APPENDICES

Acadians Who Found Refuge in Louisiana, February 1764-early 1800s

MOLAISON

[MOH-lay-zonh]

ACADIA

Gabriel Moulaison dit Recontre, born in Limoges, France, in c1685, arrived in Acadia by 1702, the year he fathered a daughter by Marie, daughter of Olivier Daigre and widow of Pierre Sibilau, at Port-Royal.  Gabriel dit Recontre and Marie did not marry.  Their daughter married into the Henshaw family.  In July 1706, at Port-Royal, Gabriel married Marie, daughter of Julien Aubois of the Cap-Sable area.  They settled at Pobomcoup, today's Pubnico, near the cape, and had nine children, including four sons, all born at Pobomcoup, who created families of their own.  Gabriel dit Recontre's daughters by his legitimate wife married into the Bertrand, Doucet, Mius d'Entremont, and Viger families.  

Oldest son Pierre, born in c1709, married Marie-Josèphe, daughter of Joseph Doucet, in c1750. 

Jacques, born in c1712 (another source says c1720), married Cécile, daughter of Ambroise Melanson, at Port-Royal in November 1743.  

Joseph married Jeanne, daughter of Augustin Comeau, probably at Pobomcoup in July 1753. 

Youngest son Gabriel, fils, born in c1724, married Anne-Marie, daughter of Jean-Baptiste Porlier, probably at Pobomcoup on the same day his older brother Joseph married. 

Since the family was relatively new to Acadia, its members were more or less together in 1755, on the eve of Le Grand Dérangement.  Gabriel, père was still alive when his sons Joseph and Gabriel, fils married at Cap-Sable in July 1753, but he probably died soon afterwards, in his late 60s or early 70s, and did not live long enough to accompany his family into exile.  

LE GRAND DÉRANGEMENT

Le Grand Dérangement of the 1750s scattered this family to the winds:  

During the first phase of Le Grand Dérangement, in the spring of 1756, two English sloops, the Mary and the Vulture, transported approximately 170 Acadians from the Cap-Sable area to New York and Massachusetts.  The Molaisons probably were not among these refugees.  They may have made their way to one of the Maritime islands north of peninsula Acadia, either to Île St.-Jean, today's Prince Edward Island, or to Île Royale, today's Cape Breton Island, which in 1755 were areas still controlled by France.  Or, more likely, the family remained at Pobomcoup.  No baptismal, marriage, or burial record places any of the Molaisons of Cap-Sable on any of the Maritime islands.

The fall of the French stronghold at Louisbourg on Île Royale in July 1758 changed everything.  In late September 1758, 400 British soldiers disembarked at Cap-Sable to search for Acadians still in the area.  Two sailboats manned by British troops sailed along the shore of the Cap-Sable area "to prevent the vermin from escaping in canoes," one British officer commented.  This time luck ran out for the Molaisons of Pobomcoup.  The British burned all of the houses and other buildings in the area to deny the Acadians shelter and sustenance.  In late October, the British embarked 68 Acadians they had captured at Cap-Sable, plus their priest, on the transport Alexander II.  This probably included Molaisons.  Several families escaped the ruthless Rangers sent out to catch them but surrendered to British authorities the following summer and were held as prisoners at Georges Island, Halifax.  Meanwhile, the Alexander II sailed from Cap-Sable to Halifax, which it reached the first week of November.  From Halifax, in December, the British sent the Cap-Sable Acadians to France with other Acadians from the Maritime islands.  The Molaisons and their fellow exiles reached Le Havre or Cherbourg, Normandy, in January 1759. 

At Cherbourg, Gabriel Molaison, père's youngest son, Gabriel, fils, only 36 years old, was buried at Trés-Ste.-Trinité church in March 1760, the same year that a number of his D'Entremont relatives perished in that city, perhaps in an epidemic.  A month later, in April 1760, Gabriel, père's daughter Jeanne, only 30 years old, wife of Acadian Louis Doucet, was buried at Notre-Dame du Havre in the port city of Le Havre, on the other side of Normandy from Cherbourg.  But there were moments for the family to celebrate during their exile in the French ports.  Madeleine, daughter of Jacques Molaison, now a sailor, and his wife Cécile Melanson, was baptized at Trés-Ste.-Trinité, age 8 months, in January 1760, Étienne was born at Cherbourg in February 1763, Victoire-Marguerite in September 1765, and Jean-Baptiste in January 1770.  Caesar Auguste, son of Pierre Molaison and Marie-Josèphe Doucet, was born at Le Havre in May 1761 or 1762.  Jacques's daughter Modeste married Ambroise, son of fellow Acadian Charles Bourg and widower of Anne Pitre, at Cherbourg in July 1763.  But tragedy always lurked in the dark corners of their lives.  In February 1769, Jacque's brother Pierre died at Le Havre; he was 60 years old.  Jacques's son Joseph died at Cherbourg, age 16, in December 1770.  Meanwhile, Jacques's sisters Marie-Josèphe, wife of Acadian Joseph Mius d'Entremont, and Anne, wife of Acadian Francois Viger, were counted at Cherbourg in 1761.  Six years later, in 1767, when Anne was 37, she was counted again at Cherbourg.  By then she had remarried to Simon, son of fellow Cap-Sable Acadian Joseph Mius d'Entremont and widower of Marie Amireau, at Cherbourg in September 1763.  Félicité, daughter of Jacques Molaison, married fellow Acadian Jean-Baptiste Henry at Le Havre in July 1764.  François, son of Jacques Molaison, married Frenchwoman Thérèse Quoniam of Cherbourg in that city in October 1771.  The following year, in 1772, Marie-Josèphe, now 62, Jacques, now 60, and Anne, age 42, were counted again at Cherbourg.  In that same year, their sister Madeleine, age 57, wife of Acadian Jacques Bertrand, was counted at Le Havre.  Francois's daughter Marie-Thérèse-Julie was born at Cherbourg in October 1772.  

