Iberville Parish, in January 1808; Louis Rigobert in Ascension Parish in November 1813; and Jean Marie was born posthumously in April 1826.  Isabelle Cécile died in April 1826, a day after son Jean Marie was born, probably from complications of childbirth.  Jérôme Athanase had died in Ascension Parish in January 1826, age 47, four months before son Jean Marie's birth and his wife's death.  Their daughters married into the Braud, Hamilton, and Landry families.  Two of Jérôme Athanase's sons also married, but neither of their lines seems to have endured. 

Oldest son Marius, at age 34, married Virginia, daughter of Barthélemy Hamilton and his Acadian wife Mélanie Dupuis, at the Convent church, St. James Parish, in February 1840.  Marius died in Ascension Parish in May 1841, age 35.  Did he father any sons? 

Jérôme Athanase's second son Lesimond married Marie Adamiene, daughter of Jean Félix Pallaquin and his Acadian wife Josèphe Marie Bellemère, at the Donaldsonville church in April 1826.  Their son Stanislas Jérôme was born in Ascension Parish in September 1827 but died at age 5 "of long illness and fever" in November 1832.  Lesimond (the recording priest called him Onésime) died in Ascension Parish in April 1829.  The priest who recorded Lesimond's burial said that he was age 23 when he died, but he was 21.  When his only son died three years later, this family line probably died with him.  

Athanase's younger son Henri, born probably at Ascension in c1782, died there at age 13 in April 1795. 

Jean's fifth son Michel, born in greater Acadia in c1757 during exile, was imprisoned with his family in Nova Scotia during the early 1760s and followed his family to Louisiana and to lower Bayou Teche.  After retreating to Cabahannocer on the river with his siblings after the death of his parents, he married Anne-Rose or -Sophie, called Sophie, daughter of fellow Acadians Bonaventure Forest and Claire Rivet, at St.-Jacques of Cabahannocer in February 1778.  Their daughters married into the Babin, Futele, Landry, and LeBlanc families.  Michel, in his early 40s, remarried to Rose or Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Forest and Isabelle Léger and widow, perhaps, of Joachim Maroi, at Ascension in July 1800.  Their daughter married into the Babin family.  Michel died in Ascension Parish in October 1828, age 71.  His four married sons settled on upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Oldest son Michel-Édouard, by first wife Sophie Forest, born at Ascension in January 1781, died there at age 6 months the following July.  

Michel's second son Joseph, by first wife Sophie Forest, baptized at Ascension, no age recorded, in April 1787, married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph Landry and Osite Landry, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in June 1812.  Their son Joseph Avantin, Avante, Aventin, Evantin, Evantine, Eventin, or Valentin was born in Assumption Parish in February 1815; Joseph Drosin, called Drosin, a twin, in June 1818; and Joseph Achille, called Achille, in July 1823.  They remained on the upper bayou.  Their daughters married into the Bourg, Daigle, and LeBlanc families.  Joseph's three sons also created their own families on the river and the upper Lafourche. 

Oldest son Joseph Avantin married cousin Marie Séraphine, called Séraphine, daughter of fellow Acadians Louis Babin and Céleste Dugas, at the Donaldsonville church in October 1835; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They lived near the boundary between Ascension and Assumption parishes.  Their son Joseph was born in September 1837, Joseph Léon in February 1851, and Joseph Aristide in February 1856.  They also had an older son named Numa, unless he was the first Joseph.  Avantin died near Paincourtville in January 1863.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Aventin, as he called him, died at "age 47 years."  His daughters married into the Allemand, Giroir, and Theriot families.  One of his sons married by 1870 and settled on the western prairies after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Numa married cousin Émelie, daughter of fellow Acadians Armogène Giroir and Marie Dupuy, at the Paincourtville church in February 1859; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  They settled on Bayou Quatre Mille.  Their son Joseph Evariste was born in March 1860; another son, name unrecorded, died "age a few months" in May 1862; Joseph Albert, called Albert, was born near Plattenville in April 1863 but died near Paincourtville, age 1 1/2, in August 1864; and Louis Alfred was born near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in January 1869.  They were living near Brashear, now Morgan, City, St. Mary Parish, on the lower Atchafalaya, in the early 1860s and may have returned to upper Bayou Lafourche before moving back to the western prairies. 

