APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

GRANGER

[GRAIN-jer, Gron-JHAY]

ACADIA

Laurent Granger, a young sailor from Plymouth, England, came to Acadia in the late 1650s during the English occupation.  He married Marie, 17-year-old daughter of René Landry, l'âiné, at Port-Royal in c1667 Laurent had to convert to Catholicism to marry his Acadian girl.  She gave him nine children, including five sons, all born in Port-Royal, who created families of their own.  Their three daughters married into the Babineau dit Deslauriers, Lanoue, and Melanson families.  Laurent died at Port-Royal in the early 1700s, in his 60s.  

Oldest son Pierre, born in February 1671, married Isabelle, daughter of Pierre Guilbeau, at Port-Royal in c1693.  They moved to Minas and had nine children, including three sons who married into the Richard, Gautrot, and LeBlanc families.  Their six daughters married into the Vincent, Hébert, Richard, and Bugeaud families.  Pierre died at Grand-Pré in January 1737, age 68.

Jacques, born in c1672, married Marie, daughter of Jacques Girouard, at Port-Royal in c1700.  They also moved to Minas and had nine children, including four sons who married into the Daigre, Gautrot, Thériot, and Richard families.  Two of their daughters married into the LeBlanc and Daigre families.  Jacques died at Grand-Pré in late February 1739, age 67.

René, born in c1676, married Marguerite, daughter of Bonaventure Thériot, probably at Port-Royal in c1695.  They also moved to Minas and had nine children, including six sons who married into the Comeau, LeBlanc, and Landry families.  Their three daughters married into the Dupuis, Belliveau, and Daigre families.  René died at Rivière-aux-Canards in November 1740 age 64.

Claude, born in c1678, married Jeanne, another daughter of Pierre Guilbeau, at Port-Royal in November 1703.  Unlike his older brothers, Claude remained at Port-Royal, where he and Jeanne had 10 children, including three sons who married in the Belliveau and Robichaud families.  Four of their daughters married into the Melanson, Petitot dit Saint-Seine, Johnson dit Jeanson, and Porlier families.  

Youngest son Laurent, fils, born in c1688, married Marie, daughter of Bernard Bourg, at Port-Royal in April 1711.  They, too, remained in the Port-Royal area and had nine children, including two sons who married into the Melanson and Porlier families.  Four of their daughters married into the Martin, Porlier, and Melanson families.  

In 1755, descendants of Laurent Granger could be found at Port-Royal and Minas, especially at Grand-Pré.  

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this large family to the winds. ...

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

The first Acadian Grangers to reach Louisiana came from exile in Maryland in 1766 with the first continent of refugees from that colony.  They settled at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques on the river, where Acadians from Georgia and Halifax had settled during the previous two years:

Euphrosine Gautrot, age 42, widow of Pierre Granger, came with three children, all born at Grand-Pré--Marie-Anne, age 23, Joseph, age 19, and Jean-Baptiste, age 14.  Euphrosine remarried to fellow Acadian Pierre dit Pierrot à Jaque Landry at Cabanocé in the late 1760s and settled at Ascension, just upriver from Cabanocé.  Marie-Anne also married into the Landry family and settled at Ascension, where she died in August 1781, in her late 30s.  Joseph and Jean-Baptiste followed their mother and stepfather to Ascension but moved on to the western prairies in the 1770s, where they created a western branch of the family.

~

In 1767, the second contingent of Acadian refugees from Maryland reached the colony and went to the new settlement at St.-Gabriel d'Iberville, on the river above Cabanocé:

Marie Landry, age 38, widow of Alexis Granger, came with daughter Anne-Madeleine, age 10, sister Élisabeth, or Isabelle, age 33, and brother Pierre.  Anne-Madeleine married into the Theriot family at St.-Jacques and settled there.  

~

The arrival dates of two Acadian Grangers are difficult to pinpoint:

Marie Granger married Spanish first sergeant Emmanuel, called Manuel, Quintero of "Sainte Croix," at New Orleans in March 1767; the priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give either the bride's or the groom's parents' names, but he did say that Marie was "Acadian."  They lived at either Pointe-Coupée or Baton Rouge in the 1770s.  Marie died at Ascension in January 1780; the priest who recorded her burial did not bother to give her parents' names or her age at the time of her death.  Manuel remarried to Acadian Madeleine Breau at Ascension in January 1781. Was Marie Granger an Acadian exile from Maryland who had come to the colony in September 1766 (the 1767 exiles from Maryland did not arrive until July), or had she come earlier, in 1765 from Halifax, before any other member of her family had arrived?

Louise Ludivine, called Ludivine, Granger, born probably at Minas in c1750, came to the colony by January 1768, when she married fellow Acadian Jean Bourgeois at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  Was Ludivine an Acadian exile from Maryland?  She remained on the river and died near Convent, St. James Parish, in December 1823, a widow in her early 70s.

~

The final, and largest, contingent of Acadian Grangers arrived nearly 20 years later aboard at least five of the Seven Ships from France that reached New Orleans in 1785.  Most of them chose to settle on the river: 

Anne Granger of Rivière-aux-Canards, age 49, widow of Joseph Trahan, crossed on Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August.  With her were four children, ages 21 to 12.  They went to Manchac, south of Baton Rouge, and settled near old Fort Bute.  Anne did not remarry and died at Baton Rouge in January 1806; she was 70 years old.  

Marie-Josèphe Granger, age 46, widow of Pierre-Simon Trahan, also crossed on Le Beaumont with four children, ages 25 to 13.  They, too, went to Manchac.

Charles-Benoît Granger, age 33, a widower, crossed on Le Beaumont with his nephew, Joseph Daigle, age 14.  They also went to Manchac, where Charles remarried in the late 1780s.  By the early 1790s, however, he and his wife had moved to upper Bayou Lafourche.  

Jean-Marie Granger, age 19, crossed on Le Beaumont alone.  He went to Manchac.  

.

Anne Thériot, age 36, widow of Joseph Granger, crossed on La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in December.  With her were Anne Landry, age 17, a daughter by her first marriage, and five Granger children and stepchildren--stepson Joseph-Constans, age 20, stepdaughter Ignace, age 15, Jeanne-Marie, age 8, Françoise-Eulalie, age 7, and Pierre-Marie, age 6.  They followed the majority of the passengers from their ship to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores north of Baton Rouge.  After a series of hurricanes devastated the community in the early 1790s, they moved downriver to Baton Rouge.  Ignace married a Lanoir, Jeanne-Marie a Labauve, and Françoise-Eulalie an Arthacho, all at Baton Rouge.  Joseph-Contans and Pierre-Marie also married at Baton Rouge and settled in the area.  

.

A Granger from France was the first to create a family line on the river, in West Baton Rouge Parish.  It proved to be the only Granger family line that survived east of the Atchafalaya Basin.  Even then, it was a thin one: 

Joseph-Constans GRANGER (1764-?; Laurent, Jacques)

Joseph-Constans, son of Joseph Granger and his first wife Marie Cyr, was born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in April 1764, followed his parents and siblings to the Falkland Islands in 1765, returned with them to St.-Malo in December 1771, and followed his widowed stepmother and siblings to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  He married Marie-Modeste, daughter of fellow Acadian Jacques Molaison and widow of Ambroise Bourg, at either Bayou des Écores or Baton Rouge in July 1790.  Marie-Modeste also had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  They may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  

Descendants of Pierre-Marie GRANGER (1779-; Laurent, Jacques)

Pierre-Marie, son of Joseph Granger and his second wife Anne Thériot, born at St.-Servan, France, near St.-Malo, in December 1779, followed his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  He married Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Hébert of Baton Rouge, at Baton Rouge in May 1804.  Geneviève was a native of Louisiana.  They settled in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Their daughters married into the Peyronnin and de Richebourg families.

1

Oldest son Anselme, born near Baton Rouge in January 1807, probably died young.  

2

Joseph, born in Baton Rouge Parish in April 1811, also probably died young.  

3

Pierre Dorville, called Dorville, born in West Baton Rouge Parish in January 1816, married Apolline or Pauline, daughter of fellow Acadian Mathurin Lejeune of West Baton Rouge Parish, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in December 1838.  Their son Dorville Duffosat was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1839, and Dorgeville near Brusly in July 1846.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 9 slaves--5 males and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 36 years to 6 months--on Pierre Grangier's farm; this probably was Pierre Dorville.  

4

Youngest son Julien Ignace, born in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1820, may have died young.

~

Other GRANGERs on the River

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link at least one Granger on the river with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Beatrice Granger married Anglo American Richard Green Wooten at the home of Acadian Valentine Hébert near Baton Rouge in July 1829.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names.  Was she the Anne-Beatrice, called Beatrice, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Granger and Susanne Cormier of Côte Gelée, baptized at Attakapas, age unrecorded, in January 1786, who married Fabien, son of Olivier Landry of Côte Gelée, at St. Martinville in December 1810?  If so, this would have been her second marriage.  

LOUISIANA:  WESTERN SETTLEMENTS

In the 1770s, brothers Jean-Baptiste and Joseph Granger, exiles from Maryland, crossed the Atchafalaya Basin to the Opelousas District, where they established a western branch of the family.  If not the only branch of the family that survived, it certainly was the largest one:

Descendants of Joseph GRANGER (1746-1798; Laurent, Pierre)

Joseph, elder son of Pierre Granger, fils and Euphrosine Gautrot, born at Grand-Pré in December 1746, was exiled with his family to Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted them at Snow Hill, on the Eastern Shore, in July 1763.  His father died a few years later, and in 1766 he followed his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana with the first contingent of Acadian refugees from Maryland.  They went to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques, where he married Anne-Geneviève, called Geneviève, daughter of fellow Acadian René Babin, in April 1768.  They followed his mother and stepfather to Ascension, but in the 1770s, he and younger brother Jean-Baptiste moved west to the Opelousas District.  In the late 1780s or early 1790s, Joseph and Geneviève moved again, this time south to the Attakapas District.  Their daughters married into the Crawford, Doucet, Hébert, Reao, and Simar families.  Daughter Madeleine had a "natural son," Marcel, by Spaniard Antoine Martin, in St. Martin Parish in January 1817.  Meanwhile, Joseph remarried to Anne-Osite, called Osite, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Dugas and widow of Charles Hébert, at Attakapas in January 1791.  They settled on Bayou Tortue near present-day Lafayette.  Joseph died probably on Bayou Tortue in December 1798; he was only 51 years old.  His four sons married and remained in the old Attakapas District, especially at Prairie Sorel, Côte Gelée, and along the lower Vermilion, but some of his grandsons moved out onto the St. Landry and Calcasieu prairies in the early 1800s.  

