APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

OLIVIER

[oh-LIV-ee-ay]

ACADIA

Pierre Olivier, a tailor, born in c1692 in the Parish of St.-Mederic, Paris, came to Acadia by 1718, the year he married Françoise, daughter of Jacques Bonnevie, at Annapolis Royal.  They had eight children, including three sons, all born at Annapolis Royal, who created families of their own:

Oldest son Paul, born in c1727, settled first at Chignecto and then at Pigiguit before moving on to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, where he married Marguerite, daughter of François Poirier, in September 1749.

Jean-Baptiste, called Baptiste, born in c1728, also settled at Chignecto before moving on to Île St.-Jean.  He married twice, first to Susanne Pitre in c1749 and then to Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Haché dit Gallant, at St.-Servan, France, in January 1767 during Le Grand Dérangement.

Youngest son Joseph, born in c1730, moved to Chignecto, where he married Marguerite, daughter of Paul Martin dit Barnabé, in c1752.  They remained at Chignecto.  

In 1755, descendants of Pierre Olivier the tailor could be found at Chignecto and on Île St.-Jean.  

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered the family even farther:  

The Acadians at Chignecto were the first to endure a disruption of their lives.  In the early 1750s, Canadian soldiers, assisted by Mi'kmaq warriors led by the fanatical French priest Abbé Jean-Louis Le Loutre, burned Acadian homesteads in the British-controlled area east of Rivière Missaguash, forcing the habitants to move to the French-controlled area west of the river.  Oliviers may have been among the refugees.  After yet another war erupted between Britain and France in 1754, the Chignecto Acadians were caught in the middle of it.  When British and New England forces attacked Fort Beauséjour in June 1755, Chignecto settlers, pressured by the French, served in the fort as militia.  They, too, along with the French regulars, became prisoners of war when the fort surrendered on June 16.  Governor Lawrence was so incensed to find so-called French Neutrals fighting with French regulars at Beauséjour that he ordered his officers to deport the Chignecto Acadians to the southernmost British colonies on the Atlantic seaboard.  

In the fall of 1755, the British deported Joseph Olivier and his wife Marguerite Martin dit Barnabé to South Carolina.  In 1756, they evidently were among the Acadians who did not take advantage of the South Carolina governor's permission to return to greater Acadia on their own hook.  In August 1763, six months after the war with Britain had ended, colonial officials placed Joseph and his family on a list of Acadians in South Carolina "who desire to withdraw from under the standard of their king ...."  Joseph was able to sign the list, indicating that he was literate.  Soon afterwards.  He and his family, along with hundreds of other Acadians in the British Atlantic colonies, emigrated to French St.-Domingue, present-day Haiti, where the French were building a naval base at Môle St.-Nicolas on the north shore of the island.  French authorities promised a new start for the Acadian exiles who had been languishing in the British colonies, but for many Acadians in St.-Domingue their dream of liberation became a nightmare. ...

~

Living in territory controlled by France, Joseph's older brothers Paul and Baptiste, still on Île St.-Jean, escaped the British roundup of 1755, but their respite from British oppression was short-lived.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British rounded up most of the Acadians on Île St.-Jean and transported them to France.

Among the Acadians exiled from Île St.-Jean was older sister Anne, born at Port-Royal in c1721, who had married Jean-Baptiste Haché-Gallant, her brother Jean-Baptiste's wife Marie's brother.  Jean-Baptiste Haché died in France.  Anne did not remarry.  She remained in France for a quarter of a century, suffering along with hundreds of other Acadians the indignities of life in the mother country.  She and her family survived, like so many other Acadians, on government subsidies.  When the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France a chance for a better life in faraway Louisiana, hundreds of them, including Anne Olivier, agreed to take it.  

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

An Acadian Olivier may have come fairly early to Louisiana.  Joseph Olivier, his wife Marguerite Martin dit Barnabé, and their young son, Jean-Baptiste, reached the colony by July 1767, when Spanish officials recorded them at New Orleans: 

Descendants of Joseph OLIVIER (c1730-?; Pierre?)

Joseph, son of perhaps Pierre Olivier and Françoise Bonnevie, born at Port-Royal in c1730, moved to Chignecto, where he married Marguerite, daughter of Paul Martin dit Barnabé, in c1752.  They remained at Chignecto.  The British deported them to South Carolina in 1755.  Colonial officials counted them there in August 1763.  Soon afterwards, they likely emigrated to St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, with other Acadian exiles and came to Louisiana from Haiti by July 1767, when Spanish officials counted them at New Orleans.  Unlike the great majority of Acadian immigrants, Joseph and his family remained at New Orleans, but the family line probably did not survive in the Bayou State. 

1

Older son Jean-Baptiste, born at Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, today's Haiti, in the mid- or late 1760s, married Marie-Madeleine-Adélaïde, daughter of French Creole Pierre Mioton of Vienne, France, at New Orleans in June 1785.  A daughter was born at New Orleans in August 1782, several years before their marriage. Their son Joseph le jeune was born at New Orleans in June 1787, and Guillaume or Étienne in August 1791 but died at age 1 in September 1792.  Two of their children, Guillaume/Étienne and Eulalie, died in New Orleans nine days apart in September 1792.   Their daughters married into the Boswell, Perrilliat, and Turpin families.  Jean Baptiste died "suddenly" at New Orleans in August 1808; the priest who recorded his burial said that Jean Baptiste died at age 46, but he probably was in his early 40s.  His line of the family, except for its blood, probably died with him. 

2

Younger son Marc, born at New Orleans in February 1768, probably died young.  

~

After her even longer ordeal in France, Joseph's older sister Anne Olivier came to Louisiana with a daughter of her dead husband's niece aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in November 1785.  She and her husband's grand-niece, Madeleine-Apolline Achée, settled south of the city in the largely-Isleño community of San Bernardo, now St. Bernard Parish.    

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

Olivier is a fairly common name in France, both as a surname and as a masculine given name, and the name also can be found in other European countries.  Non-Acadian Oliviers, English and Spanish as well as French, came to Louisiana as early as the 1740s and settled at New Orleans, Pointe Coupée, and on the German and Acadian coasts:

Michel Olivier married Anne-Toussaine Robert by the mid-1740s and settled at New Orleans.  

Michel Olivier dit Masson married Anne Robert and settled at Pointe Coupée by 1750, when a daughter was born there.  Their Joseph-Michel was born at Pointe Coupée in February 1752 but died at age 3 in May 1755, and Jean-Baptiste was born in April 1762.  Their daughters married into the Bonaventure and Daniel families.  

Jean Olivier, a soldier, died at Pointe Coupée in August 1764.  The priest who recorded Jean's burial did not give his parents' names or his age at the time of his death.

Jean, son of Thomas Olivier and Susanne Hoops of London, England, married French Creole Marie-Thérèse Drouillan of New Orleans, widow of Pierre Sebin, at Pointe Coupée in June 1769.  

Antoine Olivier of Marseilles, France, a merchant, died at New Orleans in March 1773.  He was only 50 years old.  

The unnamed child of a merchant named Olivier died at New Orleans in March 1773.  

The unnamed son of a tavern keeper named Olivier died at New Orleans in April 1773.  

Baptiste Olivier died at Pointe Coupée in November 1777.  The priest who recorded Baptiste's burial did not bother to give his parents' names or his age at the time of his death.  

Marie Olivier died at New Orleans in January 1786.  She was 70 years old.  

Pélagie, daughter of Francois Olivier and Anne-Marie Olivier, married Jean-Baptiste, son of François Campo, at New Orleans in September 1786.  

Madame Olivier died at New Orleans in October 1786.  She was only 30 years old.  

Nicolas Olivier died at New Orleans in March 1788.  He was only 6 years old.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not bother to give his parents' names.