Joseph's second son Drosin married first cousin Clarisse or Claire, daughter of fellow Acadians Joseph LeBlanc and Julie Clothilde Dugas, Drosin's paternal aunt, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in February 1841; they had to secure a dispensation for second degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Léon Théodore was born near Plattenville in January 1842; Théodule Oscar in February 1843; Angelle in c1852 but died near Paincourtville, age 10, in December 1862; Joseph Nicols was born near Paincourtville in December 1860; and Joseph Lacroix, called Lacroix, in May 1863 but died at age 1 in June 1864.  Their daughter married into the Hébert family. 

Joseph's third and youngest son Achille likely married fellow Acadian Marie Marguerite Landry in Assumption Parish during the late 1840s or early 1850s.  Their son Joseph Camille was born near Plattenville in December 1853; Joseph Vileor near Paincourtville in March 1855; Joseph Treville in May 1857; Joseph Edgard in June 1858; Joseph Aristide, called Aristide, in October 1860 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1862; Joseph Nicolas was born in September 1863; and Joseph Hippolyte, called Hippolyte, in July 1865 but died at age 1 1/2 in October 1866.

Michel's third son Joseph-Alexandre, called Alexandre, from second wife Rose Forest, born at Ascension in April 1801, married cousin Marie Adeline, called Adeleine, 22-year-old daughter of fellow Acadians Charles Babin and Madeleine Angélique Foret of Iberville, at the Donaldsonville church in February 1825.  They also settled on upper Bayou Lafourche.  Their son Joseph Zéphirin, called Zéphirin, was born in Ascension Parish in October 1829; and Joseph Clovis, called Clovis, in Assumption Parish in December 1831.  They also had  younger sons named Séverin and Augustin or Auguste.  Alexandre died before April 1853, when he was listed as deceased in a son's marriage record.  His daughters married into the Bourg, Daigle, and LeBlanc families.  All four of his sons married on the upper Lafourche.  The oldest son moved to lower Bayou Teche after the War of 1861-65. 

Oldest son Zéphirin married Olive or Oliva, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin LeBlanc and Léonise Landry, at the Paincourtville church in April 1853.  Their son Joseph Treville was born near Paincourtville in February 1854, and Joseph Clerville in April 1858.  Zéphirin remarried to Arselie, Arselia, Arsely, Arcelie, or Arceline, daughter of fellow Acadians Onésime Achée and Zéolide LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church in May 1858.  Their son Joseph Émile was born near Paincourtville in November 1861.  They were living near New Iberia and Lydia on lower Bayou Teche soon after the War of 1861-65. 

Alexandre's second son Clovis married cousin Lorenza, daughter of fellow Acadians Magloire Landry and Justine Babin, at the Paincourtville church in February 1854. 

Alexandre's third son Séverin married Elise, called Lise, Lize, and Eliza, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Clet Daigle and his Creole wife Mathilde Simoneaux, at the Paincourtville church in May 1857.  Their son Joseph Richard was born near Paincourtville in April 1858, Joseph Alexandre in June 1859, Denis Désiré in October 1861, Édouard Tranquille in July 1866, and twins Léo and Léon in September 1868. 

Alexandre's fourth and youngest son Augustin or Auguste, married cousin Ernestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin Landry and Adélaïde Dupuy, at the Paincourtville church in January 1860; they had to secure a dispensation for third and fourth degrees of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Joseph Édouard, called Édouard, was born near Paincourtville in February 1861 but died at age 1 1/2 in October 1862; Zéphirin Hugues was born in April 1862; Grégoire near Plattenville in March 1868; and Joseph Edmond in July 1870. 