1

Oldest son Joseph, fils, by his first wife, born at St.-Jacques or Ascension in c1770, married Marguerite, 26-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Landry, at Attakapas in February 1791.  Their son Joseph III was born at Prairie Sorel in October 1792, Charles Éloi, called Éloi, was baptized at Attakapas, age 9 1/2 months, in July 1797, Jean-Baptiste le jeune was born in March 1801 but died at age 14 in August 1815, and Dositée was born in c1804 but died at age 3 in October 1807.  Their daughters married into the Louvière and Morvant families, and daughter Éloise, who had married a Louvière, had a daughter by an "unknown father" who married into the Istre family.  Joseph, fils died at Prairie Sorel in November 1812; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 46 years old when he died, but he probably was closer to 43.  

1a

Éloi died probably at Prairie Sorel in June 1814.  He was only 19 years old and probably did not marry.  

1b

Joseph III married Julienne, daughter of fellow Acadian Isidore Louvière, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1815.  Their son, name unrecorded, died at Prairie Sorel, age 2 months, in November 1816, Octave was born on the Vermilion in October 1820, and Augustin in July 1841.  Their daughters married into the Breaux, Hébert, and Louviere families.  Joseph III died in Lafayette Parish in March 1861; the priest who recorded his burial said that Joseph was 72 years old when he died, but he was "only" 68; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following month.  

Octave married Marcelienne or Maximilienne, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Trahan, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1841.  Their daughter married into the Comeaux family.  Octave died in Lafayette Parish in August 1865; the priest who recorded his burial said that Octave was 46 years old when he died, but he was only 44; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in March 1868.  Did he father any sons? 

2

Simon-Pierre, by his first wife, born at Ascension in July 1773, married Françoise, daughter of fellow Acadian Amand Landry of Bayou Tortue, at Attakapas in May 1795.  Their daughters married into the Comeaux, Hébert, and Vallot families.  Simon died at Côte Gelée in August 1818; the priest who recorded his burial said that Simon was 47 years old when he died, but he was only 45; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in September 1820.  He and his wife seem to have had no sons.  

3

Raphaël, by his first wife, baptized at Opelousas, age unrecorded, in August 1779, married Geneviève, daughter of French Creole Simon Gaspard dit Picard of New Orleans, at Attakapas in October 1804.  Their son, name and age unrecorded, died at Côte Gelée in July 1808, and Simon le jeune, called Simonet, was born in September 1809. 

Simonet was supposed to have married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Baptiste Trahan, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1831 (the marriage record states that the "Entry was cancelled," but for what reason it does not say).  He married, instead, fellow Acadian Adélaïde Hébert, widow of Jean Boulle and Pierre Trahan, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in June 1838.  They settled probably near Carencro.  Their son Simon, fils was born in April 1840, and François in November 1847.  Simonet remarried to fellow Acadian Felonise Boutin.  Their son Raphaël le jeune was born in St. Landry Parish in January 1858. 

Simon, fils, called Simon de Calcasieu, from his first wife, married Caroline Tile or Till at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in March 1864.  Their son Sylvanie had been born in Lafayette Parish in July 1862.

4

Youngest son Jean-Baptiste le jeune, by his first wife, born at Opelousas in May 1784, married Pélagie, daughter of fellow Acadian Claude Broussard, at Attakapas early in the 1800s.  They settled at Côte Gelée and then moved out to the Calcasieu prairies.  Their son Jean Treville, called Treville, was born at Côte Gelée in November 1805, Jean Marcellin, called Marcellin, in January 1809, Joseph Bélisaire, called Bélisaire, on the Vermilion in September 1811, and Joseph Clairville in February 1820.  Their daughters married into the Benoit, Duhon, and Lebleau families.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted 10 slaves--4 males and 6 females, 6 blacks and 4 mulattoes, ranging in age from 60 to 1--on Jean Grangé's farm near Treville Grangé; this was probably Jean Baptiste le jeune.  In September 1860, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted 17 slaves--8 males and 9 females, 8 blacks and 9 mulattoes, ages 70 to 1, including 2 sets of twins, living in 4 houses--on Jean Grangé's farm next to Marcelline Grangé; if this was Jean Baptiste le jeune, he would have been in his late 70s.  His sons settled on the St. Landry and Calcasieu prairies. 

4a

Bélisaire married Marie Céleste or Célise, daughter of French Creole Martin Lebleu, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1828.  Their son Bélisaire, fils was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 3 months, in November 1830, Aladin at age 8 months in May 1835, and Joseph was born in December 1840.  Their daughter married into the Fenetre family.  In October 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--a 17-year-old black female--on B. Grangé's farm in the parish's Western District; this may have been Bélisaire.  

4b

Marcellin, living in Calcasieu Parish, married Azitte, daughter of Anselme Sallier of Calcasieu, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1829.  Their son Anselme was born probably in Calcasieu Parish in January 1839, and Joseph Moïse in September 1847.  Marcellin remarried to French Creole Dosithée Lebleu.  Their son Henry was born in Calcasieu Parish in June 1850.  In September 1860, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted a single slave--a 13-year-old female mulatto--on Marceline Grangé's farm next to Jean Grangé; this was probably Marcellin.  

 4c

Treville married 15-year-old Modeste, another daughter of Martin Lebleu, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1831.  They settled on the Calcasieu prairie.  Their son Séverin was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 18 months, in April 1835, Louis Treville was born in January 1840, François Treville in January 1843, Trasimond in March 1847, and Martin Adonis in February 1852.  In December 1850, the federal census taker in Calcasieu Parish counted 1 slave--a 20-year-old male mulatto--on Treville Grangé's farm near Jean Grangé.  

Descendants of Jean-Baptiste GRANGER (c1752-1842; Laurent, Pierre)

Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, younger son of Pierre Granger, fils and Euphrosine Gautrot, born at Grand-Pré in c1745, was exiled with his family to Maryland in 1755.  Colonial officials counted them at Snow Hill, on the Eastern Shore, in July 1763.  His father died a few years later, and in 1766 he followed his widowed mother and siblings to Louisiana with the first contingent of Acadian refugees from Maryland.  He went to Cabanocé/St.-Jacques and then to Ascension, and in the 1770s followed his older brother Joseph to the Opelousas District.  He married Susanne, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph Cormier, at Attakapas in January 1779They lived in the Opelousas District before settling at Côte Gelée in the Attakapas District.  Their daughters married into the Granger, Landry, Simon, and Trahan families.  Daughter Hélène had a "natural daughter" named Célestine who married a Simon in April 1817.  Meanwhile, after his wife died, Jean-Baptiste filed succession records at the Opelousas and St. Martinville courthouses in St. Landry and St. Martin parishes in August 1812; he never remarried.  He died in Lafayette Parish in September 1842; the Vermilionville priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste was 103 years old when he died, but he was closer to 90.  Only two of his six sons created family lines.  One of his sons moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, but the other remained in St. Martin and Lafayette parishes.  Some of his grandsons moved out to the Ville Platte and Abbeville areas and into Calcasieu Parish during the 1850s.  

1

Oldest son Joseph-Laurent, called Laurent, born at Opelousas in January 1783, married Augustine, called Delle, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexandre Duhon and widow of Pierre Trahan, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1821; Laurent was 38 years old at the time of the wedding.  Laurent died in St. Martin Parish in August 1842; he was 59 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville and Vermilionville courthouses the following November, so he likely owned property in both St. Martin and Lafayette parishes.  He and his wife may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.  

2

Jean-Pierre, called Pierre, born at Opelousas in March 1786, was "res. Vermillion Parish" when he married Renée Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadian Marin Gautreaux, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in October 1808.  They lived in Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche, moved to Côte Gelée in the 1810s, but soon returned to Assumption Parish.  Their daughters married into the Desormeaux, Missonnier, and Richard families and settled in Lafayette Parish.  Only two of Jean Pierre's six sons created families of their own; Maxille Valcour or Dalcour, called Dalcour, remained on Bayou Lafourche, where his line, except perhaps for its blood, did not survive.  The other son settled on lower Bayou Teche before moving out to the southwestern prairies. 

Louis Elphége, called Elphége, their sixth and youngest son, born in Assumption Parish in August 1827, married Spanish Creole Rosalie H. Mendoza.  Their son Joseph Symphorien was born near Charenton, St. Mary Parish, in October 1854, Jean Charles near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in March 1861, and Alcide Victorin in September 1864.  Their daughter married into the Bonin family. 

3

Jean, born at Opelousas in c1787 or c1788, died at Côte Gelée in May 1805.  He was only 18 years old and probably did not marry.  

4

Cyprien, born at Côte Gelée in January 1792, married Louise, daughter of French Creole Michel Pivauteau of Bayou Vermilion, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1812; Louise's mother was a Broussard.   They settled on the Vermilion.  Their son Jean Baptiste le jeune was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1812, Gilles in September 1814, and Émilien Filosel was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 1, in August 1825.  Cyprien remarried to French Creole Sidalise Gaspard.  Their son Lasty was born in St. Landry Parish in November 1843, and Henry in June 1849.  They also had sons named Cyprien Landry, called Landry; Ambroise; and Louis le jeune. Their daughters married into the Guillory and Manuel families.  

4a

Jean Baptiste le jeune, by his first wife, married Elise or Lise, daughter of German Creole Joseph Falk or Faulk, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1833; Lise's mother was a Broussard.  Their son Jean was baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 1 1/2 months, in March 1834, Cyprien le jeune near New Iberia, then in St. Martin Parish, in July 1842, and Joseph near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in February 1851.  

4b

Gilles, by his first wife, married Cléonise, also called Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian François Xavier Benoit, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in c1842 and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1844.  Their son Onésime was born probably in Calcasieu Parish in January 1849, Eugène in February 1851, and Joseph in April 1857.

4c

Landry, by his second wife, married Françoise, daughter of French Creole Zenon Deshotel, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1846.  Their son Landry, fils was born in St. Landry Parish in September 1848, Geramb or Gerand in August 1851, and Cyprien le jeune near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in March 1856.  Landry, père's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in January 1858; it was not post-mortem.  He remarried to fellow Acadian Celina Aucoin in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1867. 

Gerand, by his first wife, married Odile, 21-year-old daughter of French Creole Valéry Guillory, at the Ville Platte church, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in January 1870.  They settled near Eunice. 