Jayme Olivier du Bois married Marie-Madeleine Michel.  Their son André was baptized at New Orleans, age 5 months, in December 1790.  

Marguerite Olivier died at New Orleans in October 1797.  She was 50 years old.  

Augustin, son of Marie Olivier, was baptized at New Orleans, age 19 days, in December 1797.  The priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name.  

François, son of Étienne Olivier and Marguerite Glaize of Bastide de Jourdan, Provence, France, married Félicité, daughter of Leandre Delor-Treget of Illinois, at New Orleans in February 1800.  Their son Jean-François was born at New Orleans in December 1800.  

Pedro, son of Santiago Olivier and Maria Curais of Spain, married Madeleine, daughter of German Creole Sébastien Loupe of St.-Charles des Allemans and widow of François Larrieux, at St.-Jacques on the Acadian Coast in June 1801.  Their son Noël was born at St.-Jacques in December 1802.  

Clamas Olivier died at New Orleans in March 1802.  She was only 40 years old.

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One of the most prolific Olivier families in Louisiana was that of a high colonial official whose full surname hints that he was of the French aristocracy.  During the late colonial period, his oldest son settled on Bayou Teche and created a prominent family there:

Descendants of Pierre-François OLIVIER du Closel de Vézin (c1708-1776)

Pierre-François, also called François-Pierre, Olivier du Closel de Vézin, born in Maine, Lorraine, France, in c1708, settled at St. Maurice, just upriver from Trois-Rivières, Canada.  He married Marie-Josèphe, called Josèphe, Duplessis Gatinot of Trois-Rivières and moved to New Orleans by 1750, when a daughter was born there.   Under the French regime in Louisiana, he served as royal councilor and chief surveyor and inspector of the colonial roads.  He remained a colonial official after the Spanish took control of the colony; his titles during the Spanish regime were regidor and alcade mayor.  His daughters married into the De Reggio, Dreux, Fagot de la Garsinier, and Lalande d'Alcour families.  Pierre-François died at New Orleans in April 1776; he was 68 years old.  His second son and a grandson from his third son settled on Bayou Teche.  The names of the families into which his descendants married are a who's-who of the affluent families of the region.  Surprisingly, two of his great-great grandsons married Acadians. 

1

Oldest son Pierre-François, fils, like his father, was a military engineer.  In the spring of 1765, he assisted retired military engineer Lieutenant Louis-Antoine Andry in leading the Broussard dit Beausoleil party of Acadians from New Orleans to Attakapas via the Atchafalaya Basin.  Did Pierre-François, fils marry? 

2

Charles-Honoré-Hughes or Hughes-Charles-Honoré, called Charles-Honoré and Honoré, born at New Orleans in June 1751, married Marie-Madeleine Marigny de Mandeville in the 1770s.  Charles-Honoré served as permanent regidor of the city.  His son Charles, fils was born at New Orleans in November 1778, and Pierre in April 1782.  Charles-Honoré moved his family at the end of the Spanish regime.  His daughter married into the DeBlanc family.  Charles Honoré died "on the east side of Bayou Teych (Teche) at his home below New Iberia" in St. Mary Parish in April 1815; the priest who recorded his burial said that Charles Honoré was 65 years old when he died, but he was 63.  

2a

Charles, fils, by his first wife, married Céleste-Mathilde, daughter of Louis-Charles Chevalier DeBlanc of Natchitoches, at Attakapas in April 1798.  Céleste's brother married Charles's sister Adélaïde two years later.  Charles, fils served as major des milices, or major of the militia, at Attakapas and settled near his father on lower Bayou Teche in what became St. Mary Parish.  Charles's son Pierre-Louis or Pierre-Charles was born at Attakapas in January 1802 but died at age 11 in September 1812, and Joseph de Vezin was born in July 1806.  Their daughters married into the Delahoussaye, Ducros, and Pellerin (French Creole, not Acadian) families.  In 1819, one of Charles, fils's daughters married a son of Governor Jacques Villeré.  Charles, fils remarried to Anne Willelmina, called Mina or Minie, daughter of French Creole Jean Baptiste Perrault probably in St. Martin Parish in the 1810s.  Their son Jules Germain was born in c1820, Barthélémy Eugène in St. Mary Parish in April 1822, Alexandre de Vezin in March 1827, Louis Oscar de Vezin in March 1831, Adolphe or Adolphus Pierre de Vezin in October 1833, and Alexandre Albert or Albert Alexandre near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1840 but died at age 4 1/2 in July 1845.  They also had sons named Charles A. or N. and Jules Germain.  Their daughters married into the Fuselier, Grevemberg, Reggio, and Vidrine families.  Charles, fils died near New Iberia in November 1861; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Charles died "at age 85 yrs.," but he was "only" 83; his succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, a few days after his death.  

Charles A. or N., by his second wife, married Félicia, daughter of French Creole Hippolyte Chretien, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1836; the marriage had been recorded in St. Mary Parish the month before.  They settled near Grand Coteau.  Did the family line survive? 

Jules Germain, by his second wife, married Marie Adèle Despanet, called Adèle, daughter of French Creole Jean Baptiste Despanet DeBlanc of Orleans Parish, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in 1843.  Their son Joseph Georges was born in St. Martin Parish in August 1854, Joseph Alexandre perhaps near Franklin, St. Mary Parish, in 1856, and George Michel in December 1863.  Their daughters married into the Dumatrait and Lanaux (French Creole, not Acadian) families in St. Mary Parish.  Jules Germain died in St. Martin Parish in April 1870; the St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, died "at age 50 yrs."; his succession record, calling him Jules G., was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, the day of his death. 

Adolphe Pierre de Vezin, by his second wife, married Charlotte L., daughter of William Wickoff, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1855.  They settled in St. Mary Parish.  Their son William was born near Franklin in April 1860, and Adolphe, fils in June 1862 but may have died "at Plaquemine Ridge," St. Landry Parish, age 8, in October 1870.  Adolphe's succession record was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in September 1865; he would have been 32 years old that year.  If this was a post-mortem succession, one wonders if his death was war-related. 

Alexandre de Vezin, by his second wife, married Amande, Amanda, or Armanda, daughter of Ludger Lastrapes, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1855.  Their son Lucien Albert was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in September 1860, Agricole Charles in January 1862, Laurent P. in March 1866, and Jules Joseph in December 1869. 

2b

Pierre, by his first wife, married Marie-Jeanne-Aspasie, daughter of French Creole Alexandre Bienvenu de Vince, at New Orleans in March 1802.  They followed his father to the Attakapas District.  Their son Charles du Closel was born at Attakapas in March 1803, Pierre Alexandre Derneville du Closel in June 1806, and a son, name unrecorded, died at his parents' home in St. Martin Parish, age 9 days, in May 1808.  Their daughters married into the Bienvenu de Vince, Delahoussaye, and Fontenette families.  Pierre remarried to Marie Josèphe, called Josette, daughter of French Creole Joseph Latiolais of Bayou Teche, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1812.  Their son Joseph du Closel was born at his parents' home at "le quartier de l'église (near the area around the church)" at St. Martinville in February 1814, Charles St. Maurice du Closel at his parents' home at La Pointe on upper Bayou Teche in January 1816, Alcide du Closel died at his parents' home on the Teche, age 14 months, in August 1818, Paul du Closel was born in May 1819, and Paul Sydney, called Sydney, du Closel, born in c1820, died "at his grandmother's house at l'ance des Charpentiers," St. Martin Parish, age 4 1/2, in July 1824.  Josette's succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse in February 1820, so she may have died giving birth to Sydney.  Pierre and Josette's home near La Pointe on Bayou Teche was probably the original version of today's Maison Olivier in Longfellow-Evangeline State Park, north of St. Martinville, which his son Charles du Closel inherited perhaps in the 1820s.   