Michel's fourth son Joseph-Valéry, called Valéry, from second wife Rose Forest, born at Ascension in November 1802, married cousin Marguerite Séraphine, called Séraphine, another daughter of Charles Babin and Madeleine Angélique Foret, at the Donaldsonville church in January 1827.  They lived on upper Bayou Lafourche near the boundary between Ascension and Assumption parishes before moving down bayou.  Their son Joseph Valéry, fils, perhaps also called Martin, was born in Ascension Parish in November 1827; Joseph Jules, called Jules, in September 1836; Joseph Séverin or Zéphirin Valéry, called Zéphirin, in August 1839; and Joseph Michel Numa in Assumption Parish in September 1842.   Three of Valéry's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Joseph Valéry, fils married Mélisaire, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin LeBlanc and Sidalise Breaux, at the Paincourtville church in February 1855.  Their son Joseph Clairville was born near Paincourtville in December 1855. 

Valéry's second son Jules married Adelisca, Adeliska, Adoliska, or Odoisca, daughter of fellow Acadians Ursin Daigle and Mathilde Theriot, at the Paincourtville church in May 1857.  Their son Joseph died near Paincourtville 6 days after his birth in September 1858, and Joseph Ursin was born in February 1869.  They were living near Pierre Part, north of Lake Verret, on the eve of the War Between the States but evidently moved back to the bayou. 

Valéry's third son Zéphirin married cousin Laurenza, daughter of fellow Acadians Marcellin Landry and Adélaïde Dupuy, at the Paincourtville church in January 1861; they had to secure a dispensation for fourth degree of consanguinity in order to marry.  Their son Albert Saintville was born near Paincourtville in February 1863, Joseph Edmond in November 1867, and Joseph Ulysse Sulpice in January 1870. 

Valéry's fourth and youngest son Joseph Michel Numa, if he survived childhood did not marry before 1870. 

Michel's fifth and youngest son Thomas Clovis, called Clovis, from second wife Rose Forest, born in Ascension Parish in December 1809, married cousin Claire Dugas probably in Ascension Parish in the 1830s and joined his older brothers on upper Bayou Lafourche by the early 1840s.  Their son Joseph Jérôme, called Jérôme, was born in Ascension Parish in February 1840; Joseph Ferdinand in March 1842; Joseph Nicolas Elphége, called Elphége, near Plattenville, Assumption Parish, in September 1844; and Hippolyte Théophile, called Théophile, near Paincourtville in May 1847.  Their daughters married into the Landry and Legleu families.  Three of Clovis's sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Jérôme married Clorinthe, daughter of Victorin Simoneaux and Eglantine Freoux, at the Paincourtville church in January 1866. 

Clovis's second son Joseph Ferdinand, if he survived childhood did not marry before 1870. 

Clovis's third son Elphège married cousin Pamela, daughter of fellow Acadians Achille Dugas and Marie Pharalie LeBlanc, at the Paincourtville church in January 1867.  Their son Jean Ferdinand was born near Paincourtville in December 1867, and Thomas in March 1870. 

Clovis's fourth and youngest son Théophile married Désirée, daughter of Emérand Simoneaux and his Acadian wife Élisabeth Landry, at the Plattenville church in February 1868. 

Jean's sixth and youngest son Théodore, born in greater Acadia in c1759 during exile, was imprisoned with his family in Nova Scotia during the early 1760s and followed his family to Louisiana and to lower Bayou Teche.  After retreating to Cabahannocer on the river with his older siblings after the death of his parents, he married Marie-Victoire, called Victoire, daughter of fellow Acadians Pierre Forest and Marguerite Blanchard, at nearby Ascension in October 1784.  Théodore died in Ascension Parish in March 1827, age 69.  His daughters married into the Babin and Guidry families.  Only one of his four sons married.  He settled in Ascension Parish, but, except for its blood, his line of the family did not endure. 

Oldest son René, baptized at Ascension, age unrecorded, in November 1787, probably died young.  

Théodore's second son François-Isidore, called Isidore, a twin, born at Ascension in October 1793, died in Ascension Parish in April 1826.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded his burial said that Isidore was age 23 when he died, but he was 33.  He probably did not marry.  