4d

Ambroise, by his second wife, married Marie, another daughter of Zenon Deshotel, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1846, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, the following January.  Their son Armogène was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in December 1863, Aristides in April 1866, and Angelas in December 1868.  Their daughter married into the Guillory family.  

4e

Louis le jeune, by his second wife, married Pauline, daughter of Spanish Creole Jean Baptiste Manuel, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, probably in July 1861.  

4f

Émilien, by his first wife, may have married Louisa Colas.  Their twin sons Clémile and Émile were baptized at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, age 7 1/2, in September 1870, and Edgar was born in January 1870.  

5

Jean-Baptiste, fils died "as a child" at Opelousas in August 1795.  

6

Youngest son Louis, born at Côte Gelée in November 1797, married Spanish Creole Celina Lopez probably in Lafayette Parish.  In August 1850, federal census takers in Lafayette Parish counted 2 slaves--both females, both black, ages 17 and 1--on Louis Grangé's farm near Charles Grangé in the parish's western district.  Louis died in Lafayette Parish in December 1869; the Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Louis died "at age 72 yrs."; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse a few days after his death.  Were he and his wife that rare Cajun couple who had no children, at least none who survived childhood?

~

During the early antebellum period, a cousin from upper Bayou Lafourche settled at Côte Gelée and added a new line to the western branch of the family:

Descendants of Charles-Auguste GRANGER (1789-1851; Laurent, Pierre, Joseph)

Charles-Auguste, son of Charles-Benoît Granger and his second wife Marguerite-Ange Dubois, born at Assumption in September 1789, married Constance, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Mire of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1809.  They lived on upper Bayou Lafourche before returning to Côte Gelée.  Their daughters married into the Landry and Richard families.  After the death of his first wife, Charles filed a succession record at the St. Martinville courthouse in November 1818 and then remarried to cousin Susanne, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Granger of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church later that month.  Their daughters married into the Comeaux and Landry families.  Susanne died in Lafayette Parish in June 1827; she was only 28 years old; her succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in January 1829.  Charles remarried again--his third marriage--to Anastasie, daughter of fellow Acadian Edmond Giroir, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1828.  Their daughter married into the Landry family.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted 9 slaves--6 males and 3 females, all black, ranging in age from 50 to 4--on Charles Grangé's farm near Louis Grangé in the parish's western district; this was probably Charles Auguste.  He died at Côte Gelée in May 1851; the priest who recorded his burial said that Charles was 72 years old when he died, but he was closer to 62; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse the following August.  His children settled in Lafayette and St. Martin parishes.  

1

Oldest son Charles Joseph, also called Charles, fils, from his first wife, born in Assumption Parish in February 1810, married Cécile, also called Arthémise, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Olivier Breaux, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in December 1829, and remarried to Carmelite, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Landry, at the Vermilionville church in November 1833.  He may have fathered no children by either of his wives.

2

Gérard, by his first wife, born at Côte Gelée in June 1816, married Pouponne Pélagie, called Pélagie, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Broussard, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1838.  Their child, name unrecorded, perhaps a son, died in Lafayette Parish, age 9 days, in July 1839, Gérard Norville was born in August 1840, Charles Hannibal in October 1841, and Marcel in July 1846.  Gerard died in Lafayette Parish in June 1848; he was only 32 years old; his succession record was filed at the Vermilionville courthouse in May 1851.  

Marcel may have married French Creole Alice or Elize Mallet and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the late 1860s. 

3

Hermogène, by his second wife, born at Côte Gelée in December 1819, married Victoire Léonide, daughter of Spanish Creole Bertrand Miguez, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in February 1850.  Their son Eusèbe was born in Lafayette Parish in August 1852.  Their daughter married into the Pelouse family.  Hermogène died in Lafayette Parish in March 1855; the priest who recorded his burial said that Hermogène was 37 years old when he died, but he was only 35.  In July 1860, the federal census taker in Lafayette Parish counted a single slave--a 15-year-old female mulatto--on Mrs. Ermogène Grangé's farm; this was Victoire Miguez's slave.

4

Augustin, by his second wife, born in St. Martin Parish in March 1821, may have died young.

5

Genereux, by his second wife, died at Côte Gelée, age 1 1/2 or 2 months, in February 1824.  

6

Clairville or Clerville, by his second wife, born at Côte Gelée in September 1826, may have married Lelie Réon in Calcasieu Parish in the late 1840s.  He married--or remarried to--Arthémise, daughter of French Creole Victor Herpin, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in April 1849; Arthémise's mother was a Trahan.  Their son Désiré was born in Lafayette Parish in May 1850, Charles le jeune in March 1856 but died at age 1 in August 1857, Isaac was born in December 1860, Fergus in December 1865, and Ferlus in September 1866.  

~

Other GRANGERs on the Western Prairies

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link many Grangers in the western parishes with known Acadian lines of the family there.  One suspects that some of the Grangers who lived on the western prairies during the post-war period were Afro Creoles once owned by Acadian Grangers:

Avelina Granger married Hinrilse Christophe Stemmann in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1849.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  

Marcellite Granger married Spanish Creole Joseph Sosthène Ortego in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in August 1854.  Again, the clerk did not record the couple's parents' names.

Antoine or Ambroise Granger married Sidonise Frugé.  Their son Jean Ambroise was born near Ville Platte, then in St. Landry but now in Evangeline Parish, in January1855.  

Froizin Granger married Oline Granger in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in October 1856.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  

Hildevert Granger married French Creole Lise Moreau in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1861.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  

Louis Cyprien Granger married Élodie Joséphine, called Léocestine, Saucier.  They were living near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, in the early 1860s.  Their son Angelus was born near Eunice in October 1868. 

Josephine Granger married Hippolyte Missonier in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in October 1864.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  

Élisabeth Granger married Joseph Guidry and settled in Lafayette Parish by the mid-1860s. 

Elphége Granger married Aureline Guidry and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the mid-1860s. 

J. Uberti Granger married Emelia Hébert and settled near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Ildevese Granger married Lucia Ratelle and settled near Eunice, St. Landry Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Belzire Granger, widow of Joseph Garry, married Edward Garry in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1866.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  

George Granger married Joséphine Granger in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in January 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  

Maria Granger married Ozémé Cite in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in January 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  

Béloni Granger married Seranie Louis.  Their son Edgard was born near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in April 1869. 

Estelle Granger married Paul Duplechin in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1869, and sanctified the marriage at the Eunice church, St. Landry Parish, the following January.  Neither the parish clerk nor the priest who recorded the marriage gave the couple's parents' names. 

Valentin Granger married Amelie Guidry.  Their son Duelis was born near Church Point in July 1869. 

Clara Granger married Benjamin Guillory in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in November 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  

Eugénie, daughter of Alexandre Granger and Cécile Granger, married Uljrand, son of Célestin Delzenne, at the Youngsville church, Lafayette Parish, in 1870.  Were Alexandre and Cécile Acadian?

.

A Granger family that cannot be linked by area church and civil records to other Grangers on the western prairies lived on Bayou Teche during the antebellum and post-war periods:

Descendants of Jean GRANGER (?-)

Jean Granger married Marie Granger and settled in St. Martin Parish.  They may have been Afro Creoles and not Acadians.

1

Jean, fils married Marie Anaïs, called Anais, daughter of Pierre Orso, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in January 1861, and remarried to Eucharis, daughter of Jean Baptiste Prate or Prade, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1869.  They settled near New Iberia. 

2

Joseph married Adeline, daughter of Tibercle Morvant and Clarine ____, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1870. 

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

Some of the Grangers who came to Louisiana from France in 1785 chose to settle on upper Bayou Lafourche, but no new family lines came of it: 

Marie-Madeleine Granger of Grand-Pré, age 54, crossed on La Bergère, the second of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in August.  With her were husband Joseph Bourg of Cobeguit, age 52, and four children, ages 21 to 14, and two of her husband's Daigle nieces, ages 24 and 17.

Anne-Françoise Granger, age 41, crossed on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in November.  With her were husband Chrysostôme Trahan, age 43, and seven children, ages 20 to infancy.  Anne-Françoise died in Assumption Parish in July 1811, in her late 60s.  

Anne Granger, age 54, crossed on Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in September.  With her were husband Théodore Bourg, age 39, and three children, ages 19, 17, and 14. 

Joseph GRANGER (c1752-; Laurent, Pierre?)

Joseph, son of perhaps Joseph Granger and Marguerite Gautrot, born perhaps at Grand-Pré in c1752, came to Louisiana from France probably in 1785 probably as a middle-age bachelor.  He married Anne-Marie-Madeleine, daughter of fellow Acadian Bernard Savary and widow of Pierre Potier, at Lafourche in June 1786.  They may have been that rare Acadian couple who had no children.

~

During the late colonial period, a Granger from the river moved to upper Bayou Lafourche, but his only son did not settle there: 

Descendants of Charles-Benoît GRANGER (c1751-1790s; Laurent, Pierre)

Charles-Benoît, son of Joseph Granger and Marguerite Gautrot, born at Grand-Pré in c1751, followed his family into exile in Virginia in 1755, on to England in 1756, and to France aboard the ship L'Ambition in May 1763.  He became a sailor in France and married Marie, daughter of fellow Acadian Charles LeBlanc of Grand-Pré, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay in September 1780.  He was a widower when he sailed to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships from France, in 1785.  He followed the majority of his fellow passengers to Manchac, south of Baton Rouge, where he remarried to Marguerite-Ange, daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph-Ange Dubois and widow of Jean Daigle, in the late 1780s.  They moved to upper Bayou Lafourche soon after their marriage, though they may have lived at New Orleans for a time, where one of their daughters was born.  Charles died by January 1792, when his wife remarried at Lafourche.  

Charles-Auguste, by his second wife, born at Assumption in September 1789, married Constance, daughter of fellow Acadian Simon Mire of Côte Gelée, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1809.  They settled on upper Bayou Lafourche and then moved on to the western prairies, where Charles Auguste married two more times.  