During the early 1770s, when French officials attempted to settle Acadians on a nobleman's land in the Poitou region near the city of Châtellerault, the history record becomes flush with Cap-Sable Molaisons.  For two long, frustrating years, dozens of Acadian families from the fetid port cities, eager to escape dependence on French government handouts, tried to eek a living from the rocky soil around the long line of houses in the woods of Poitou.  By late 1775, however, it was evident that the venture was a failure.  The Acadians in Poitou retreated in four convoys to the port city of Nantes, where they continued to endure the frustrations of life in the mother country.  Jacques Molaison and his married son François were among the Acadians who took their families to Poitou.  François's daughter Thérèse-Adélaïde was born at Archigny, near Châtellerault, in October 1774.  Jacques's older son, Jacques, fils, born probably at Pobomcoup in c1747, married Marie-Blanche, daughter of fellow Acadian Paul Doiron and widow of Bonaventure Thériot and Sylvain Aucoin, at St.-Jean l'Evangeliste, Châtellerault, in May 1774.  Their daughter Marie-Rose, called Rose, was born at nearby Cenan in July 1775.  Also with the family in Poitou were Jacques, père's younger sons Pierre, Étienne, and Jean-Baptiste.  Three of Jacques, père's daughters, Luce-Divine, Marie, and Victoire, also endured the frustrations of the Poitou settlement.  When the venture failed, the family took the first convoy that left Châtellerault for Nantes in October 1775.  Jacques, père died at L'Hermitage, Chantenay, now part of Nantes, in August 1780, in his late 60s.  Two months later, son Étienne, now a sailor, died at nearby Paimboeuf; he was only 17 years old.  Married sons François and Jacques, fils made their livings at Nantes as carpenters and seamen.  

In the early 1780s, the Spanish government offered the Acadians in France the chance for a new life in faraway Louisiana.  François Molaison and his French wife remained in the mother country, as did younger brother Pierre, who had married Marguerite, daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Granger, at St.-Martin-de-Chantenay, in July 1784.  And so did their widowed mother, Cécile Melanson, who died at Nantes in January 1796.  But two families of Cap-Sable Molaisons took up the Spanish offer and sailed to Louisiana aboard three of the Seven Ships.  

LOUISIANA:  RIVER SETTLEMENTS

Some of the Molaisons who came to Louisiana from France in 1785 settled in river communities: 

Jacques Molaison, fils, age 38, wife Marie-Blanche Doiron, age 41, and three of their children--Marie-Rose, called Rose, age 10, Marie-Sophie, called Sophie, age 9, and Jacques III, age 6--crossed on Le Beaumont, the third of the Seven Ships from France, which reached New Orleans in August.  They followed most of the passengers from their ship to the Baton Rouge area.  Rose married Louis-François, son of fellow Acadian François Daigle, at Baton Rouge in July 1790; Louis-François also had come to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont.  Sophie married Pierre, son of fellow Acadian Charles Broussard, at Baton Rouge in March 1794; Pierre had come to Louisiana aboard Le Bon Papa, the first of the Seven Ships.  Jacques, fils remained at Baton Rouge, where he died in July 1812, in his mid-60s.  He and Marie-Blanche had no more children in Louisiana, so their only son, Jacques III, carried on the line in what became West Baton Rouge Parish. 

Marie-Modeste, 40-year-old daughter of Jacques Molaison and sister of Jacques, fils, crossed on La Ville d'Archangel, the sixth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in early December.  With her were husband Ambroise Bourg, age 53, two sons, ages 8 and 1, and seven daughters, ages 20 to 2.  Marie-Modeste, Ambroise, and their large family followed the majority of the passengers from their ship to the new Acadian community of Bayou des Écores, north of Baton Rouge.  Ambroise died not long after they reached Louisiana, and Marie-Modeste remarried to Joseph-Constans, son of fellow Acadian Joseph Granger, probably at Bayou des Écores in July 1790.  Joseph-Constans also had come to Louisiana aboard La Ville d'Archangel.  Marie-Modeste's Bourg children settled in the Baton Rouge area.

Descendants of Jacques MOLAISON III (1779-1854; Gabriel dit Recontre, Jacques)

Jacques III, son of Jacques Molaison, fils and Marie-Blanche Doiron, born at Nantes, France, in May 1779, followed his family to Louisiana aboard Le Beaumont and settled with them at Baton Rouge, where he married Céleste-Renée, daughter of French nobleman Félix-Gilles-Louis Bernard du Montier, in May 1807.  Céleste's father was a veteran of the American Revolution; her mother, Marie-Victoire Bourg, was daughter of Acadian Antoine Bourg and his second wife, Marie-Modeste Molaison, so Jacques III and Céleste were cousins.  Céleste gave Jacques III over a dozen children, at least nine of them sons.  Their daughters married into the Daigle and Gras families.  Economically, Jacques III did very well during the antebellum period perhaps because of the wealth and influence of his in-laws.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 50 slaves--21 males and 29 females, all black except for 2 mulattoes, ranging in age from 50 years to 3 months--on Jacques Molaison's plantation.  Jacques III, like his father, lived to a ripe old age.  He was buried in the family tomb at Brusly Landing, West Baton Rouge Parish, in December 1854; he was 75 years and one of the last Acadian immigrants in Louisiana to join our ancestors.  One wonders what happened to all of his slaves after his death; none of his sons appear as slaveholders in the federal census of 1860.  

1

Oldest son Jacob or Jacques Félix, also called Jacques, fils, born near Baton Rouge in December 1811, married Irma, daughter of fellow Acadian Pierre Foret, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in January 1835.  Their son Dorville was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in December 1835, and Jacques Joseph Osward in July 1846. 