Charles du Closel, by his first wife, married Marie Eméranthe, called Eméranthe, another daughter of Joseph Latiolais and his stepmother's sister, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1821.  Their plantation home north of St. Martinville on the west side of Bayou Teche, inherited from his father, is today's Maison Olivier in the Longfellow-Evangeline State Historic Site.  The park's historian describes the maison as "an excellent example of a simple and distinctive architectural form called a Raised Creole Cottage, which shows a mixture of Creole, Caribbean, and French influences.  The ground floor walls, 14 inches thick, are made of bricks from the clays of the adjacent Bayou Teche.  The upper floor walls consist of a mud and moss mixture called 'bousillage' which is placed between cypress uprights."  (Despite what the park historian claims, the original house probably was built not by Charles but by his father Pierre; Charles would have been only 12 years old in c1815, when the original part of the house was supposed to have been constructed; however, the structural improvements to the house in the 1840s would have been the work of Charles du Closel, in his middle age.)  Charles and Eméranthe's son, name unrecorded, died at the family home on Bayou Teche in October 1822, Louis Joseph du Closel was born there in December 1823 but died at his grandfather's home in St. Martinville, age 2, in March 1826, Charles Ovignac was born probably at Maison Olivier in August 1825, Pierre du Closel in July 1827 but died at age 8 in March 1835, Charles Derneville du Closel was born in March 1830, and François du Closel in August 1832 but died at age 15 months in October 1833.  Their daughter married into the Voorhies family.  Their two surviving sons married Acadians. 

Charles Ovignac married cousin Marie Françoise Élodie, called Élodie, daughter of Acadian Jean Sosthène Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1845; Françoise's mother, also, was a Latiolais.  Their son Joseph Ernest was born in St. Martin Parish in June 1850, Pierre in April 1853, Jean Ovignac in October 1855, and Charles, fils in February 1857.  Their daughter married into the Guerinière family.  Charles Ovignac, called Charles O. by the recording priest, remarried to Marie Aurelia, called Aurelia, daughter of Acadian Pierre Dugas, at the Vermilionville church in July 1866; Charles Ovignac was 41 years old at the time of the wedding.  Their son Édouard du Closel was born in St. Martin Parish in April 1870. 

Charles Derneville du Closel married Marie Corinne, called Corinne, daughter of Acadian Louis Valsin Mouton, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in October 1849.  Their son Emerand Olias or Olius was born in St. Martin Parish in February 1851 but died at age 1 1/2 in September 1852, Louis Carlos was born in June 1852, Joseph Félix in Lafayette Parish in March 1854, Derneville Charles, fils in October 1855, Jean Gaston in February 1861, Paul de Vezin in January 1862, and Charles Derneville, fils in May 1868. 

Pierre Alexandre Derneville du Closel, by his first wife, died "at his father's home" at La Pointe, St. Martin Parish, in September 1825.  Pierre was only 19 years old and did not marry.  

Joseph du Closel, by his second wife, married Louise Charlotte, daughter of Joseph Jacques Pose Eyssalenne, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in April 1836.  Their son Joseph Charles Eyssalenne was born in St. Martin Parish in June 1837.  Joseph du Closel died in St. Martin Parish in October 1837; he was only 23 years old; his succession record was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse the following December.  

Charles St. Maurice du Closel, by his second wife, married Charlotte Aminthe or Amynthe, daughter of French Creole Jean Baptiste Bérard, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1839.  Their son Aurelien was born in St. Martin Parish in January 1848, Charles Maurice in May 1850, and Louis Alcide in September 1856.  They also had older sons named Félix and Pierre D.  Their daughters married into the Mouton family.

Félix married Théodora, daughter of French Creole Antoine Ledoux, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in May 1866; Théodora's mother was a Cormier.  Their son Félix Antoine was born in St. Martinville in May 1867. 

Pierre D. "of Laf[ayette Parish]," married Corinne, daughter of French Creole Diogènes Bossier, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1866. 

3

Charles-Frédéric, born at New Orleans in September 1752, married Marie-Françoise La Mollere de D'Orville, at New Orleans in February 1777.  Their son Charles-Frédéric, fils was born at New Orleans in April 1778, and Joseph-Marie-François in March 1786.  His younger son settled on the western prairies.  

Joseph Marie François followed his uncle and cousins to the Bayou Teche valley, where he married Marguerite Celima, daughter of French Creole Louis Judice, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1811.  Did they remain in the Teche valley? 

4

Pierre-Louis, born at New Orleans in October 1753, may have married L____ De Reggio at New Orleans in October 1789. 

5

Youngest son Nicolas-Joseph-Godefroi or Joseph-Nicolas, born at New Orleans in May 1757, married Eulalie, daughter of Jacques Toutant Beauregard, regidor of the city, at New Orleans in December 1782.  Their son Charles was born at New Orleans in December 1782, and Vincent-Godefroi in June 1786 but died at age 3 in September 1789.  Nicolas-Godefroi served as a lieutenant in the Louisiana Regiment.  He remarried to Marianne, daughter of French Creole Jean Bienvenu of Bordeaux, France, probably at New Orleans in the early 1790s.  Their son Jean-Baptiste was born at New Orleans in June 1795, Joseph in September 1797, and Godeficot died "as a result of inoculation," age 6 months, in April 1802. 

In January 1815, at the time of the Battle of New Orleans, the mother superior of the Ursuline Convent at New Orleans was Mother Sainte Marie Olivier de Vézin, who may have been a descendant of Pierre-François. 

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A Creole Olivier settled on the Upper German Coast during the late colonial period.  One of his sons settled on upper Bayou Lafourche and created a substantial progeny.  Many of his descendants married Acadians, and some of them moved to the western prairies after the War Between the States:

Descendants of François OLIVIER (c1737-1787)

François Olivier married Catherine Michel.  They were living at  St.-Jean-Baptiste on the Upper German Coast in the early 1770s.  Their daughter married into the Perieu family.  Francois died at New Orleans in January 1787; he was 50 years old.  One of his sons moved from the German Coast to upper Bayou Lafourche at the end of the colonial period and created a vigorous family line. 

1

Jean-Adam, a twin, baptized at New Orleans, age unrecorded, in January 1775, may have died young, unless he was the Jean Olivier who died in Assumption Parish in December 1851.  The Labadieville priest who recorded the burial. and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Jean died at "age 86 years," but Jean Adam would have been "only" 76. 

2

François, fils, born in c1775, married Marianne, daughter of German Creole Pierre Keler, at St.-Jean-Baptiste in May 1799.  Francois, fils died at St.-Jean-Baptiste in August 1803; he was only 28 years old.  

3

Jean-François married Dorothée, daughter of French Creole Jean-Baptiste Lagrange, at St.-Jean-Baptiste in February 1797.  Their son Jean was born at St.-Jean-Baptiste in November 1798, François le jeune in September 1800, Pierre-Zéphirin, called Zéphirin, at Assumption on upper Bayou Lafourche in December 1802, Augustin Eugène in Assumption Parish in August 1814 but died in Lafourche Interior Parish, age 14, in August 1828, and Hubert was born in Assumption Parish February 1819.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Clement (French Creole, not Acadian), and Delaune families.

3a

Jean married Acadian Madeleine Melançon probably in Lafourche Interior Parish in the late 1810s.  Their son Adam Eugène was born in Lafourche Interior Parish September 1820.

3b

François le jeune married Pauline, daughter of Acadian Joseph Pierre Bourg, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1822.  Their son François Zéphirin, called Zéphirin, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1823.  Their daughters married into the Skinner and Thibodeaux families.  François le jeune died in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1828; he was only 28 years old.  