~

During the early antebellum period, in a reversal of the usual Acadian settlement pattern, a Granger moved his family from the western prairies to upper Bayou Lafourche, but none of his many sons established a lasting line on the bayou:  

Descendants of Jean-Pierre GRANGER (1786-; Laurent, Pierre, Pierre, fils)

Jean-Pierre, called Pierre, second son of Jean-Baptiste Granger and Susanne Cormier of Opelousas and Côte Gelée, born at Opelousas in March 1786, was "res. Vermillion Parish" when he married Renée or Irénée Angélique, daughter of fellow Acadian Marin Gautreaux, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in October 1808.  They lived in Assumption Parish on upper Bayou Lafourche, moved to Côte Gelée, then in St. Martin Parish, in the 1810s, but soon returned to Assumption Parish.  Their daughters married into the Desormeaux, Missonnier, and Richard families and settled on the western prairies.  Only two of Jean Pierre's six sons created families of their own.  The older one moved down bayou to Lafourche Interior Parish, but he may not have fathered any sons to carry on the line.  The younger one moved west to lower Bayou Teche before moving out to the southwestern prairies. 

1

Oldest son Jean Baptiste le jeune, born in Assumption Parish in December 1809, died at age 8 months in August 1810.

2

Pierre Urbin, born at Côte Gelée in June 1811, probably died young.  

3

Louis Valsin, born in Assumption Parish in August 1816, died in Assumption Parish, age 3, in November 1819.

4

Maxile Valcour or Dalcour, called Dalcour and Dalcourt, born in Assumption Parish in June 1818, married Rosalie, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Baptiste Hébert of Assumption Parish, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1841.  A daughter had been born in Lafourche Interior Parish in September 1840, months before they married, and they had more daughters in the 1840s, but did they have any sons?  

5

Charles, born probably in Assumption Parish in c1820 and baptized at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, age 3 1/2 or 4, in May 1824, died the day he was baptized.  

6

Youngest son Louis Elphége, called Elphége, born in Assumption Parish in August 1827, married Spanish Creole Rosalie Mendoza.  They moved west to the Charenton area of St. Mary Parish in the early 1850s before moving on to the Abbeville area, Vermilion Parish, later in the decade. 

~

Other GRANGERs in the Lafourche Valley

Area church and civil records make it difficult to link some Grangers in the Bayou Lafourche valley with known Acadian lines of the family there:

Mary Granger married George Owder in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in May 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names.  Was Mary an Acadian?

Isaac Granger married Sarah Jane Goode in a civil ceremony in Lafourche Parish in July 1869.  Again, the parish clerk did not record the couple's parents' names, so one wonders if Isaac was an Acadian.  

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Area church records reveal no Grangers in colonial Louisiana who were not Acadian.  Several Foreign Frenchmen who came to Louisiana in the early 1800s were Grangers.  One wonders if they were descendants of the Acadian members of the family who had remained in France after 1785:

Édouard Grangé, a 26-year-old man servant from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Olympia out of Le Havre, France, in June 1836.  

Louis Granger, a 32-year-old farmer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Swanton out of Le Havre in July 1845.  

François Granger, a 30-year-old Frenchman, occupation unrecorded, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Sea Lion out of Le Havre in May 1849.  

Auguste Granger, a 36-year-old dentist from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Cornelia out of Le Havre in May 1851.  

.

At least one Granger who lived on the western prairies during the post-war period was neither Acadian nor Foreign French but was a result of the family's participation in the South's peculiar institution:

Natalie[sic] Granger, freedman, married Félicia Duhon, freedwoman, in a civil ceremony in Lafayette Parish in March 1869.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

CONCLUSION

Grangers, descended from an Englishman, settled early in Acadia, and they came fairly early to Louisiana.  The first of them reached the colony from Maryland in 1766 and settled on the river at Cabanocé/St.-Jacques.  Two of them, brothers Joseph and Jean-Baptiste, lived with their mother and stepfather at St.-Jacques and Ascension on the Acadian Coast, but they did not settle there.  In the 1770s, they moved first to the Opelousas District and then to the Attakapas country; the older one, Joseph, settled on Bayou Tortue south of present-day Lafayette, while younger brother Jean-Baptiste moved to Côte Gelée near present-day Broussard.  They each created vigorous lines on the western prairies.  

In 1785, 13 Grangers came from France aboard five of the Seven Ships.  The few males among them went to Manchac, south of Baton Rouge, and to upper Bayou Lafourche.  Two brothers married at Manchac, but only one of their lines survived, in present-day West Baton Rouge Parish, and it remained a small one.  A widowed cousin who also had gone to Manchac remarried there but settled at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche.  His only son did not remain on the Lafourche, however, but joined his cousins on the western prairies soon after the Louisiana Purchase.  The only family line that survived on Bayou Lafourche was that of one of the Côte Gelée Grangers, Jean-Pierre, called Pierre, son of Jean-Baptiste, who married at Ascension in the first decade of the new century, returned briefly to Côte Gelée, and then settled in Assumption Parish.  Most of his daughters returned to the western prairies.  Only two of his six sons created families of their own.  By the 1840s, the older son had moved down bayou to Lafourche Interior Parish, but his line, except perhaps for its blood, probably died out before the War Between the States.  The younger son moved to St. Mary Parish on lower Bayou Teche and then out to the Abbeville area of Vermilion Parish to settle near some of his cousins.  

As a result of all this moving about and the demise of several family lines, no Grangers remained on Bayou Lafourche, only a small line remained on the river, in West Baton Rouge Parish, and the largest center of family settlement remained on the western prairies.  During the early antebellum period, Grangers moved from the family center in Lafayette Parish out into the prairies of what became Calcasieu Parish.  By the eve of the War Between the States, Grangers could be found in nearly every corner of the old Attakapas and Opelousas districts.  

Granger, of course, originally was not a French name in Acadia.  Interestingly, though, several immigrants from France who appeared at New Orleans during the antebellum period also bore the name, so one wonders if they were descendants of the Acadian Grangers who had remained in the mother country after 1785.  Anglo-American members of the family settled in Louisiana after Jefferson's Purchase.  Nevertheless, before the War Between the States, the great majority of the Grangers of South Louisiana were descendants of Laurent of Plymouth and Port-Royal. 

Judging by the numbers of slaves they owned during the late antebellum period, a few members of the family lived comfortably on their farms along the river and out on the prairies.  In 1850, Pierre Granger held nine slaves in West Baton Rouge Parish, but he does not appear in the federal slave census a decade later.  In Lafayette Parish in 1850, Charles Granger held nine slaves, but he, too, does not appear in the 1860 federal slave schedule.  The widow of Charles's son Hermogène does appear on the 1860 federal slave schedule; she owned a single slave on her farm in the western part of parish.  The largest family slave holders were the ones who had moved out to the southwestern prairies in the early 1800s.  In 1850, Jean Granger held 10 slaves in Calcasieu Parish.  A decade later, he owned 17.  Two of his sons owned a slave apiece.  Most of their Granger cousins, however, owned no slaves at all and participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  

Only a hand full of Grangers served Louisiana in uniform during the War Between the States.  Three of the five Grangers who appear in Confederate military records served in Company D of the Miles' Legion Louisiana Infantry, a front-line unit raised in St. Landry Parish that fought gallantly in Mississippi and Louisiana, especially in the Siege of Port Hudson.  All of the ones who served seem to have survived the war.  ...

During the war, successive Federal incursions devastated the regions where Acadian Grangers lived.  The Bayou Lafourche valley suffered early in the war and remained under the hard hand of federal occupation for most of the conflict.  Federal armies marched three times through the Teche and upper Vermilion valley in 1863 and 1864, burning and pillaging many farms and plantations, some of them no doubt owned by Grangers.  Thanks to these Federal incursions, emancipation came early to the area, with its resulting economic and social turmoil.  Confederate foraging parties and cutthroat Jayhawkers also plagued the area, including the remote Calcasieu prairies, adding to the family's misery. 

The family's name also is spelled Grancher, Grandgé, Grandgeai, Grandger, Grandges, Grangé, Grangee, Grangere, Granges, Grangier.

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Calcasieu, Lafayette, & West Baton Rouge parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Calcasieu Parish; Arsenault, Généalogie, 583-87, 1174-82, 2302, 2341-49, 2496-98; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:249, 2:143, 3:132; BRDR, vols. 1a(rev.), 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 161-67, 561-64, 580-81; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; NOAR, vols. 2, 7; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/Duc_Guillaume.htm>, "Family" No. 58; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family No. 25; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 71-73; Robichaux, Acadian in St. Malo, 364-69; White, DGFA-1, 761-70; White, DGFA-1 English, 157.