2

Agricole Prudent, called Prudent, born in West Baton Rouge Parish in October 1816, married Marie, daughter of French Creole Bernard Peyronnin, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in April 1837.  Their daughter married into the Broussard family.  Prudent died in West Baton Rouge Parish in July 1838, soon after his marriage; he was only 21 years old.  He probably had no sons, so this line of the family, except for its blood, died with him.  In August 1850, Prudent's remains were moved to a new family tomb at Brusly Landing, West Baton Rouge Parish.  

3

Jules Augustave, baptized at the St. Gabriel church, Iberville Parish, age unrecorded, in May 1820, married cousin and fellow Acadian Elisa or Elise Dupuis at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in October 1838; they had to secure a dispensation for third degree of relationship in order to marry.  Their son Jules was born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in January 1840, and Joseph George in December 1847.  

4

Théodule Gil, born in West Baton Rouge Parish in November 1820, married Victorine, daughter of fellow Acadian Narcisse Landry, at the Baton Rouge church, East Baton Rouge Parish, in November 1843.  Their son Odon was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in December 1845, Numa Amédée in December 1848, and Joseph Théophile in June 1854.  In August 1850, the federal census taker in West Baton Rouge Parish counted 2 slaves--a 25-year-old male, and a 16-year-old female, both blacks--on T. Molaison's farm.  Théodule died near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in September 1857; he was only 36 years old.  

5

Théophile Bernard, born in West Baton Rouge Parish in May 1823, died in West Baton Rouge Parish in May 1850.  He was only 27 years old and probably did not marry.  

6

Paul, born probably in West Baton Rouge Parish in the early 1820s, married fellow Acadian Hélène Marie Babin, probably in the mid- to late 1840s.  Their son William Paul was born near Brusly, West Baton Rouge Parish, in 1849. 

7

Alexandre was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in December 1829 but died at age 2 in September 1831.  

8

Léon was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in April 1832 and probably died young.  

9

Youngest son Numa was born in West Baton Rouge Parish in February 1836 and probably died young.

LOUISIANA:  LAFOURCHE VALLEY SETTLEMENTS

Some of the Molaisons who came to Louisiana from France in 1785 chose to go to upper Bayou Lafourche. 

Marie-Josèphe Doucet, age 60, widow of Pierre Molaison, and her unmarried son, Joseph Molaison, age 30, a sailor like his uncle Jacques, crossed on L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships, which reached New Orleans in November.  Marie-Josèphe did not remarry.  Although Joseph had fewer sons than his cousin Jacques III of West Baton Rouge Parish, Joseph's sons and grandsons were more successful in carrying on the name in the Bayou State.  His descendants settled in the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley from Assumption Parish down to the coastal marshes of Lafourche and Terrebonne:  

Descendants of Joseph MOLAISON (c1755-c1815; Gabriel dit Recontre)

Joseph, son of Pierre Molaison and Marie-Josèphe Doucet, born probably at Pobomcoup, Nova Scotia, in c1755, followed his parents into exile in France and came to Louisiana with his widowed mother aboard L'Amitié, the fifth of the Seven Ships from France, in 1785.  Joseph settled with his mother on upper Bayou Lafourche, where he married Marie-Marguerite-Pélagie, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexis Gautreaux, in June 1786.  Marie was a native of Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, and also had come to Louisiana aboard L'Amitié.  Their daughters married into the Clouâtre, Dechamps, D'Hué, Ledet, and Pitre families.  Most of the Acadian Molaisons of Louisiana are descended from three of Joseph's sons.  Three of his daughters and one of his sons were baptized at New Orleans in the 1790s, so the family resided in the city (one wonders why), but Joseph returned to the upper bayou.  His belongings were inventoried and recorded at the Thibodauxville courthouse, Lafourche Interior Parish, in March 1815; he would have been 60 years old that year.  

1

Oldest son Pierre, born at Lafourche in c1788, married Marie Louise, daughter of fellow Acadian Guillaume Bénoni Hébert, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in September 1809.  Their son Pierre Joseph, called Joseph, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1812, Evariste in July 1820, Pierre Melius, also called Pierre, fils, in July 1826, Joseph Adrien, called Adrien, in February 1828, and Joachim in c1830 but died at age 4 in June 1834.  Their daughters married into the Chiasson and D'Hué families.  Pierre, père died in Lafourche Parish in June 1858; he was 70 years old.  

1a

Joseph married Marie Azélie, 18-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Valéry Bourgeois, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in October 1832.  Their son Joseph Elphége was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in April 1838, Joseph Adrien le jeune in June 1843, and Lovency in April 1848.  Their daughters married into the Boudreaux, Giroir, LeBlanc, and Part families.  Joseph died in Lafourche Interior Parish in November 1852; he was only 40 years old.  

Joseph Elphége or Joseph Adrien le jeune may have married Marie Alzire, called Alzire, Alzina, and also Marcelline, Lefort and settled near Lockport, Lafourche Parish, by the early 1860s.  

1b

Evariste married Adeline, 14-year-old daughter of Nicolas Laine, Laisne, or Lene, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1841; Adeline's mother was a Doucet.  Their son Jules Homer was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1843, Evariste Justilien, called Justilien,  in December 1844, Eusèbe Adrien in October 1848, and Joseph Léo or Léo Joseph in June 1857 but died at age 18 months in November 1858.  

During the War Between the States, Jules served in Company I of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  After he was captured at Vicksburg, he may have served with Company D of the 1st Regiment Louisiana Heavy Artillery at Mobile, Alabama, from which he went absent without leave in January 1865.  Jules married Aglae Bruse and settled near Lockport, Lafourche Parish.  