Théodore's third son Pierre-Octave, born at Ascension in March 1799, married Anne Orsise, daughter of Auguste Léveque and Marguerite Justine Prevot, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in December 1821.  Their son Aymar Hercule Théodore was born in Ascension Parish in August 1825 but died at age 1 in August 1826, and François Augustin Théodore was born in October 1833 but died at age 6 months in April 1834.  Their daughter married into the Mullett family. 

Théodore's fourth and youngest son Hubert Séverin, born at Ascension in February 1806, died there at age 6 months the following August.  

Charles dit Charlitte (c1737-1808) à Claude à Abraham Dugas

Charles dit Charlitte, second son of Charles Dugas and Anne Robichaud dit Niganne, born probably at Annapolis Royal in c1736, followed his family into exile and married Marguerite, daughter of Joseph Broussard dit Beausoleil and Agnès Thibodeau of Peticoudiac, date & place unrecorded.  Charlitte probably was part of the Acadian resistance in present-day southeastern New Brunswick led by his father-in-law.  He and Marguerite may have been the couple held by the British at Fort Edward, Pigiguit, in July 1762.  They may also have been the couple with two others in the family at Fort Edward in August of that year.  In 1764-65, they followed her family to Louisiana from Halifax via Cap-Français, French St.-Domingue, and from New Orleans to lower Bayou Teche that spring.  They brought no children to Louisiana but had at least three of them there, a daughter and two sons.  Charlitte died at his home at Fausse Pointe on the lower Teche in September 1808, in his early 70s.  His sons created vigorous lines on the Teche.  Many of his grandsons and a great-grandson married Broussard cousins from Fausse Pointe.  

Older son Éloi, also called Édouard, born at Attakapas in c1770, married Susanne, daughter of Jean-Louis Bonin of Mobile and his Acadian wife Marguerite Prince, at Attakapas in November 1795.  They settled at Fausse Pointe.  Éloi died probably at Fausse Pointe in December 1835, age 65.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse later that month.  His daughters married into the Gonsoulin, Hayes, Judice, Labauve, and Ranconnet or Ransonnet families.  All five of his sons also created their own families on the prairies. 

Oldest son Éloi, fils, born at Fausse Pointe in February 1796, married Julie, daughter of fellow Acadians Amand Broussard dit Beausoleil and his second wife Anne Benoit of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1816.  They settled at Fausse Pointe.  Their son Éloi III was born at Fausse Pointe December 1817; Jean Baptiste Treville or Treville Jean Baptiste in December 1818; Aurelien le jeune in February 1820 but died at age 8 in April 1828; Louis Demaselière was born in January 1823; Édouard Jules or Jules Édouard in October 1824; Louis Ferjus died "at age about 1" in November 1828; Louis Éloi le jeune was born in August 1830; Charles Fualdes, called Fualdes, in May 1833 but died at age 15 months in August 1834; Séverin Onésiphore, called Onésiphore, was born in February 1837 but died at age 6 in January 1843; and Jean Baptiste Désiré was born in July 1839.  They also had sons named Don Louis, unless he was Louis Éloi le jeune; and Ducre Jean Baptiste or Jean Baptiste Ducre, unless he was Jean Baptiste Désiré.  Éloi, fils died in St. Martin Parish in January 1866.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Éloi died "at age 71 yrs.," but he was a few weeks shy of age 70.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse later in the month.  His daughters married into the Breaux, Broussard, Dugas, and Gonsoulin families.  Five of his sons married by 1870. 

Oldest son Éloi III married cousin Céleste Emma, daughter of fellow Acadians Nicolas Amand Broussard and Céleste Comeaux, at the St. Martinville church in September 1838, and remarried to first cousin Élisabeth Pouponne or Pouponne Élisabeth, daughter of Alexandre Judice and his Acadian wife Susanne Dugas, Élois III's paternal aunt, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in January 1845.  Éloi III and Élisabeth's son Alexandre Edevard was born probably near New Iberia in October 1847; Césaire in October 1856; Denis le jeune, perhaps also called St. Denis, in September 1858 but may have died at age 3 1/2 in June 1862; Louis Gaston, called Gaston, was born in July 1860 but died at age 11 months in June 1861; and Alexandre Sidney was born in March 1862.  Éloi III, at age 48, remarried--his third marriage--to Irma, daughter of Louis Terence Boutté and Rosilia Judice, at the St. Martinville church in May 1866. 