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day parishes that existed during the War Between the States in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Anne GRANGER 01 Aug 1785 BR born 3 Sep 1736, Rivière-aux-Canards; daughter of François GRANGER & Anne LANDRY; sister of Marie-Josèphe?; exiled to VA 1755, age 19; deported to England 1756, age 20; married, age 21, Joseph, fils, son of Joseph TRAHAN & Marie BLANCHARD, 22 Aug 1757, Falmouth, England; at Penryn, England, 1758; repatriated to Morlaix, France 1763, age 27; at Morlaix 1763-65; at Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, 1765, with husband, daughters Madeleine, Marguerite, & son Joseph, fils; on list of Acadians at Paimboeuf, France, Sep 1784, called Anne GRANGER, widow TRAHAN, with 3 unnamed sons, & 2 unnamed daughters; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 49, widow, head of family; on list of Acadians at Fort Bute, Manchac, 1788, called Ana GRANGÉ, widow TRAHAN, with 5 unnamed persons in her family, 6 barrels corn, 0 barrels rice, 1/4 qt. [?]; died [buried] Baton Rouge 20 Jan 1806, age 70
Anne GRANGER 02 Sep 1785 Asp born c1731; married, age 21, (1)Pierre, fils, son of Pierre BONNIÈRE & Madeleine-Josèphe FORET of Pigiguit, c1752, probably St.-Pierre-du-Nord, Île St.-Jean; at St.-Pierre-du-Nord 1752; deported to France from Île St.-Jean 1758-59, age 27; moved from Boulogne, France, to St.-Malo, France, 1762, age 31; at St.-Servan, France, 1762-63; at St.-Coulomb, France, 1763-65; married, age 33, (2)Théodore BOURG, son of Jean BOURG & Élisabeth HÉBERT, 5 Jun 1764, St.-Coulomb; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, with husband, 2 unnamed sons, & 2 unnamed daughters; sailed to LA on Le St.-Rémi, age 54; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, age 56, with husband, 1 son, & 2 daughters; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, age 60, with husband, 1 son, & 1 daughter; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Ana, age 68[sic], with husband & no children; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Anne GRANGÉ, age 69[sic], with husband & no children; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, age 69[sic], with husband & no children
Anne-Françoise GRANGER 03 Nov 1785 Asp born c1743 or 1744, Rivière-aux-Canards; exiled to VA 1755, age 11 or 12; deported to England 1756, age 12 or 13; married, age 19 or 20, Chrysostôme, son of Joseph TRAHAN & Marie BLANCHARD of Pigiguit, 10 Jan 1763, Falmouth, England; repatriated to Morlaix, France, 1763, age 19 or 20; at Kerlan, Bangor, Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, 1765, age 22; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, called Anne, with husband, 2 unnamed sons, & 5 unnamed daughters; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 41; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, age 44, with husband, 2 sons, & 4 daughters; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, called Anne-Françoise, age 45[sic], with husband, 2 sons, & 4 daughters; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Ana, age 50, with husband, 2 sons, & 3 daughters; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Anne, age 51[sic], with husband, 2 sons, & 3 daughters; died [buried] Assumption Parish 28 Jul 1811, age 68
Anne-Madeleine GRANGER 04 Jul 1767 StG, StJ born c1757; called Madeleine; daughter of Alexis GRANGER & Marie LANDRY; in report on Acadians at Oxford, MD, Jul 1763, called Magdne., with widowed mother; in report on Acadians who settled at St.-Gabriel, 1767, called Madalena, age 10, with widowed mother, uncle Pierre LANDRY, & aunt Isabelle LANDRY; in Cabanocé census, 1769, left [east] bank, called Magdelaine GRANGÉ, stepdaughter, age 12, with stepfather Joseph SONNIER, mother, 1 half-sister, & step cousin Agnaise DAIGLE; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, called Magdelaine GRANGEE, his [Joseph SONNIER's] belle-fille, age 19, with widowed stepfather Joseph SONNIER, 1 half-sister, & orphan Marie BABIN; married, age 20, Ambroise, son of Joseph THÉRIOT & Françoise MELANÇON, 17 Jun 1777, St.-Jacques; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with husband & 1 other
Charles-Benoît GRANGER 05 Aug 1785 BR, Asp born c1751, Grand-Pré; called Benoît; son of Joseph GRANGER & Marguerite GAUTREAUX; brother of Joseph?; exiled to VA 1755, age 4; deported to England 1756, age 5; repatriated to France aboard L'Ambition, arrived St.-Malo 22 May 1763, age 12; at St.-Servan, France, 1763-72; sailor; married, age 29, (1)Marie, daughter of Charles LEBLANC & Anne BOUDREAUX of Grand-Pré, 5 Sep 1780, St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, France; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, called Charles GRANGÉE, with 1 unnamed orphan [probably nephew Joseph DAIGLE]; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 33, traveled with nephew, Joseph DAIGLE; married (2)Marguerite-Ange, daughter of Joseph-Ange DUBOIS & Anne MICHEL, & widow of Jean DAIGLE, late 1780s, probably Baton Rouge; on list of Acadians at Fort Bute, Manchac, 1788, called Carlos GRANGÉ, with 4 persons in his family, 4 1/2 barrels corn, 0 barrels rice, 1/4 qt. ?; moved to Lafourche valley; died by Jan 1792, when his wife remarried at Lafourche
Françoise-Eulalie GRANGER 06 Dec 1785 BdE, BR born & baptized 14 May 1778, St.-Servan, France; daughter of Joseph GRANGER & his second wife Anne THÉRIOT; sister of Jeanne-Marie & Pierre-Marie, half-sister of  Ignace & Joseph-Constans; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 7, traveled with widowed mother; married, age 26, Christoval, son José ARTHACHO & Francisca VIEGAS of Granda, Andalusia, Spain, 21 May 1804, Baton Rouge
Ignace GRANGER 07 Dec 1785 BdE, BR born c1769, probably Falkland Islands; daughter of Joseph GRANGER & his first wife Marie CYR; sister of Joseph-Constans, half-brother of Françoise-Eulalie, Jeanne-Marie, & Pierre-Marie; in Falkland Islands 1769-71; returned to St.-Malo, France, from Falkland Islands 20 Dec 1771, age 2; at St.-Servan, France, 1771-72; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 15, traveled with widowed stepmother; married, age 35, Jean-Charles, son of Étienne LANOIR & Madeleine TERGE, 30 Jan 1804, Baton Rouge
Jean-Baptiste GRANGER 08 Sep 1766 StJ, Op, Atk born c1752, probably Grand-Pré; son of Pierre GRANGER & Euphrosine GAUTREAUX; brother of Joseph & Marie-Anne; exiled to MD 1755, age 3; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, with parents & siblings; arrived LA Sep 1766, age 14; in Cabanocé census, 1769, left [east] bank, called Baptiste GRANGE, age 16, with mother, stepfather Pierre LANDRY, & 3 step-siblings; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1777, called Jean Baptiste GRANGE, age 25, bachelor, head of "family" number 93, with 0 slaves, 2 cattle, 0 horses, 0 hogs, 0 sheep; married, age 26, Susanne, daughter of Joseph CORMIER & his first wife Marguerite SONNIER of Opelousas, 10 Jan 1779, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; in Opelousas census, 1785, called Bap GRANGE, with 8 unnamed free individuals, 0 slaves; in Opelousas census, 1788, Bellevue, called Bte. GRANGE, with 4 unnamed males, 1 unnamed woman [wife Susanne], 3 unnamed girls, 0 slaves, 70 cattle, 14 horses, 10 arpents; in Opelousas census, 1796, Bellevue District, called Bte. GRANGE, with unnamed wife [Susanne], 5 unnamed white males, 4 unnamed white females, & 0 slaves; moved to Côte Gelée, Attakapas District; succession record filed Aug 1812, St. Landry Parish courthouse; succession filed dated 6 Aug 1812, St. Martin Parish courthouse; died Côte Gelée, Lafayette Parish, 10 Sep 1842, age 103[sic]; one of the author's paternal ancestors~~
Jean-Marie GRANGER 09 Aug 1785 BR born c1766, France; carpenter; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 19, listed singly; on list of Acadians at Fort Bute, Manchac, 1788, called Juan Maria GRANGÉ, with no one else in his family, 1 1/2 barrels corn, 0 units rice
Jeanne-Marie GRANGER 10 Dec 1785 BdE, BR born 19 Nov 1776, baptized next day, St.-Servan, France; daughter of Joseph GRANGER & his second wife Anne THÉRIOT; sister of Francoise-Eulalie & Pierre-Marie, half-sister of Ignace & Joseph-Constans; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 8; traveled with widowed mother; married, age 21, Isidore, son of Antoine LABAUVE & Anne VINCENT, 15 Jan 1798, Baton Rouge
Joseph GRANGER 11 Sep 1766 StJ, Asc, Op, Atk born 31 Dec 1746, baptized next day, Grand-Pré; son of Pierre GRANGER & Euphrosine GAUTREAUX; brother of Jean-Baptiste & Marie-Anne; exiled to MD 1755, age 9; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1766, age 19; married, age 21, (1)Anne-Geneviève, called Geneviève, daughter of René BABIN & Madeleine BOURG, 11 Apr 1768, Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1769, occupying lot number 145, left [east] bank, called Joseph GRANGÉ, age 24, with wife Geneviève age 21, & no children; in Ascension census, 1770, left [east] bank, age 25, head of family number 60, with wife Geneviève age 23, no children, & no land listed; moved to Opelousas District; in Opelousas census, 1777, called Joseph GRANGES, age 30, head of family number 127, with wife Geneviève age 27, sons Joseph age 7, & Siméon [Simon-Pierre] age 5, daughters Marie[-Euphrosine] age 3, & Julie age 1, 0 slaves, 2 cattle, 1 horse, 0 hogs, 0 sheep; in Opelousas census, 1785, call Jh GRANGÉ, with 10 unnamed free individuals, 0 slaves; married, age 44, (2)Anne-Osite, called Osite, daughter of Pierre DUGAS & Marguerite DAIGLE, & widow of Charles HÉBERT, 16 Jan 1791, Attakapas, now St. Martinville; died Attakapas 27 Dec 1798, age 50[sic]
*Joseph GRANGER 12 probably 1785 Asp born c1752, perhaps Grand-Pré; son of perhaps Joseph GRANGER & Marguerite GAUTREAUX; brother of Joseph?; exiled to VA 1755, age 3?; deported to England 1756, age 4?; repatriated to France aboard L'Ambition, arrived St.-Malo 22 May 1763, age 11?; arrived LA probably 1785, age 33; married, age 34, Anne-Marie-Madeleine, daughter of Bernard SAVARY & Marie MICHEL dit La Ruine, & widow of Pierre POTIER, 5 Jun 1786, Ascension, now Donalsonville; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, left bank, age 35, with wife, stepsons Olivier POTIER age 15, & [Jacques-]Silvain [POTIER] age 9; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, left bank, called Joseph GRANGÉ, age 28[sic, probably 38], with wife & [step]son Olivier [POTIER] age 19; in AValenzuéla census, 1795, called Josef, age 45, with wife & stepson Olivier POTIERS age 24; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Joseph GRANGE, age 46, with wife [the wrong name is listed & probably the wrong age] & [step]son Olivier [POTIER] age 25, 0 slaves; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called Joseph GRANGÉ, age 47, with wife Anne age 50, [step]son Olivier [POTIER] age 26, 5/40 arpents, 0 slaves
Joseph-Constans GRANGER 13 Dec 1785 BdE, BR? born 18 Apr 1764, baptized next day, St.-Servan, France; son of Joseph GRANGER & his first wife Marie CYR; brother of Ignace, half-brother of Franéoise-Eulalie, Jeanne-Marie, & Pierre-Marie; St.-Servan 1764-65; left France for Falkland Islands aboard frigate L'Aigle, 1765, age 1; in Falkland Islands 1765-71; returned to St.-Malo from Falkland Islands 20 Dec 1771, age 7; at St.-Servan 1771-72; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 20, traveled with widowed stepmother, no occupation listed; granted head-of-family status by Intendant NAVARRO until he joined the family of his cousin, Simon LANDRY; married, age 24, Marie-Modeste, daughter of Jacques MOLAISON & Cécile MELANÇON, & widow of Ambroise BOURG, 17 Jul 1790, Bayou des Écores or Baton Rouge
Louise-Ludivine GRANGER 14 176? StJ born c1750; called Ludivine; married, age 18, Jean, son of probably Joseph BOURGEOIS & Marie CYR of Chignecto, & widower of _____, 30 Jan 1768, Cabanocé; in St.-Jacques census, 1777, left [east] bank, age 27, with husband, 2 sons, & 1 daughter; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with husband & 5 unnamed others; died [buried] St. James Parish 6 Dec 1823, age 76[sic], a widow
*Marie GRANGER 19 176? PCP?, BR?, Asc married First Sergeant Emmanuel, called Manuel, QUINTERO of Ste.-Croix, 8 Mar 1767, New Orleans; lived near Pointe-Coupée or Baton Rouge, 1770s; died [buried] Ascension 21 Jan 1780
Marie-Anne GRANGER 15 Sep 1766 StJ, Asc, StJ born 23 Sep 1742, baptized next day Grand-Pré; called Anne; daughter of Pierre GRANGER & Euphrosine GAUTREAUX; sister of Jean-Baptiste & Joseph; exiled to MD 1755, age 12; in report on Acadians at Snowhill, MD, Jul 1763, called Marie, with parents & siblings; arrived LA 1766, age 23; married, age 25, Joseph, son of Abraham LANDRY & his first wife Élisabeth LEBLANC, & widower of ____, 10 Aug 1768, Cabanocé; in Cabanocé census, 1769, right [west] bank, called Marie, age 26, with husband & 2 stepsons; in Ascension census, 1770, right [west] bank, called Marie-Anne GRANGE, age 26, with husband, 2 stepsons, & 1 daughter; in Ascension census, 1777, right [west] bank, called Marie, age 34, with husband, 1 son, 2 stepsons, & blacksmith Jean-Baptiste MIL HOMME; in St.-Jacques census, 1779, unnamed, with husband & 6 others; died [buried] Ascension 20 Aug 1781, age 36[sic]
Marie-Josèphe GRANGER 16 Aug 1785 BR? born 8 Sep 1738, Rivière-aux-Canards; daughter of perhaps François GRANGER & Anne LANDRY; sister of Anne?; exiled to VA 1755, age 17; deported to England 1756, age 18; married, age 20, Pierre-Simon, son of Joseph TRAHAN & Marie BLANCHARD, 18 Nov 1778, Falmouth, England; repatriated to Morlaix, France, 1763, age 25; at Kerguenolay, Bangor, Belle-Île-en-Mer, France, 1765, age 28[sic]; on list of Acadians at Paimboeuf, France, Sep 1784, called Marie-Josèphe GRANGER, widow TRAHAN, with 3 unnamed sons, & 2 unnamed daughters; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 46, widow, head of family; died at sea?
Marie-Madeleine GRANGER 17 Aug 1785 Asp born & baptized 2 May 1731, Grand-Pré, a twin; daughter of Joseph GRANGER & Angélique RICHARD; married (1)Alain BUJOLE; deported from Île St.-Jean or Île Royale to St.-Malo, France, aboard one of the Five Ships 25 Nov 1758, arrived St.-Malo 23 Jan 1759, age 27; married (2)Joseph, son of Abraham BOURG & Marie THÉRIOT of Cobeguit, & widower of Marguerite DUGAS, 30 Jun 1760, Pleurtuit, France; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, with husband, 3 unnamed sons, & 2 unnamed daughters; sailed to LA on La Bergère, age 54; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, called Marie GRANGE, age 56, with husband, 1 son, & 1 daughter; died by Jan 1791, when her husband was listed in the Valenzuéla census without a wife
Pierre-Marie GRANGER 18 Dec 1785 BdE, BR born & baptized 31 Dec 1779, St.-Servan, France; son of Joseph GRANGER & his second wife Anne THÉRIOT; brother of Francoise-Eulalie, & Jeanne-Marie, & half-brother of Ignace & Joseph-Constans; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 3[sic], traveled with widowed mother; married, age 24, Geneviève, daughter of Jean Baptiste HÉBERT & Marguerite RICHARD of Baton Rouge, 21 May 1804, Baton Rouge