François Zéphirin likely married Acadian Alida, Alica, or Elezida Bergeron in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in September 1847.  Their son Zéphirin Treirl or Treville Ureyul, called Treville, was born probably on Bayou Black in July 1848.  Their daughters married into the Blanchard and Trahan families. 

Treville married Clémence, daughter of Acadian Edmond Hébert, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1870. 

3c

Zéphirin married Marie Delphine, called Delphine, daughter of German Creole surgeon Jean Louis Exnicios of St. John the Baptist Parish, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in November 1824.  Their son Zéphirin, fils, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1825, Jean Sylvanie, called Sylvanie, in August 1827, Jean Louis, called Louis, in May 1831, Jean Pierre, called Pierre, in February 1834, Joseph Clovis in March 1835, Valéry Jean in May 1837, Pierre Clairville Ozémé, called Ozémé, in January 1844, Arthur in January 1847, and Trasimond Gustave or Augustave, called Augustave and Gustave, in December 1847.  They also had an older son named Meril.  Their daughters married into the Daigle, Peltier, and Pontiff families.  Most of Zéphirin and Delphine's many sons married, created families of their own, and settled in Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes.  Some of his grandchildren moved to the western prairies after the War Between the States. 

Zéphirin, fils married Séraphine, daughter of fellow French Creole Jean Lagrange, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in September 1844, four months after their daughter was born; Séraphine's mother was an Hébert.  Their daughters married Hébert brothers, also from Lafourche Parish, who also were their cousins, in Lafayette Parish after the War Between the States.  Zéphirin, fils remarried to Marie Rose, daughter of Acadian Cyrille Hébert, at the Thibodaux church in April 1852.  They lived near the boundary between Lafourche Interior and Assumption parishes.  Their son Augustin Désiré was born in February 1858, Maurice Jean Baptiste in July 1862, and Alfred Jean Baptiste in April 1865. 

Jean Sylvanie married Adèle, daughter of Acadian Charles Romain Boudreaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1848.  They settled at Chacahoula, near the boundaries between Lafourche, Assumption, and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Charles Estiveur was born in November 1850, and Ulger Joseph in October 1858.

Meril married Azélie Césaire, daughter of French Creole Édouard Peltier or Pelletier, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in January 1853; Meril's sister Myrthe married Azelie's brother Étienne.  Meril and Azélie settled at Chacahoula, near the boundaries between Lafourche, Assumption, and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Édouard Meril was born in July 1856, Oscar Joseph in September 1859, Adam Camille in April 1860, and Arthur Edgar in November 1864 

Jean Louis married Marie Elesida, also called Elesida Rosima and Lezida, daughter Acadian Euphémon Boudreaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1854.  Their son Joseph Hippolyte was born in Lafourche Parish in May 1857, Augustave Louis in March 1863, and Charles in June 1864.

Jean Pierre married Marcellite Egladie, called Egladie, another daughter of Euphémon Boudreaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in June 1854.  They settled at Chacahoula, near the boundaries between Lafourche, Assumption, and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Joseph Numa was born in June 1856, Arthur Joseph in February 1857, and Oscar Léoni in August 1869. 

Valéry Jean married Marie, daughter of Jean Baptiste Navarre, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in September 1857; the marriage was recorded also in Terrebonne Parish; Marie's mother was a Guillot.  Their son Ernest Ulysse was born near Montegut in April 1866. 

Joseph Clovis may have married Acadian Élodie Thibodeaux at the Raceland church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1861; the marriage was recorded also in Terrebonne Parish.  They, too, settled at Chacahoula, near the boundaries between Lafourche, Assumption, and Terrebonne parishes.  Their son Joseph Edgar was born in September 1866. 

Ozémé married Odile or Odilia, daughter of French Creole Romain LeBoeuf, at the Chacahoula church, Terrebonne Parish, in August 1864; Odile's mother was an Hébert.  They settled near Montegut.  Their son Josepy Wily was born in September 1869. 

Augustave married Aurelia, daughter of Acadian Edmond Hébert, at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1870.  Their son Venance Arthur was born in Terrebonne Parish in November 1870. 

Other Oliviers in the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley may have been descendants of François of the German Coast:

Antoine, son of Lange Olivier and Hélène Marie, married Scolastie, daughter of Acadian Joseph Firmin Guidry, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in August 1845.

Donatile Olivier married J. Andressi or Odressie Ayo in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in December 1867, and sanctified the marriage at the Houma church, Terrebonne Parish, in May 1870.  Neither the parish clerk nor the priest who recorded the marriage gave the couple's parents' names. 

Camille Olivier married Acadian Laurenza Babin.  Their daughter married into the Portier family in Terrebonne Parish in April 1868. 

John, also called William, Olivier married Anglo American Susan Brooks at the Lockport church, Lafourche Parish, in May 1868.  Neither the parish clerk nor the priest who recorded the marriage gave the couple's parents' names. 

Grégoire Olivier married Julia Taylor, probably an Anglo American, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in June 1870.  Neither the parish clerk nor the priest who recorded the marriage gave the couple's parents' names. 

.

A French-Creole Olivier created a family on the Opelousas prairies during the late colonial period.  During the antebellum and immediate post-war periods, his descendants settled near Grand Coteau and Arnaudville.  Some of them married Acadians:

Descendants of Maurice OLIVIER (?-?)

Maurice Olivier married Catherine, daughter of French Creole Pierre Lejeune, probably at Opelousas by the late 1770s.  Their daughters married into the Frugé, Hayes, and Langlois families.  Catherine remarried to Benjamin, son of Jacob Kidder of London, at Opelousas in May 1810, so this gives an idea of when Maurice died. 

Joseph, baptized at Opelousas, age 6 months, in September 1781, had at least three "natural children" with Madeleine Mayer.  Their son Alexis was baptized at Opelousas, age 1, in July 1804, Joseph, fils at age 2 years, and André at age 6 months in February 1808.  Joseph, père married Anne Marguerite, daughter of Acadian Joseph Hébert and widow of Jean Pierre Bodin, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in October 1809Anne Marguerite, a native of Chantenay, near Nantes, France, had come to Louisiana with her family as an infant aboard Le St.-Rémi, the fourth of the Seven Ships, in 1785.  Their daughters married into the Lagrange family, and perhaps into the Lantier family as well.  Joseph died near Grand Coteau in June 1847; the priest who recorded his burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Joseph died "at age 70 yrs.," but he would have been "only" 66

Alexis, by his first "wife," married Marie Arsène, called Arsène, daughter of French Creole Laurine Lagrange, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1823.  Their son Alexis, fils was born near Grand Coteau in December 1835.  Their daughters married the Bergeron (French Creole, not Acadian) and Olivier families, one of them to a first cousin.  Alexis, père died near Grand Coteau in January 1863; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Alexis died "at age 60 yrs.," so this was him. 

Alexis, fils married Marie Sidonise, daughter of French Creole Jean Pierre Guidroz, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in September 1856.

Joseph, fils, by his first "wife," married Émelite, called Melite, daughter of Acadian Paul Boutin, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1824.  Their son Joseph III was born near Grand Coteau in March 1830, Valéry in April 1832, Émile in January 1836, and Jérôme in January 1844.  Their daughter married into the Lagrange family.  Joseph, fils remarried to Julie George, daughter of German Creole Michel George Stelly and widow of Joseph Noël, at the Grand Coteau church in January 1851.  Joseph, fils died in St. Landry Parish in October 1869; the Arnaudville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Joseph died "at age 67 yrs."; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in November. 

Joseph III, by his first "wife," died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in March 1847.  He was only 17 years old. 