Élois, fils's second son Treville married cousin Elismène or Élise, also called Lismène, daughter of fellow Acadians Philemon Broussard and his Creole wife Élise Ardoin, at the New Iberia church in April 1841.  Their son Denis was born near New Iberia in November 1842.  Treville died in St. Martin Parish in August 1858.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Treville died "at age 38 yrs.," but he was 39.  His succession record, which identified his wife, was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in December 1861.  His daughter married into the Marie family. 

Élois, fils's fifth son Jules Édouard married first cousin Émilie Célestine, called Célestine, daughter of fellow Acadians Désiré Dugas and Melite Broussard, his uncle and aunt, at the New Iberia church in July 1846.  Their son Pierre Frère was baptized at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, age 14 months, in October 1848; a son, name unrecorded, died probably near New Iberia 5 days after his birth in May 1849; Pamphile, perhaps a son, was born in June 1850; Louis in August 1860; Désiré in May 1865; and St. Morc Eusèbe in January 1870. 

Élois, fils's seventh son Don Louis married Marie Lodoiska, called Lodoiska, Toffiez or Toffier at the St. Martinville church in May 1851.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Auguste Louis was born in February 1852, and Antoine Onar in November 1855. 

During the War of 1861-65, Élois, fils's tenth and youngest son Jean Baptiste Ducre served in Company D of the Yellow Jackets Battalion Louisiana Infantry, and Company D of the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jackets Battalion Infantry, raised in St. Martin Parish, which fought in Louisiana.  Ducre married Azéma, daughter of James Moore and Azema Dejean of Lafayette Parish, at the St. Martinville church in August 1865. 

Éloi, père's second son Benjamin-Aurelien or Aurelien-Benjamin, also called Benoît, born probably at Fausse Pointe in May 1800, married Élisabeth Anne or Anne Élisabeth, also called Anne Eurasie and Anne Aspasie, daughter of fellow Acadians Édouard Broussard and Anne Thibodeaux of Fausse Pointe, at the St. Martinville church in May 1821.  Their son Benjamin was born at Fausse Pointe in July 182[2] but died the following December; Benjamin Telesphore or Telesphore Benjamin was born in October 1823; Darneville Édouard, called Édouard, in March 1831; Vital Octave, called Octave, in April 1835 but died at age 2 1/2 in October 1837; Éloi Désiré, called Désiré, was born near New Iberia in September 1843 but died at age 6 (the recording priest said age 7) in November 1849; Joseph Olidon, called Olidon, was born in January 1848 but died at age 2 1/2 in July 1850; and Bernard Delue was born in October 1852.  Their daughters married into the Berard, Hébert, and Segura families.  Two of his sons also created their own families on the lower Teche. 

Second son Telesphore married first cousin Coralie, daughter of his Éloi Dugas, fils and Julie Broussard, his uncle and aunt, at the New Iberia church in January 1845.  Their son Numa was born near New Iberia in December 1850 but died at age 1 in February 1852, and Omer was born posthumously in September 1853.  They also had older sons named Aristide and Alphonse.  Telesphore died in St. Martin Parish in January 1853, age 29.  His succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in December 1859.  Two of his sons married by 1870. 

Aristide gained his emancipation in St. Martin Parish in March 1866 and married Philomène, daughter of Charles Darby and Malvina Dupré, at the New Iberia church in August 1866.  Their son Omer Louis was born near New Iberia in July 1870. 

Alphonse married Olymphe, daughter of Sosthène Amy and Uranie Morris, at the St. Martinville church in September 1867.

Benjamin Aurelien's third son D