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 33 (pl. 8L), calls her Anne GRANGER veuve TRAHAN, & lists her with 5 children; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 576, Belle-Île-en-Mer section, calls her Anne GRANGER, "his [Joseph TRAHAN's] wife, 28 yrs. old," says she was born on 3 Sep 1736 but gives no birthplace, does not give her parents' names, says her husband was born on 25 Sep 1733 "at Assumption parish, Acadie" [which was L'Assomption, Pigiguit], & that he died at Nantes, France, on 1 Dec 1778, details the birth of daughters Madeleine & Marguerite & son Joseph, fils, & says "The family was held at Falmouth, England, entered France at Morlaix, five other children were born at Belle-Île," & that "members of this family left for Louisiana in 1785 on the Beaumont"; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 165-66, Family No. 298, calls her Anne GRANGER, gives her birth date & birthplace & her parents' names, details her marriage, says her husband was born in c1731 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says he was a ploughman, that he died at age 47 & was buried on 1 Dec 1778 at Paimboeuf, includes the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of daughter Julie TRAHAN, died age 1 & buried 7 Apr 1777, Paimboeuf, the birth/baptismal & marriage records of daughter Marie-Madeleine TRAHAN, born 21 Dec 1758, Penryn, England, married Antoine-Julien ARCHIER of St.-Sauveur, Brignoles, Aix, France, son of François ARCHIER & Marie-Anne JULIAN probably of Paimboeuf, 21 Apr 1785, Paimboeuf, & details her family's voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 32-33, calls her Anne GRANGER, veuve TRAHAN, age 49, on the embarkation list, seems to be listing only her children on the debarkation list, calling her Anan GRANCHER, & calls her Anne GRANGER, widow TRAHAN, age 49, on the complete listing, says she was in the 7th Family aboard Le Beaumont with 5 children, & details her marriage, including the her & her husband's parents' names, but gives no place of marriage; BRDR, 3:374 (SJO-4, 42), her death/burial record, calls her Anna GRANGER, age 70 yrs., but does not give her parents' names or mention a husband.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth Century Louisianians, 511, 524.

Was she a sister of Marie-Josèphe GRANGER, widow of Simon-Pierre TRAHAN?  They were born in the same community in Acadia 2 years apart; they married brothers in the same city in England; they were listed in the same city in France in 1784, both widows, one above the other; their families are next to one another on the passenger list of Le Beaumont; plus they settled in the same community in LA.  

Evidently daughter Marie-Madeleine, called Madeleine, TRAHAN, who married a Frenchman less than 2 months before Le Beaumont left Paimboeuf for LA, did not accompany her widowed mother & siblings to the colony but stayed in France.  What was the fate of Anne's daughter Marguerite TRAHAN, born probably at Falmouth on 11 Oct 1760, who was with the family on Belle-Île-en-Mer in 1765? 

02.  Wall of Names, 35 (pl. 9L), calls her Anne GRANGER, & lists her with her second husband & 3 children; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 80-81, Family No. 100; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 936, the record of her second marriage, calls her Anne GRANGERE, does not give her parents' names but gives the name of her first husband, gives her second husband's parents' names & says they were both deceased at the time of the marriage, says she & her second husband were both natives of Acadie & residents of St.-Couloub at the time of their marriage, that on 30 Apr & 11 May they received dispensation "of the third to fourth degree of consanguinity," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Joseph BOURG (his uncle, who could not sign), Victor BOURG/BOURQUE (his brother, who signed), Prosper GIROIR/GIRROIR (who signed), & Francois/Francoise LOSSOIE (who signed); Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 158-59, Family No. 185; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 44-45, calls her Anne GRANGER, sa [Théodore BOURG's] femme, age 54, on the embarkation list, & Anne GRANGER, his [Théodore BOURG's] wife, age 54, on the complete listing, says she was in the 12th Family aboard Le St.-Rémi with her second husband & 3 children, details her second marriage but does not give her parents' or first husband's names or place of marriage, says son Théodore BOURG was born in 1770 but gives no birthplace, & daughter Anne BOURG married Mathurin D'AUNIS 25 Oct 1791 but does not say where.  

Her parents' names are from the marriage record of her brother Charles-Benoît GRANGER, son of Joseph GRANGER & Marguerite GAUTREAUX, at St.-Martin, Chantenay, 5 Sep 1780, in which marriage witness Théodore BOURQUE, her second husband, was called the brother-in-law of the groom.  See Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 182.  But one wonders if she was the twin of Marie-Madeleine GRANGER, born & baptized at Grand-Pré in May 1731, daughters of Joseph GRANGER & Anne or Angélique RICHARD.  See BRDR, 1a(rev.), 82, 87.  Marie-Madeleine also came to LA, aboard La Bergère.  

Her first husband's family, the BONNIÈREs are not in White, DGFA-1, but they can be found in Arsenault, Généalogie, 1335-36, 2070, 2321, which says that Anne GRANGER's first husband's father, Pierre BONNIÈRE, was a tailor & farmer, born in c1709 at Raquiel, Diocese of Rennes, which is in Brittany, & settled at Pigiguit by 1730, when he was a witness to a marriage at nearby Grand-Pré.  Arsenault gives conflicting information on the parents of Pierre BONNIÈRE's wife Madeleine-Josèphe FORET.  On p. 1335, Arsenault says she was daughter of Michel FORET & Marie CÉLESTIN dit BELLEMÈRE of Pigiguit.  On p. 2070, Arsenault calls her parents Pierre FORET & Cécile RICHARD of Pigiguit.  Pierre BONNIÈRE & Madeleine-Josèphe FORET's son Pierre, fils was born probably at Pigiguit c1731, the oldest of 8 children.  According to Arsenault, pp. 1336, 2070, his siblings were:  sister Marie-Madeleine, born c1733, brother [François-]Michel-Joseph, born c1735, brother Jean-Jacques, born c1736, sister Rose, born c1738, sister Rosalie, born c1739, sister Anne, born c1741, & brother Charles, born c1744, all probably at Pigiguit.  According to Arsenault, the family was on Île St.-Jean in 1750.  Arsenault says Pierre, père died at Plymouth, England, c1758 or c1759, depending on which page you consult, so he & his family probably returned to Pigiguit, were exiled to VA in the fall of 1755, deported to England in 1756, &, without Pierre, père, repatriated to France in 1763.  Pierre, père's widow died in Apr 1769 at Bangor, Belle-Île-en-Mer, where many of the Acadians who had lived in England settled after they reached France.  See also Arsenault, p. 2321.  According to Arsenault, p. 1336, Pierre BONNIÈRE, fils & Anne GRANGER married c1752 but does not say where, & had 2 daughters, Charlotte, born 1755, & Marie, born 1758.  Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 38, shows that their daughter Marie BONNIÉRE, born 21 May 1753 & baptized 3 Jun 1753 at St.-Pierre du Nord, Île St.-Jean, died at St.-Pierre-du-Nord at age 4 mos. on 9 Oct 1753, daughter Charlotte BONNIÈRE was baptized 25 May 1755 at St.-Pierre-du-Nord, & a third daughter, Anne-Marie BONNIÉRE, was born 5 Apr 1758 & baptized the next day at St.-Pierre-du-Nord.  Anne-Marie's godparents were Francois-Michel-Joseph BONNIÈRE & Anne BONNIÈRE, Pierre, fils's younger siblings.  Since Pierre, fils & Anne were still on Île St.-Jean in the spring of 1758, they & their children missed the British roundup at Pigiguit in the fall of 1755 that sent Pierre, fils's parents & some of his siblings into exile.  Pierre, fils, Anne, & their daughters would have escaped British deportation until the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, after which the British deported most of the Île St.-Jean Acadians to France.  None of the BONNIÈREs of Pigiguit via France immigrated to LA.  