During the War Between the States, Justilien served in Company G of the 18th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Louisiana.  Justilien married Elmire, daughter of fellow Acadian Arsène Naquin, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in July 1865.  The settled near the boundary between Lafourche and Assumption parishes. 

1c

Pierre, fils married Phelonise daughter of fellow Acadian François Doucet, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in May 1848, and remarried to Azema, Rosanna, Rosema, or Rosina, daughter of fellow Acadian Hippolyte Hébert, at the Thibodaux church in April 1857.  Their son Augustin Oscar was born in Lafourche Parish in August 1858, Henri France in September 1860, and Pierre III in April 1864.  By 1866, Pierre, fils and Rosema were living near Vacherie, St. James Parish, on the river.  

1d

Adrien married Zéolide, daughter of German Creole Drosin Toups, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in May 1855.  Their son Adrien Léon was born in Lafourche Parish in October 1857, and Henri in May 1859.  

2

Joseph, fils, born at Lafourche in c1789, married Adélaïde Constance, called Constance, daughter of fellow Acadian Alexis Lejeune, at the Plattenville church, Assumption Parish, in April 1812.  Their son Joseph Marcellus, called Marcellus, was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in February 1821, Jean Baptiste or Evariste, called Evariste, in October 1823, Michel Raphaël in March 1828, Baptiste Augustin or Auguste, called Augustin, in January 1831, and Alexis Joseph or J. Alexis in December 1832.  They also had a son named P. Onésime, called Onésime.  Their daughters married into the Folse family.  Joseph, fils died in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1842; he was only 54 years old; his succession inventories were filed at the Houma courthouse, Terrebonne Parish, in May and November 1859, years after his death.  

2a

Evariste married Julie Arthémise, 19-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Jean Pierre Pitre, in a civil ceremony in Terrebonne Parish in May 1844, and sanctified the marriage at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in July 1848.  Their son Henry Philemon was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in October 1848.  Their daughters married into the LeBlanc family.  

2b

Marcellus died in Lafourche Interior Parish in July 1843.  The Thibodaux priest who recorded his burial said that Marcellus was 25 years old when he died, but he was only 22.  Marcellus did not marry.  

2c

Michel Raphaël married Carmelite, another daughter of Jean Pierre Pitre, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in April 1851.  Their son Augustin was born in Lafourche Parish in June 1854.  Their daughter married into the Robichaux family.  Michel Raphaël died in Lafourche Parish in June 1855; he was only 27 years old; his succession inventory was filed at the Houma courthouse, Terrebonne Parish, in March 1856.  

2d

During the War Between the States, Augustin served in Company D of the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry, raised in Lafourche Parish, which fought at Vicksburg, Mississippi.  He was captured at Vicksburg, paroled, exchanged with his unit, and survived the war.  

2e

Onésime married Aglae, daughter of French Creole Urbain Adam and widow of Aurelien Robichaux, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1867. 

3

Jean-Amable, born at New Orleans in August 1796, probably died young.

4

Youngest son Jean-Baptiste, born at Assumption in June 1805, married Marie Émilie, also called Eulalie and Marie Melite, 14-year-old daughter of fellow Acadian Joseph LeBlanc of St. James Parish, at the Thibodauxville church, Lafourche Interior Parish, in January 1830.  Their son Joachim Guillaume was born in Lafourche Interior Parish in May 1832, Jean Baptiste Freguis in April 1833, Paul Justin in March 1835, Joseph le jeune in September 1837, and Evariste Émile in July 1839.  Their daughters married into the Guidry, Lapeyrouse, and Rivet families.  Jean Baptiste remarried to fellow Acadian Marie Breaux probably in the 1840s.  Their daughter married into the Pitre family.  Jean Baptiste died by November 1868, when he was listed as deceased in a daughter's marriage record.  

4a

Jean Baptiste Freguis died in Lafourche Parish in February 1854.  He was only 21 years old and did not marry.  

4b

Evariste Émile married Odelia, daughter of fellow Acadian Louis Hébert, at the Thibodaux church, Lafourche Parish, in February 1862.  Their son Joseph Arthur, called Arthur, was born in Lafourche Parish in October 1868 but died at age 1 in September 1869.  

4c

Joseph le jeune may have married Marie Alzire, called Alzire and also Marcelline, Lefort in Lafourche Parish in the early 1860s.  

NON-ACADIAN FAMILIES in LOUISIANA

South Louisiana church records reveal no non-Acadian Molaisons settling in Louisiana during the colonial period.  During the early antebellum period, however, non-Acadians with the name, probably Foreign French, appeared at New Orleans.  Also, a large family of French Basques came to Louisiana from the Pyrénées region of southern France and settled west of the Atchafalaya Basin.  Their surname, Monlezun, is pronounced much like Molaison.  Very few of them married Acadians:  

Descendants of Dominique MONLEZUN (?-?)

At least three sons of Dominique Monlezun and Marie Maihles of Lalaunce, Department of Hautes-Pyrénées, France, settled in Louisiana:

1

Antoine married Jeanne, daughter of Cadet Loustaueau or Loustaunais of the Department of Basse-Pyrénées, France, at the New Iberia church, then in St. Martin but now in Iberia Parish, in December 1847.  Their son Henri was born near New Iberia in January 1849.  

Henri married Aimée Guex probably in the 1870s.  Their son John Berchman was born near Washington, St. Landry Parish, in May 1883.  

2

Paschal, born at Tarbe, France, in October 1832, married Bernadine Abbadie probably in St. Landry Parish the late 1850s.  Their son Pascal, fils was born near Grand Coteau, St. Landry Parish, in January 1862.  They settled in Lafayette Parish and then moved to the Rayne area, then in St. Landry but now Acadia Parish.  Their daughters married into the Adam, Baronnet, Bordes, Delacroix, Haure, Murray, and Villa families.  Daughter Marie gave birth to son Dominique near Rayne in August 1880; the priest who recorded the boy's baptism did not name the father.  