Valéry, by his first "wife," married German Creole Marie Éloise, called Éloise and Louisa, daughter of German Creole Louis Taylor or Teller, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1852.  Their son Arcade was born near Grand Coteau in March 1856, Joseph Teller in January 1858 but died at age 6 1/2 in September 1864, Valéry, fils was born near Arnaudville in November 1859 but died at age 1 1/2 in March 1861, Joseph Arille was born in May 1864, and Louis in March 1870.

Émile, by his first "wife," married first cousin Alida, daughter of his uncle Alexis Olivier, père, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1857.  Their son Joseph Émile was born near Grand Coteau in February 1858 but died at age 2 in April 1860, and Alexis le jeune was born near Arnaudville in August 1866.  Émile died in St. Landry Parish in May 1866; the Grand Coteau priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Émile died "at age 30 yrs."; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse in December 1869.  Meanwhile, Alida remarried to French Creole Philogène Bergeron in April 1869. 

Jérôme, by his first wife, married Clémence, Clementine, or Clemena, daughter of French Creole Jacques Arnaud, at the Arnaudville church, St. Landry Parish, in June 1867.  Their son Joseph François was born near Arnaudville in August 1869. 

André, by his first "wife," married Anastasie, called Tasie, another daughter of Paul Boutin, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1829, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1829.  Their son Alexis le jeune was born near Grand Coteau in September 1831.  Their daughters married into the Bergeron (French Creole, not Acadian) family.  André died probably near Grand Coteau in February 1862; the priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that André died "at age 50 yrs," but this André would have been in his mid-50s; a succession record for André Olivier was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in August 1865. 

Alexis le jeune married first cousin Marcellite, daughter of French Canadian George Lalonde, at the Arnaudville church, St. Landry Parish, in February 1866; Marcellite's mother, Ursule Boutin, was Alexis's maternal aunt. 

Other Oliviers who lived in St. Landry and Lafayette parishes may have been descendants of Maurice and Joseph

Théodore Olivier, husband of Marie Sonnier, died in Lafayette Parish in January 1823.  The Vermilionville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names, did not say how old Théodore was at the time of his death.  Was Théodore a son of Maurice's son Joseph?  

Joseph Olivier married Marie Aurore Janise.  Their son Hilaire was born in St. Landry Parish in July 1832, Joseph, fils in February 1836, and Léon in August 1838.  Was Joseph a son of Joseph Olivier and his wife Anne Marguerite Hébert

Zéphirin Olivier died in St. Landry Parish in June 1841.  The Opelousas priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names, said that Zéphirin died "at age 2 yrs."

Benjamin, son of Thomas Olivier and Marguerite Brown, married Marie, daughter of Anglo Creole Théophile Andrus, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in August 1841; Marie's mother was a Richard.  Their daughter married into the Guillory family.  Benjamin may have been the Benjamin L. Olivier who married--in this case, remarried to--Anglo American Rebecca Williams, widow of Murdock McIntire, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in July 1857.   One wonders if he was the L. Benjamin  Olivier who married--or remarried to--Félicia, Félician, or Féliciana Lacomb at the Opelousas church in April 1861.  Their son Lenard was born in St. Landry Parish in May 1864, and Peter in September 1868. 

Pierre Étienne Olivier married Célestine Garand in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1842.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Augustin Olivier died near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in July 1847.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Augustin died "at age 25 yrs."

Dominique Olivier married Irma or Ema Bayon or Ryon and settled in near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, by the late 1840s.  They were living in Calcasieu Parish by the late 1850s. 

Oliva, also called Oliver, Olivier married Forestier, son of Acadian Louis André Richard and widower of Anaïs Teller, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in May 1861, and sanctified the marriage at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in May 1862.  Neither the parish clerk nor the priest who recorded the marriage gave the couple's parents' names. 

Adolphe Olivier died in St. Landry Parish in February 1864.  The Opelousas priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Adolphe died "at age 30 yrs."  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

Florentin Olivier married Marie Thérèse Daigle, probably a German Canadian, and settled near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

D. Olivier married Adélaïde Irma Cormier.  Their son Joseph was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in September 1866. 

Henry Olivier married Rachel Wilson in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

John G. Olivier's succession record, identifying his wife as Elisa McDaniel, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in January 1869. 

Adolphus Olivier's succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in July 1869. 

Zachary T[aylor?]. Olivier married Elizabeth Booker in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in February 1870.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

~

During the antebellum and immediate post-war periods, Oliviers, either French Creoles, Foreign French, or Afro Creoles, settled on the river above New Orleans or west of the Atchafalaya Basin:

Father Jean-Baptiste Olivier, native of Nantes, France, was an elderly refugee from the French Revolution when he came to New Orleans via Spain about the time of Jefferson's Purchase.  In December 1806, he was appointed vicar-general of the Diocese of Louisiana by Bishop John Carroll of Baltimore.  The wardens of the St.-Louis cathedral, who were called the Marguilliers, vehemently opposed Father Olivier's authority.  Father Olivier was allowed to retire from his onerous duties in December 1810.  He remained at New Orleans, where he died in August 1817, age 77, and was buried in the St. Louis parish cemetery. 

François Olivier married Marie Dinos.  They settled near Baton Rouge by the early 1820s.  

Edmond Olivier married Mélanie Bertrand.  Their son Edmond Saintville was born in St. Martin Parish in November 1836. 

Bienvenu Victor or Victor Bienvenu Olivier married Pauline Angelina Reynaud.  Their son Victor William was born near Baton Rouge in September 1838.  

Pierre Olivier's "Last Will listing his heirs" was filed at the St. Martinville courthouse, St. Martin Parish, in November 1840.  One wonders which Pierre Olivier he was.  

Hyacinthe Olivier married Alice Vincent, perhaps an Acadian, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in June 1841.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Philip "of France," son of Joseph Olivier and Marguerite Bertrand, married Célestine, daughter of Marcellin Girard, probably French Creole, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in June 1842. 

Pierre Olivier died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, on 28 October 1843.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Pierre died "at age 50 yrs."  Another burial record for Pierre Olivier, age 50, recorded by the New Iberia priest on a different page of the parish register, is dated 28 October 1853. 

Valmont, perhaps also called Valmont Louis, Olivier married Marie Louise Fort Hossoreth, perhaps also called Alene Olivier, and settled near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, by the early 1850s. 

Dominique Olivier married Françoise Helvina or Pinta.  Their son Jean Baptiste Dominique was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in June 1854, and Gabriel in December 1858. 

Eugène Barthélémy Olivier married Thérèse Laure or Sara Dalcourt and settled near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, by the early 1850s.  Their son Joseph Warren was born near New Iberia in July 1855, Robert Alfred in April 1858, François Xavier in December 1861, and Joseph in November 1868. 

Éloi Olivier married Rose Perceau, also called Oza Decou.  Their son Éloi, fils was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in June 1861, and Aristide in April 1863. 

Joseph Olivier died in St. Martin Parish in July 1861.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names, said that Joseph died "at age 5 yrs." 

Perico, son of Marie Olivier, was born in Ascension Parish in August 1861.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the child's baptism did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names.  Perico, called Perique by the recording priest, died in Ascension Parish, "age 6 years," in September 1867.  Again, the Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial did not bother to give the child's parents' names, but, given the age of the boy at the time of his death, this probably was Marie's son.  Interestingly, Manuel, son of Marie Olivier, had died in Ascension Parish, "age 7 months," in February 1866.  The Donaldsonville priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names.  Was this the same Marie? 

Désiré Olivier married Azélie Rennet.  Their son Jean Baptiste was born near Franklin, St. Mary Parish, in November 1861. 

Joseph, son of Victoire Olivier, was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in November 1861.  The priest who recorded the boy's burial did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names. 