She was 15 years older than her second husband!

03.  Wall of Names, 41, calls her Anne GRANGER; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 575; BRDR, 3:374 (ASM-3, 70), her death/burial record, calls her Ana GRANGER, "age 68 yrs. of Acadia, married to Chrisistomo TRAHAN," but does not give her parents' names.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 154.

Her middle name is from the Ascension census of 1791.  

04.  Wall of Names, 17, calls her Madeleine GRANGER; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2594, calls her Anne-Madeleine; BRDR, 2:333, 687 (SJA-1, 40a), her marriage record, calls her Magdelaine GRANDGES of Acadia, says her husband also was "of Acadia," gives her & her his parents' names, says her father & both his parents were deceased at the time of the wedding, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Olivier LANDRY & Joseph LANDRY.

05.  Wall of Names, 34 (pl. 8R), calls him Charles GRANGER, & lists him with a nephew; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 71-72, Family No. 135; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 38-39, calls him Charles GRANGER, marin, age 33, on the embarkation list, Carlos GRANCHER, on the debarkation list, & Charles GRANGER, sailor, age 33, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 37th Family aboard Le Beaumont with a nephew.  

Where is the record of his second marriage?  Evidence of his marriage to Marguerite-Ange DUBOIS is in son Charles-Auguste's baptismal record, dated 25 Apr 1790, in BRDR, 2:323 (ASC-5, 39).  The Ascension priest noted that the boy's parents were "res. Valenzuéla" on the upper Lafourche.

06.  Wall of Names, 45, calls her Françoise-Eulalie GRANGER; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 366-68, Family No. 453, her birth/baptismal record, calls her Françoise-Eulalie GRANGER, gives her parents' names, says her godparents were Joseph GODET & Anne LANDRY, & details the family's voyage to LA in 1785; BRDR, 3:375 (SJO-3, 42), her marriage record, calls her Francisca Eulalia GRANGER, calls her husband Christophe ANTACHE (possibly ARTACHE), gives her & his parents' names, says her mother was "of Baton Rouge," & that the witnesses to her marriage were Juan Bta. BOISETTE & Francisco ROI. 

She married on the same day & at the same place as her younger brother Pierre-Marie.  Her husband was from Granada, Andalusia, Spain.  See the baptismal record of daughter Maria ARTHACHO, dated 10 Aug 1806, in BRDR, 3:33 (SJO6, 9), which gives the grandparents' names & where they were from. 

07.  Wall of Names, 45 (pl. 12L), calls her Ignace GRANGER, & lists her with her widowed stepmother, 5 siblings, & a stepsister; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 366-68, Family No. 453, calls her Ignace GRANGER, son of Joseph GRANGER & Marie CYR, his first wife, says she was born in c1769, that her family resided at St.-Servan from 1758-65, that "In 1765, [the] entire family left France on the frigate, L'Aigle to go reside at the Falkland Islands," that "On December 20, 1771, [they] ... arrived at St.-Malo from the Falkland Islands," says they resided at St.-Servan from 1771-72, & details their voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 98-99, calls her Ignace GRANGER, enfant, age 15, on the embarkation list, does not include her on the debarkation list, calls her Ignace GRANGER, child, age 15, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 41st Family aboard La Ville d'Archangel with her widowed stepmother, 5 siblings, & a stepsister; BRDR, 3:375, 518 (SJO-3, 43), her marriage record, calls her Ygnacia GRANGER, calls her husband Juan Carlos LANOIR, gives her & his parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Vandelino PIROT, Pedro LEBLAN, & Juan B. HÉBERRE.

Most confusing, but her marriage record answers the question about her gender to this researcher's satisfaction.  Why did she wait so long to marry?

08.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Jean-Baptiste GRANGER; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:210, 211, 360-61 (SM Ch.: v.1, p.66; SM Ch.: Folio B-1), his marriage record, calls him Jean-Baptiste GRANGER, native of Acadia, & of Opelousas, d'Acadie, calls his wife a native of Acadia, says they were "parishioners of the parish of Opelousas," gives his & her parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Joseph GRANGE [his brother], Aman PREJEAN, & Jean-Baptiste CORMIER [her cousin]; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:438 (Opel.Ct.Hse.: Succ.#42), a succession record, date Aug 1812, calls him Jean Baptiste GRANGER widr. of Susanne CORMIER; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 2-A:438 (SM Ct.Hse.: Succ. #118), another succession record, dated 6 Aug 1812, calls him Jean Baptiste GRANGER widr. Suzanne CORMIER, & lists their 9 children--Hélène, Marguerite, Lorent, Beatris, Pierre, Siprien, Euphrosine, Louis, & Suzane; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 4:215 (Laf. Ch.: v.3, p.170), his death/burial record, calls him Jean Baptiste GRANGER, says he died at Cote Gelee "at age 103 yrs., but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.

Why did he file 2 succession records so many years before his death?  Because his wife had just died?  Did he ever remarry?  If not, he would have been a widower for 30 years, poor fellow.  

The age given in his burial record is way off.  He was of great age when he died, but closer to 90 than to 103!

09.  Wall of Names, 34 (pl. 8R), calls him Jean-Marie GRANGER, & lists him singly; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 40-41, calls him Jean-Marie GRANGER, garçon, charpentier, age 19, on the embarkation list, Juan Maria GRANCHER, on the debarkation list, & Jean-Marie GRANGER, young man, carpenter, age 19, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 44th "Family" aboard Le Beaumont with no one else.  

How was he related to Anne GRANGER, widow of Joseph TRAHAN, who also sailed to LA on Le Beaumont?  What happened to him?

10.  Wall of Names, 45, calls her Jeanne GRANGER; BRDR, 2:333, 401 (SJO-3, 19), her marriage record, calls her Juana Maria GRANGER, give her & her husband's parents' names, says her parents were from St. Malo & his parents were from "Cahabanoa," which was St.-Jacques, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Pedro LABOVE & Francisco Ives LEGENDRE.

11.  Wall of Names, 17, calls him Joseph GRANGER; BRDR, 1a(rev.):85 (SGA-3, 41a), his birth/baptismal record, calls him Joseph GRANGÉ, gives his parents' names, & says his godparents were Pierre DOUCET, who signed the baptismal record, & Anne GAUTROT; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 171, & Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 425, the record of his first marriage, calls him Joseph GRANGÉ, calls his wife Geneviève BABIN, but gives no witnesses to his marriage; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:269, 361 (SM Ch.: v.4, #49), the record of his second marriage, calls him Joseph GRANGE, veuf de Anne-Geneviève BABIN, says his wife was from "St. Pierre & St. Paul in Acadia," which was Cobeguit, gives his & his wife's parents' names, says his father was from "Georgentonon, Acadie," gives his wife's first husband's name, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Jean-Baptiste GRANGER [his brother], Olivier LANDRY, Joseph LANDRY, & Félix LOPES; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 361 (SM Ch.: v.4, #170), his death/burial record, calls him Joseph GRANGER of Acadia m. (2)Dorithée DUGA, says he died "at age 50 yrs.," that he received none of the sacraments, & gives his parents' names, calling them "natives of Acadia."

Where was "Georgeentonon, Acadia"?  Did the priest at Attakapas in 1791 mean that he lived in Georgetown, MD, during Le Grand Dérangement? The Georgetown, MD, where the Acadian exiles lived is in northeast MD, not near present-day DC.    

12.  Not in Wall of NamesBRDR, 2:183, 332-33 (ASC-2, 3), his marriage record, calls him Joseph GRANGER of Acadia, calls his wife Anne Magdalina CHAVINE, does not give their parent's names or her first husband's name, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Abraham LANDRY & Jean-Charles BOUDEAU.  

According to the editors of Wall of Names, there were only 2 Acadian Joseph GRANGERs who came to LA, & neither one of them matches this Joseph GRANGER's ages in the Lafourche valley censuses of 1788, 1791, 1795, 1797, & 1798.  See Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 42, 60, 94, 144, 174; Wall of Names, index.  So there must have been a third Acadian Joseph GRANGER, & he probably arrived in 1785 aboard one of the 7 ships.  Was he the Joseph, no birth year given, son of Joseph GRANGER & Anne POIRIER & stepson of Simon BABIN, who was part of the Acadian settlement in Poitou, 1773-75, with his stepfather, mother, sister Luce, & 3 BABIN stepsiblings, & who was in the Second Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes in Nov 1775?  See Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 5, Family No. 8; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 9, Family No. 15.  Or perhaps he was the Joseph, born in c1753 at Grand-Pré, son of Joseph GRANGER & Marguerite GAUTROT, who was exiled to VA in 1755, deported to England in 1756, repatriated to France in 1763, & at St.-Servan from 1763-72.  See Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 365, Family No. 451.  If he was the latter Joseph GRANGER, his mother came to LA with her third husband Simon LANDRY aboard Le St.-Rémi.  

13.  Wall of Names, 45, calls him Joseph GRANGER; Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 366-68, Family No. 453, his birth/baptismal record, calls him Joseph-Constans GRANGER, gives his parents' names, says his godparents were Joseph CYR & Marguerite VARENNE, says his family resided at St.-Servan from 1758-65, that "In 1765, [the] entire family left France on the frigate, L'Aigle to go reside at the Falkland Islands," that "On December 20, 1771, [they] ... arrived at St.-Malo from the Falkland Islands," says they resided at St.-Servan from 1771-72, & details their voyage to LA in 1785; BRDR, 2:333, 550 (PCP-19, 34), his marriage record, calls him Joseph-Coutant GRANGER of St.-Malo, France, says his wife was "of Quebec, Canada," gives his parents' names, calls his mother Marie CIRE, does not give his wife's parent's names but gives the name of  her first husband, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Louis DAIGLE & Jacques MOLESON.