Pascal, fils married German Immigrant Linie, Livie, Livinia, or Lucie Plattsmeir in a civil ceremony in Acadia Parish in September 1888.  

3

Dominique, fils, born at Tarbe, France, in April 1845, married Louise Thomassine Peterson, also called Louise MacCarthy, at the Vermilionville church, Lafayette Parish, in June 1874.  Their son Joachim Isidore was born near Abbeville, Vermilion Parish, in January 1876, Paul Émile in November 1877, Théodore in November 1879, and Antoine near Youngsville, Lafayette Parish, in March 1882.  Dominique, fils remarried to Acadian Julie Broussard at the Jennings church, then in Calcasieu but now in Jefferson Davis Parish, in December 1900, or this Dominque may have been a son of Dominique, fils.  

.

J. Monlezan, a 28-year-old clerk from Villimbits, Haute-Garonne, France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Cardinal de Cheveruse out of Bordeaux, France, in February 1839.  Was he kin to Dominique Monlezun

P. Monlezun, a 34-year-old "traveller" from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Amerika out of Bordeaux in May 1842. 

J. B., probably Jean-Baptiste, -Placide Monlezien, a 19-year-old laborer from France, reached New Orleans aboard the ship Spartan out of Bordeaux in December 1849. 

François Monlezun, probably a kinsman of Antoine et al., married Louise Urbine Lagrange.  Their son Alexandre married Virginie Jean Marie or Naure, widow of ____ Valette, at the New Iberia church, Iberia Parish, in April 1871.  Their son Lawrence was born near New Iberia in August 1879.  

Evariste Monlezun, probably a kinsman of Antoine et al., married Acadian Odelia Hébert.  Their son Camille married Emma, daughter of German Creole Gabriel Zeringue, at the Franklin church, St. Mary Parish, in March 1894.  Evariste's daughters and Camille's sisters married into the Brems or Brenn, Champagne, Edgerly, and Zeringue families.  

Fernand Monlezun, probably a kinsman of Antoine et al., married Amelia Robert.  Their son Albert married Rita Sanguinette at the Charenton church, St. Mary Parish, in May 1895.  

Joseph Monlezun, probably a kinsman of Antoine et al., married Marie Alzina Lefort.  They settled near Rayne, Acadia Parish.  Their daughter married into the Smith family.  

~

Molaisons, some of them perhaps Acadians from the Baton Rouge area, lived in New Orleans during the late antebellum period and held slaves:  

In August 1850, the federal census taker in Ward 4 of Municipality 1, Orleans Parish, counted 2 slaves--a 45-year-old male and a 40-year-old female, both black--in Widow Molaison's household.  The census taker, in Ward 5 of Municipality 1, Orleans Parish, counted 5 slaves--1 male and 4 females, all black, ranging in age from 30 to 1--in another Widow Molaison's household, and 3 slaves--all male, all black, ages 42, 39, and 37--in the household of yet another Widow Molaison in the same ward.  That same month, the census taker in Ward 2 of Municipality 3, Orleans Parish, counted a single slave--a 50-year-old black female--in J. Molaison's household.  The census taker in Ward 3 of Municipality 3, in early September, counted 5 slaves--3 males, 2 females, all black, ranging in age from 35 to 7--in Jacques Molaison's household.    

In 1860, the federal census taker in New Orleans's 8th Ward counted a single slave--a 19-year-old black male--in A. Molaison's household.    

CONCLUSION

Molaisons settled fairly late in Acadia, and they came "late" to Louisiana.  They were among the hand full of families who lived at Pobomcoup, now Pubnico, Nova Scotia, near Cap-Sable, at the southwestern tip of the peninsula.  When the British rounded up the Acadians at Chignecto, Minas, and Annapolis Royal during the fall of 1755, they did not get around to the Acadians at Cap-Sable until early 1756.  The Molaisons eluded the redcoats, but their respite from British oppression was short-lived.  After the fall of the French fortress at Louisbourg in July 1758, the victorious British returned to Pobomcoup and deported the Molaisons and other Cap-Sable Acadians to France. 

If the Spanish government had not coaxed over 1,500 Acadians in France to emigrate to their Louisiana colony, there would be no Molaisons in the Bayou State today, at least none who were descendants of Acadians.   All of the Acadian Molaisons of South Louisiana descend from first cousins Jacques III and Joseph, both of whom came to the colony from France in 1785.  Jacques III married the daughter of a French nobleman, and their descendants remained in what became West Baton Rouge Parish.  Joseph married a fellow Acadian, and their descendants settled in the Bayou Lafourche/Bayou Terrebonne valley from Assumption Parish down to the coastal marshes of Lafourche and Terrebonne parishes. 

Jacques III was still alive in 1850 when a federal census taker counted 50 slaves on his plantation near Brusly Landing.  The only other Molaisons who held slaves in Louisiana that year lived in New Orleans.  None of Jacques III's cousins in the Lafourche valley held slaves during the late antebellum period, at least none who appeared in the federal census schedules of 1850 and 1860, so they likely were petit habitants who participated only peripherally in the South's antebellum plantation economy.  

A number of Acadian Molaisons served Louisiana in uniform during the War Between the States.  Several of them, all from the Lafourche valley, served with the 26th Regiment Louisiana Infantry at Vicksburg.  Extant service records reveal no member of the family losing his life in Confederate service. 