Gaston Olivier died in St. Martin Parish in July 1862.  The St. Martinville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names, said that Gaston died "at age 21 mths." 

Oscare Olivier married Françoise Olivier.  Their son Louis was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in June 1863.  Françoise Ollivier's son Jacques Xavier was born near New Iberia in October 1865; the priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not give the father's name or the mother's parents' names.  Was Oscare the boy's father? 

Joseph Olivier married Virginie Henry and settled Charenton, St. Mary Parish, by the mid-1860s. 

Telesphore Olivier married Célestine Boutté in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in October 1865.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Félix Olivier died "at Vera Cruz, Mexico," no date given, and was "Buried in St. Peter's Cemetery," New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in November 1865.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or mention a wife, said that Félix died "at 24 yrs." 

Édouard, also called Lovius, Olivier married Rosa Pecan or Pecault and settled near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Jean, son of François Olivier and Catin ____, died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in June 1867.  He was only 30 years old.  The priest who recorded his burial said nothing about a wife for Jean. 

Joséphine Marie Olivier married French Creole Charles Octave Delahoussaye at the Franklin church, St. Mary Parish, in July 1867.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

Pierre Olivier married Corinne Bonin.  Their son Joseph Eugène was born in St. Martin Parish in December 1867. 

Léonard Olivier died near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, in May 1868.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names, said that Léonard died "at age 3 yrs." 

François Olivier married Marie Ozan at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in September 1868.  The priest who recorded the marriage did not bother to give the couple's parents' names. 

François Olivier died near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, in November 1869.  The priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that François died "at age 55 yrs." 

Valmont Olivier married Alix Fornerette.  Their son Henri was born near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, in April 1870. 

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During the antebellum period, Oliviers, probably French Creoles, moved from the Acadian Coast to the western prairies and settled in St. Landry and Acadia parishes: 

Descendants of Pierre OLIVIER (c1768?-1846?)

Pierre, son of James Olivier and Antonia Balla, born perhaps in c1768, married Madeleine Loupe, and remarried to Antoine, daughter of Antoine Millan or Miliano, at the Donaldson church, Ascension Parish, in January 1817.  Their daughter married into the Bayetta famly.  Pierre may have died in Ascension Parish in January 1846; the Donaldsonville priest who recorded the burial, and who did not bother to give any parents' names or even mention a wife, said that Pierre died at "age 78 years."  His surviving son moved to St. Landry Parish. 

1

Older son Noël, by his first wife, born in St. James Parish, married Louise, Éloise, or Héloise, natural daughter of Modeste Duplechin, also called Daigle (her father may have been from that German-Canadian family), at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in April 1830.  Their son Noël, fils was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1831, Onésime in St. Landry Parish in October 1834, Laurent, Flaurent, Florant, or Florent in February 1837, Zéphirin in April 1839, Eugène near Grand Coteau in March 1842, Pierre le jeune in April 1844, and Hermogène near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in September 1854.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Carrière, and Daigle families. 

1a

Noël, fils married Uranie, also called Marie, daughter of Anglo American Daniel Boone, at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in December 1852; Uranie's mother was a Boudreaux.  Their son Joseph was born near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in March 1854, and Oscar in February 1861.  Their daughter married into the Bellard family. 

1b

Onésime married Estelle, daughter of Acadian Sylvère Thibodeaux, at the Grand Coteau church, St. Landry Parish, in November 1855.  Their son Albert was born near Church Point, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in May 1863.  Onésime died near Church Point in August 1864; the priest who recorded the burial did not bother to give any parents' names, mention a wife, or give the age of the deceased; Onésime would have been only 29 years old; his succession record was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in July 1865.  One wonders if his death was war-related. 

1c

Florent married cousin Marie Thérèse, daughter of German Canadian Joseph Étienne Daigle, at the Church Point church, then in St. Landry but now in Acadia Parish, in November 1858.  They were still living near Church Point in 1870. 

2

Younger son Emmanuel Sylvestre, by his second wife, born in Assumption Parish in January 1821, died in Ascension Parish, age 4, in January 1825.   

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Oliviers who lived west of the Atchafalaya Basin during the antebellum and immediate post-war periods were neither French Creole nor Foreign French but free persons of color whose ancestor may have been owned, and freed, by an Olivier; or, more likely, their ancestor had the given name "Olivier."  They were especially numerous along lower Bayou Teche.  Area church and civil records do not always reveal their ethnicity, but the record keepers sometimes provided tantalizing clues: 

François Olivier, a free man of color, married Marie Bijeau probably in St. Martin Parish by the late 1830s. 

Benedicte Olivier, "a free negro," married Batiste Rabot, "a free negro," in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in March 1842.  The parish clerk who recorded the marriage did not give the couple's parents' names. 

François Olivier, probably a free man of color, married Marie Philippe, free woman of color.  Their son Xavier was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in May 1843. 

Eliz or Lise, daughter of Ursul Olivier and Céleste Olivier, described as a free woman of color, married Henri or Henry, son of Jeannette Provost, a free man of color, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in April 1859, and sanctified the marriage at the Opelousas church, St. Landry Parish, in May. 

Francois Olivier, probably a free man of color, married Zoë ____, a free woman of color, and settled near New Iberia, Iberia Parish, by the late 1860s. 

Olivier Olivier married Marie Marguerite ____ and settled in Lafayette Parish by the late 1860s. 

François Olivier married Marie Louise Jean Louis at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in April 1869. 

Descendants of Charles OLIVIER and Adélaïde DU BREUIL

Charles Olivier, a free man of color, married Adélaïde Du Breuil, a free woman of color.  Their daughter married into the Boutté family.  Félicité Aspasie Olivier, quarteroone libre, or free quadroon, minor daughter Adélaïde Du Breuil, mulatresse libre, or free mulatto, of New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, married Philippe Frillot, quateron libre, son of Rosette Boutté, mulatresse libre of Côte-aux-Puces, or the Flea Coast, near New Iberia, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in November 1809.  Adélaïde also may have had children by other men.  Her natural daughter Amelia married into the Delile family, who were free persons of color from New Orleans.  

1

Zenon married Marie Modeste, called Modeste, Frillot, a free woman of color.  Their son Charles, described by the recording priest as a quarteron libre, was born in St. Martin Parish in May 1815, Joseph in February 1828, and a son, name unrecorded, died at age 2 in March 1834.  They also had sons named Philippe and perhaps Zenon, fils.  Their daughters married into the Decuir and Senette families. 

1a

Zenon, fils, called a free man of color by the recording priest, married Angela Boutté at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in February 1846.  They had a son named Joseph Zenon

Joseph Zenon married cousin Madeleine, daughter of Ursin Marinette, at the Patoutville, now Lydia, church, Iberia Parish, in February 1870; Madeleine's mother, also, was a Boutté

1b

Philippe married Élizabeth, daughter of Godfroi Decuir, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in September 1848. 

1c

Charles may have married cousin Marie Thérèse, perhaps also called Deline and Adeline, Frillot.  They had sons named Paul and Lovince.  Their daughter married a Frillot cousin. 

Paul married Jeanne Aurelia, called Aurelia, daughter of Baptiste Collette, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in February 1859.  Their son Léopold was born near New Iberia in November 1859, and Dolzé in December 1861.  Paul remarried to Amelie, daughter of Charles Philippe Boutté, at the Patoutville, now Lydia, church, Iberia Parish, in September 1869. 

Lovince married Rosa, daughter of ___ Pecot and Marie Louise Fontenot, at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in July 1859.

2

Adélaïde Du Breuil's natural son, name unrecorded, by ____ Olivier de Vixen, perhaps a member of the French Creole family of St. Mary Parish, married Marie Philippe, daughter of Philippe Reyeau, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1837; the marriage also was recorded in St. Mary Parish, where the couple probably lived.  