For the marriage record of his parents, see Robichaux, Acadians in St.-Malo, 999, dated 30 Jun 1763, St.-Servan, France; the groom was son of Joseph GRANGER & Marguerite THÉRIOT, both deceased, & the bride was the daughter of Jean CYR & Marie-Josèphe HÉBERT, still living, & all Acadians.  His mother died at St.-Serven in Feb 1775, only 36 years old.  His father remarried to his cousin Anne THERIOT at St.-Servan in Feb 1776, when Joseph-Constans was 11 years old. 

Although his marriage was recorded at Pointe Coupée, it was probably performed at either Bayou des Écores or Baton Rouge.  The Bayou des Écores settlement never had a church of its own, so priests from Pointe Coupée, across the river, would perform the sacraments there until the settlement was abandoned in the 1790s.  This couple may have moved from Bayou des Écores to nearby Baton Rouge by the time of their wedding.  Baton Rouge did not have a church of its own until 1793, so Pointe Coupée priests performed the sacraments there also until the community got its own church.

14.  Wall of Names, 12, calls her Ludivine GRANGER, & lists her as the wife of Jean BOURGEOIS; Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 171, & Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 424, her marriage record, calls her Ludivine GRANGÉ, calls her husband Jean BOURGEOIS, but gives no witnesses to her marriage; BRDR, 4:246 (SMI-8, 57), her death/burial record, calls her Louise Ludivine GRANGER, "age 76 yrs., wid. Jean BOURGEOIS," but does not give her parents' names.  See also Bourgeois, Cabanocey, 171; Voorhies, J., p. 424.  

When did she reach LA?  

Wall of Names lists her as though she & Jean BOURGEOIS came to LA together, but the record is clear that they married in LA.  Arsenault, Généalogie, 2435, says they were married in c1768, but the Cabanocé census of 1766 shows that he already was married, hence, I assume, the Wall of Names listing.  See Voorhies, J., p. 115.  This time Arsenault is correct.  Jean evidently was a widower when he married Ludivine.  So who was his first wife?  Was Jean & Ludivine's marriage at Cabanocé in 1768 the blessing of a marriage that already existed?  If so, why did they wait so long?  Jean had been living in the colony since 1765, so one wonders if Ludivine also had been living there that long. 

15.  Wall of Names, 17, calls her Marie-Anne GRANGER; BRDR, 1a(rev.):87 (SGA-3, 16b), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Marie-Anne GRANGÉ, gives her parents' names, & says her godparents were Amans BUGOT, who signed the baptismal record, & Anne LEBLANC; Arsenault, Généalogie, 2527-28, profile of her husband in the LA section, calls him Joseph LANDRY, says he had been married first to a woman whose name is unknown, & that he married Marie-Anne GRANGER, daughter of Pierre [GRANGER] & Euphrosine GAUTEROT "à Saint-Jacques, le 10 août 1768"; BRDR, 2:332 (ASC-1, 185b), her death/burial record, calls her Anne GRANGER, "age 36 years & Wife of Joseph LANDRY," but does not give her parents' names.  

Where did Arsenault find her marriage date?

16.  Wall of Names, 33 (pl. 8L), calls her Marie-Josèphe GRANGER veuve TRAHAN, & lists her with 4 children; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 577-78, the Belle-Île-en-Mer section; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 170, Family No. 307, calls her Marie-Josèphe GRANGER, details her birth date & birthplace but does not give her parents' names, details her marriage, says her husband was born 25 Mar 1735 "in the Parish of L'Assomption of Pisiguit in Acadie," gives his parents' names, says he died at age 45 & was buried 25 Feb 1781 at Paimboeuf, provides the birth/baptismal & death/burial records of daughter Marguerite [TRAHAN], baptized 2 Mar 1777, Paimboeuf, son Jean-Baptiste TRAHAN, baptized 21 May 1779, Paimboeuf, died 26 Dec 1779, probably Paimboeuf, son Étienne-Augustin TRAHAN, died at age 14, buried 17 Apr 1781, Paimboeuf, & daughter Marie-Madeleine TRAHAN, died at age 11, buried 24 Apr 1781, Paimboeuf, & details the families voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 30-31, calls her Marie-Josèphe GRANGER, veuve TRAHAN, age 46, on the embarkation list, seems to be listing only her children on the debarkation list, calling her Maria Josef GRANCHER, & calls her Marie-Josèphe GRANGER, widow TRAHAN, age 46, on the complete listing, says she was in the 6th Family aboard Le Beaumont with 4 children, details her marriage, including her husband's parents' names but not her parents' names, says daughter Marguerite [TRAHAN] was baptized in 1777 but does not say where, & details son Jean-Baptiste TRAHAN's marriage in LA, calling her Josèphe GRANGET, but does not gives the place of marriage.  

Was she a sister of Anne GRANGER, widow of Joseph TRAHAN?  They were born in the same community in Acadia 2 years apart, they married brothers in the same city in England, they were listed in the same city in France in 1784, both widows, one above the other, their families are next to one another on the passenger list of Le Beaumont, plus they settled in the same community in LA.  

Her seeming absence from the debarkation list of Le Beaumont suggests that she may have died on the voyage over.  Note that in three of her children's marriage records--son Jean-Baptiste TRAHAN's record, dated 22 May 1786, in BRDR, 2:705 (SGA14, 3, #7), at St.-Gabriel; son Paul-Raymond TRAHAN's record, dated 26 Nov 1789, in BRDR, 2:707 (PCP-19, 27), at Pointe Coupée; & daughter Marie-Renée TRAHAN's record, dated 13 Apr 1795, in BRDR, 2:706 (SJO-3, 8 & 9), at Baton Rouge--the priests in all 3 communities recorded the parents' names but failed to mention that any of the parents were deceased at the time of the marriage.  As a result, these marriage records are not reliable sources to answer the question of when Marie-Josèphe GRANGER may have died; her husband was truly dead at the time of all 3 marriages, & the priests did not bother to record that fact.  I have found no burial record for her, but that was not unusual at the time.  Did the official who compiled  the debarkation list for Le Beaumont in 1785 inadvertently leave her off?  Or, reading the passenger list another way, did he mention her as being present but only in the context of her children?  Further examination of the Le Beaumont debarkation list as recorded in Hebert, D., pp. 30-40, shows a similar treatment of widows--they are often mentioned only in the context of their children.  I will assume that Marie-Josèphe GRANGER made it to LA unless I find solid evidence that says she died on the voyage over.

17.  Wall of Names, 31 (pl. 7R), calls her Marie-Magdelene GRANGER, & lists her with her second husband, 4 children, & 2 of her husband's nieces; BRDR, 1a(rev.):87 (SGA-2, 108), her birth/baptismal record, calls her Marie-Magdeleine GRANGÉ, twin of Anne, gives her parents' names, says her godparents were Pierre LANDRY & Cécile RICHART, widow of Pierre FORET, & that her father signed the baptismal record; <perso.orange.fr/froux/St_malo_arrivees/5bateaux.htm>, Family No. 25, shows that in the crossing to St.-Malo in 1758-59, she lost her husband Alain BUGEAU, who died at St.-Servan, France, 20 Feb 1759, & both of their children, son Simon, age 7, who died at St.-Servan 18 Mar 1759, & daughter Marie-Louise, age 3, who died at sea; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 24-25, calls her Marie-Magdelene GRANGER, sa [Joseph BOURG's] femme, age 54, on the embarkation list, does not include her on the debarkation list, calls her Marie-Magdelene GRANGER, his [Joseph BOURG's] wife, age 54, on the complete listing, says she was in the 58th Family aboard La Bergère with her second husband, 4 children, & 2 of her husband's nieces, details her second marriage, including her & her husband's parents' names, says son Jean-Baptiste was born in 1767 but gives no birthplace, & daughter Élizabeth was born in 1770 but gives no birthplace. 

In France she wasted little time in starting an entirely new family with Joseph BOURG, who also had lost his first wife in the crossing to St.-Malo.

18.  Wall of Names, 45, calls him Pierre-Marie GRANGER; BRDR, 3:375, 411 (SJO-3, 41), his marriage record, calls him Pedro GRANGÉ, calls his wife Genevefa HÉBERT, gives his & her parents' names, says her parents were "of Baton Rouge," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Juan Batista BOISETTE & Andreas MARTIN.

He married on the same day & at the same place as his older sister Françoise-Eulalie. 

19.  Not in Wall of NamesNOAR, 2:140, 233 (SLC, M2, 28 & 41), her marriage record, calls her Maria GRANGAY, "Acadian," calls her husband Manuel QUINTERO, "Sainte Croix, sergeant," does not give her or his parents' names, & says the witness to her marriage was Jean Bautista BELOTE; BRDR, 2:333 (ASC-1, 182a), her death/burial record, calls her Maria GRANGER, spouse of Manuel QUINTERO, but does not give her parents' names.  

Was she the Marie GRANGÉ, orphan, counted with the family of Charles DAIGLE at Newton[sic], MD, in Jul 1763?  See Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 150.  If so, the town where they were counted was the Newtown on the upper Eastern Shore, near Chestertown, in present-day Kent County, not the Newtown in today's Charles County near Port Tobacco.  See Wood, Acadians in Maryland, 15, 16. 

See BRDR, 2:612, for evidence of her residence at or near Pointe Coupée in the 1770s.  They may have lived at Baton Rouge, which had no church of its own until 1793.  Three or four of their daughters settled on the western prairies in what became St. Landry Parish.  Daughter Marie QUINTERO married Charles LEBLANC "of New Orleans," probably a Frenchman, not an Acadian, at Opelousas in Aug 1791.  Daughter Anne QUINTERO "of Pointe Coupée," married Blaise LEJEUNE, fils at Opelousas in May 1792.  Daughter Marie-Constance QUINTERO married Isaac JOHNSTON "of Carolina in America, Presbyterian" & a widower, at Opelousas in Aug 1796.  Daughter Marie-Clotilde QUINTERO married Charles BOURASA at Opelousas in Feb 1797.  Marie-Clotilde's marriage record states that both her parents are deceased at the time of the wedding.  See Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, 1-A:94, 441, 498, 516, 654-55 (Opel. Ch.: v.1-A, pp. 35, 40, 67, 73).

Why is this well-documented Acadian immigrant not on the Acadian Memorial's Wall of Names?

[top of page GRANGER]

Copyright (c) 2007-13  Steven A. Cormier