The Molaisons lived in areas of South Louisiana that were especially hard hit by the War Between the States.  Early in the war, successive Federal incursions devastated the Bayou Lafourche valley, and Confederate foragers also plagued the area when the Federals were not around.  Even before Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation went into effect in January 1863, Federal commands controlling the lower Mississippi freed the slaves on every farm and plantation that their forces could reach.  This would have included the Molaison plantation in West Baton Rouge Parish.  Union navy gunboats shelled and burned dozens of plantation houses along the river, perhaps including the Molaison's. ...

The family's name also is spelled Mailaison, Molaisson, Molaizon, Moleçons, Molesan, Moleson, Molezon, Molison, Mollaison, Moloison, Moulaison, Moulezon, Moulizot, Oulizon.  This Acadian family should not be confused with the Monlezuns, who were French Basques, not Acadians.  The Monlezuns did not come to Louisiana until the early antebellum period and settled on the western prairies, where no Molaisons settled. 

Sources:  1850 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Orleans, West Baton Rouge parishes; 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Slave Schedules, Orleans Parish; Arsenault, Généalogie, 1607-08; Brasseaux, Foreign French, 1:387, 2:246, 3:220; BRDR, vols. 2, 3, 4, 5(rev.), 6, 7, 8, 10, 11; Paul Delaney's chronology of Le Grand Dérangement  in <acadian-home.org>; Hébert, D., Acadians in Exile, 334-35; Hébert, D., South LA Records, vols. 1, 2, 3, 4; Hébert, D., Southwest LA Records, vols. 4, 5, 6, 7, CD; NOAR, vol.s 5, 6; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 79-80; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 133-35; White, DGFA-1, 1236-38; White, DGFA-1 English, 262.  

Settlement Abbreviations 
(present-day parishes that existed during the War Between the States in parenthesis; hyperlinks on the abbreviations take you to brief histories of each settlement):

Asc

Ascension

Lf

Lafourche (Lafourche, Terrebonne)

PCP

Pointe Coupée

Asp

Assumption

Natc

Natchitoches (Natchitoches)

SB San Bernardo (St. Bernard)

Atk

Attakapas (St. Martin, St. Mary, Lafayette, Vermilion)

Natz

San Luìs de Natchez (Concordia)

StG

St.-Gabriel d'Iberville (Iberville)

BdE

Bayou des Écores (East Baton Rouge, West Feliciana)

NO

New Orleans (Orleans)

StJ

St.-Jacques de Cabanocé (St. James)

BR

Baton Rouge (East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge)

Op

Opelousas (St. Landry, Calcasieu)

For a chronology of Acadian Arrivals in Louisiana, 1764-early 1800s, see Appendix.

The hyperlink attached to an individual's name is connected to a list of Acadian immigrants for a particular settlement and provides a different perspective on the refugee's place in family and community. 

Name Arrived Settled Profile
Jacques MOLAISON, père 01 Aug 1785 BR born c1747, probably Pobomcoup, Cap-Sable; son of Jacques MOLAISON & Cécile MELANÇON; brother of Marie-Modeste; deported to France probably 1758, age 11; at Cherbourg, France, 1761, 1772; carpenter & seaman; in Poitou, France, 1774-75; married, age 27, Marie-Blanche, daughter of Paul DOIRON & Marguerite MICHEL of Pigiguit, & widow of Bonaventure THÉRIOT & Sylvain AUCOIN, 7 May 1774, St.-Jean l'Evangeliste, Châtellerault; in First Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Oct 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, called Jacques MOULAISON, with wife Marie, 1 son, & 2 daughters; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 38, head of family; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, called Santiago MOLISON, with unnamed wife [Marie], 3 children [son Jacques, daughters Rose & Sophie], 6 units corn, 1/4 unit rice; died [buried] Baton Rouge 29 Jul 1812, age 77[sic]
Jacques MOLAISON, fils 02 Aug 1785 BR, StG born 27 May 1779, baptized 28 May 1779, St.-Nicolas, Nantes, France; son of Jacques MOLAISON & Marie-Blanche DOIRON; brother of Marie-Rose & Marie-Sophie; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 6; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & siblings; married, age 28, Céleste-Renée, daughter of Félix-Gilles-Louis BERNARD DU MONTIER & Marie-Victoire BOURG, 9 May 1807, Baton Rouge; moved to St.-Gabriel then to West Baton Rouge Parish; died [buried] West Baton Rouge Parish 1 Dec 1854, age 76  #
Joseph MOLAISON 03 Nov 1785 Asp, Lf born c1755, probably Pobomcoup, Cap-Sable; son of Pierre MOLAISON & Marie-Josèphe DOUCET; deported to France probably 1758, age 3; sailor; on list of Acadians at Nantes, France, Sep 1784, called Joseph MOULAISON, with widowed mother; sailed to LA on L'Amitié, age 45[sic, actually 30], traveled with widowed mother; married Marie-Marguerite-Pélagie of Boulogne-sur-Mer, France, daughter of Alexis GAUTREAUX & Marguerite-Louise HACHÉ, 10 Jun 1786, Ascension, now Donaldsonville; in Valenzuéla census, 1788, right bank, called Joseph MOULEZON, age 32, with wife Marie age 24, no children, 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 35 qts. corn, 2 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1789, right bank, called Joseph MOLLAISON, age 33, with wife Marie GAUTERO age 25, no children, 0 slaves, 6 arpents, 0 qts. rice, 45 qts. corn, 0 cattle, 0 horses, 6 hogs; in Valenzuéla census, 1791, right bank, called Joseph MOLLAISON, age 40[sic], with wife Marie age 24, sons Pierre age 3, Joseph age 1, 0 slaves, 11 arpents, 0 qts. rice, 100 qts. corn, 6 horned cattle, 0 horses, 20 swine; in Valenzuéla census, 1795, called Josef MOULAIZON, age 40, with wife Maria age 31, sons Pedro age 8, Josef age 6, daughters Maria age 3, & Céleste age 2; in Valenzuéla census, 1797, called Joseph MOULEZON, age 41, with wife Marie age 32, sons Pierre age 9, Joseph age 7, daughters Marie age 4, & Céleste age 2, 0 slaves; in Valenzuéla census, 1798, called Joseph MOULEZON, age 50[sic], with wife Marie age 33, sons Pierre age 9, Joseph age 7, daughters Magdelene age 5, & Adélaïde age 3, 11/60 arpents, 0 slaves; succession inventory dated 13 Mar 1815, Lafourche Parish courthouse; depicted in Dafford Mural, Acadian Memorial, St. Martinville
Marie-Modeste MOLAISON 04 Dec 1785 BdE, BR? born c1745, probably Pobomcoup, Cap-Sable; daughter of Jacques MOLAISON & Cécile MELANÇON; sister of Jacques, père; deported to France probably 1758, age 13; married (1)Ambroise, son of Charles BOURG & Cécile MELANÇON, & widow of Anne-Josèphe PITRE, 12 Jul 1763, Trés-Ste.-Trinité, Cherbourg, France; at Le Havre, France, 1764-66; at Cherbourg 1766-1773; arrived St.-Malo, France, from Cherbourg, 20 Jan 1773, age 28; at Pleurtuit, France, 1773-85; sailed to LA on La Ville d'Archangel, age 40; married, age 45, (2)Joseph-Constans of St.-Malo, France, son of Joseph GRANGER & his first wife Marie CYR, 17 Jul 1790, Bayou des Écores or Baton Rouge
Marie-Rose MOLAISON 05 Aug 1785 BR baptized 21 Jul 1775, Cenan, France; called Rose; daughter of Jacques MOLAISON & Marie-Blanche DOIRON; sister of Jacques, fils, & Marie-Sophie; in Poitou, France, 1775; in First Convoy from Châtellerault to Nantes, France, Oct 1775; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 10; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & siblings; married, age 15, Louis-François, son of François DAIGLE & Jeanne HOLLEY of Cherbourg, France, 21 Jul 1790, probably Baton Rouge; died [buried] Baton Rouge 2 Oct 1830, age 54
Marie-Sophie MOLAISON 06 Aug 1785 BR born & baptized 25 Dec 1776, St.-Nicolas, Nantes, France; called Sophie; daughter of Jacques MOLAISON & Marie-Blanche DOIRON; sister of Jacques, fils, & Marie-Rose; on list of Acadians at Nantes, Sep 1784, unnamed, with parents & siblings; sailed to LA on Le Beaumont, age 9; on list of Acadians at Baton Rouge, 1788, unnamed, with parents & siblings; married, age 18, Pierre, son of Charles BROUSSARD & his first wife Bonne-Jacqueline-Françoise-Catherine CATELLE, 4 Mar 1794, Baton Rouge