3

François married Élizabeth, daughter of Léon Verdun, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in July 1852. 

Descendants of Charles OLIVIER and Madeleine LACOSTE

Charles Olivier, a free man of color, married Madeleine Lacoste, a free woman of color.  Their daughters married into the Casimen Menial and Frillot families.  

1

Jean Baptiste, called Baptiste, married Marie Louise dite Fanchonne, natural daughter of Pierre Boutté, free man of color, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in December 1822; the marriage also was recorded in St. Mary Parish, where the couple probably lived.  They had a son named Alfred.  Their daughters married into the Boutté, Rachon, and Raget families.

Alfred married Héleine, probably Hélène, daughter of John Hill, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in September 1870. 

2

Désiré was born probably in St. Mary Parish in October 1835. 

3

Madeleine Lacoste's natural son Pierre, a free man of color, married Marie Thérèse, also called Adeline, Frillot, natural daughter of Claude Frillot and Rosette Boutté, free mulattoes, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in February 1818.  Their son Pierre, called a quarteron libre by the St. Martinville priest who recorded his baptism, was born probably in St. Mary Parish in December 1822, Ursin Isidore, called Isidore, in November 1824, Joseph in July 1826, another Joseph in June 1828, Paul in March 1835, and Édouard in June 1837.  They also had a son named Alfred.  Their daughters married into the Boutté and Marchand families. 

3a

Pierre, fils married Célestine, daughter of Célestin Darby and a free woman of color, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in January 1844, and remarried to Marie Louise, daughter of Charles Darby, at the New Iberia church, in December 1846.  Their daughter married into the Boutet, probably Boutté, family. 

3b

Joseph married cousin Marie Louise Narcisse, called Louise and perhaps also Celina, daughter of Narcisse Boutté, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in April 1853.  Their son Edmond was born near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in August 1854, Édouard le jeune in February 1858, Hilaire in February 1862, and Joseph, fils in August 1864.  They also had an older son named Raphaël Joseph

Raphaël Joseph married Agathe or Agatha, daughter of Martin Preferee, in a civil ceremony in St. Martin Parish in October 1868.  Their son Joseph Gabriel was born near New Iberia in November 1870. 

3c

Alfred married Eulalie, daughter of Honoré Olivier, at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in June 1854. 

3d

Ursin Isidore, called Isidore, "of free color," married Charlotte, perhaps also called Fidelina, Benoit, couleur libre, daughter of Palmire Reviere, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in October 1854.  Their son Oscar Pierre, couleur libre, was born in St. Martin Parish in October 1857. 

4

Madeleine Lacoste's natural son Casimir, perhaps also called Louis, a free man of color, married Carmezile or Carmelite, perhaps also called Séraphine, daughter François Frillot, free man of color, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in January 1828.  Their son Louis was born probably in St. Mary Parish in January 1829, and Isidore Valcour, called Valcour, in December 1830.  

4a

Louis may have married cousin Marie Louise, daughter of Canon Fornerat or Forneret, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1851; Marie Louise's mother, also, was a Frillot

4b

Valcour married cousin Félicia or Féliciana, daughter of Antoine Frillot, at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in June 1855; Félicia's mother was an Olivier

5

Madeleine Lacoste's natural son Honoré, a free man of color, married Françoise Azélie, called Azélie, daughter of Claude Frillot, a free man of color, at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in August 1828; the marriage also was recorded in St. Mary Parish, where the couple probably lived.  Their son Joseph was born probably in St. Mary Parish in September 1836.  Their daughters married into the Ozenne and Pinta families.  A succession record for Honoré Olivier, free man of color, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in May 1859. 

Descendants of Dubreuil OLIVIER (c1812?-1862?)

Dubreuil Olivier, free man of color, married Aimée Gradnier or Gradenigo, a free woman of color and widow of Edmond Donat, in a civil ceremony in St. Mary Parish in February 1843.  Dubreuil may have died near New Iberia, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in October 1862 "at age 50 yrs."; a succession record, calling him a free man of color, was filed at the Opelousas courthouse, St. Landry Parish, in November 1865; a second succession record, saying nothing about his ethnicity, was filed at the Franklin courthouse, St. Mary Parish, in February 1866, so he may have owned property in both parishes.  His adopted son settled in St. Martin Parish. 

Gaston "of Opel[ousas]," described by the recording clerk as a free man of color and by the recording priest as "fils adoptil," or adopted son, married Virginie, a free woman of color, daughter of Louis Decuir, in a civil ceremony in St. Landry Parish in December 1864, and sanctified the marriage at the St. Martinville church, St. Martin Parish, in June 1866.  They settled near New Iberia.  Their son Alfred Gaston was born in November 1865, and B. Gaston, also called Ignace, in April 1869. 

CONCLUSION

Oliviers settled late in Acadia, but one of them may have come fairly early to Louisiana.  Joseph Olivier brought his family to the colony in the late 1760s probably from St.-Domingue, today's Haiti.  Unlike the great majority of his fellow Acadians, if indeed he was an Acadian, Joseph settled at New Orleans, where, except for its blood, his family line died out in its third generation.  Only by settling among other Acadians on the river, along the Lafourche, or out on the prairies west of the Atchafalaya Basin could Joseph's descendants have held on to their Acadian identity.  Moreover, Joseph's only married son, Jean-Baptiste, took as his spouse a French Creole from the city, farther distancing his children from their father's native culture. 

Two decades after Joseph Olivier reached the colony, Anne Olivier, perhaps Joseph's older sister and now a widow, her daughter, and a grand-niece, came to the colony aboard one of the Seven Ships from France in 1785.  Perhaps because her brother had settled at New Orleans, Anne Olivier settled in the largely-Isleño community of San Bernardo, present-day St. Bernard Parish, south of the city, instead of in a predominantly Acadian community west of New Orleans.  

The Oliviers of South Louisiana, then, are descended not from Acadians who spurned their own culture, but largely from French immigrants who came to the colony as early as the 1740s.  However, one colonial-era Olivier was an Englishman, another a Spaniard.  Many of the French Oliviers remained at New Orleans, but others settled on the German Coast, at Pointe Coupée, at Opelousas, and in predominantly-Acadian communities such as the Bayou Lafourche valley, where they inevitably married Acadians.  During the antebellum period, French-Creole and Foreign-French Oliviers settled not only in New Orleans but also in East Baton Rouge, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Lafourche Interior, St. Mary, St. Martin, Lafayette, and St. Landry parishes.  

The most noteworthy Olivier family sprang from a French nobleman turned colonial official who settled at New Orleans by 1750.  His son Charles-Honoré, who had held high office at New Orleans during the Spanish regime, moved to the Bayou Teche valley about the time the Americans purchased the colony and created a prominent family there; one of Charles-Honoré's granddaughters, for instance, married a son of Louisiana Governor Jacques Philippe Villeré in 1819.  One line of the family settled in St. Mary Parish, the other in St. Martin.  The Maison Olivier in today's Longfellow-Evangeline State Historical Site, north of St. Martinville, was the plantation house of one of Charles-Honoré's grandsons.  These South Louisiana aristocrats, with only two exceptions (and not until the late antebellum and immediate post-war periods), did not deign to marry Acadians; they found spouses in other prominent Creole families living along the Teche.  The exceptions were the two Oliviers who married into the affluent Mouton family.  

On the other end of the socio-economic spectrum, Afro-Creole Oliviers, free persons of color, also lived in the Bayou Teche valley during the antebellum period.  They may have had a common ancestor with the given name "Olivier," or their ancestors may have been owned, and freed, by French-Creole Oliviers.  ...