NOTES

01.  Wall of Names, 34 (pl. 8R), calls him Jacques MOULAISON, & lists him with his wife & 3 children; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 79-80, Family No. 156, calls him Jacques MOULAISON, says he was born c1747 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says he was a seaman & carpenter, details his marriage, including his wife's parents' & previous husbands' names, says that at the time of the marriage he was "resident of the parish of St. Jean L'Evangeliste of Châtellerault," provides the birth/baptismal record of daughter Rose, baptized 21 Jul 1775, Cenan, Vienne, goddaughter of Étienne MOULAISON (his brother) & Adélïde DOIRON, & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 134, Family No. 244, calls him Jacques MOULAISON, says he was born c1747 but gives no birthplace, gives his parents' names, says he was a carpenter & seaman, details his marriage, including his wife's parents' & previous husbands' names, includes the birth/baptismal records of daughter Marie-Sophie, born & baptized 25 Dec 1776, St.-Nicolas, Nantes, but gives no godparents' names, & son Jacques, born 27 May 1779, baptized 28 May 1779, St.-Nicolas, Nantes, but gives no godparents' names, & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s as well as their voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 38-39, calls him Jacques MOULAISON, charpentier, age 38, on the embarkation list, Santiage MOULAISON, on the debarkation list, & Jacques MOULAISON, carpenter, age 38, on the complete listing, says he was in the 31st Family on the embarkation list & in the 32nd Family on the debarkation list of Le Beaumont with his wife & 3 children, details his marriage, including his & his wife's parent's names but does not give the place of marriage, & says daughter Rose MOULAISON was born in 1775 but gives no birthplace; BRDR, 3:641 (SJO-4, 65), his death/burial record, calls him Jacque MOLAISON, age 77 yrs., married, but does not give his parents' names or mention a wife.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505, 527.  

02.  Wall of Names, 34 (pl. 8R), calls him Jacques [MOULAISON], & lists him with his parents & 2 sisters; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 134, Family No. 244, his birth/baptismal record, calls him Jacques MOULAISON, does not give his godparents' names, & details the family's voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 38-39, calls him Jacques, son [Jacques MOULAISON's] fils, age 6, on the embarkation list, Santiage, su [Santiage MOULAISON's] hijo, on the debarkation list, & Jacques MOULAISON, his [Jacques MOULAISON's] son, age 6, on the complete listing, & says he was in the 31st Family on the embarkation list & the 32nd Family on the debarkation list of Le Beaumont with his paernts & 2 sister; BRDR, 3:642 (SJO-3, 60), his marriage record, calls him Santiago MOLAIZON, gives & his wife's parents' names, & says the witnesses to his marriage were Thomas LOSADA & Mr. BERNARD; BRDR, 8:427 (SJB, Brusly-4, 59), his death/burial record, calls him Jacques MOLAISON, age 76 yrs., native Nantes, Bretagne, France.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505, 527.  