The family's name also is spelled Levier, Olibier, Olivares, Olivena, Olivie, Oliviers, Oliviert.

Sources:  Arsenault, Généalogie, 703, 1029; Baudier, The Catholic Church in LA, 260-63, 266; Bergerie, They Tasted Bayou Water, 33; Brasseaux, ed., Quest for the Promised Land, 43; BRDR, vols. 1b, 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 1-A, 1-B, 2-A, 2-B, 2-C, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9; Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 234; NOAR, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11; <stateparks.com/longfellowevangeline.html>; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 426.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day parishes that existed during the War Between the States in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Anne OLIVIER 01 Nov 1785 SB born c1721, Annapolis Royal; daughter of Pierre OLIVIER & Françoise BONNEVIE; sister of Joseph; married, Jean-Baptiste, fils of Île St.-Jean, son of Jean-Baptiste HACHÉ-GALLANT [ACHÉE] & Marie-Anne GENTIL; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, called Anne OLIVIER, widow HATCHET, with 2 sons & 2 orphans; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 56[sic], a widow, with a niece's daughter, Madeleine-Apolline HACHÉ
Jean-Baptiste OLIVIER 02 176? NO born Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, today's Haiti; son of Joseph OLIVIER & Marguerite MARTIN dit Barnabé of Chignecto; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, Jul 1767, with parents; settled New Orleans; married Marie-Madeleine-Adélaïde MIOTON, 9 Jun 1785, New Orleans; died New Orleans Aug 1808, age 46[sic]
*Joseph OLIVIER 03 176? NO born c1730, Annapolis Royal; son of Pierre OLIVIER & Françoise BONNEVIE; brother of Anne; settled Chignecto; married, age 22, Marguerite dit Barnabé, daughter of Paul MARTIN dit Barnabé & Marguerite CYR of Chignecto, c1752, probably Chignecto; exiled to SC, 1755, age 25; on list of Acadians in SC, Aug 1763, called Joseph OLLIVIER, with notation "he signed," wife Margte. BERNABÉ, & son Jean B. OLIVIE age 1; moved to St.-Domingue, present-day Haiti, perhaps Nov 1763, age 33; in report on Acadians in New Orleans, Jul 1767, called OLIVIER, with wife & son Jean-Baptiste; settled New Orleans

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 40, calls her Anne OLIVIER veuve HACHÉ; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 74-75.  

02.  Wall of Names, 22, calls him Jean-Baptiste [OLIVIER], & lists him with his widowed mother; NOAR, 4:212, 229 (SLC, M5, 39), his marriage record, calls him Jean-Baptiste OLIVIER, "native of Cabo Frances," says his wife was "native of this parish," gives his & his wife's parents' names, says his father was "native of Marseilles" & his mother "native of Cabo Frances (Cap Français)," that her father was "native of Lyon in France" & her mother "native of La Rochelle," & that the witnesses to his marriage were Geronimo RO(G/Y)O & Eusebio RODRIGUEZ ARFIAN.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 234; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 426.  

His burial record gives him an estimated birth year of c1762, which poses problems for the records.  Is Arsenault wrong about his & his parents' birthplaces, or is his marriage record merely saying that this family lived at Cap-Français, St.-Domingue, before coming to LA?  The SC Acadians did not leave for St.-Domingue, now Haiti, until late 1763 or early 1764, so if Jean-Baptiste was born in Haiti in c1762 why had he been counted with his parents in SC in Aug 1763? 

The baptismal records of son Guillaume, dated 7 Mar 1792, & daughter Émilie-Marie, dated 12 Mar 1794, & the burial records of son Étienne, dated 15 Sep 1792, & daughter Eulalie, dated 24 Sep 1792, in NOAR, 5:288-89 (SLC, B11, 187; SLC, B11, 305; SLC, F2, 52; SLC, F2, 55), call him Juan Bautista [OLIVIER], "native of Guarico."  This could only be Guárico, present-day Caricol, Haiti, because the only other Guárico is an inland province in present-day Venezuela!  Guárico also is an old Indian name for Cap-Français.  The baptismal record of daughter Arsène, dated 13 May 1800, in NOAR, 7:241 (SLC, B14, 121), confirms this by calling him Juan Bautista [OLIVIER], "native of Cap Français (Santo Domingo)," an echo of his marriage record, cited above.  

The vessel taken by Acadians from MD to New Orleans in Apr-Jul 1767 spent 17 days at a place called Guárico.  So, did his family come to LA in 1767 from MD via Haiti, or did the family, already in Haiti, join the Acadian exiles from MD on their way to New Orleans?  

03.  Not in Wall of Names.  Arsenault, Généalogie, 703, the Port-Royal section, calls him Joseph OLIVIER, says he was born in 1730, gives his parents' names, & says he settled at Beaubassin with brothers Paul & Jean-Baptiste; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1029, the Beaubassin section, calls him Joseph OLIVIER, says he was born in 1730, gives his parents' names, & says he married Marguerite MARTIN dit Barnabé in c1752, gives her parents' names, but lists no children.  See also Jehn, Acadian Exiles in the Colonies, 234; Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 426.  

There is some mystery about Joseph's origins.  The marriage record of son Jean-Baptiste, dated 9 Jun 1785, in NOAR, 4:229 (SLC, M5, 39), says that the groom's parents were "Joseph [OLIVIER], native of Marseilles, and Margarita MARTIN, native of Cabo Frances (Cap Français)," which was Haiti.  The baptismal record of grandson Guillaume OLIVIER, dated 7 Mar 1792, in NOAR, 5:289 (SLC, B11, 187), says that the boy's paternal grandparents were "Josef OLIVIE and Margarita OLIVIE natives of Provence in France."  The baptismal record of granddaughter Émelie-Marie, dated 12 Mar 1794, in NOAR, 5:288-89 (SLC, B11, 305), is even more confusing when it calls the girl's paternal grandparents "Jose OLIVIER, native of Marseilles, and Margarita OLIVIER, native of Acadia."  This brings into question Joseph's Acadian origins.  Was he not the son of Pierre OLIVIER of Paris & Port-Royal, Acadia, as Arsenault insists, but another Joseph OLIVIER who emigrated from the south of France to SC & married an Acadian exile there before Aug 1763?  Perhaps Stephen A. White's DGFA-2 will gives us the answer.

If Joseph & his family were among the SC Acadians who emigrated to Haiti in Nov 1763, then they were among the relatively few Acadians from the island who moved on to LA.  See Milling, Exile Without End, 27, & appendix.  They could have hooked up with one of the several parties of Acadians going from Halifax to LA via Cap-Français, Haiti, in 1765, or the Acadian exiles from MD who stopped at Cap-Français for 17 days in the summer of 1767, or they could have gone from Haiti to New Orleans on their own.  Would coming to LA on their own hook explain why Joseph & his family remained in New Orleans & did not settle with other Acadian families upriver or in the prairie region beyond the Atchafalaya?  One wonders why they did not hook up with either of the MARTIN clans at St.-Jacques or at Attakapas, all of whom were kin to Joseph's wife Marguerite.  

Wall of Names, 22, states that Marguerite MARTIN was a widow when she reached LA, but the Spanish report of Jul 1767 does not say that Joseph was dead, &, even more compelling, birth records in NOAR, 2:217, show that he was very much alive in 1768 & 1771, when son Marc & daughter Rosalie were born & baptized at New Orleans.  Nor does his son Jean-Baptiste's marriage record in Jun 1785 indicate that Joseph was deceased even then.  See NOAR, 4:229 (SLC, M5, 39).  

If Joseph OLIVIER was still alive when he reached LA, & if he was an Acadian, then his name belongs on the Wall of Names at the Acadian Memorial in St. Martinville.

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