The movements of his family can be found in the baptismal records of his many children in BRDR, vols. 3, 4, & 5(rev.).  Compared to other Acadian families, they did not move far.  They settled first on the east side of the river in the old Baton Rouge District & then moved a few miles down to St.-Gabriel before moving back upriver to the west side, near Brusly Landing in West Baton Rouge Parish, establishing a Baton Rouge-area branch of the MOLAISON family.  

He was one of the last Acadian immigrants in LA to join our ancestors. 

03.  Wall of Names, 41, calls him Joseph MOULAISON; BRDR, 2:320, 536 (ASC-2, 3), his marriage record, calls him Joseph MELANÇON[sic] & places him in that family's section, does not give his or his wife's parents' names, & says the witness to his marriage was Marie COMMO; Hébert, D., South LA Records, 1:398 (Thib.Ct.Hse.: Succ.: Year 1815), his inventory record, calls him Joseph MOLAISON m. Marie GAUTROS, but does not give his parents' names or the names of his children.  See also Robichaux, Bayou Lafourche, 1770-98, 33, 65, 102, 122, 165; Robichaux, LA Census & Militia Lists, 1770-89, 129.

His birth year is based not on the age given in the passenger list of L'Amitié, which would give him an estimated birth year of c1740, but on a compromise of the ages given in the LA censuses in which he is found, which give him estimated birth years ranging from c1748 to c1756.  

The baptismal record of son Jean-Amable, dated 16 Oct 1792, in NOAR, 6:198 (SLC, B14, 15), calls Joseph "native of Havre de Grace," which was Le Havre.  The baptismal record of daughter Ursule, however, dated 9 May 1799, in NOAR, 6:198 (SLC, B14, 89), says he was "native of Acadia."  The marriage record of son Joseph, fils, dated 12 Apr 1812, in BRDR, 3:641 (ASM-2, 191), says that Joseph, père & his wife Maria GAUTRAUX were "of Havre de Grace."  What does this mean?  That they both lived there at one time?  Joseph's family did not reach France until early 1759, so he was born in Acadia. 

The Acadian Memorial spells his surname MOULAISON.  He is Figure #14 on the Dafford Mural, the man kneeling beside Anselme BLANCHARD.

04.  Wall of Names, 45, calls her Marie-Modeste MOULAISON; BRDR, 2:333, 550 (PCP-19, 34), the record of her second marriage, calls her Marie Modeste MOLESON "of Québec, Canada, & widow of Ambroise BOURG," gives her husband's but not her parents' names, & says the witnesses to her marriage were Louis DAIGLE & Jacques MOLESON [probably her uncle].

Although her marriage was recorded at Pointe Coupée, it probably took place at either Bayou des Écores, which never had its own church, or in the Baton Rouge District, which did not have its own church until 1793.  Pointe Coupée priests administered the sacraments across the river at Bayou des Écores & downriver at Baton Rouge until it got its own church.  

05.  Wall of Names, 34 (pl. 8R), calls her Rose [MOULAISON], & lists her with her parents & 2 siblings; Robichaux, Acadians in Châtellerault, 79-80, Family No. 156, her birth/baptismal record, calls her Rose MOULAISON, says her godparents were Étienne MOULAISON (her uncle) & Adélaïde DOIRON, & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 134, Family No. 244, calls her Rose [MOULAISON], & details the family's participation in the Poitou settlement of the early 1770s as well as its voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 38-39, calls her Rose, sa [Jacques MOULAISON's] fille, age 10, on the embarkation list, Rosa, su [Santiago MOULAISON's] hija, on the debarkation list, & Rose MOULAISON, his [Jacques MOULAISON's] daughter, age 10, on the complete listing, says she was in the 31st Family on the embarkation list & the 32nd Family on the debarkation list of Le Beaumont with her parents & 2 siblings, &, calling her Rose MOULAISON, says she was born in 1775 but gives no birthplace; BRDR, 2:216, 550 (PCP-19, 35), her marriage record, calls her Marie-Rose MOLESON of Poitou, gives her & her husband's parents' names, says her husband was from Normandy, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Joseph VAHAMORNDE & Charles BROUSSARD; BRDR, 5(rev.):452 (SJO-11, 37), her death/burial record, omits her name but says she was age 54 yrs. wife of Louis DAIGLE.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505, 527.  

Although her marriage was recorded at Pointe Coupée, it probably took place in the Baton Rouge District, where she & her family settled.  Baton Rouge did not have its own church until 1793, so priests from Pointe Coupée administered the sacraments in the Baton Rouge District until it did.  

06.  Wall of Names, 34 (pl. 8R), calls her Sophie [MOULAISON], & lists her with her parents & 2 siblings; Robichaux, Acadians in Nantes, 134, Family No. 244, her birth/baptismal record, calls her Marie-Sophie MOULAISON, does not give her godparents' names, &, calling her Sophie, details the family's voyage to LA in 1785; Hébert, D., Acadian Families in Exile 1785, 38-39, calls her Sophie, sa [Jacques MOULAISON's] fille, age 9, on the embarkation list, Sofia, su [Santiago MOULAISON's] hija, on the debarkation list, & Sophie MOULAISON, his [Jacques MOULAISON's] daughter, age 9, on the complete listing, & says she was in the 31st Family on the embarkation list & the 32nd Family on the debarkation list of Le Beaumont with her parents & 2 siblings; BRDR, 2:163, 550 (SJO-3, 5), her marriage record, calls her Maria Sophia MOULAISON, gives her & her husband's parents' names, says her parents were from Nantes, France, & his parents were from "Charbour, France, & that the witnesses to her marriage were Baptiste BOUSEL & Pedro BLANCO.  See also Voorhies, J., Some Late Eighteenth-Century Louisianians, 505, 527.  

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